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Kadoka Press, October 11, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 13
October 11, 2012
~ by Robyn Jones ~
~ by Robyn Jones ~
October is
National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
The Kadoka American Legion
Auxiliary is once again asking the
community to help make Christ-
mas extra special for those at the
Veterans Administration Hospital
in Hot Springs.
Each year auxiliary members
reach out to help supply Christmas
gifts for the veterans. You don’t
have to be a member of the auxil-
iary to help.
Veterans will be able to do their
Christmas shopping for family
members at their convenience
without leaving the hospital gift
shop. They may also pick out a gift
for themselves.
Please remember, do NOT give
used items -- this is Christmas.
Some gift ideas for adults in-
clude sweaters, shirts, hoodies,
socks and slippers, sweat pants
and shirts, hats and gloves and
body care kits.
Towel sets make nice gifts for
families, as well as picture albums
and games.
Children will enjoy receiving
hand-held and board games, toys,
puzzles, clothing and hats.
Gifts may be dropped off at the
Jackson County Library anytime
before Saturday, October 20.
Christmas
for the
veterans
six-plus characteristics for each.
Students also scored on how well
they could identify the range sites,
determine the pasture quality and
make the proper recommendations
to improve that quality.
Also receiving bronze medals
were Myles Addison placing 11th,
Kenar VanderMay 12th, Steven
Kiewel 14th and rounding out the
team was Rebekkah Kary placing
17th, Logan Ammons 19th and
Kwincy Ferguson 20th.
Congratulations to all the stu-
dents who competed last Wednes-
day, your hard work and time spent
studying paid off. Mark Williams,
Veryl Prokop and Merle Stilwell
were kind enough to let the stu-
dents practice for the competition
on their land, which made all the
difference.
“It is a great privilege to go to
nationals and represent our home
town FFA team,” commented Aage
Ceplecha.
--by Kate Rasmussen
Four members of the Kadoka
FFA Range Judging team will be
attending the National Range
Judging competition in Oklahoma
in the spring of 2013.
Ten Kadoka FFA team members
competed at the annual West River
Land and Range Judging competi-
tion Wednesdsay, September 26,
which was a perfect, sunny day.
Four students received the highest
scores on the winning team, quali-
fying them for nationals; Clint
Stout was in the gold with 3rd
place, Kate Rasmussen in the sil-
ver with 5th place, Aage Ceplecha
in the silver with 8th place and Jed
Brown in the bronze with 10th
place. Competing against towns
from as far away as Harding
County, Kadoka won the event by
one point out of two thousand with
Philip placing a close second.
Brandy Knutson acted as advi-
sor to this FFA group. Studies re-
quired for competition included the
knowledge of over 100 plants and
Four FFA members earn spots
at national judging in Oklahoma
FFA judging …After competing in the West River Land and Range
Judging competition four members have secured a spot to advance to
Oklahoma next year. Making the national team was Clint Stout, Kate
Rasmussen, Aage Ceplecha and Jed Brown. Pictured above back row (L-
R): Clint Stout, Steven Kiewel, Myles Addison and Kenar VanderMay.
Front row: Jed Brown, Rebekkah Kary, Kate Rasmussen and Logan Am-
mons. Not pictured: Kwincy Ferguson and Aage Ceplecha.
--photo by Ronda Dennis
Fall Decorations
Stevie & Cam Uhlir’s
Fall Greetings
on the
Doorstep
Lisa & Dale Christensen’s
The Jackson County Commis-
sioners met on Monday, October 1
at 9 a.m. Commissioners Jim Stil-
well, Glen Bennett, Ronnie Twiss
and Larry Denke were in atten-
dance. Delores Bonenberger was
absent. Also attending was Larry
Johnston, who will be seated on the
commission board in January.
County Auditor Vicki Wilson
presented the financial statement,
although with the meeting being
held on first of the month, final
monthly balances were not com-
plete.
A notice of hospitalization was
received from Rapid City Regional
for estimated patient costs of
$60,000. The notice was reviewed,
but required no action.
A mental illness billing for eval-
uation was denied to Carol Butz-
man Counseling in the amount of
$84.86.
Wilson stated that 911 disperse-
ment from the state was received
in the amount of $1,300 or $1,400.
Wilson stated that she would not
forward it to Pennington County
until they (Pennington County) re-
quest it.
Commissioner Denke inquired
about the commercial drivers li-
cense (CDL) test and if the county
needed to provide a truck to take
the test. Wilson said that either
you can provide a truck for the test
or rent one. The county is unable to
use any county trucks because they
(the trucks) would not pass inspec-
tion.
