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Kadoka Press, October 18, 2012

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October is
National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 14
October 18, 2012
News Briefs …
The Pennington County Re-
publican Party will be hold-
ing an Educational event on
Tuesday, October 30, 2012 from
6:00 pm to 8:00 p.m. at the
Journey Museum. This event is
to provide an opportunity for
the public to visit with the Re-
publican candidates and to ed-
ucate the public on the
Amendments and Initiated
Measures on the General Elec-
tion Ballot. Please RSVP at
penncogop@rushmore.com or
348-8396. “The Journey Mu-
seum is a non-profit organiza-
tion that does not endorse any
candidate or political issue.”
Estate planning meeting:
SDSU Extension will host a
training session on estate plan-
ning and transitioning the fam-
ily operation on October 25, 26
and November 1 & 2 at the Bad
River Senior Center in Philip.
Registration is required; call
605-782-3290.
Discussion Group Readers:
Please return your book,
Fahrenheit 451, to the library
so they may be sent back to SD
Humanities.
~ by Robyn Jones ~
~ by Ronda Dennis ~
Inside this week’s issue
Sports
Cross
County
Co-op
Page
Page 6
Sports
Football
Volleyball
Cross
Country
Page 7
News
JKEDC
receives
$99,000
Grant
Page 4
Obituaries
Mary Pekron
&
Gertrude
Woodden
Page 2
Classifieds
&
Thank
Yous
Page 9
Wicked
Wi tches
Casper
the Ghost
Club 27 …
Decorated
for
Halloween
The Kadoka Area School Board
held their regular monthly meeting
on Wednesday, October 10. Board
members DJ Addison and Ken
Lensegrav were absent.
The minutes from the Septem-
ber 12 meeting, financial state-
ment, bills and the agenda was
approved with the addition of a
contract ammendment for Annette
VanderMay.
Superintendent Jamie Hermann
shared information that was pre-
sented at the NAFIS meeting that
he and Dale Christensen attended.
Future proposed changes from
USDA for the school lunch program
were presented. If some of the
changes are passed, it would
change the lunch program drasti-
cally, which could include no longer
serving milk or cheese.
Re-authorizing the Elementary
Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is
also being considered. If this would
happen it would definitely benefit
the district in a positive manner.
Hermann said there was a good
attendance at the public meeting
concerning the proposal of building
a new gym. The comments received
were very positive.
Secondary Principal George
Seiler stated that attendance at
parent/teacher conferences was
very good. An average of 23 parents
attended each classroom to discuss
their students’ progress.
On October 16 the high school
biology class, which is taught by
Dylan Moro, will present informa-
tion about buffalo to the fourth
grade class. On October 17 the bi-
ology class and fourth grade will at-
tend the buffalo round up in the
Badlands National Park.
Seiler said that Red Ribbon
week will be observed October 22-
25 with various activities, includ-
ing an assembly at the auditorium
on the 25th.
Discussion was held on the
scoreboard at the sports complex.
Daktronics has attempted to repair
it several times without success
and they believe there is an electri-
cal short somewhere which would
require disassembling the entire
scoreboard. Quotes received for a
new scoreboard range in price from
$10,000 to $20,000.
Elementary Principal Jeff Ne-
mecek noted that approximately
80% of the parents attended confer-
ences.
Attendance district wide for the
elementary classes averaged
95.88% for September.
The fifth grade classes, district
wide, have been taking part in the
Starbase Program every Monday,
which is a five-week program. The
fifth graders will be traveling to the
Air and Space Museum at
Ellsworth AFB on October 15. The
program will conclude on October
22 with all students having the op-
portunity to tour the portable star-
dome.
Teresa Shuck, National Honor
Society advisor, said the NHS will
be hosting a Halloween Carnival
on Sunday, October 28 from 2 to
5:30 p.m. with all proceeds being
donated to Cystic Fibrosis.
Colby Shuck addressed the
board regarding the community
winter musical. Auditions will be
October 17 and 19, with perform-
ances on November 30, December 1
and 2.
After an executive session for
personnel matters, contracts were
approved for Colby Shuck, school
and community drama $1,200;
Keena Byrd-Moro, 7th-8th grade
girls’ basketball coach, $1,050;
Grady Brunsch, 5th-8th girls’ bas-
ketball coach at Interior, $600;
Dylan Moro, asst. boys’ varsity bas-
ketball coach, $2,700.
Contracts amendments were ap-
proved for Reuben Vollmer, custo-
dial to $10.25 per hour effective
November 1; Tara Leach, custodial
to $10.25 per hour effective Novem-
ber 1; Joan Enders, speech facilita-
tor to $24,485 to reflect 85% of time
for speech duties; Annette Vander-
May, head girls’ basketball coach at
$3,450.
Authorization was granted to
advertise for a special education in-
structional aide at the Kadoka
School. There is a need for addi-
tional help in the elementary and
middle school classrooms.
The next board meeting was set
for November 15 at the Midland
School. A tour of the building will
be held at 3 p.m. with the meeting
to follow at 4:30 p.m.
School board discusses score board
at sports complex, offers contracts
Inc., Rapid City, regarding the fire
alarm system for the auditorium.
They discussed dates to start the
bidding, advertising, etc. It was
noted that the project needs to be
done prior to mid June.
Bar Manager JoBeth Uhlir said
two teams want to have a pool
league as in the past. She has been
running specials on inventory and
is tracking the sales. Other activi-
ties at the city bar include Bingo
and poker nights. She estimated
that the poker nights will pick up
once the time changes.
The swimming pool has been
winterized.
Dick Stolley mention the light-
ing in the auditorium and said the
city should think about it when
working on next year’s budget.
The Chief of Police was unable
to attend the meeting, but Ryan
Willert relayed that there is still a
skunk problem. There still needs to
be something done at the Triple E
Motel, he added.
The 2010-2011 audit has been
completed and the results should
be available at the next meeting.
The council will meet again on
Monday, November 12 at 7:00 p.m.
The Kadoka City Council held
their regular meeting on Tuesday,
October 9 with council members
Ryan Willert, Dick Stolley, Kieth
Prang and Colby Shuck present.
Once again, the council tabled
approving the minutes of the Au-
gust 13 meeting, due to the absence
of Brad Jorgensen.
The minutes of the September
10 and September 24 meetings
were approved, along with the bills
and financial statement.
A plat for the property of Steve
Jeffords had been dropped off at
the city office by Brad Stone. After
some discussion the plat was ap-
proved.
A building permit was approved
for Mark Carlson to put up a 20x40
shed for Frito Lay along the west
side of their existing storage shed
units.
A moving permit for Jeff Neme-
cek’s double wide was also ap-
proved.
The council reviewed a letter
that pertains to the bidding system
from West Plains Engineering,
City approves building
and moving permits
Coalition would like to hear from
the public on their thoughts.
The public meetings will be as
follows:
Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Caputa Store
15350 E Hwy 44
6:30 – 7:00 p.m. Trail Social
7:00 – 7:30 p.m. Presentation
on the Trail
7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Public
comment period
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Kadoka, SD
City Auditorium Annex
820 Chestnut Street
6:30 – 7:00 p.m. Trail Social
7:00 – 7:30 p.m. Presentation
on the Trail
7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Public
comment period
For more information you may
contact Future Focus Consulting at
605‐631‐0117 or email
FutureFocusConsulting@midco.net
The West River Trails Coalition,
along with Future Focus Consult-
ing, will host two public meetings
to hear comments on the proposed
Mako Sica Trail.
The proposed trail would follow
the old Chicago, Milwaukee, St.
Paul Railroad corridor from Rapid
City to Kadoka, SD. This corridor
was purchased by the State of
South Dakota in the 1980s and has
been rail‐banked (a process by
which a Congressional Action has
designated the corridor in perpetu-
ity for future transportation uses).
If built this rails to trail will be
approximately 100 miles long. The
trail would run along Hwy 44 East
of Rapid City to Caputa and
through the Rapid Creek Drainage,
Spring Draw and then through
parts of the Badlands before it con-
nects with Kadoka. The trail con-
cept is in the feasibility study right
now and the West River Trails
West River Trails Coalition
to hold public meetings
Another close call …Fire broke out Friday afternoon when this pickup, pulling a horse trailer, started
on fire near the westbound mile marker #155 on I-90. Flames were shooting out of the cab of the pickup and the
fire broke with a black cloud of smoke toward the north, posing a threat to the Merle and Linda Stilwelll home.
Fire departments from Kadoka and several surround towns were able to extinguish the wind-driven blaze before
doing extensive damage. No buildings or structures were lost. The fire appeared to be approximately one-half
mile wide and burned some of Hogen’s CRP and a south pasture of Merle Stilwell’s on land owned by John
Wearner.
--photo by Ronda Dennis
State bound … The girls’ cross country team was named runner up at the regional meet held in Philip
last week. Pictured Marti Herber, Shaley Herber, Kwincy Ferguson, Scout Sudbeck, Bobby Anderson and Victoria
Letellier. Anderson also qualified as a single runner. See more in this week’s paper.
Whooping cough cases are on
the rise and state health officials
are urging parents to make sure
their children are immunized.
Nationally, 48 states and Wash-
ington, DC, have reported in-
creases in whooping cough, also
known as pertussis, through Sep-
tember. In South Dakota, cases are
up 87% over the five-year median,
with 56 cases reported as of Octo-
ber 3. Most of those cases are in
school-age children and result from
an outbreak in a school setting.
Pertussis causes uncontrollable
coughing, rib fractures, pneumo-
nia, loss of consciousness and even
death. Very young children are at
highest risk, with two-thirds of
kids under age 1 who get it needing
hospitalization.
The Dept. of Health provides
free pertussis vaccine for children,
with doses recommended at 2
months, 4 months, 6 months, 15-18
months, and 4-6 years. Children
need the complete series to be fully
protected. A booster dose is also
recommended at 11-12 years as im-
munity begins to wane. That
booster dose is free as well.
The booster dose protects middle
school students from the disease
and increases the ring of protection
around vulnerable infants. Be-
cause whooping cough is highly
contagious and spreads easily in
the school setting, immunizing the
older age group also helps decrease
the likelihood of outbreaks.
Contact your usual vaccine
provider to request the vaccine.
Whooping cough
press@kadokatelco.com
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
Support
Breast
Cancer
Awareness
“Wear Pink”
to all
sporting
events in
October!
NOTICE:
Please
remember to
mail the
entire pink card
back to the
Kadoka Press
when renewing
your subscription.
For
Sale:
Newsprint
End Rolls
$5.00 each
Great for craft
projects, painting,
drawing & more.
Kadoka Press
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Pastor Art Weitschat
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
Ingredients:
8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup caramel ice cream topping
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup marshmallow creme
3 medium tart apples
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons water
Directions:
•In a small bowl, beat the cream cheese, brown sugar, caramel topping and
vanilla until smooth; fold in marshmallow creme. Cut apples vertically into thin
slices.
•In a small bowl, combine lemon juice and water; toss apples in lemon juice
mixture. Drain.
Serve apple slices. Yield: 2 cups.
Caramel Apple Dip
1 Peter 1:6-7
God is always at work in our lives. Even during sea-
sons of adversity, He wants to accomplish something
powerful and good. How should this knowledge affect
our response? Today's passage teaches us to choose to
rejoice during difficult times. This doesn't mean we have to be happy about the hardship itself. Instead,
joy comes from drawing close to the Lord and believing steadfastly that through His redemptive power,
He is growing and preparing us. If your usual response to trials is anxiety, anger, or depression, the idea
of having joy in the midst of a negative situation might not seem logical. However, if you look beneath
the surface, you will discover that this biblical directive makes sense for several reasons.
Often, our natural reaction to pain is to run in the opposite direction, and as fast as possible. However,
God wants to teach us endurance--much like a long-distance runner builds up strength in training--so
that we can fully benefit from what He is doing in our hearts. He uses trials as a refining fire to purify
us like gold and bring us to greater spiritual maturity. As we realize that we are actually being made
more complete through our adversities, we'll begin to face challenging times with confidence that He al-
ways has our best interest in mind.
While a worldly viewpoint sees hope and joy in the midst of dark times as naïve, a spiritual perspective
discerns that we're really progressing on a journey toward life at its fullest. We can be filled with super-
natural joy, knowing that the Lord is making us into world-changing spiritual warriors.
Refined by Fire
Inspiration Point
Monday, October 22
Polish sausage and sauerkraut,
mashed potatoes, sliced carrots,
corn bread, and applesauce.
Tuesday, October 23
Oven crisp chicken, mashed po-
tato casserole, spinach with vine-
gar, bread, and tropical fruit.
Wednesday, October 24
Hungarian goulash, creamed
corn, french bread, and mandarin
oranges.
Thursday, October 25
Roast beef, mashed potatoes and
gravy, green beans, dinner roll,
and mixed fruit.
Friday, October 26
Homemade pizza, tossed salad,
juice, and fresh fruit.
Meals for
the Elderly
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HWY:
July 2012
Sherri Husler, Denver, CO $125
Dawn Nelson, Silverdale, WA $125
Harold Seeley, Mavston, WI $125
Michael McEachern, Sioux Falls $125
Matthew Olson, Cottage Grovee, WI $125
Mark Kowalke, St. Michael, MN $145
Arlen Brother of All, Rapid City $105
Aung Htay, Des Moines, IA $125
Katie Boyle, West Jordan, UT $125
Brittany Calder, Boerne, TX $125
SPEEDING STATE HIGHWAYS:
July 2012
Christine Gentry, Rapid City $125
SPEEDING OTHER ROADWAYS:
July 2012
Connor Ulness, Coon Rapids, MN $145
Shelley Gardner, Pembroke Pines, FL $165
James Pedler, Wanblee $165
Lisa Bryan, Parmalee $165
SPEED LIMITS IN AREAS OF ROAD
CONSTRUCTION:
July 2012
Michael Burg, St. Anthony, IA $125
FAILURE TO DISPLAY FUEL PERMIT:
July 2012
Gary Degan, Ellendale, MN $170
OPERATE OVERSIZE/
OVERWIDTH VEHICLE:
July 2012
Gary Degan, Ellendale, MN $125
REARLAMPS REQUIRED:
July 2012
Brett Gardner, Interior $120
CARELESS DRIVING:
July 2012
Andreas Wolf, Waukesha, WI $98
NO DRIVERS LICENSE:
July 2012
Arlen Brother of All, Rapid City $120
Jed Rahfaldt, Rapid City $120
Reckless Driving:
07-13-12: Allen Backen, Sturgis: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 06-06-12; Fine
and costs $170; Possession: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-12; Fine and
costs $300; 10 days jail suspended based on the following conditions:
obey all laws for one year, pay fine and costs, including any blood test
costs if applicable.
Driving Under the Influence - 1st Offense &
Possession of Alcohol by Minor:
07-15-12: Joseph Rosales, Kyle: DUI: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-
12; Fine and costs $584; 30 days jail with 28 days suspended; Posses-
sion: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-12; Fine and costs $138; Jail time is
suspended based on the following conditions: obey all laws for one year,
pay fine and costs and restitution to clerk, report to Pennington County
Jail to serve jail sentence by 10 a.m. on 08-03-12; obtain alcohol evalu-
ation, attend and successfully complete any recommendations, and file
proof with the clerk by date stated, review hearing on first Mag. Court day
in February 2013, if all conditions met, and does not have to appear.
Driving with Revoked (Not Suspended) License:
07-15-12: Randy Peters, Belvidere: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-12;
Fine and costs $300; 15 days jail with 13 days suspended based on the
following conditions: obey all laws for one year, pay fine and costs, in-
cluding any blood test costs if applicable, report to Jackson County Sheriff
on August 10, 2012 at 7 a.m. to serve jail time.
Fail to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
05-11-12: Bonnie Hairyshirt, St. Francis: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-25-
12; Fine and costs $150; 5 days jail suspended based on the following
conditions: pay fine and costs, no law violations for one year.