Sherriff Ray Clements Jr. met
with the commissioners and said
that Deputy Sheriff Dallas
Kendrick is doing well in the posi-
tion.
Clements stated that they had
received a request for assistance
with a matter from the Oglala
Sioux Tribe Police Department.
Since the location of the call was
close to where Paul Williams lives,
he requested that Williams re-
spond to help.
Discussion was held on running
blue emergency lights. Clements
said that with blue lights, the
driver is requesting the right-of-
way, but does not have the right to
exceed the speed limit or not stop
at stop signs.
The commissioners entered in to
executive session for personnel
matters at 9:27 a.m. with Johnston
present. When returning to open
session at 10:15, no action was
taken.
Wilson stated that there will be
a mandatory meeting concerning
the upcoming election that her and
Deputy Auditor Kerri Enders
needed to attend. With both em-
ployees gone, there would be no one
in the office. Motion carried to offer
Verda Anderson $8.00 per hour to
work in the auditor’s office for this
day.
John Siedschlaw addressed the
commissioners, requesting ap-
proval of organizing a volunteer
fire and rescue department in Wan-
blee.
Siedschlaw stated that there are
23 members, officers have been
elected, and with county approval,
they could then submit their by-
laws as a final step. Once approved
the volunteer members would at-
tend training and the department
would become certified.
Twiss said that the other local
volunteer fire departments had
stated they were in favor of the ad-
ditional fire department, and the
other departments are quite a few
miles away.
Motion carried to support and
approve Wanblee Volunteer Fire
Department and Rescue.
At 11:00 a.m. a public auction
was held where three parcels of
land were offered. Lots 17 and 18
of block 8 in Belvidere were sold to
Wallace Wells in the amount of
$300. Lot 10 of block 3 in Wanblee
were sold to Ed Bettelyoun in the
amount of $35.00. Ed Bettelyoun
also purchased lots 12 and 13 of
block 3 in Wanblee for $35.
A hearing was held for the addi-
tion of a road to the county high-
way department. The request was
submitted by Jeff Willert for three-
quarters of a mile of road which
will lead to his residence. Willert
stated that he was mainly con-
cerned with snow removal and
ditches being mowed.
Willert noted that part of the
road would need built up, two or
three culverts would be needed and
he had two cattle gaurds to install.
Bennett stated that since he has
came on the board he was not in
favor of adding any more roads to
the system.
Johnston stated that he was in
favor of adding the road so in case
there was an emergency, the emer-
gency vehicles could get to the
house.
Motion carried to add the road to
the highway system, with Bennett
casting a no vote.
Denke stated that the road de-
partment is terribly behind with
maintenance, and was not really
wanting to add more miles to the
system, but did not want to deprive
anyone either.
Veryl Prokop addressed the com-
missioners concerning the road CS
29 which leads to the former Otto
Prokop home, south of Kadoka
along SD Highway 73.
Although no one is living there
currently, several people use that
road to gain access to the adjoining
land and Veryl Prokop has cattle
there.
The river has cut the banks
away and is now at the edge of the
road. The width of the road is nar-
row and accessing the place with
pickup and horse trailer is getting
difficult.
Craig Coller with West River Ex-
cavation presented a plan to move
the road in the amount of $24,999.
The commissioners agreed to
enter in to a contract with West
River Excavation for the road con-
struction and if culverts are needed
for the project, the county agreed to
provide them.
In addition to moving the road,
a section of the electrical line will
also need to be relocated. It was
questioned whether West Central
Electric would charge for this and
who would be responsible for those
charges. If the road is left where it
is, the pole is near the edge of the
bank. More information will need
to be gathered to determine the re-
sponsible party.
Aaron Richardson, who is serv-
ing as highway superintendent on
an intern basis, stated that the
screener that has been rented from
Morris, Inc. is at the Sharp pit and
the gravel is not good.
Richardson stated that renting
the screener and trying to do it
themselves has been hard. He said
that they are short employees and
in order to do it, they are handling
the gravel three times and do not
have the equipment to do it right.
Following discussion, the com-
missioners requested Richardson
to contact Morris Inc. to come and
get the screener and contact West-
ern Construction to see if they
would be interested in screening
and crushing gravel at the current
bid amounts.
The commissioners entered into
executive session at 2:07 p.m. for
personnel matters with Johnston
present and Richardson present for
a portion of it. They returned to
open session at 2:43.
Motion carried to accept the res-
ignation of Chase Olney from the
highway department.
Continued on page 4
County approves Wanblee volunteer
fire department, delays library building
A public meeting was held Mon-
day, October 8 at the Kadoka
School Great Hall to discuss the po-
tential building project of a new
gymnasium.