The open enrollment period for
Medicare Part D and Medicare Ad-
vantage plans is Oct. 15-Dec. 7,
2012.
“One of the things we want peo-
ple to know is that if they have a
Medicare Advantage plan the only
time they can make changes to
their plans is Oct. 15-Dec. 7, 2012,”
said Kim Malsam-Rysdon, secre-
tary for the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Social Services. “All
Medicare recipients should take
this time to review their current
plans and consider whether a
change in coverage is necessary for
them.”
Medicare Advantage is a health
plan offered by a private company
that contracts with Medicare to
provide Part A and Part B coverage
(hospital, skilled nursing, home
health, hospice, doctors’ care and
other outpatient services).
Medicare Part D offers prescrip-
tion drug coverage for all people
with Medicare; the drug coverage
includes both brand name and
generic drugs.
Beginning Oct. 15, trained vol-
unteers from the South Dakota
Senior Health Information and In-
surance Education Program (SHI-
INE) will offer free assistance to
seniors seeking additional
Medicare information.
SHIINE volunteers can help
seniors compare plans, evaluate
their current coverage and fill out
paperwork. Seniors taking advan-
tage of the free one-on-one counsel-
ing should bring their Medicare
card and a current list of medica-
tions. The volunteers will use the
information to sort through the
Medicare Plan Finder and compare
coverage options. The Plan Finder
can also be accessed from home at
www.medicare.gov
For more information on SHI-
INE or to meet with a volunteer in
your community, call 1-800-536-
8197 or contact your Regional Co-
ordinator:
•Eastern South Dakota: Tom
Hoy at 605-333-3314 or
SHIINE@cfag.org
•Central South Dakota: Kath-
leen Nagle at 605-224-3212 or SHI-
INE@centralsd.org
•Western South Dakota: Debbie
Stangle at 605-342-8635 or SHI-
INE@westriversd.org
Medicare open enrollment period begins,
recipients urged to review options
Mary Pekron ___________________
Mary Pekron, age 80 of Philip,
died Wednesday, October 10, 2012,
at the Hans P. Peterson Memorial
Hospital in Philip.
Mary A. Gottsleben was born
January 18, 1932, in Philip, SD,
the daughter of William and Helen
(Gehan) Gottsleben. She grew up
on a farm-ranch northwest of
Philip and attended the Deadman
Rural School in that area. She at-
tended high school at St. Martin’s
Academy in Sturgis, graduating in
1951. She then attended Black
Hills State College in Spearfish,
where she obtained her teaching
certificate. She taught rural school
at the Jones Rural School for three
years and one year at the Malone
Rural School near Milesville. Once
their children were in school, she
returned to teaching, served as a
substitute teacher and teacher's
aide for numerous years.
Mary was united in marriage to
Henry “Hank” Pekron on August
28, 1954, in Philip. They made
their home in the Milesville area,
where they worked on a ranch and
later purchased their own ranch.
They continued to ranch for over 50
years. Due to health reasons, they
moved into Philip in October 2007.
Her husband Henry “Hank”
Pekron preceded her in death on
August 27, 2010. Mary continued
to reside in Philip until her death.
Mary was a member of the Sa-
cred Heart Catholic Church of
Philip, and a former member of St.
Mary Catholic Church and Altar
Society of Milesville.
Survivors include six children,
Nancy Ehrhardt and her husband,
Rick, of Brandon, Steve Pekron and
his wife, Nina, of Milesville, Beth
Walker of Gillette, WY, Karen
Kroetch and her husband, Jerry, of
Philip, Theresa Pekron of West-
minster, CO, and Joe Pekron and
his wife, Julie, of Hot Springs; 13
grandchildren; six great-grandchil-
dren; one sister, Ann Pattno, and
her husband, Tom, of Hastings,
NE; a sister-in-law, Myrna
Gottsleben, of Philip; several nieces
and nephews; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
In addition to her husband,
Mary was preceded in death by her
parents, and one brother, Jim
Gottsleben.
Visitation was held 6-7 p.m.
Sunday, October 14, at the Sacred
Heart Catholic Church in Philip,
with a prayer service at 7:00 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial was
held 10:00 a.m. Monday, October
15, at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Philip, with Father
Kevin Achbach as celebrant.
Altar servers were Mike Gebes
and Ben Stangle; Lectors were
Linda Stangle and Joe Gittings;
Eucharistic Ministers, Don
Schultz, Kelly Blair and Donna
King
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frein, pianist, Maureen Pale-
cek, vocalist. Ushers were Mike
Gebes and Bill Gottsleben. Pall-
bearers were Ryan Hovland, Jere-
miah Walker, Joshua Kroetch,
Nathan Walker, Zane Pekron, Cody
Pekron, Justin Pekron and Jeff Go-
ertz. Gift bearers were Melinda
Coslet, Brooke Formanek, Katie
Pekron, Allison Pekron and Grace
Pekron.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Gertrude Woodden ________________
Gertrude E. Woodden, age 95 of
New Underwood, died Friday, Oc-
tober 12, 2012, at the Good Samar-
itan Center in New Underwood.
Gertrude E. Doughty was born
February 23, 1917, in Rapid City,
South Dakota, the daughter of
Phillip and Clara (Evenson)
Doughty. She grew up north of
Quinn and graduated from Wall
High School. She then attended
Spearfish Normal and earned her
teacher’s certificate. She taught at
rural schools for 21 years.
Gertrude married Richard R.
Palmer on January 8, 1944. They
lived on his ranch at Grindstone.
She took great pride in raising or-
phaned lambs. Richard and
Gertrude had a baby girl, Marjorie
Rachel, whom lived only seven
hours. Richard, along with
Gertrude’s father, Phillip, lost their
lives in a boating accident on Au-
gust 16, 1956.
She later married Raymond Mc-
Griff on November 23, 1962. They
lived at the ranch until Ray’s
health was so that he couldn’t do
the ranch work, so they moved to
Hermosa. Ray died January 5,
1977.
Gertrude met Roy Woodden and
they were dating when a drunk
driver ran into them. Due to the
trauma, Gertrude was unconscious
for 18 days and in rehab for three
months. This caused severe dam-
age but she did all she could to get
better.
She married Roy on August 19,
1983, and they made their home in
Hermosa. Roy later died, and she
remained in Hermosa until moving
into the Good Samaritan – Echo
Ridge and later into the Good
Samaritan Center in New Under-
wood, where she has since resided.
The family appreciated the staff
at the Good Samaritan Centers at
Echo Ridge and New Underwood
for the loving care they gave her.
Survivors include three sisters,
Eva Farkner of Box Elder, Phyllis
Reub of Rapid City, and Lucille
Huether of Rapid City; several
nieces and nephews; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
In addition to her three hus-
bands, Gertrude was preceded in
death by her daughter, Marjorie
Rachel as an infant; and a sister,
Esther Doughty.
Visitation was held one hour
preceding the services on Monday.
Funeral services were held 10:00
a.m. Monday, October 15, at the
Rapid Valley Baptist Church in
Rapid City, with Pastor OC Sum-
mers officiating.
Music was provided by Kay
Williams, pianist and Lynn Fuerst,
vocalist.
Honorary pallbearers were all
relatives and friends in attendance.
Interment followed at the Wall
Cemetery.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Bel videre News …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
June Ring • 462-6328
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
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Fall Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
“On Sale” is a relative term.
Sometimes it represents consider-
able savings and sometimes not so
much. Take cottage cheese and
sour cream for instance. Locally
they are usually priced at about
$4.09 whereas the sale price often
is maybe only $3.89. Okay, that’s
twenty cents off, but only an actual
five-percent reduction. Not exactly
a hot deal. Still, twenty cents is
twenty cents so you might as well
take advantage of the slight bar-
gain if you actually need the stuff.
If your refrigerator is already too
full, you can safely delay the pur-
chase for later without suffering
major financial consequences.
On the other hand, products
like paper towels and toilet paper
are best to buy and stock up on
when they’re sale priced. Paper
towels can be over $13 for a large
multiple-roll package whereas on
sale they may range from $5 or $8.
In other words, they may be half
off. Since we go through a ton of
paper towels around here, I always
buy a goodly supply when they’re
cheap.
One brand of paper towels was-
n’t a good buy, however, according
to wife Corinne. They were an off-
brand variety at a good price that
I dragged home a month or so ago.
Corinne said they were about as
absorbent as tinfoil and not to buy
any more of them despite their
having a pretty design. We have
allocated them to uses that don’t
require a lot of absorbency and put
a better brand on the kitchen cup-
board. I think we have the bad
ones almost used up now, but it’s
taken a concerted effort.
Coffee is another product that is
often a lot cheaper when on sale. A
good brand currently goes for over
$13 a can at standard prices
whereas it can drop to close to $7
or $8 on sale. Luckily, we aren’t
tied into just one brand since sev-
eral are okay. We can take advan-
tage of most of the price cuts.
All of this brings to mind the
concept of actual worth. If the reg-
ular prices and sale prices are
vastly different, this might possi-
bly indicate that the product is
generally overpriced. Conversely, if
there isn’t much difference, maybe
you’re actually getting a product
that is worth what you’re paying
for it.
Unfortunately for my mid-sec-
tion, ice cream is frequently of-
fered at reduced prices. One of my
favorite brands tends to go on sale
about once a month and severely
tests my somewhat-feeble sales re-
sistance. They have a chocolate-al-
mond that is to die for. Also excel-
lent is their “moose-tracks”
involving vanilla ice cream with
lots of chocolate strips and peanut
butter cups. Even their vanilla
bean is quite tasty with fresh
peaches or maybe a banana and a
touch of chocolate syrup. When
these luscious dairy delights are
on sale, they offer a form of low-
cost weight gain although they
aren’t unhealthful in other ways.
Some sales techniques are a bit
confusing. It is popular nowadays
to offer ten packages of something
for $10. Do you really need ten
boxes of Hamburger Helper? This
is more of a gimmick than any-
thing since you can usually buy
one or two items instead of ten and
still get the sale price. Another
trend is for stores to say, “Buy one.
Get one free.” This may be okay,
but I noticed that deal being of-
fered on a cut-up chicken this
week. The only problem was that
the one you pay for is around $9
which is about twice what a
chicken is worth in the first place.
Generally speaking, if a store
cuts something up, it costs more.
Similarly, if they cook it or make it
instant, it is higher priced. When
it comes to bacon, though, I often
buy the pre-cooked stuff since we
don’t eat a lot of it. What’s more, it
is so simple to microwave four
strips for fifteen seconds rather
than spend twenty minutes frying
it and dealing with all that grease.
My nephew would find this a silly
idea, however, since many of his
favorite dishes include bacon
grease for frying or simply as an
addition. He fishes and hunts al-
most constantly, and I suspect that
venison and other wild game
might indeed be improved with
lashings of bacon grease.
So, as usual, one needs to keep
their wits about them when buy-
ing anything whether it’s on sale
or not. I have noticed that sour
cream is this week actually being
offered at $2.49 which is a good
deal on that product. I should
probably stock up. I make a form
of kolache with that which in-
volves flattening a bit of bread
dough, poking a dent in the mid-
dle, and baking it six minutes.
Then you add the sour cream
mixed with some sugar and cinna-
mon in the dent and on top and
bake it some more. This is just
first-rate, and I actually crave it
from time to time. Got to go now.
The sale ends today. Don’t want to
miss it.
On Sale
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
The Belvidere Fire Department
responded to another prairie fire on
Friday afternoon at about 3:00 p.m.
A pickup had caught fire on the in-
terstate east of Kadoka and south
of Stillwell’s. It was somewhat
windy which made things a bit
scary for Stillwells there for a
while, but it mostly just burned
some of their fence line after burn-
ing across some CRP land of
Hogen’s. Fire trucks came from
Midland, Murdo, Philip, Interior
and White River as well as
Belvidere and had things under
control by 6:00 that evening. De-
spite the unsettling fire, Stillwells
are preparing to sell their calves at
Philip on Tuesday.
Jo Rodgers has been running the
Belvidere Post Office the last two
weeks since Dena Buckholz has
been transferred to the Wanblee
Post Office. Normally Jo is working
quite a distance from home in some
post office or other although she is
actually the postmaster at Murdo.
Driving just up the street to work
seemed awfully simple. Jo isn’t
sure who will take over at
Belvidere just yet, but they are
hoping to train someone to do that
in the near future. Jo was planning
to be back at her regular Murdo
Post Office on Monday but then to
be in Draper on Tuesday. Son Jory,
meanwhile, is between sports sea-
sons. Football is over and wrestling
hasn’t started quite yet.
Howie Ireland said they had a
little excitement this weekend
when their grandson, Sean,
(Richard’s son) rolled his pickup
north of Kadoka on the South
Creek Road. Sean and his girl-
friend were headed out to visit a
classmate of Sean’s, but didn’t
quite make it. Sean hadn’t been
home since enrolling at college in
Madison this fall and had hoped to
reconnect with friends. Luckily,
neither Sean nor his girlfriend
were seriously hurt although they
felt battered and had sore spots
and bruises. Sean had to resurrect
his old car that he’d used before
getting the pickup in order to get
back to Madison. Howie said the
road where the rollover happened
isn’t very good right now with lots
of washboard and loose gravel. He
had traveled it lately delivering
mail and didn’t think much of it.
Bill and Norma Headlee were
visited this weekend by their
daughter, Corale, and her husband,
Dan, and three kids from Dell
Rapids. The Dorns hadn’t been
here in quite a while, partly due to
kids being in sports events. Their
son, Justin, however, had his arm
in a cast due to a football-related
injury so he couldn’t play, and there
was no volleyball game scheduled
for another child. Family members
enjoyed riding horses and helping
Bill move some cows. On Sunday,
Tom DeVries came for dinner be-
fore heading out south to spend a
good part of the week doing dirt
work on Wilson’s Pines Ranch. He
plans to camp out in his truck
which has facilities in the cab.
Headlees were recently written up
in the October 4 issue of Tristate
Livestock News in their “Ranching
Legacy” feature. It tells about
growing up in this area and raising
kids here. It tells some family his-
tory and also that Bill and Norma
started their vet practice in
Kadoka back in 1978 and expanded
in 1999 to Philip as well. The head-
line reads, “Rooted in ranch coun-
try, Headlee family is at home on
the range.” The article was also
posted on Facebook by Bill’s niece,
Reagan Wilson Ison, who is the
daughter of Vicki and Stu Wilson.
Carter and Taya Iversen spent
from Friday night until Sunday af-
ternoon with their grandparents,
Rick and Ronda Dennis.
Chris and Terry Baldwin and
girls took in the football game be-
tween Kadoka and Colome that
was held in Kadoka last Friday.
They sort of had to go since both
Chloe and Cella are in the band
that played at the event. Cella
plays the clarinet and Chloe the
trumpet.
The Mansfield family has been
doing a bit of carpooling lately in-
volving Jim, Fayola, Aaron,
Michelle and Tyrel. A week ago Sat-
urday, all five drove together down
to Long Valley to take in the an-
nual hog roast which serves as a
fundraiser for the Long Valley Fire
Department. On Sunday, they all
went to Sylvan Lake for the wed-
ding of Fayola’s niece who is
Mervin Griswold’s daughter. The
wedding was supposed to be out-
side but was moved inside due to it
being cold and windy. On Tuesday
of this week, they first went to
Rapid City for a dental appoint-
ment for Tyrel. From there they
went to Newcastle, WY, to take in
the last football game of the season
for Jim and Fayola’s grandson,
Thomas Davis.
Chuck and Merry Willard drove
to Harrison, NE, on Saturday to
visit their son, Casey. Casey’s two
kids were visiting him at the time
but weren’t actually there. Instead,
they were at Edgemont at a rodeo,
so Chuck and Merry went to Edge-
mont to see them. Back at the
ranch, Chuck and Merry have been
doing some fencing down by the
river. They noted that the beavers
have been busy felling trees and
building dams, the deer have been
shedding horns, and that a four-
wheeler had been driving up and
down the dry river bed. Chuck also
helped Mark DeVries work some
cattle last week.
We have a budding television
star in the area now since Brisa
Badure appeared on KOTA TV last
Wednesday on Paula Vogelsang’s
Pennywise segment of the news.
Brisa showed how to decorate a
pumpkin. Dana said Brisa was a
little shy at first but then got going
and was okay. She enjoyed meeting
the newscasters and seeing how
things are done there. Greg and
Martin didn’t accompany Dana and
Brisa to Rapid City, partly because
Greg has been having some back
problems. He plans to consult a
doctor in Pierre this week.
Betty Kusick was visited one
day last week by Joe Livermont of
Wanblee. They had lunch in
Kadoka before Joe went back
home. On Sunday, Betty went over
to see Dolores Obr, and the two had
a nice visit. Betty took Dolores
some tomatoes that she’d been
given by her daughter, Loretta.
Loretta had picked them just be-
fore frost and while they weren’t
completely ripe yet. They had since
ripened and were ready to be
eaten.
Syd, Corinne and Chance Iwan
went to Rapid City on Friday to
consult gastric specialists about
Chance’s stomach tube. It had been
causing some discomfort. A CAT
scan under sedation at the hospital
showed the tube was slightly out of
position so it was replaced with a
different style of tube which seems
to be working better.
“The leaves fall, the wind blows,
and the farm country slowly
changes from the summer cottons
into its winter wools.”
Henry Beston
The first week in October Pastor
Denke attended the SD District
Fall Conference in Rapid City.
Monday evening October 8, the St.
John voters met at the church. On
Wednesday, the 10th, Pastor led
the topic at the LA-LWML meeting
at the home of June Ring. Friday
evening he sat in on the Thrivent
board meeting at church. Then
came Sunday! It was the annual
meeting of the joint parish of St.
John and St. Peter held at St. John
this year. It was also the celebra-
tion of Pastor Glenn Denke’s 30
years in the ministry, with the last
15 years serving St. Peter and St.
John. Family members who came
to join in the celebration were Pas-
tor’s brother, Paul Denke, and his
wife, Lurene, and son, Luke, of
Pierre, his sister, Darlene Baye, of
Philip, and niece, Sandy Staples, of
Rapid City. Also joining the mem-
bers of St. John and St. Peter were
Pastor Andrew Utecht, his wife,
Lori, and sons, Justus, Amos and
Isaac.
Last Monday Howard and Nette
Heinert helped Tafts work cattle.
Tuesday the 9th, they attended the
fireman’s meeting in Parmelee.
Howard was in Winner on business
Saturday, and Chris and Beau took
the day off to go to Valentine to
visit their brother, Toby, and grand-
mother, Erna Heinert.
Cliff and Pam Allard reported
that their corn is now combined,
and did fairly well, considering the
dry year once the rains cut off.
Kenda Huber accompanied June
Ring to Rapid City on Monday, the
8th, where June kept a doctors ap-
pointment.
The Hubers finished combining
soy beans Thursday, and are now
preparing the equipment for har-
vesting sunflowers and corn.
David and Nicole’s home is still
undergoing changes, and it is being
prepped for new siding.
RaeBeth Staab of Kansas stayed
and visited a day or two after tak-
ing her mother, Jean Kary, to the
West River History Conference in
Rapid City. She left for her home in
Mayetta on Tuesday.
Jason Lehman and his room-
mate, Patrick Remund, were home
from college in Brookings for the
weekend. Patrick Lehman had a
four-day weekend from college in
Chadron and was also home. It was
a time of celebrations with the
Lehman’s and Rasmussen’s, as
Amy and Blake celebrated their
wedding anniversary on the 12th,
and Dan’s birthday on the 14th.
Kevin and Kris Hachmeister of
Custer were at Jan Rasmussen’s
home and joined in on the celebra-
tions. Kevin and Kris will be mov-
ing to Vancouver, British Colombia
November 1, 2012. Saturday the
crew were in White River for the
Catholic Fall Festival.
Jim and Marjorie Letellier and
Andrea Beckwith were in White
River Wednesday for the Harlem
Ambassador game. Friday they
were at Sunshine Bible Acedemy
for the football game with High-
more/Harrold, and Sunshine won
32-6. The Burma’s came home to
Norris for the weekend and were
joined by Julie Letellier and An-
drea Beckwith, as they helped Jim
and Marjorie work cattle Saturday.
The Dan and Cheyenne Schmidt
families were in Mission Saturday
for a memorial service for Rob
Bromwich.
It was Native American Week in
Norris School last week, and some
special activities were done to
mark the occasion. Wednesday
Christine Dunham did some Na-
tive story telling for the children,
and Thursday Miss Rosebud Geor-
gianne Larvie explained and per-
formed dances for the students and
staff.
Wednesday Bruce Ring picked
up Stephanie, Ryan, Reina and
Reno from school a little early and
took them to the School of Mines in
Rapid City for a presentation on
the Lakota Way of Strength and
Courage, with emphasis on how
the bow represents strength.
Thursday Jessie and Risa were
in Martin for a medical appoint-
ment. Friday Donna Burnette and
a trainee visited the Bruce Ring
home.
The SD Plains Chapter of
Thrivent had a board meeting at
St. John Church Friday evening.
Present were Mick Hamar of Long
Valley, Jill Olson of Mission, Marv
and Deb Moor of Kadoka and
Bruce and Jan Ring of Norris. June
Ring and Pastor Denke came a lit-
tle later and sat in on the rest of
the meeting.
Robert and Sharon Ring were in
Chadron last Monday, taking a
part to be repaired. It was not fin-
ished, so they have to return this
week to retrieve it. They heard
from their daughter, Deb, that she
had returned from her trip to
Florida for a conference there. She
was able to visit Karen Totton and
Meghan while she was in their
vicinity in Florida.
Honors band students from
many schools in the area met Mon-
day in White River for practice all
day and a concert in the evening.
Two of the students from our com-
munity from the Long Valley
School who participated were Je-
remy Ring and Torry Rattling Leaf.
Last Tuesday Dan and Susan
Taft were in White River for the
last home game of the middle
school volleyball team. They played
Todd County. Thursday Morgan
traveled with the volleyball team to
Colome for the middle school game.
Friday Dan and Heather helped
Berry’s work cattle. Saturday
Susan and Morgan were in White
River for the middle school volley-
ball tournament. White River came
in 2nd.
The Annie’s Project class fin-
ished up last Wednesday in White
River. They had 21 in attendance
for the course.
The Historical Society served
meals Monday at the museum for
the honor band festival people.
Richard and Noreen Krogman
were at Clarence’s for supper Octo-
ber 2. On the 6th, they traveled to
Arlington, NE, to visit Kay and
Mike Japp, and helped the twins
celebrate their first birthday at the
home of Mike’s parents. There were
about 25 people there. Glen came
from Fargo to join in the celebra-
tion. Glen left on the 7th, and
Richard and Noreen came home on
the 8th. Saturday the 13th, they
went in to the Catholic Fall Festi-
val. One day Noreen found a
strange animal in the chicken
house, which Richard identified as
a possum.
Sharon Allard came from
Spearfish on Friday to visit her
mother, Maxine, and to take her up
to Bill and Marjorie Letellier’s for
a visit with them. Later June Ring
was a supper guest of Maxine and
Sharon. Saturday morning Edna
and Rebekkah Kary visited them.
Sharon returned home that after-
noon.
Donation …October 6 Lorna and George Moore donated this paint-
ing to the Casey Tibbs/Mattie Goff Rodeo Center in Ft. Pierre, SD. The
painting by artist Lorna Moore, shows some South Dakota Rodeo history
of two world champion saddle bronc riders from Belvidere, SD. Earl Thode
the first world champion in saddle bronc riding (1929 and 1931) and Jef-
fery Willert, world champion in 2005. Included in the painting is Willert’s
barn located north of Belvidere and the original old Thode house south of
Belvidere. --courtesy photo
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Saturday: 8 to Noon
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Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
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place your ad in
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Dakota
daily & weekly
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Locals …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
Email the
Kadoka Press at:
press@kadokatelco.com
Carnival Games
Cake Walk • Bingo
Fish Pond • Ring Toss
Haunted House & More!
Costume Contest
Four different age groups
Bring your
carved pumpkins,
they will be
judged for the:
•Scariest
•Funniest
• Most Original
Halloween
Family
Fun
Carnival
Sun., Oct. 28 • 2 to 5:30 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
Sponsored by
Kadoka National Honor Society
Tickets
Ages 0-13 yrs.: 25¢ each or 25 for $5
Ages 14 & up: 25 for $8
Come & Go Baby Shower
for
RoseAnn Eisenbraun & Baby Girl
(Fiancée of Danny Whidby)
Sunday, October 21, 2012
2:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Home of Lori Shearer • 279-2456.
Registered at Target.
how important it is for everyday
people, no matter what age, to
move some every day … to get that
heart pumping.
Looking at this year’s cross
country team’s record and knowing
the students personally, another
set of life-long runners are in the
making. This year’s state con-
tenders Bobby Anderson, Scout
Sudbeck, Kwincy Ferguson, Shaley
Herber, Tori Letellier and Marti
Herber are runners who demon-
strate what it take to be a runner:
courage, strength, determination
and persistence. Good luck
Kougars and congratulations
Keena for your outstanding per-
formance at Crazy Horse.
--submitted by Karen Byrd
Twenty-six.two miles … 41.8
kilometers … 52,000 steps … no
matter how you say it, it is a long
way to run!
Unless you have witnessed the
feat, it is hard to imagine the
courage, strength, determination
and persistence required to com-
plete this incredible task.
Last week the Crazy Horse
Marathon took place from Crazy
Horse Monument, through and
around Hill City. The great thing
about a marathon, like the Ameri-
can Heart Association sponsored
the Hill City event, is that it offers
running options to involve a multi-
tude of people. Generally, most
marathons offer a 1-kilometer “kid
run,” a 5-kilometer run/walk for
any age or a team option to
run/walk the half or full marathon.
According to this year’s Crazy
Horse Women’s champion of the
full marathon, Keena Byrd-Moro,
who finished with a time of 3:41:47,
“…it is not about the race or about
how far you go, it’s about getting
out there and challenging yourself
to do more activities than you’ve
done before!”
She is a registered nurse at the
Kadoka Nursing Home and has
been interested in running since
her high school track days between
2000-2004.
Her current involvement in the
Army required her to be in shape,
but her love of the sport was in-
spired by other Kadoka area run-
ners like Curtis Huffman, her
sister, Tess Byrd, and her training
partner and husband, Dylan Moro,
who is a marathon event winner in
his category, as well.
Keena’s education in the health
field has made her passionate
about spreading the word about
Winning Crazy Horse Marathon
Marathon runners …Dylan and Kenna Byrd-Moro.
Emily McGuire and daughter,
Lilly Anna 19-months old, of Rapid
City arrived on Wednesday of last
week to visit at the home of Ron
and Renate Carson. They are the
granddaughter and great-grand-
daughter of the Carsons. Wilma
Carleton came down to visit them
and they also went to the Kadoka
Nursing Home to visit great-great
grandmother, Wynona Carson.
They returned home on Thursday.
Sue and John Kaiser drove to
Harrold on Saturday to attend the
funeral of her aunt, Rose Russell.
The services were held at the Har-
rold United Methodist Church and
burial was in the Medicine Hill
Cemetery near Harrold. Rose
passed away on Oct.7 in Pierre.
Deb Moor attended the South
Dakota Library Association confer-
ence held in Huron Oct. 3 through
the 5th. On Saturday, Oct. 6, Deb
and her sisters hosted an 80th
birthday party for their father,
Hank Kosters, at the Pizza Ranch
in Ft. Pierre. All three Moor sons,
Matthew, Mitch and Marc, were
present as well as lots of other rel-
atives. Deb picked up Harlan Moor
of Mitchell recently and he will
spend a few days with his brother
and wife. Monday Harlan and
Marv attended the funeral of Del-
bert Birkel of Bonesteel, a long
time friend of the Moor family.
Mitch Moor of Pierre came to
Kadoka on Friday to attend the
high school football game here.
Paul Briggs, Bonnie Riggins and
her daughter, Linda, of Rapid City,
drove to Bradshaw, NE, last week
to attend the funeral of Natasha
Todd, granddaughter of Electa
(Briggs) and Doug Preslicka.
Natasha, 19, died as the result of a
car accident.
Cindy and Kenny Wilmarth
drove to Denver on Monday of last
week and attended meetings of
Rodeway Inns on Tuesday. While
there they had dinner with friends,
Pat and Adele Brown. The
Wilmarths returned home Wednes-
day evening. On Saturday Cindy
and Kenny attended the volleyball
tournament held at Douglas High
School. Kadoka Area came away
with the consolation championship
after being beaten by Red Cloud in
the first round and then defeating
Todd County, Hill City and Rapid
City Christian. Pine Ridge won the
championship. The Wilmarths then
went on to Wall to watch the
Amiotte grandsons play football.
Ruby and Leonard Sanftner,
Kenny and Lyndee Ireland and Jan
Hewitt of Philip were among those
attending the Order of the Eastern
Star Conference in Pierre over the
weekend. Jan took a fall and went
back home on Saturday. Ruby said
she is okay after being checked out
by a doctor, but is sore and bruised.
The Jackson County American
Legion Auxiliary will met on
Thursday, Oct. 11. The unit will
again have a booth at the Holiday
Festival to be held on Sunday, Nov.
4 in Kadoka. It was moved to send
25 comfort kits to the veterans at
the VA facility in Hot Springs, and
Christmas gifts will be delivered
there next week for the gift shoppe
to be held the middle of November.
Gifts can be taken to the Jackson
County Library by Saturday, Oct.
20. A report was given on the Dis-
trict 2 meeting held recently in
Martin. Scholarship forms will be
taken to the high school soon and
poppies were ordered. The next
meeting will be Nov. 8 at the com-
munity room at the Gateway
Apartments. Members are re-
minded that 2013 dues are due.
Eight readers attended the book
discussion of Fahrenheit 451 on
Sunday, Oct. 14. Dorothy Liegl led
an educational discussion.
Kadoka Area Schools will be cel-
ebrating Red Ribbon Week with ac-
tivities October 22-25. This year’s
theme is “The Best Me is Drug-
Free!”
It will begin with lessons on
drug/alcohol awareness and pre-
vention in the classrooms the week
of October 15. Themed dress up
days and lessons will be October
22-25. Students who participate in
dress up days have the chance to
win prizes.
Community members can par-
ticipate, too!
Show your support by donning
red ribbons or decorating doors or
mailboxes with red ribbons. Feel
free to dress all in red on Thursday,
October 25 to show your support of
healthy choices for our youth!
Promoters of Red Ribbon Week
have their 2nd annual photo con-
test where you can win an ipad and
money for your school by decorat-
ing your door or mailbox and send-
ing in a picture. Check it out at
www.redribbon.org/ . Parents can
sign the following Red Ribbon
Pledge on the website: “I pledge to
set guidelines to help children grow
up safe, healthy and drug-free.”
Red Ribbon Week Dress Up
October 22-25, 2012
Monday: Sock it to drugs!
Wear crazy socks
Tuesday: It’s crazy to do drugs!
Crazy hair/clothes
Wednesday: I “can” be drug-free
Bring a can of food to donate to the
food bank
Thursday: 2-3 p.m. Kadoka Area
School-wide assembly
The best me is drug-free!
Wear as much red as you can!
Kadoka Area
Schools to
kick off Red
Ribbon Week
Show & dance with full band at 8 p.m.!
Come early
for supper!