Superintendent Jamie Hermann
addressed those in attendance stat-
ing that the building committee
has meet and examined to see if
there is a need for another gym fa-
cility and is it financially possible.
“The need is definitely there,”
said Hermann referring to the
amount of hours that the current
auditorium is used.
PE classes, girls and boys bas-
ketball practice for grades fifth
through twelfth, games, tourna-
ments and community events fill
up the auditorium.
“For everyone to have gym
space, practices for the younger
students start at 6 a.m., which
makes for a long day,” stated Her-
mann, “especially if the students
live in the country and have to
travel to school.”
Currently within the school
budget a fund is established for
capital outlay project that has a
balance of $488,000.
The school also received funds in
a settlement agreement to repair
the Great Hall. After the repairs
are finished there will be approxi-
mately $175,000 that could used
for this project.
Total cost of the project is un-
known at this time. The options
that the facility could offer (class-
rooms, offices, weight room, walk-
ing track, kitchen, etc.) will
determine the final price.
A standard gym would consist of
approximately 10,000 square feet
and gym with a mezzanine would
be closer to 15,000 square feet.
Cost projections range from
$138 per square foot with no design
cost and $158 per square foot with
all costs included. A construction
company roughly estimates that
the total project would cost from
1.5 to 2.7 million, while an engi-
neering firm estimates costs rang-
ing from 1.05 to 2.5 million.
With the cost exceeding the fund
amount available, grants, dona-
tions and fundraising will also be
pursued.
“The South Dakota Legislators
set the levy amounts,” said Her-
mann, “and at this time there is no
need to raise taxes to accomplish
this project.”
The main obstacle of the project
is location. Several locations are
being considered, but where it is
built, also determines the use. If it
is close to the school the possibility
of use during school hours increase.
But for this size of building, quite a
bit of space is needed.
Time frame from the start of
construction, to a finished building
would be approximately nine
months.
Several people in attendance
voiced support for the new facility
and noted that the need is great, it
has been a need for many years,
and current interest rates are low.
Hermann stated that the next
step in moving forward would be to
developed a committee, and asked
if anyone is interested in serving on
the committee to please indicate so.
Once the committee is established,
comments from the meeting will be
reviewed and proceeding to the de-
sign phase will occur.
School hosts meeting
for new gym proposal
News Briefs
on
page 2
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
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Church Page …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
Support
Breast
Cancer
Awareness
“Wear Pink”
to all
sporting
events in
October!
For
Sale:
Newsprint
End Rolls
$5.00 each
Great for craft
projects, painting,
drawing & more.
Kadoka Press
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Pastor Art Weitschat
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
Monday, October 15
Fish portions, scalloped pota-
toes, peas, fruit muffin, and man-
darin oranges with banana slices.
Tuesday, October 16
Salisbury steak in gravy, boiled
potatoes with gravy, green beans,
bread, and pears.
Wednesday, October 17
New England boiled dinner with
ham and vegetables, dinner roll,
and fruit cocktail cake.
Thursday, October 18
Roast turkey, mashed potatoes
and gravy, broccoli, cranberries,
bread, and chocolate pudding.
Friday, October 19
Sloppy joe on a bun, oven pota-
toes, coleslaw, and peaches.
Meals for
the Elderly
John 21:15-19
All of us make tracks through the valley of fail-
ure. Then the key question is, What we will do
next? Sadly, many believers who stumble give up
a vibrant kingdom-serving life for a defeated existence. But failure can also be a chance for a
new beginning of living in Christ's strength.
In pride, Peter thought his faith was the strongest of all the disciples' and swore that even if
the others left Jesus, he never would (Mark 14:29). Yet when the time of testing came, he denied
even knowing Christ--and did so three times (Matt. 26:69-75). Satan hoped the disciple would
be so wounded by his own disloyalty that his faith would be undermined by shame, condemna-
tion, and despair.
Likewise, when the Enemy sifts believers today, his goal is for us to become shelved and inef-
fective for God's kingdom. That's why he goes after our strengths, especially the areas in which
we proudly consider ourselves invincible. But if we're willing, the Lord can use our failures to
do spiritual housecleaning, as He did in Peter's life. After the resurrection, Jesus met with the
disciple personally and restored him, preparing him to become a great leader in the early church.
He made it clear that Peter's potential to serve was defined, not by failure, but by his unwavering
love for Christ.
Peter laid down his pride, received the healing Jesus offered, and put on courage with the
Holy Spirit's help. He then risked his life fearlessly to further the gospel, and many came to
Christ through his example. Failure was the catalyst that grew in him a stronger, more authentic
faith.