The Rural Development funds
will aid the Jackson-Kadoka Eco-
nomic Development Corporation
with establishing a revolving loan
fund to assist small and emerging
businesses. The revolving fund
will be a catalyst for interested en-
trepreneurs to secure financing
and assist with furthering eco-
nomic development. Keeping busi-
nesses running in rural areas is
critical to the survival of the town.
“This funding opportunity is
amazing. It will further help us
with our goals of continued support
for our existing businesses and pro-
vide opportunities for new and
emerging small businesses,” said
Jo Beth Uhlir, Director of Opera-
tions for the Jackson-Kadoka Eco-
nomic Development Corporation.
“Providing our residents with
hometown services and economic
stability is one of our highest prior-
ities and this grant will help us
meet those challenges.”
Since 2009, USDA has provided
more than $8.1 billion in invest-
ment to bring modern, updated
water and waste water capacity to
thousands of rural communities –
helping to safeguard the health
and wellbeing of millions.
For additional information on
Rural Development projects, please
visit Rural Development’s new in-
teractive web map featuring pro-
gram funding and success stories
for fiscal years 2009-2011. The data
can be found at:http://www.rur-
dev.usda.gov/RDSuccessStories.ht
ml.
Since taking office, President
Obama's Administration has taken
historic steps to improve the lives
of rural Americans, put people back
to work and build thriving
economies in rural communities.
From proposing the American Jobs
Act to establishing the first-ever
White House Rural Council the
President is committed to a
smarter use of existing Federal re-
sources to foster sustainable eco-
nomic prosperity and ensure the
government is a strong partner for
businesses, entrepreneurs and
working families in rural commu-
nities. The Rural Council is work-
ing to break down silos of
information and to find areas for
better collaboration and improved
flexibility in administering govern-
ment programs and to work closer
with local tribal and non-tribal gov-
ernments, non-profits and private
companies to leverage federal sup-
port to enhance the services offered
to rural beneficiaries. Under Sec-
retary Vilsack's leadership, USDA
has instituted a comprehensive
plan to strengthen the Department
as a model service provider and to
ensure that every farmer and
rancher is treated equally and
fairly as part of "a new era of civil
rights" at USDA. He and President
Obama have made it a priority to
resolve all of the past civil rights
cases facing the Department.
USDA, through its Rural Devel-
opment mission area, administers
and manages housing, business
and community infrastructure pro-
grams through a national network
of state and local offices. Rural De-
velopment has an active portfolio of
more than $172 billion in loans and
loan guarantees. These programs
are designed to improve the eco-
nomic stability of rural communi-
ties, businesses, residents, farmers
and ranchers and improve the
quality of life in rural America.
Rural Development South
Dakota State Director Elsie Meeks
announced the award of $99,000
Rural Business Enterprise Grant
Funds (RBEG) to the Jackson-
Kadoka Economic Development
Corporation.
“This project provides opportu-
nity and resources to support serv-
ices in Jackson County. The
partnership with Jackson-Kadoka
Economic Development shows
what can be accomplished when
government and entrepreneurs
work together to bring increased
economic stimulus and jobs to rural
South Dakotans,” stated Meeks.
“The Obama Administration is
committed to improving the lives of
rural Americans, put people back
to work and build thriving
economies in rural communities.”
Rural Development awards $99,000 to Jackson-
Kadoka Economic Development Corporation
Accepting the grant …left to right include Rural Development Area Director Tim Potts, corporation
member Rusty Olney, Kadoka Mayor Harry Weller, corporation member Rich Bendt, Rural Development State
Director Elsie Meeks, corporation member Eileen Stolley, Director of Operations JoBeth Uhlir, and corporation
member Dale Christensen. --courtesy photo
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Club 27
Club 27
Kadoka, SD • 837-2241
Halloween
Halloween
Dance Featuring
W
estbound
W
estbound
Costume
Unveiling
at
11 p.m.
Prime Rib Prime Rib
Special Special
Saturday,
October 27
Costume Party &
Costume Party &
Dance Featuring
This & That …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota
daily & weekly papers through the
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
605-837-2259
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
The Sioux Horse
Effigy and
Missionary
Mary Collins
Slender as a whip-
pet, the Sioux Horse
Effigy is one of the
most recognizable
and cherished arti-
facts in the South
Dakota State Histor-
ical Society’s Mu-
seum at the Cultural
Heritage Center in
Pierre. The effigy is
the logo of the
SDSHS.
Most horse dance
sticks carved by the
Lakota are of the
front half of a horse
on a stick that could
be carried in a
dance. The Sioux
Horse Effigy is con-
sidered a master-
piece of American
Indian sculpture be-
cause it is the com-
plete figure of a horse. Carved out of wood, the three-foot-long dance stick
is enhanced by a mane and tail of real horsehair, with reins and a bridle
made of leather.
It is believed that the Sioux Horse Effigy was carved by a warrior in
the late 1800s to honor a brave horse that was injured or killed in battle.
The sides of the effigy are riddled with holes that suggest bullet wounds,
with red paint suggesting blood seeming to seep from the wounds. Its ears
are slanted backward, symbolizing fear and pain. The horse sculpture’s
elongated body and forward leaping motion suggest a leap from life to
death.
The Sioux Horse Effigy was collected by Mary Collins, a missionary to
the Lakota.
Collins was born in 1846 in Illinois and grew up in Keokuk, Iowa. She
received a Master of Arts degree from Ripon College in Wisconsin. After
three years of teaching in Keokuk, she decided to become a congregational
missionary and was sent to Dakota Territory to be a missionary to the
Lakota.
She arrived at Oahe Mission, located about 12 miles north of what is
now Pierre, on Nov. 10, 1875. Ten years later, Collins moved to the Little
Eagle Station on the Grand River, located about 20 miles west of Mo-
bridge. Her home, made of logs, was used for both school and church.
Collins learned the Lakota language and ways. Her knowledge of med-
icine resulted in her becoming known as a “medicine woman” and gave
her a status that she might not otherwise have had. Collins became
friends with Sitting Bull and tried to convince the Lakota to give up the
Ghost Dance. She possessed a sense of humor and was a practical woman.
She taught American Indians how to live well in this present life, how to
serve God, how to build homes and how to become self-supporting. By all
accounts, Collins was respected by the Lakota.
“I had dedicated my life to this work little knowing how much of hard
physical labor and drudgery were required of a missionary in our own
land,” Collins wrote. “I had been in school all my life either as a student
or a teacher, so that I was not very well fitted for hardships, and had I
not felt that everything I did was for the uplift of the Indians I could not
have held out.”
Nonetheless, she described her years to service to the American Indians
as years of delight.
Collins retired from the ministry in 1910 and moved back to Keokuk.
There, she made the leap from life into death on May 25, 1920. Many of
her correspondences, including her autobiography, are contained in the
SDSHS Archives.
This moment in South Dakota history is provided by the South Dakota
Historical Society Foundation, the nonprofit fundraising partner of the
South Dakota State Historical Society. Find us on the web at
www.sdhsf.org.
rolled over. The victim was ejected
through the rear window of the ve-
hicle and died on the scene. Clair-
mont's blood alcohol level was
determined to be .281 two hours
after the crash.
The investigation was conducted
by the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion and Rosebud Sioux Tribe Law
Enforcement Services. The case is
being prosecuted by Assistant
United States Attorney Marie H.
Ruettgers.
A presentence investigation was
ordered, and a sentencing date was
set for January 2, 2013. The defen-
dant was remanded to the custody
of the United States Marshal pend-
ing sentencing.
United States Attorney Brendan
V. Johnson announced that Mark
Clairmont, age 48, of Norris, South
Dakota, appeared before United
States District Judge Roberto A.
Lange on October 9, 2012, and pled
guilty to Involuntary Manslaugh-
ter. The maximum penalty upon
conviction is 8 years in custody, a
$250,000 fine, or both.
The conviction stem from an in-
cident that took place on February
17, 2012, when Clairmont was
driving a motor vehicle at approxi-
mately 79 miles per hour, had been
drinking alcoholic beverages, and
was under the influence of alcohol.
Clairmont lost control of the vehi-
cle; it traveled into a ditch and
Norris man pleds guilty to
involuntary manslaughter
from a different family member.
They traveled from Wanblee to the
Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation
and located the victim. At gun
point, they forced the victim out of
a vehicle and assaulted him. They
forced the victim into their car for
the purpose of harassing and inter-
rogating him and started driving
back toward Wanblee. Law enforce-
ment authorities were dispatched
to the area, located the Jakeways,
stopped their vehicle, and freed the
victim. The victim suffered bruises
and abrasions as a result of the
kidnapping.
The investigation was conducted
by Rosebud Sioux Tribe Law En-
forcement Services. The case was
prosecuted by Assistant United
States Attorney Tim Maher. Jake-
way was remanded to the custody
of the United States Marshal.
United States Attorney Brendan
V. Johnson announced that a Wan-
blee,South Dakota, man charged
with kidnapping and aiding and
abetting was sentenced on October
1, 2012, by United States District
Judge Roberto A. Lange.
Jerett Jakeway, age 26, was sen-
tenced to 62 months in custody,
three years of supervised release,
and a $100 special assessment to
the Victim Assistance Fund.
Jakeway was indicted by a fed-
eral grand jury on April 10, 2012,
and pled guilty to the charge on
June 15, 2012.
The conviction stems from an in-
cident that took place on November
5, 2011, when Jakeway and his fa-
ther abducted the victim, an adult
male. Jakeway and his father,
William Jakeway, thought the vic-
tim had stolen a piece of property
Wanblee man sentenced
South Dakota’s sex offender reg-
istry,” said Jackley. “This remark-
ably low non-complaint rate is the
result of the attentive work of law
enforcement and these individuals
should be commended.”
South Dakota’s Sex Offender
Registry was the fourth state in the
nation to become certified. To be
certified the State must substan-
tially implement the provision of
SORNA. To date, South Dakota is
only one of sixteen states whose
registries have met the national
SORNA certification requirements.
Attorney General Marty Jackley
has announced that the compliancy
rate for registered sex offenders is
98.7% across the state. Currently,
3,027 sex offenders reside
statewide with just 40 identified in-
stances of non-compliance. State
law requires those convicted of sex
crimes to register as a sex offender
within three business days of com-
ing into any county to reside. Addi-
tional state law requires sex
offenders to reregister every six
months.
“Keeping the public and children
safe is the ultimate goal of the
SD non-complaint sex
offender rate remains low
Drought continues its relentless
march across South Dakota, as re-
flected in the latest U.S. Drought
Monitor, released on Oct. 11. Ex-
ceptional drought, the worst cate-
gory on the map, has grown to
nearly one-third of the state's area,
a 26 percent increase from 25. Cur-
rently, more than 91 percent of
South Dakota is covered in the se-
vere, extreme or exceptional
drought (D2-D4) categories, says
Laura Edwards, SDSU Extension
Climate Field Specialist.
"Last week, the drought map de-
picted one-category degradations
across much of western South
Dakota. This week's changes re-
flect worsening conditions in the
northeast. Winter wheat planting
is being delayed, and there is poor
germination and emergence in
many of the fields that have been
planted," Edwards said. "Dry soils
and very little rainfall have led to
very dry soil conditions to start off
winter wheat and cover crops this
fall."
The month of September was
the record driest for several loca-
tions in the northeast and central
parts of the state, including; Ab-
erdeen, Mobridge and Pierre. In
Aberdeen, the total rainfall for the
month of September was just 0.01
inches. So far, 0.02 inches have
been reported in October. Pierre
has had no measurable rainfall
since Aug. 12, when 0.01 inches
fell. Edwards says the National Cli-
matic Data Center has reported
South Dakota being the driest
state on record.
"Over the last two weeks, expan-
sions in the three worst drought
categories on the U.S. Drought
Monitor map in South Dakota re-
flected these dismal precipitation
amounts. Soil moisture is well
below normal for this time of year
as well, as farmers are concerned
about cover crops and winter wheat
statewide," Edwards said.
The USDA Weekly Crop
Weather Report, issued on Oct. 9,
states that 95 percent of topsoil
moisture is short to very short, and
93 percent of subsoil moisture is
short to very short.
Dennis Todey, SDSU State Cli-
matologist, says that drought is
getting worse rather than better.
"The opportunities for recovery
this fall are becoming limited. We
were hoping for some relief before
winter, but the situation appears to
be going to the other direction,"
Todey said. "This will have implica-
tions for cropping decisions this
fall, and possibly into the spring.
Limited surface water availability
will be an issue for livestock pro-
ducers through the winter season."
"We don't see any clear climate
signal that this fall or winter will
be a game-changer," Todey said.
"The drought is so severe and ex-
tensive that it will be challenging
to make a significant recovery dur-
ing our winter dry season."
He adds that there may be small
amounts of relief over the late fall
and winter season, but both crop
and livestock producers should be
prepared for the current drought
impacts to continue into the spring.
One positive impact of the ongo-
ing drought is that harvest is well
ahead of schedule for soybeans and
corn, according to the USDA report.
Soybeans are 94 percent har-
vested, up from 61 percent last
year at this time, and well ahead of
the 5-year average of 43 percent.
Corn is currently 78 percent har-
vested, considerably up from 15
percent at this time last year, also
well ahead of the 5-year average of
12 percent for this same week.
To learn more visit iGrow.org.
Winter wheat planting
delayed due to drought
The Department of Revenue, Di-
vision of Motor Vehicles imple-
menting an Electronic Lien and
Title system (ELT).
Under the ELT system, motor ve-
hicle lien recordings and title appli-
cations processed on and after
October 1 that denote a lien will
not be issued a paper title docu-
ment. The title document will be
retained electronically in the
state’s data base. A paper motor ve-
hicle title certificate will be printed
when the lien is released.
“The Division continues to look
for effective, efficient ways to serve
the citizens of South Dakota,” said
Deb Hillmer, Division of Motor Ve-
hicles director. “Implementing the
ELT system will provide advan-
tages to our industry partners as
well as individuals in the notation
and release of liens, such as a re-
duction in duplicate titles and
quicker receipt of title upon lien
payoff.”
South Dakota will join a number
of other states that have already
implemented ELT.
According to Hillmer, lenders
recording a motor vehicle lien have
the option to utilize an approved
third party provider that will pro-
vide the lender with electronic no-
tices of title and lien when the
motor vehicle record is processed in
the state system. Participating
lenders will also release a lien elec-
tronically through its provider.
Upon receipt of the electronic lien
release, the title will be printed and
mailed to the motor vehicle owner,
unless directed otherwise by the
lender.
Lenders that do not participate
through a third party provider can
obtain access to search the state’s
title system to verify title and lien
records. Lienholder information,
title brands and other public motor
vehicle information can be accessed
through the SDcars system at
www.sdcars.org by entering a valid
motor vehicle VIN in the “VIN √”
option.
More information is online at
http://www.state.sd.us/drr2/mo-
torvehicle/ELT.htm, or call the
South Dakota Division of Motor Ve-
hicles at 605-773-3541.
Electronic lien and title for
motor vehicles with liens
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Good Luck Cross Country Team …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
H & H Restaurant H & H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn & Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287 Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287
BankWest BankWest
Gene Christensen: 837-2281 Gene Christensen: 837-2281
BankWest BankWest
- -Insurance Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277 Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Jigger’s Jigger’s
Restaurant Restaurant
Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell: 837-2000 Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell: 837-2000
Midwest Midwest
Cooperative Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600 Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600
Kadoka Clinic Kadoka Clinic
Phone: 837-2257 Phone: 837-2257
America’s Best America’s Best
Value Inn Value Inn
Grant Patterson • Phone: 837-2188 Grant Patterson • Phone: 837-2188
Discount Fuel Discount Fuel
Mark & Tammy Carlson Mark & Tammy Carlson
Phone: 837-2271 Phone: 837-2271
People’s Market People’s Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232 Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232
Stadium Sports Stadium Sports
Shelly Young • Mission, SD Shelly Young • Mission, SD
1-888-502-3066 1-888-502-3066
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697 Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697
Groven’s Chemical Groven’s Chemical
Rick Groven: Rick Groven: 837-2550 837-2550
Hogen’s Hardware Hogen’s Hardware
Don & Randi Oyan: 837-2274 Don & Randi Oyan: 837-2274
Rush Funeral Home Rush Funeral Home
Philip • Wall • Kadoka Philip • Wall • Kadoka
Jack & DJ Rush: 859-2400 Jack & DJ Rush: 859-2400
Double H Feed Double H Feed
& Supply & Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976 Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976
Hildebrand Steel Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete & Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226 Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926 Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Kadoka Press Kadoka Press
Ronda & Robyn • 837-2259 Ronda & Robyn • 837-2259
Club 27 Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston: Lonny & Carrie Johnston:
837-2241 837-2241
Kadoka Kadoka
Booster Club Booster Club
Promoting Spirit Promoting Spirit
State Farm State Farm
Insurance Insurance
Jan Hewitt: 859-2559 Jan Hewitt: 859-2559
Headlee Headlee
Vet Clinic Vet Clinic
Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee
Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859- Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859-
2610 2610
West River West River
Excavation Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690 Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Peters Excavation Peters Excavation
Brent Peters: 837-2945 Brent Peters: 837-2945
Midland Midland
Food & Fuel Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen: Clint & Brenda Jensen:
843-2536 843-2536
J& S Restore J& S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376 John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376
Kadoka Gas & Go Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350 Grant Patterson: 837-2350
Bobby A nde r s on,Vict or ia Le t e llie r , Kwincy F e r g us on, S ha le y H e r be r , Ma r t i H e r be r , S cout S udbe ck Bobby A nde r s on,Vict or ia Le t e llie r , Kwincy F e r g us on, S ha le y H e r be r , Ma r t i H e r be r , S cout S udbe ck
Ka doka Cros s Country Tea m
Good Luck a t the
S ta te Bound!
2012 S ta te Cros s Country Meet
S a turda y, October 20 - 12:00 noon MT
Broa dla nd Golf Cours e • H uron
Sports…
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Bobby Anderson Kwincy Ferguson
Marti Herber & Kwincy Ferguson
Scout Sudbeck, Victoria Letellier & Shaley Herber Victoria Letellier & Shaley Herber
Scout Sudbeck & Shaley Herber
Cross Country Photos by Del Bartels
Victoria Letellier
& Scout Sudbeck
Marti Herber
Cowboys were able to capitalize
early in the third quarter to bring
the score to 12-0. We then went
three straight series without get-
ting a first down and ending with
another tough special teams play,
when we had a punt go off the side
of our punter’s foot that was recov-
ered and returned to the one-yard
line by a Colome defender. Colome
would score their final touchdown
after that to bring the final score to
26-0.
This game was really the tale of
two halves. We played much better
in the first half then we did in the
second half. But give Colome
credit. They played good, funda-
mental football and they capital-
ized on our mistakes.
Offensively this week, Chandlier
Sudbeck led the team in rushing
with 18 carries for 69 yards, and
Chance Knutson had 12 carries for
55 yards. Defensively, Clint Stout
led once again this week with 16
tackles and he also had 1 intercep-
tion. Klay O’Daniel had 9 tackles,
Chance Knutson had 8 tackles and
1 sack, Chandlier Sudbeck, Sam
Pretty Bear, True Buchholz, and
Chris Anderson all had 5, Logan
Ammons and Dylan Riggins each
had 4 tackles, Lane Patterson had
2 and Gavin DeVries had 1.
This week the Kougars travel to
Philip to take on the Scotties for
our final regular season game on
Thursday night at 7:00 p.m. The
Scotties have had a tough year, but
it really doesn’t matter what the
records are when the Kougars and
the Scotties take the field, it’s al-
ways going to be a battle.
--by Coach Chad Eisenbraun
Colome 26
Kadoka Area 0
The Kougars played their last
regular season home football game
last Friday night against the
Colome Cowboys and unfortu-
nately, lost the game 26-0.
Colome opened the game with
their first offensive series and
scored on an 11-yard touchdown
pass. After that our defense did a
great job the rest of the first half.
Offensively, we drove into the red
zone three times in the first half,
but came up empty every time. We
ran the ball very effectively with
Chance Knutson and Chandlier
Sudbeck behind some great block-
ing from our offensive line. Our line
had their work cut out for them in
this game to say the least.
Colome’s offensive and defensive
lines averaged around 250 pounds.
They were probably the biggest
line I’ve seen in all of my years of
coaching, but our kids did a nice
job, especially in the first half.
The second half we were set to
receive the opening kickoff, but
after an unfortunate turnover, the
Kougars lose to Cowboys in final home game
On Thursday, October 11, the
Kadoka Lady Kougars traveled to
New Underwood for a triangular.
Jones County defeated Kadoka
25-22, 25-20, 32-30
Kadoka defeated New Under-
wood 25-23, 25-20, 25-23
Kadoka vs. Jones County
This is definitely a match the
team and I would like to forget. We
came out with a new lineup, and
we hadn't played since October 2. I
had a misunderstanding on the
libero rule which really confused
our rotation that we had been
working on in practice, and we had
a difficult time recovering. The
girls still fought hard and made it
a good match, but it was a bit too
late by the time we felt comfortable
on the court. No excuses though,
we had plenty of opportunities to
take the third set but couldn't man-
age to do it. Mariah Pierce had 11
service points, 1 ace, and 8 digs;
Raven Jorgensen had 8 kills and 1
block; Taylor Merchen had 12 set
assists.
Kadoka vs. New Underwood
New Underwood has really im-
proved since the last time we
played them, and they had just
given Jones County a scare in a
close 5 set match. The girls played
well after getting our bearings
straight following the Jones
County match. It was a real solid
victory. Kwincy Ferguson had 12
service points and 4 aces and
Raven Jorgensen had 9 service
points and 3 aces; Mariah Pierce
had 8 kills; Tessa Stout had 10 set
assists and Taylor Merchen had 8.
~~~~~
On Saturday, October 13 the
team competed at the Rapid City
Douglas Tournament.
Red Cloud defeated Kadoka in
first round 25-23, 25-20
Kadoka defeated Todd County in
1st round of consolation bracket 25-
15, 25-8
Kadoka defeated Hill City in
2nd round of consolation bracket
25-15, 25-8
Kadoka defeated Rapid City
Christian in finals of consolation
bracket 25-17, 25-19
The day didn't start the way we
would have liked. Red Cloud beat
us in the first round, and we played
poorly. We didn't move well--it
looked like we were still asleep. We
really felt like they were a team we
should beat, but I guess they didn't
feel the same way. We came back
after that and had a great day, win-
ning three in a row to win the con-
solation bracket. I was very happy
with the way the girls played.
Kwincy Ferguson had 28 service
points, 6 aces, and 14 digs on the
day; Tessa Stout had 24 service
points, 5 aces, and 24 set assists;
Raven Jorgensen had 19 service
points, 3 aces, and 26 kills; Taylor
Merchen had 13 service points, 4
aces, and 26 set assists; Shaley
Herber had 13 kills and 3 solo
blocks; Mariah Pierce had 23 serv-
ice points, 3 aces, and 14 kills; and,
Marti Herber played her usual out-
standing defense at the libero posi-
tion. Also, I have to compliment our
girls that took our stats: Shelby
Uhlir, Destiny Dale, and Myla
Pierce. They do a great job and
don't always get a lot of thanks for
sitting on the bench all day and
doing the tedious work. We are now
14-12 on the season with two more
matches to play before districts.
Kadoka travels to Jones County
on Tuesday, October 16, and then
we end our regular season at home
against Rapid City Christian on
Monday, October 22.
--by Coach Barry Hutchinson
Lady Kougars compete
in tough road trips
Athletes of the Week
Klay O’Daniel
Football
Our “little big man in the middle”
Klay O’Daniel had 9 tackles this
week and was second in tackles on
the team versus a HUGE Colome
offensive line. Klay has been play-
ing nose tackle for us all season
and has done a great job, even
though he is always out matched in
size. His effort and tenacity has al-
lowed us to do a lot of different
things on defense this year.
Kwincy Ferguson
Volleyball
Kwincy is a quiet leader who al-
ways gives her absolute best in
practice and matches and is the ul-
timate team player. She quietly had
a solid and consistent performance
in our last six matches that were
played in a span of three days. The
team won four of those matches. In
those six game she spiked 56/63
(88%) with 21 kills, served 68/71
(96%) with 42 service points and 10
aces, and had 22 digs.
Sponsored by
Jackson County Title Company
and
Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543 • 605-837-2286
Tough on defense …Clint Stout #26 wraps up the offense for the
tackle and takes him down for a loss of yards.
Aggressive offense …
Chance Knutson #50 turns up the
field and moved the chains for the
Kougars. Kadoka will travel to
Philip next Thursday night for
their last game of the regular sea-
son.
Pass complete …from quarterback Lane Patterson to Logan Am-
mons #22.
A team works together …which was evident during the season. Gavin DeVries (L) #72, Lane Patter-
son #23, and Chance Knutson #50 block the Cowboys and open up the field for Chandlier Sudbeck #21.
--football photos by Robyn Jones
The Kadoka Cross Country
team competed at the Region 5B
meet in Philip on Wednesday, Octo-
ber 10.
Bobby Anderson placed 14th in
the boys’ varsity division with a
time of 20:01.
In the girls’ varsity division Vic-
toria Letellier finished 6th place
16:32; 7th place Shaley Herber
16:33; 8th place Scout Sudbeck
16:39; 15th place Marti Herber
17:37; and 23rd place Kwincy Fer-
guson 18:37.
The girls team placed second
with a total time of 49:44.
The Philip girls placed first with
a total time of 49:10.
The girls team and Anderson
will advance to the state meet
which will be held in Huron on Sat-
urday, October 20.
Cross country
runners headed
to state in Huron
Public Notices …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . . . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . . . . . .344-2500
All others call . . . . . . . . . .911
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Lana F. Sanftner,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 12-13
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NO-
TICE OF INFORMAL PROBATE AND
APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Notice is given that on 19th day of Sep-
tember, 2012 in Circuit Court of Jackson
County, South Dakota, BankWest, Inc.
Trust Department, whose address is 420
S. Pierre Street, Pierre, South Dakota
57501, was appointed as Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of Lana F. San-
ftner.
Creditors of Decedent must file their
claims within four (4) months after the
date of the first publication of this notice
or their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk of Courts with a copy of the claim
mailed to the Personal Representative.
Dated this 1st day of October, 2012.
/s/ Greg Litton
Greg Litton, Trust Officer
BankWest, Inc. Trust Department
420 S. Pierre Street
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 399-2265
Jessica L. Larson
Beardsley, Jensen & Von Wald,
Prof. L.L.C.
4200 Beach Dr., Ste. 3
P.O. Box 9579
Rapid City, SD 57709
Tel: (605) 721-2800
Fax: (605) 721-2800
Ms. Carol Schofield
Jackson County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 128
Kadoka, South Dakota 57543
1-605-837-2122
[Published October 11, 18, & 25, 2012]
)
)SS
)
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
September 20, 2012
CALL TO ORDER:
The West River Water Development Dis-
trict convened for their regular meeting at
the K Bar S Lodge in Keystone, SD.
Vice-Chairman Casey Krogman called
the meeting to order at 8:05 a.m. (MT).
Roll call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Krogman declared a quorum was pres-
ent. Directors present were: Casey Krog-
man (via teleconference), Marion Matt
and Veryl Prokop. Absent: Joseph Hieb
and Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake
Fitzgerald, Manager; Amy Kittelson, Of-
fice Manager for WR/LJ.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
None
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the agenda. Mo-
tion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the August 14, 2012,
meeting were previously mailed to the
Board for their review.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the August min-
utes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Marion Matt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77.71
Lyman County
Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69.56
Murdo Coyote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.71
Pennington County
Courant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.52
Pioneer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.41
Todd County
Tribune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.58
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the August Financial Report is on file
at the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the August Fi-
nancial Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his Sep-
tember report to the Board.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the Manager’s
Report. Motion carried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 8:15 A.M.
(CT).
Casey Krogman, Vice-Chairman
ATTEST:
Amy Kittelson,
Recording Secretary
[Published October 18, 2012 at the total
approximate cost of $32.83]
75th Annual Western Junior Livestock …was held in
Rapid City on October 10-13. Reed Ohrtman showed a Market Meat Type
Wether, Yearling Meat Type Ewe, and was in the Beginner Sheep Show-
manship. --courtesy photo
Unapproved Minutes
Kadoka City Council
REGULAR MEETING
OCTOBER 9, 2012
7:13 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:13 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert, Dick Stolley, Kieth
Prang and Colby Shuck. Members ab-
sent: Brad Jorgensen and Micki Word.
Others present: Patty Ulmen, Finance
Officer; Jackie Stilwell; Ronda Dennis;
Patrick Solon, JoBeth Uhlir; and Ben
Latham.
Approval of the minutes of the regular
meeting of August 13, 2012 was post-
poned pending consultation with the
South Dakota Municipal League.
Willert made Motion 12-10-09:98 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of September 10, 2012 and the special
meeting of September 24, 2012. The mo-
tion was seconded by Stolley, with all
members present voting yes and the mo-
tion carried 4-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
After review by all council members, Stol-
ley made Motion 12-10-09:99 to approve
the bills as submitted. The motion was
seconded by Willert. A roll call vote was
taken, with all members present voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
OCTOBER 9, 2012 MEETING
AFLAC, Monthly Premium 85.82; Delta
Dental, Monthly Premium 551.50; SD
Municipal League, Conference Registra-
tion/Willert 65.00; SD Retirement,
Monthly Contribution 2,109.44; Verizon
Wireless, Cell Phone 78.13; Bank West
Insurance, Annual Insurance Premium
32,923.00; Electro Watchman, Inc., Se-
curity System 80.85; Golden West, Tele-
phone/Cable 708.53; Heartland Paper,
Supplies 115.60; Hogen's Hardware,
Supplies/Repairs 455.59; Independent
Audit Services, Audit Fees 3,525.00;
John Deere Credit, Monthly
Payment/Front End Loader 2,023.03;
Kadoka Press, Publishing 288.36;
Kadoka Water Dept., Refund Meter De-
posit 32.20; Kartak, Clay, Refund Meter
Deposit 2.80; Moses Building Center,
Supplies 46.00; Northwest Pipe Fittings,
Supplies 872.39; Oien Implement, Sup-
plies 140.26; Pahlke, Alvin, Legal Serv-
ices 150.00; Peoples Market, Supplies
407.76; Pierre Landfill, Tipping Fees
1,046.40; SD Dept. of Health, Lab Sam-
ples 26.00; SD Lottery, Annual License
Renewal 100.00; SDSWMA, Annual
Dues 100.00; Servall, Laundry 241.61;
United States Postal Service, Postage
237.00; West Central Electric, Electricity
4,302.80; West River Excavation, Solid
Waste Transportation/Backhoe 1,223.80;
West River Lyman Jones, Water Pay-
ment 7,362.50; Chamberlain Wholesale,
Liquor Supplies 1,695.93; Coca Cola,
Liquor Supplies 79.50; Dakota Toms,
Liquor Supplies 49.68; Eagle Sales,
Liquor Supplies 9,640.70; Jerome Bev-
erage, Liquor Supplies 2,179.30; John-
son Western Wholesale, Liquor Supplies
3,996.94; Republic, Liquor Supplies
4,328.64; ACH Withdrawal for Taxes,
Federal Employment Taxes 3,702.36;
ACH Withdrawal for Dakota Care, Health
Insurance Premium 6,271.58; Total Bills
Presented: 91,246.00 .
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of September was distributed.
After a review of the information, Willert
made Motion 12-10-09:100 to approve
the financial report. The motion was sec-
onded by Stolley. A roll call vote was
taken, with all members present voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 9-30-12:
Revenue: General Fund - $64,128.94; 3
B’s Fund - $2,555.72; Street Fund -
$6.55; Liquor Fund - $31,031.57; Water
Fund - $17,964.81; Sewer Fund -
$3,106.43; Solid Waste Fund -
$4,091.21.