Defeating the Devil's Strategies
Inspiration Point
Joyce F. Dykema_________________
Joyce F. Dykema, age 79 of
Murdo, S.D., died October 3, 2012,
at the Golden Living Center in
Pierre.
Joyce Finck was born to Waldo
and Clara (Jordan) Finck on Feb-
ruary 12, 1933, in Okaton.
She married Herman “Boyd”
Dykema on November 27, 1953,
and to this union three daughters
were born, Sherry, Cindy and Lora.
Joyce loved life and was known for
her fun personality. Joyce espe-
cially loved to tease the kids and
they loved to tease her back. Those
same kids (and you know who you
are) would scare her knowing how
jumpy she was. Adults and kids
alike made a special stop at Joyce’s
house at Halloween, with lights
and siren (and you know who you
are) for her popcorn balls. Joyce
also made the best bread and
chocolate fudge and she often
shared her baked goods with family
and friends. Crocheting was a pas-
time for Joyce and she enjoyed
sharing her handiwork.
Joyce loved going to bowling
tournaments except for the times
her partners angered or embar-
rassed her (and you know who you
are).
Joyce had many talents and she
used these in several of the jobs she
performed throughout the years.
She especially like working at
Dean’s Market where she could be
found by the sound of her whistle.
She always said there was no song
she just liked to whistle. Joyce has
done everything from driving com-
bines at harvest, driving semi-
trucks long haul, to milking cows,
ironing, baking doughnuts, and
loved painting apartments.
You would often find Joyce
whistling, whether she was at work
or at play. This reflected Joyce’s
love for life. Joyce will be missed by
her family and many friends.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters, Sherry Philips and her hus-
band, Bill, of Murdo, Lora Gibbs
and her husband, Brett, of Au-
dobon, Iowa, and Cindy Jost and
her husband, Mike, of Murdo; four
grandchildren, Brooke and Susie
Jost, and Georgie and Billy Gibbs;
one brother, Kenny Finck of
Newell; five sisters, Irene Brink of
Murdo, Alice Stroppel and her hus-
band, George, of Midland, Betty
Block and her husband, Dick, of
Midland, Ironis Poppe of Pierre,
and Norma Oldenberg and her hus-
band, Jim, of Philip; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Joyce was preceded in death by
her husband, Herman, on May 13,
2006; two brothers, Robert Finck
and Emil Finck, and one sister,
Bonna Lindquist.
Services were held Friday, Octo-
ber 5, at the Methodist Church in
Murdo, with Pastor Rick Hazen of-
ficiating.
Music was provided by Lois
Jaide, pianist. Ushers were Barb
Venard and Linda Kessler. Pall-
bearers were Marvin Kessler, Joe
Connot, Gary Block, Dean Block,
Brad Block and Dean Faber. Regis-
ter book attendants were Wanda
Olson and Jill Venard.
Graveside services were held
Friday at the Black Hills National
Cemetery near Sturgis.
Rush Funeral Home of Philip
was in charge of the arrangements.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Earl E. Helms__________________
Earl E. Helms, age 61, of Rapid
City, S.D., died Wednesday, October
3, 2012, in Rapid City.
Earl Erving Helms was born No-
vember 17, 1950, in Wall, the
fourth child of Erving and Eliza-
beth (Eisenbraun) Helms. As a
young child Earl was very enthusi-
astic and ambitious. At the age of
five, he became very ill and from
this he became mentally chal-
lenged, and had to learn many
things over again. In 1963, for med-
ical reasons, Earl moved to Red-
field State Hospital and School.
While there, he learned many
things and enjoyed working in the
workshop, going to dances, movies,
bowling, and horse riding. In the
summers he would enjoy coming
back home to the ranch and visit-
ing friends and relatives.
In 2010, Earl got the opportu-
nity to fulfill a dream of moving to
Black Hills Works, where he be-
came a resident and learned to
know many new people and work
in the workshop. Here he was very
helpful and liked by the staff and
residents. Here he enjoyed going
bowling, camping, football games,
and riding horses at SunCatchers
Riding Academy.
He passed away suddenly on
Wednesday, October 3, 2012, and
will be dearly missed by family,
friends, and staff.
Grateful for having shared his
life are three sisters Ester Johan-
nesen and her husband, Gene, of
Wall, Edith Eisenbraun and her
husband, Aaron, of Rapid City, and
Eileen Niederwerder and her hus-
band, Greg, of Rapid City; two
brothers, Eugene Helms and his
wife, Glenda, of Creighton and
Elden Helms and his wife, Lillian,
of Creighton; 11 nieces and
nephews; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Earl was preceded in death by
his parents.