Expense: General Fund - $49,836.27;
3B’s Fund - $5,083.27; Street Fund -
$4,480.00; Liquor Fund - $32,513.07;
Water Fund - $13,172.51; Sewer Fund -
$721.99; Solid Waste Fund - $2,968.21.
Payroll: Administration - $2,997.02;
Streets - $2,397.87; Police - $2,576.94;
Auditorium/Parks - $2,332.80; Liquor -
$4,962.27; Water/Sewer – $2,734.66;
Solid Waste - $799.28; Group
Health/Dental - $6,823.08; Retirement -
$2,109.44; Social Security/Medicare -
$3,702.36.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$757,068.73; ATM Account - $2,882.40;
Certificates of Deposit - $775,152.04.
Citizen Input: No one was present to ad-
dress the council.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. Approve Plat/Steve Jeffords Property:
A plat was submitted for review for the
property owned by the Steve Jeffords es-
tate. After review of the document, Shuck
made Motion 12-10-09:101 to approve
the plat as submitted. The motion was
seconded by Prang. A roll call vote was
taken, with all members present voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
B. Building Permit/Mark Carlson: A build-
ing permit was submitted by Mark Carl-
son for approval. After review, Shuck
made Motion 12-10-09:102 to approve
the building permit as submitted. The
motion was seconded by Willert. A roll
call vote was taken, with all members
present voting yes and the motion car-
ried 4-0.
Moving Permit/Jeff Nemecek: A moving
permit was submitted by Jeff Nemecek
for approval. After review, Willert made
Motion 12-10-09:103 to approve the
moving permit as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Shuck. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members present vot-
ing yes and the motion carried 4-0.
C. West Plains Engineering, Inc.: In order
to proceed with the installation of the fire
alarm system in the auditorium, a series
of questions from the engineering firm re-
quired an answer. The council reviewed
the information, and their responses will
be forwarded to West Plains Engineer-
ing, Inc.
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: no report
B. Streets: no report
C. Solid Waste: no report
D. Liquor: The bar will sponsor 2 teams
for the pool league.
E. Auditorium/Park: no report
F. Public Safety: no report
G. Mayor’s Report: The audit for 2010
and 2011 will be ready for review and ap-
proval at the November meeting. The
meeting date for the November meeting
was discussed. That date is Veteran’s
Day; however, the council decided to
hold the meeting according to the regular
schedule. Therefore, the city council will
meet on Monday, November 12, 2012 at
7:00 p.m.
Willert made Motion 12-10-09:104 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Shuck, with all members present voting
yes and the meeting was adjourned at
8:07 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published October 18, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $72.46]
NOTICE
OF INTENT TO
MINE GRAVEL
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Highway Department, PO Box
594, Kadoka, SD 57543, will be conduct-
ing a gravel mining operation at NW4,
Section 29, T 43 N, R 38 W, Jackson
County, South Dakota. The general loca-
tion is four and one-half miles east and
three and one-quarter miles south of In-
terior, SD.
The operation is to begin November 1,
2012 and will be completed to include
final reclamation by November 1, 2022.
Proposed future use of the affected land
will consist of re-grading, replacing top-
soil and re-seeding to allow the area to
be returned to pasture land.
For additional information contact the
Jackson County Highway Department,
(605) 837–2410, or the S.D. Department
of Environment and Natural Resources,
Minerals and Mining Program, 523 East
Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501-3182
(605) 773–4201.
[Published October 18 & 25, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $20.27]
by Del Bartels
The 63rd annual West Central
Electric Cooperative meeting, held
in Philip, Wednesday, October 3,
was a warning of diminishing in-
come, an increasing need for more
power plants, an environmental
condemnation of coal-powered
plants and an awareness of peak
power requirements.
Approximately 250 guests and
West Central Electric personnel
gathered in the Philip Fine Arts
Building. The official business
meeting was followed by a roast
beef supper provided by the Philip
Volunteer Fire Department. The
evening’s entertainment was the
Jim Szana Trio jazz group.
Door prizes included beef certifi-
cates, small appliances and grand
prizes of a color television, a patio
barbecue and a tabletop barbecue.
During the meeting, the Philip
chapter of Family, Career and
Community Leaders of America
provided child care. The opening
prayer was given by Father Kevin
Achbach and the national anthem
was sung by the Philip High School
honor choir.
West Central Electric is a rural
cooperative serving members in
Haakon, Jackson, Jones, Lyman
and Stanley counties. The coopera-
tive maintains around 3,573 miles
of line in an area of more than
7,000 square miles, serving approx-
imately 3,660 members. The coop-
erative’s monthly newsletter,
“Cooperative Connections,” in-
cludes energy saving programs,
current events and issues about
the cooperative, along with local,
state and national news and infor-
mation. Almost 40 people are em-
ployed by West Central Electric.
West Central Electric officers
presented the projected future of
the cooperative. Chief Executive
Officer Steve Reed said, “One thing
about electricity, a warm winter is
not necessarily a good thing.” He
pointed out that less usage equated
into less sales, but with the same
operating costs and with increasing
peak requirements. The coopera-
tive is nine percent down from the
previous year, even with the hot
summer’s high air conditioner
needs.
“We believe this year’s weather
pattern is an anomaly,” said Reed.
After stressing that costs are going
up, he added, “Coal is all of a sud-
den the bad guy in the environmen-
tal debate,” even though almost 57
percent of the area’s electricity in
2011 came from coal operated
plants. Hydropower fulfilled 22
percent of the needs, renewables
(wind) nine percent, nuclear two
percent, natural gas half of a per-
cent, and purchases from other
areas was close to 10 percent.
Reed announced that the cus-
tomer billing due date will be on
the 20th of each month, to assist
with the cooperative’s own pay-
ment due dates. And, in 2013 a
three dollar charge increase will be
implemented. Customers who re-
quire less than 500 feet of hook-up
will not be charged, but for over
500 feet the cooperative member
will be charged an aid fee. Reed
said that it costs $12,000 to build a
1,500 foot hook-up.
One bright point, said Reed, was
that the TransCanada Keystone
XL Pipeline will, by far, be the co-
operative’s main customer. Trans-
Canada has already paid $9.5 mil-
lion for the cooperative to increase
its infrastructure.
Reed mentioned that the cooper-
ative’s two way automated commu-
nication computer program is
helping to control a stable output of
energy. Bar coding will help with
real-time inventory. Cell phone no-
tifications to members will also
save costs and efforts, especially
since landlines may be out during
a power outage.
Vic Simmons of Rushmore Elec-
tric presented an update for the
state’s electric cooperatives. He
said, in order to keep up with fu-
ture demand, more power plants
must be built relatively soon. The
cooperatives of South Dakota,
North Dakota, Montana and
Wyoming have a $2.9 billion con-
struction program. Costs are going
up, a great percentage being a di-
rect result of requirements under
the Clean Air Act.
Cooperatives must be able to pro-
vide the generation and transmis-
sion of electricity needed to meet
maximum usage at any given in-
stance. Demand side management,
also called load control, can be pos-
itively affected by individuals by
running major appliances in off-
peak times.
Customers/members are encour-
aged to help with electrical load
bearing by running major appli-
ances at night or in the times that
are not peak times for electrical
use. The cooperative, by using a
customer-requested connection sys-
tem, can temporarily turn off hot
water heaters if variable peak load
times require it.
63rd annual West Central Electric meeting
NOTICE OF
TAX SALE CERTIFICATE
TO: Wayne and Donna Randall
AND THE UNKNOWN EXECUTORS,
ADMINISTRATORS, DEVICEES AND
LEGATEES OF
TO: Dept. of the Treasury, Internal
Revenue Service
AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson
County is the lawful holder of a 2005 Tax
Sale Certificate, Number 71, purchased
by Jackson County at Kadoka, South
Dakota on the 18th day of December
2006, said real property described as fol-
lows:
Lots nineteen (19), twenty
(20), twenty-one (21),
twenty-two (22), twenty-three
(23), and twenty-four (24),
Block one (1), Town of Wan-
blee, Jackson County, South
Dakota
as shown by the plat recorded in the Of-
fice of the Register of Deeds of Jackson
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that the right of re-
demption will expire and a Tax Deed for
the above described property shall be is-
sued to Jackson County (60) sixty days
from the date of completed service of this
Notice unless the property is redeemed
as permitted by law.
Dated at Kadoka, South Dakota the 15th
day of October, 2012.
Cindy Willert,
Jackson County Treasurer
[Published October 18 & 25, 2012 at the
total approximate cost of $31.94]
Because of the drought this
growing season, soil sampling after
harvest becomes very important
this year says Ron Gelderman,
SDSU Soils Extension Specialist.
"Soil sampling should be part of
any nutrient management program
but is even more important after a
dry year with limited yields," Gel-
derman said. "For those fields that
were severely moisture stressed,
available nitrogen (N) carryover
may be higher than normal."
Gelderman says all growers
should take 2-foot soil samples
throughout their fields and have
them analyzed for nitrate-N; espe-
cially for those fields going into a
non-legume crop.
"If the rotation hasn't yet been
set, sample and analyze as if it will
be a non-legume crop. As the old
adage goes 'It is better to have it
and not need it, than to need it and
not have it.' The additional sam-
pling cost is inconsequential com-
pared to potential fertilizer savings
or yield gain," he said.
Gelderman says that past
drought years have shown higher
than average carryover levels. For
example, the average carryover ni-
trate-N level following corn, is
about 70 pounds per acre. In a dry
year, he says it would not be un-
usual to measure 100 to 120
pounds per acre of carryover N
after poor yields on some of these
moisture stressed fields.
"That is a difference of 30 to 50
pounds or about $18 to $30 an acre
in savings with today's N prices.
Some laboratories have been re-
porting average carryover nitrate-
N values of 20 pounds an acre
higher than average for this fall,"
he said.
However, Gelderman says this is
not always the case. Which is why
testing is a must this fall.
"One of our moisture-stressed
nitrogen rate trials on corn near
Beresford had near average carry-
over levels. In that case, if the
grower 'guessed' at carryover levels
of 30 pounds an acre more than av-
erage, yield might very well be 5 to
10 bushel an acre lower than would
be with the proper test and recom-
mendation. The point is we cannot
predict what the carryover levels
will be. Therefore, every field
should be tested."
Because of the fact that within
many fields there could be high
carryover N variability that may
reflect the high yield variability
due to differential soil moisture
within that field, Gelderman rec-
ommends zone sampling.
"A zone sampling program based
on yield zones may show some
large nitrogen fertilizer savings for
next year and will put the nitrogen
where it is needed and not oversup-
ply other areas of the field where it
is not," he said.
Given the poor yields in some
fields, there would be less phospho-
rus (P) and potassium (K) removed
with the grain as well. However,
Gelderman says measuring the
availability of carryover P and K is
more difficult than for nitrogen.
"The soil P and K test may have
increased slightly (due to less re-
moved with the lower yields) but
yield, tillage, residue removed,
soils, precipitation and tempera-
tures all can influence how much of
these nutrients become available
for next year's crop. It is best to fol-
low soil test guidelines for those
nutrients and not give a "credit" for
any unused nutrients."
In a dry fall, he says it is not un-
usual to find K tests even lower
than in a "normal" year. The reason
is that the lower rainfall after har-
vest has not moved the K from the
plant residue into the soil. Potas-
sium will move quite readily with
water while plant N and P are tied
up with organic compounds and
will depend on microbial decompo-
sition become they become avail-
able.
To learn more contact a SDSU
Extension agronomy field specialist
by calling your SDSU Extension
Regional Center. Contact informa-
tion can be found at iGrow.org.
Soil sampling after the drought
Giving new business owners a
solid start, or improving and up-
dating a plan for existing busi-
nesses is the goal of a new series of
classes offered by the SDSU Exten-
sion Community Development
team.
"Small businesses are vital to
our rural economy. We want our en-
trepreneurs and small businesses
to get comfortable doing business
planning because it can help en-
sure their long-term success," said
Peggy Schlechter SDSU Extension
Community Development Field
Specialist.
The Newell School H.O.P.E. Pro-
gram is partnering with the Newell
Horizons Group to host a five week
"Small Business Beginnings" work-
shop series beginning Monday, Oct.
22 at the Newell School at 501
Dartmouth Avenue in Newell, S.D.
Classes will be held from 6 p.m. to
9 p.m. every Monday through Nov.
19. A free meal will be offered to
participants prior to each class ses-
sion from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Workshops will cover the follow-
ing information:
Session #1: Determining Feasi-
bility and Conducting Market
Analysis
Session #2: Creating Your Busi-
ness & Marketing Plan
Session #3: Management Strate-
gies and Business Structure (in-
cludes taxes, licensing, etc.)
Session #4: Basics of Financial
Statements
Session #5: Financing Options
Throughout the classes, partici-
pants will be working on develop-
ing or updating a business plan for
themselves. A final draft of a busi-
ness plan is due at the end of the
class. All of the submitted plans are
confidential. SDSU Extension staff
will offer personalized comments
and tips on each plan.
To register for the Newell Small
Business Beginnings workshop se-
ries, contact Sabrina Harmon at
605-381-9136 or sabrina.har-
mon@k12.sd.us. For more informa-
tion, contact Peggy Schlechter,
SDSU Extension (605) 394-1722 or
peggy.schlechter@sdstate.edu.
Small business
beginnings classes
offered in Newell
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY inside
Major Retailer. Call for details: 866-
622-4591. Or email: franchiseoppor-
tunity@hotmail.com.
LOOMIX® FEED SUPPLEMENTS is
seeking dealers. Motivated individu-
als with cattle knowledge and com-
munity ties. Contact Bethany at
800-870-0356 /
becomeadealer@adm.com to find
out if there is a dealership opportu-
nity in your area.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
EMPLOYMENT
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competi-
tive wages, benefits, training, profit
sharing, opportunities for growth,
great culture and innovation. $1,500
Sign on Bonus available for Service
Technicians. To browse opportunities
go to www.rdoequipment.com. Must
apply online. EEO.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for Mechanic.
Good Benefits. Applications are
available at Courthouse in Bison, SD
or call 605-244-5629.
MATH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHER - Qualifications: Possess
valid SD Teaching Certificate for ap-
propriate level. Experience teaching
Native American children preferred.
Must pass background and drug
testing. Indian preference observed
& Lakota speaker preferred. Duties:
Maintain individual student records
as required including three forms of
assessment. Confer with parents as
needed for student concerns. Super-
vise meals, playground and early
morning duties as assigned. For a
complete job description contact Lisa
Bielawski, Principal at 605-823-4235.
JOIN OUR PLANKINTON CITY
CREW! FT maintenance position.
Electric, Streets, Water, Wastewater.
Competitive salary. Attractive benefit
package. In a growing progressive
community. For application contact
City Hall (605) 942-7767.
CHARLEY’S WELDING AND AUTO
Repair, part of Kennebec Telephone
Co., seeks full-time Mechanic. Excel-
lent pay/benefits! Submit resumes to
rodb@kennebect el ephone. com
<mailto:rodb@kennebectelephone.c
om>. Questions, call Rod or Matt,
605-869-2220.
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
MANAGER NEEDED for progres-
sive credit union. Excellent benefits
and salary. Resumes only submitted
to Box 69, Gregory, SD 57533.
EEOC.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applictions for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A
Driver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance preferred. For application
contact: Douglas County Auditor
(605) 724-2423.
WANTED: EXPERIENCE APPREN-
TICE or journeyman electrician. Ex-
cellent wages and benefits. LEC Inc,
Gettysburg. Call 800-568-4324 or
send resume to kevin@loganelec-
tric.biz.
FOR SALE
2008 35FT. NUWA HITCHHIKER 5th
wheel with 4 slides, top of line, used
very little. Central Vacuum,
washer/dryer, lots of storage. Call
605-845-3907.
2000 DUTCHSTAR 38FT. RV. Diesel
pusher 320 Cummins, stacker
washer & dryer, 2 slides, heated un-
dercarriage, driver side entry door,
38,000 mi. 605-461-9246.
HEALTH/BEAUTY
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal place-
ment of mesh for pelvic organ pro-
lapse or stress urinary incontinence
between 2005 and present time? If
the patch required removal due to
complications, you may be entitled to
compensation. Call Johnson Law
and speak with female staff mem-
bers 1-800-535-5727.
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
SEALED BIDS: CLARK COUNTY,
160 acres, cropland, waterway & old
bldg site, 3 miles N of Bradley, SD.
Bids due by November 2, 2012. Con-
tact Pro Realty, Pat Kisely, Broker,
(605)354-7653 or http://ProReal-
tySold.com.
LAKEFRONT BANK LOAN Liquida-
tion $29,900 lake property, 100’ clear
water shore; Glacial Lakes region NE
SD. Thousand Lakes Realty of Min-
nesota. 866-346-7006
www.1000LakesMN.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you TODAY! (25
WORDS FOR $150. EACH ADDI-
TIONAL WORD $5.) CALL THIS
NEWSPAPER 605-837-2259 OR
800-658-3697 FOR DETAILS.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
KADOKA PRESS
Call 605-837-2259
to start your
subscription
today!
Read when you want!
Where you want!
Catch up on the
local happenings,
any place or any
time with an
on-line edition
of the
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thank you to all the fire depart-
ments from the surrounding areas
and our neighbors and Peters Exca-
vation for their response to our fire.
Hogen Ranch
Stilwell Ranch
Mitchell Ranch
Werner Family
Thank You
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing .............................16-8
Rockers......................................14-10
Petersen’s ..................................14-10
Handrahan Const .....................13-11
Dakota Bar..................................9-15
Badland’s Auto............................6-18
Highlights:
Harvey Byrd..........................157/448
Bryan Buxcel.........................205/578
Jim Kujawa .........3-10 split; 201/562
Trina Brown..........................179/506
Arlene Kujawa.....4-10 split; 182/486
Andrew Reckling.........203 clean/545
Marlis Petersen.....2-9 split; 180/495
Maralynn Burns....................180/477
Matt Reckling..............195 clean/526
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt..................................6-2
Kennedy Imp.................................6-2
George’s Welding ..........................5-3
Kadoka Tree Serv .........................5-3
Philip Motor..................................4-4
Philip Health Serv........................3-5
G&A Trenching.............................2-6
Bear Auto ......................................1-7
Highlights:
Earl Park.......................258, 201/636
Alvin Pearson..............197 clean/579
Fred Foland3-10 split; 222 clean/552
Tony Gould ...................................520
Johnny Wilson.......................205/519
Cory Boyd.....................................514
Dakota Alfery........................215/506
Bill Bainbridge ...................3-10 split
Dan Addison............3-6 & 7-10 splits
Norm Buxcel .......................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................18-6
Cutting Edge...............................18-6
Invisibles.....................................16-8
Jolly Ranchers...........................11-13
State Farm Ins............................7-17
Highlights:
Dodi Weller....................188, 156/477
Sandra O’Connor ..................173/432
Donna King ...........159, 155, 148/462
Judy Papousek..............151, 148/437
Lila Whidby ..........................2-7 split
Marti Kjerstad....................5-10 split
Kay Kroetch.....................3-9-10 split
Karen Foland......................3-10 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar..................................16-8
Morrison’s Haying ................14.5-9.5
Chiefie’s Chicks...................13.5-10.5
Dorothy’s Catering....................13-11
First National Bank .................12-12
Hildebrand Concrete ..........10.5-13.5
Wall Food Center ......................10-14
Just Tammy’s........................6.5-17.5
Highlights:
Kalie Kjerstad.......................166/426
Val Schulz....................207 clean/484
Emily Kroetch..............................194
Shar Moses...................................185
Ashley Reckling ...........................175
Cindy VanderMay........................417
Brenda Grenz........................184/469
Sandee Gittings ...........................479
Debbie Gartner.....................5-7 split
Kathy Arthur......................3-10 split
Jessica Wagner...................3-10 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry...............................7-1
O’Connell Const ............................7-1
Dakota Bar....................................6-2
McDonnell Farms .........................4-4
West River Pioneer Tanks............4-4
WEE BADD...................................2-6
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................1-7
The Steakhouse ............................1-7
Highlights:
Jan Bielmaier........................248/668
John Heltzel .................................202
Matt Reckling .......................202/545
Jason Petersen......................209/604
Bryan Buxcel ......2-5-7 & 5-10 splits;
...............................................202/561
Jack Heinz.............................203/554
Jay McDonnell ......................203/543
Alvin Pearson...............................541
Nathan Kjerstad...................204/537
Brian Pearson.............3-10 split; 534
Wendell Buxcel ................5-7 split x2
Neal Petersen ................3-10 split x3
Mark Foland......................3-6-7 split
Tyler Hauk............................5-7 split
Alex Moos.......................3-10 split x2
Ron Coyle............................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................19-5
King Pins...............................14.5-9.5
Roy’s Repair ........................13.5-10.5
Randy’s Spray Service................13-7
Lee and the Ladies .....................8-12
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Duane Hand ................225 clean/608
Tanner Norman.....................212/530
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 205/573
Alvin Pearson...............................203
Cristi Ferguson....4-7-9 & 3-10 splits
John Heltzel ......................4-5-7 split
Deb Neville ...........................2-7 split
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Kadoka Ambulance
Service
NEEDS YOU!
EMT CLASSES STARTING
November 5.
For more information contact:
Jackie Stilwell - 605-488-0334
Dick Stolley - 605-837-2320
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢ each.
At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be ordered
at the Kadoka Press. Regular or self-
inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly newspa-
pers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just $150.00!
This newspaper can give you the
complete details. Call (605) 837-
2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
1st Anniversary of the SDSU
Extension Re-organization
We’re closing in on a year since
the re-organization of the SDSU
Extension Service, in which the
County Extension Educator Posi-
tions were eliminated. 4-H Advisors
took over the youth program at the
county level, and 8 Regional Exten-
sion Centers became the home base
for Extension Field Specialists cov-
ering a wide variety of topic areas.
This transition has yielded both
progress and pains. We encourage
you to continue to rely on SDSU
Extension for unbiased, research-
based information. If we can help,
contact the Winner Regional Exten-
sion Center at 605-842-1267.
Testing for Soybean
Cyst Nematode
Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is
the most damaging pest of soybean
in North America. While not yet
found in all soybean-producing
areas, soybean cyst nematodes are
hardy and will survive anywhere
soybeans are produced in South
Dakota as well as North Dakota
and northern Minnesota. SCN
often reduces average yields by as
much as fifty percent or more.
Soybean Cyst Nematodes have
been found in at least 20 counties
in eastern South Dakota and
throughout Minnesota and Iowa as
well as many other states. The Soy-
bean Cyst Nematode is a small,
plant-parasite round worm that
feeds in the roots of soybeans. Most
nematodes are too small to be seen
with the naked eye.
The first and most important
step in management of SCN is
identification. Soil sampling is a
means of determining both the
presence of the nematode as well as
its population levels. Fall sampling
allows adequate time to employ
SCN management techniques for
the following season, but sampling
at any time can be useful.
The SDSU Plant Diagnostic
Clinic offers SCN testing free of
charge for South Dakota growers,
funded by the South Dakota Soy-
bean Research and Promotion
Council. Soil Sample Information
Sheets and sample bags can be
picked up at the SDSU Plant Diag-
nostic Clinic. Copies may be made
of the information sheet, which can
be downloaded from: http://www.sd-
s t a t e . e d u / p s / p l a n t -
clinic/upload/SCN-Soil-Sampling-I
nfo-Sheet.pdf. Mailing information
can be found on the information
sheet.
For more information on SCN you
can go to
http://www.planthealth.info for an
updated “Soybean Cyst Nematode
Management Guide”. The guide is
provided by the North Central Soy-
bean Research Program (NCSRP)
and the Cooperative Extension
Service. You can also access fact
sheet 902-A, “Soybean Cyst Nema-
tode” at:
http://pubstorage.sdstate.edu/AgBi
o_Publications/articles/FS902A.pdf.
Good candidates for testing are
soybean fields that have had declin-
ing yields, stunted plants, plants
that are slow to canopy, become yel-
low in July or August, and show re-
duced vigor or mature earlier than
normal.
Sample fields at a depth of 0 to 6
inches with a soil probe, spade or
vehicle mounted probe. Key areas
in fields to sample are fence rows
where blowing soil may collect,
areas with a history of flooding,
field entry points, and low yielding
areas. Sampling can continue until
freeze up with hand equipment,
and all winter with hydraulic
probes. Collect 15-20 samples per
site, mix thoroughly and submit as
soon as possible, but do not use
heat to dry or grind.
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Annual Fabric Sale At
Badlands Quilting
Martin, SD • 605-685-1209
Over 2,000 bolts of fabic on SALE!
•Fabric on sale from 2.99 yard to 8.99 yard
•Hundreds of bolts priced at 2.99 & 3.29
It's wot your trip to se
te gals in Martin !
•Patterns, books, notions - all on sale.
EVERYTHING is on sale!
•Moda at 8.99 & less
•Daily door prizes
•Batiks at 8.99 & less
8 Big Days!
Oct. 26 - Nov. 3
OPEN EACH DAY:
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
•Fairy Frost at 8.99 & less
Agricul ture …
October 18, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL FEEDER & ALLBREEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS: 9 A.M.
CALVES: 10:30 A.M. MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 12,000 HEAD.
YEARLINGS: NI=NO IMPLANTS, HR=HOME RAISED
LONG 50 MOSTLY BLK SPAY HFRS.............................................................................725750#
SIMONS 550 BLK & BWF STRS......................................................................................700750#
JERDE 180 SCOTTISH HIGHLANDER STRS & OPEN HFRS ........................................700#
ADAMS 70 BLK & BWF STRS & OPEN HFRS ............................................................650750#
LONG 50 BLK & BWF STRS & SPAY HFRS..................................................................700750#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
RAPID CREEK RANCH 1100 RED ANG STRS; FS...................................................450600#
CUNY & SONS 950 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.............................................................400600#
WILCOX & RHODEN 400 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI................................................550650#
CARLEY RANCH 400 BLK CLVS; FS....................................................................................600#
L.KJERSTAD 400 FANCY BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................450550#
CREW CATTLE CO 400 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI,ASV.................................................500600#
MEEKS RANCH 350 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................................550#
C. KJERSTAD 350 BLK CLVS; NI...................................................................................450550#
FERGUSON 250 FANCY BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI................................................500600#
IWAN & SONS 250 BLK, BWF, & HERF CLVS............................................................450550#
EIDE 250 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................................................450550#
PATTERSON 220 CHAR X & A FEW BLK CLVS; FS................................................525625#
BACHAND 220 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI....................................................................500600#
MUNROE RANCH 200 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI ......................................................475575#
OLIC 180 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................................................................................500550#
DALY & DALY 180 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV WEANED 45 DAYS ......................................600#
GRUBL 150 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI, ALL HFRS IN TOWN.................................500550#
SCHELL RANCH 150 BLK STRS; FS.....................................................................................550#
MADER & MADER 140 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................450550#
COMPTON 135 BLK, HERF, & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI..............................................500525#
FREEMAN 130 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................................................550#
HARTY RANCH 120 BLK CLVS; FS,NI........................................................................500550#
KOCH 115 BLK & BWF CLVS; NI ..................................................................................500550#
NEUAHAUSER 110 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ............................................................500525#
WILCOX 105 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI........................................................................450550#
FANNING ANGUS 105 BLK CLVS; FS..................................................................................500#
DAVIS 100 BLK CLVS; FSNI,AN ....................................................................................500550#
KILNESS RANCH 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................450500#
LINN BROTHERS 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI .............................................................................600#
RICHARDS 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI,AN..................................................................................500#
GROPPER & GROPPER 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................500550#
ISKE 100 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................550600#
PRANG 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.........................................................................................500600#
BITTING 85 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................................................450550#
THOMSEN 85 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................................................400500#
GRUBL 80 CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................................450550#
O’ROURKE 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...................................................................................500575#
HARTSHORN 80 BLK CLVS; FS,NI...............................................................................400500#
DENKE & DENKE 75 BLK STRS; FS,NI .......................................................................550570#
WILLIAMS 75 BLK & BWF STRS; FS............................................................................500525#
DOOLITTLE 75 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.................................................................................550600#
VANDENBOS 75 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................................................400500#
CHORD 75 BLK & HERF CLVS; FS,NI..................................................................................500#
MCKAY 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI............................................................................450550#
SCHLECT 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................................450500#
SAMMONS 70 RED CLVS; FS .........................................................................................500550#
STRATMAN 50 BLK & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................................500#
WILLIAMS 40 BLK STRS; FS ..........................................................................................500550#
HENRY 40 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...........................................................................................500600#
ADDISON 40 BLK & RED CLVS; FS..............................................................................450500#
VOLMER 30 BLK & RED CLVS; FS................................................................................500600#
ARMENT 30 BLK CLVS; FS .............................................................................................500600#
CHAMBERLAIN 25 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI....................................................................600#
BECKWITH 20 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ..................................................................................500600#
HAMANN 25 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................................................600#
OPSTEDAHL 10 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................................500550#
FRINK 9 BLK CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................................................500#
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2012: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGU
LAR CATTLE SALE. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
STOCK COWS:
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS 60 BLK & BWF MOSTLY BROKEN MOUTH COWS;
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors, with
questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
BRED:BLK & HERF; CLV:31
CHUCK VANSICKILE 32 HERF BROKEN MOUTH COWS; BRED:HERF; CLV:31 FOR
60 DAYS
KEITH PERLI 20 BLK MIXED AGE COWS; BRED:BLK; CLV:31 FOR 60 DAYS
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALEATTACHED
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALEATTACHED
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6
WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PASTEURELLA, 7WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
& THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2: NO SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. Jt, 2DJ2
Vc soíd lU,l9b Icud ]o) ou) spccíuí ]ccdc) suíc Tucsduu,
OctoIc) lbtI. Vc Iud tIc Iíggcst c)oud o] Iuuc)s tIut
uc'uc sccn tIís ]uíí. Munu ncu Iuuc)s ín tIc c)oud. Huns
uííí stuu Iíg. l2,UUU cuttíc Ic)c ncxt Tucsduu.
CALVES:
TED & LUCILLE BERNDT - EAGLE BUTTE
119 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 500=........$183.00
78 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 432=........$194.75
92 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 555=........$172.00
A CONSIGNMENT -
113 .......................................Dll Sirs 496=........$186.00
138..........................................Dll Sirs 437=........$194.50
58 ...........................................Dll Sirs 367=........$221.75
ANDERS RANCH - ELM SPRINGS
120 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 499=........$181.00
119 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 429=........$193.00
64 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 438=........$191.50
31 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 329=........$217.00
220...............................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 456=........$164.50
77.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 383=........$170.75
FOLAND RANCH - PHILIP
110 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 506=........$179.00
137 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 450=........$187.50
29 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 380=........$205.50
DIAMOND S RANCH - UNION CENTER
92 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 551=........$173.25
94 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 518=........$172.75
136 ...............................Fcd & Dll Sirs 468=........$180.50
66 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 420=........$195.50
108...............................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 474=........$155.00
JOHN & SAMANTHA ADDISON - MIDLAND....
31 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 465=........$181.00
21 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 355=........$212.00
41.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 412=........$169.00
15.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 355=........$162.00
GUNN & CASPERS - WASTA
100 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 555=........$173.00
110 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 479=........$179.50
27.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 476=........$157.00
17.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 415=........$158.00
HOVLAND HEREFORDS - MILESVILLE
34...........................................Dwf Sirs 521=........$175.00
14 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 429=........$192.00
41...........................................Dwf Hfrs 495=........$157.25
DENNIS & MIKE SIELER - QUINN
56 ...........................................Dll Sirs 511=........$176.00
11 ...........................................Dll Sirs 436=........$192.00
DAVID & RON FEES - MUD BUTTE
82 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 527=........$172.00
22 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 411=........$198.00
56.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 488=........$155.25
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 384=........$166.50
JIM & JOAN CANTRELL - PHILIP
48 ...........................................Dll Sirs 536=........$171.50
13 ...........................................Dll Sirs 421=........$192.00
40 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 479=........$156.50
11 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 413=........$162.50
RIATA HILLS LLC - QUINN
111 .........................................Dll Hfrs 470=........$162.00
DUSTIN LUR2 - PHILIP
29 ...........................................Dll Sirs 517=........$173.00
10 ...........................................Dll Sirs 441=........$186.00
10.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 395=........$166.00
WES & DUSTIN REEVES - OWANKA
105 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 539=........$173.75
LUCY & EDIE KNIGHT - DUPREE
21 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 529=........$173.25
21 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 449=........$184.00
10 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 385=........$207.25
13 ...........................................Dll Sirs 316=........$215.50
23.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 423=........$164.00
JOHN BRENNAN - MUD BUTTE
97 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 537=........$170.50
47 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 467=........$180.50
56 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 465=........$159.50
JIM WILLUWEIT RANCH - CREIGHTON
58.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 441=........$184.50
42..........................................Hcrf Sirs 410=........$179.50
22.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 355=........$208.00
34 ................................Fwf & Dwf Hfrs 391=........$153.00
22 ................................Fwf & Dwf Hfrs 342=........$164.00
WILSON BROTHERS - ELM SPRINGS
88 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 496=........$172.00
25 ...........................................Dll Sirs 399=........$196.00
27.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 429=........$166.25
50.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 444=........$161.25
13 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 367=........$169.50
ANDREW SCHOFIELD - BELVIDERE
54 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 517=........$171.00
24 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 445=........$185.00
11 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 380=........$212.00
12................................Fwf & Hcrf Sirs 491=........$167.00
54.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 481=........$164.00
12.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 385=........$175.00
BILL & LORI KELLY - QUINN
22 ...........................................Dll Sirs 518=........$174.00
10 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 509=........$153.75
PHILIP KRUSE - SCENIC
50 ...........................................Dll Sirs 477=........$178.50
38 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 379=........$214.00
11 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 352=........$172.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
88 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 561..........$166.00
42 ...........................................Dll Sirs 485..........$172.75
MARK WILLIAMS - KADOKA
83.........................................CIar Hfrs 636=........$150.00
97.........................................CIar Hfrs 551=........$157.75
ROBERT R. YOUNG SR. & FAMILY - UNION CENTER
65 .........................................CIar Sirs 670=........$160.25
12...........................................Dwf Sirs 532=........$173.00
78.........................................CIar Hfrs 622=........$148.00
28...........................................Dwf Hfrs 571=........$154.00
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
168 .......................................CIar Sirs 660=........$159.75
84 .........................................CIar Sirs 674=........$158.50
98 .........................................CIar Sirs 576..........$166.50
80.........................................CIar Hfrs 668=........$146.75
91.........................................CIar Hfrs 586=........$150.50
184.......................................CIar Hfrs 599=........$150.75
CASTEEL & LEVINE - HEREFORD
65 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 550=........$168.75
42 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 437=........$191.00
67.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 527=........$159.00
50.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 428=........$162.75
MERLE HICKS - MARTIN
87 ...........................................Dll Sirs 630=........$158.75
85...........................................Fcd Sirs 645=........$159.75
93 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 538=........$172.50
10 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 437=........$181.00
LYNN SMITH - NEW UNDERWOOD
87 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 552=........$167.50
31 ...........................................Dll Sirs 433=........$181.50
60 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 456=........$159.25
DAN WICKS & FAMILY - RED OWL
34 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 575=........$165.50
61 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 451=........$184.25
29.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 481=........$156.25
GARY HERRINGTON - HERMOSA
35 ...........................................Dll Sirs 641=........$158.75
31 ...........................................Dll Sirs 547=........$166.75
28 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 529=........$152.50
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
61 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 575=........$165.25
23 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 482=........$169.00
GERALD, SHARLA & JAKE JULSON - QUINN
90 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 495=........$177.75
48 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 397=........$206.50
17 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 411=........$161.00
CHARLES KRUSE - INTERIOR
34 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 485=........$173.50
26 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 391=........$195.50
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 394=........$163.50
LEE IKE NEVILLE - MILESVILLE
23 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 512=........$170.50
11 ...........................................Dll Sirs 398=........$204.50
17 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 492=........$151.00
ETTIE MAE WHIRLWIND HORSE - INTERIOR
20 ...........................................Dll Sirs 531=........$170.00
13 ...........................................Dll Sirs 448=........$178.00
36 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 518=........$152.00
11.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 445=........$155.00
JOHN NAESCHER - WALL
24 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 509=........$168.00
16.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 415=........$194.00
22 ................................Fwf & Dwf Hfrs 486=........$150.00
11...........................................Dwf Hfrs 390=........$162.00
COY FISHER - SCENIC
57 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 581=........$166.75
16 ...........................................Dll Sirs 472=........$178.00
35.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 531=........$155.00
16.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 431=........$160.00
LONNY & LARRY JOHNSTON - BELVIDERE
88........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Sirs 496=........$166.75
45........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Sirs 396=........$186.25
67 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 478=........$156.75
3 .........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 376=........$157.00
MIKE COOPER - STURGIS
73 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 486=........$166.00
42 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 381=........$187.00
18.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 437=........$171.00
15 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 282=........$201.00
55.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 461=........$154.00
50.................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 375=........$169.00
MARVIN WILLIAMS - OWANKA
37 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 574=........$165.00
23 ...........................................Dll Sirs 463=........$183.25
32 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 570=........$148.25
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 440=........$156.00
BONITA HARRIS - CUSTER
14 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 592=........$163.50
11.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 535=........$152.00
DENNIS & GWEN 2ELFER - SCENIC
67.................................Fwf & Dwf Sirs 490=........$165.00
24...........................................Dwf Hfrs 506=........$156.00
KEVIN & CRAIG REINDL - CUSTER
22 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 640=........$160.00
11 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 619=........$160.00
19.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 557=........$156.25
13 ...............................CIar & Dll Hfrs 635=........$146.25
RUTH & ISAACS - FAITH
9 .............................................Dll Sirs 583=........$158.00
5 .............................................Dll Sirs 458=........$174.00
8 .............................................Dll Sirs 324=........$197.00
28 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 547=........$148.00
14 ...........................................Dll Hfrs 423=........$158.00
DEDIC TRUST - NEW UNDERWOOD
25..........................................Hcrf Sirs 566=........$158.00
JOEL DEERING - WASTA
93 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 576=........$163.75
45 ...............................CIar & Dll Sirs 443=........$189.00
55.........................................CIar Hfrs 500=........$160.75
STEVE & NICK HOBART - HILL CITY
9 ...................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 625=........$163.00
24.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 552=........$154.25
BRYAN CUNY - ALLEN
50 ...........................................Dll Sirs 577=........$161.50
44 .................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 482=........$171.00
22.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 456=........$167.00
BRIAN & HEATHER HANSON - PHILIP
16 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 629=........$155.00
5 ...................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 477=........$175.00
12.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 604=........$143.50
7...................................Fcd & Dll Hfrs 434=........$156.00
TUCKER AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
31........................Dll, Fcd & CIar Sirs 541=........$160.00
27 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 499=........$153.50
WILSON & MCGRIFF - QUINN
6 .............................................Dll Sirs 522=........$174.75
10 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 496=........$153.00
19 .......................Dll, Fcd & CIar Hfrs 414=........$160.00
BESSETTE RANCH - SCENIC
6 ...................................Fcd & Dll Sirs 512=........$152.00
10.................................Dll & Dwf Hfrs 463=........$151.50
YEARLINGS:
FAIRBANKS RANCH - WHITE RIVER
140 ...............................Dll & Dwf Sirs 783=........$153.25
BERNARD NESS - CAPUTA
81 .................................Dll & Dwf Sirs 725=........$152.25
19 ...........................................Dll Sirs 656=........$151.50
TOM & SHELIA TRASK - WASTA
60 ..................................Dll Opcn Hfrs 743=........$143.75
40 ..................................Dll Opcn Hfrs 689=........$144.50
LARRY & JOHN DOLE2AL - BELVIDERE
31........................Dll & Dwf Opcn Hfrs 772=........$137.00
ARTHUR MCILRAVY - PHILIP
50 .....................CIar & Fcd Opcn Hfrs 792=........$136.50
MIKE O'DEA - MIDLAND
35........................Dll & Dwf Opcn Hfrs 808=........$136.25
TIM & DENISE NELSON - MIDLAND
25 ..................................Dll Opcn Hfrs 782=........$135.00
JAMES BUCHANAN - RAPID CITY
22 ...........................................Dll Sirs 1048=......$128.50
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 24, 31, & NOV. 7.
Email us at:
press@
kadokatelco.com
Use the Nutrition Facts
Label to Eat Healthier
You can help your family eat bet-
ter and balance their energy by
learning to choose lower calorie,
lower fat alternatives to some of
their favorite foods. Use the Nutri-
tion Facts label found on food
packages to make smarter food
choices.
Food labels provide an abun-
dance of information on how a food
product contributes to the daily
diet. Take advantage of all the nu-
trition information available to
make informed food choices. Read-
ing the food label is the only way
to know for sure what you’re eat-
ing. The more familiar you are
with the information, the more
you’ll want to frequently use it to
ensure you’re eating a healthy, bal-
anced diet. Use the label when you
shop, as you plan your meals, and
as you cook each day.
The Nutrition Facts Label infor-
mation will tell you the serving
size and how many servings you
are actually consuming. If you
double the servings you eat, you
double the calories and nutrients.
The average person needs about
2,000 calories daily to have enough
energy for the day and extra calo-
ries are usually stored as fat.
Know how many calories you need
to eat daily by going using the
USDA’s MyPlate found at
www.choosemyplate.gov. A calorie
is a unit of energy, and different
foods contain different amounts of
calories. The Nutrition Facts Label
shows the number of calories per
serving and the calories from fat in
each serving.
To help you reduce your risk of
heart disease, use the label to se-
lect foods that are lowest in satu-
rated fat, trans fat and cholesterol.
Limit sodium to help reduce your
risk of high blood pressure. Limit
foods with added sugars. They add
calories but not nutrients, such as
vitamins and minerals.
Healthy food sources include
fruits, vegetables, whole grains
and beans can reduce the risk of
heart disease and improve diges-
tive functioning. Strive for a diet
that also includes lean meats,
poultry, fish, beans, and nuts.
If a food is made with more than
one ingredient, then the food man-
ufacturer is required to have an in-
gredients list on the label. This
shows what’s in the food. All ingre-
dients are listed in order of weight
or concentration, with the largest
amount listed first and the small-
est amount listed last.
By reading food labels, you’ll
have the information you need to
make wise, healthy food choices to
live longer, healthier lives. Obtain
heart-smart shopping and healthy
diet goals information courtesy of
the American Heart Association at
http://bit.ly/9I47gq.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Ruland Arena LLC, held their
first Black Hills Roping Club team
roping series for 2012 - 2013 on Oc-
tober 13.
There was a total of 380 teams.
•Open Incentive Roping : 73
teams. First Go Winners: Tyrell
Moody/Levi Lord - 5.29. Second Go
Winners: Jake Nelson/Dan Nelson
- 5.57. Average Winners: First -
Levi Lord/Shaun Ruland - 27.30,
Second - Tyrell Moody/Levi Lord -
27.50, Third - Tim Nelson/Dalton
Richter - 29.00, Fourth - Shaun Ru-
land/Rory Brown - 29.30, Fifth -
Tyrell Moody/Paul Griemsman -
32.49, Sixth - Wyatt Treeby/Rowdy
Curr - 35.16.
•Number 9 roping: 71 teams.
First Go Winners: Wyatt
Treeby/Brett Wilcox - 5.44. Second
Go Winners: Tye Hale/ Dalton
Richter - 5.00. Average Winners:
First - Tel Schaack/Clint Hupty -
21.54, Second - Levi Hapney/Dan
Nelson - 22.11, Third - Tel
Schaack/Levi Lord - 22.14, Fourth
- Wyatt Treeby/Bret Wilcox - 23.26,
Fifth - Troy Richter/Ora Taton -
23.38, Sixth - Troy Richter/Melvin
Arneson - 23.99.
•Number 5 Roping: 115 teams.
First Go Winners: Ty Hicks/Jess
Harris - 6.31. Second Go Winners:
Hanna Brown/Tel Schaack - 7.04.
Average Winners: First - Dewey
Ertz/Ross McPherson - 28.79, Sec-
ond - Hanna Brown/Daine Mc-
Nenny - 29.90, Third - Ty
Hicks/Jess Harris - 35.04, Fourth -
Troy Richter/Rowdy Curr - 35.23,
Dewey Ertz/Bryce Sigman - 35.79,
Sixth - Dewey Ertz/Bob Rose -
40.02.
•Drawpot Incentive Roping: 121
teams. First Go Winners: Tyrel
Moody/Daine McNenny - 5.28. Sec-
ond Go Winners: Tyrel
Moody/Daine McNenny - 5.71. Av-
erage Winners: First - Tim Nel-
son/Glen King - 17.07, Second -
Levi Lord/Ora Taton - 20.03, Third
- Larry Ruland/Ora Taton - 21.97,
Fourth - Melvin Arneson/ Carson
Musick - 25.85, Fifth - Jim
Selchert/Bryan Jones - 26.26, Sixth
- Troy Richter/Rory Brown - 26.30.
Arena holds
first roping
of season
South Dakota received good
news about personal income in the
state.
First, the United States Depart-
ment of Commerce, Bureau of Eco-
nomic Analysis (BEA) has
announced that South Dakota
leads the nation in income growth.
South Dakota’s total and per capita
personal incomes rose faster than
any state in the nation from 2010
to 2011, going up 12.8 percent and
11.8 percent, respectively.
“These numbers confirm the re-
siliency and growth of our state’s
economy,” said Pat Costello, com-
missioner, Governor’s Office of Eco-
nomic Development. “All South
Dakota industries experienced in-
come growth from 2010 to 2011.”
The state also received good
news from a two-year wage study
produced by the GOED that
showed when adjusted for payroll
taxes and cost of living, occupa-
tional wages in South Dakota, on
average, rank 26th nationally. The
study was based on data from the
U.S. Department of Labor.
“The results of this study prove
what many of us have known for
years: You don’t have to sacrifice
your earning power to live, work
and play in the greatest state in
the nation,” Costello said. “The
long-standing belief that South
Dakota is a low-wage state is mis-
leading. We as a state can and do
compete in offering jobs that pay
living wages.”
In addition to the GOED study,
the BEA report included analyses
of personal income, using varying
methodologies. In that study, South
Dakota ranked 50th in average
wages and salaries for employees.
When all personal income is in-
cluded, such as that of self-em-
ployed farmers and small business
owners, South Dakota’s ranking in-
creases to 37th.
“There are a variety of method-
ologies that generate different re-
sults, but the overall message is
clear,” said Costello. “South
Dakota’s economy continues to out-
perform many other states, and our
economic foundation of agriculture
and small business is leading the
way.”
An executive summary of the
wage study and all the data tables
are currently available on the
GOED website www.sdready-
towork in pdf form. An online
searchable database is in develop-
ment that will allow people to
search the data by state and occu-
pation.
South Dakota incomes are on the rise

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