Services were held Saturday, Oc-
tober 6, at the First Lutheran
Church in Wall, with Pastor Curtis
Garland officiating.
Music was provided by Mary
Kay Wilson, pianist. Ushers were
Dennis Sieler and Mike Sieler.
Pallbearers were Bob Helms, Paul
Staben, Marvin Denke, Tom
Mahon, Eli Helms and Wade Gei-
gle.
Interment was at the Wall
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established to Black Hills
Works or SunCatchers Riding
Academy.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
News Briefs …
Presbyterian Church will
host a potluck dinner after the
11 a.m. Sunday worship serv-
ices on October 14 . Hamburg-
ers and hot dogs will be
provided by the church. The
elders and Kadoka Presbyte-
rian Women will have their
meetings at 1:15 p.m. Everyone
is invited.
Estate planning meeting:
SDSU Extension will host a
training session on estate plan-
ning and transitioning the fam-
ily operation on October 25, 25
and November 1 & 2 at the Bad
River Senior Center in Philip.
Registration is required; call
605-782-3290.
Kadoka School board
meeting: Wednesday, October
10, 7:00 p.m.
Reading Group will meet
Sunday, October 14, 2:00 p.m.
at the library. Dorothy Liegl
will be there for discussion of
the book Fahrenheit 451.
Nancy Holub____________________
Nancy Holub, age 53 of Wall,
S.D., died Sunday, October 7, 2012,
at the Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal.
Nancy G. Pederson was born No-
vember 26, 1958, at Ft. Benning,
Ga., the daughter of Gordon and
Betty Lou (Ballard) Pederson. The
family moved to Panama until
1963, then to Rapid City, when her
father served in Vietnam. In 1966,
the family moved to Ft. Leonard
Wood, Mo., until 1968 when they
moved to Taiwan. In 1970, the fam-
ily moved to Wall where Nancy fin-
ished her schooling, graduating
from Wall High School in 1976.
After high school, Nancy moved to
New York.
Nancy was united in marriage to
Terry F. Holub on February 5,
1983, in Rapid City. They moved to
Schaller, Iowa, where their first
son, Matthew, was born. They
owned and operated two newspa-
pers in that area, and Nancy also
ran a day care. In 1990, they moved
back to Wall to operate the Dairy
Queen. It was at this time their
second son, Grant, was born.
Nancy remained in Wall until 1996
when they moved to Albany, Mo.,
where she managed a convenience
store. In 1999, she returned to
Wall, where her boys attended
school.
Nancy enrolled in Western
Dakota Vo-Tech where she gradu-
ated with honors in May of 2003.
During this time, Nancy was diag-
nosed with cancer, but fought
courageously for 12 years. She con-
tinued her education at National
American University and gradu-
ated as a paralegal in 2007.
She remained in Wall where she
was a member of St. Patrick’s
Catholic Church of Wall and a
member of the Carrol-McDonald
American Legion Auxiliary #246.
She enjoyed traveling and singing,
but especially loved spending time
with her family and friends. She
also was very active in organizing
the Relay For Life events in Wall.
Nancy was always trying to make
the world a better place, and even
after death, she continued this as
she donated her corneas so that
someone may have a better life.
Grateful for having shared her
life include two sons, Matthew
Ryan Holub and Grant Jonathan
Taylor Holub, both of Wall; their fa-
ther, Terry F. Holub of Fontanelle,
Iowa; her mother, Betty Lou Peder-
son of Wall; two brothers, James D.
Pederson of Yankton and Gary W.
Pederson of Wall; a sister, Carol A.
Naescher and her husband, Leroy,
of Oacoma; and a host of other rel-
atives and friends.
Nancy was preceded in death by
a daughter, Jennifer Rose, and her
father, Gordon Pederson.
Closed-casket visitation will be
held one hour preceding the serv-
ices on Saturday.
Mass of Christian burial will be
celebrated at 10:00 a.m. Saturday,
October 13, at St. Patrick’s
Catholic Church in Wall, with Fa-
ther Leo Hausmann as celebrant.
Interment will be at the Wall
Cemetery.
The family requests memorials
to the American Cancer Society.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
On Friday, October 12, after the
home football game against
Colome, Young Life will be serving
free hamburgers and hotdogs at
the Young Life building on Main
Street, just south of the library. All
high school students (9-12 grades)
are invited to come.
On Sunday, October 14 at 4 p.m.
Young Life will sponsor a trap
shoot at the Kadoka Trap Club.
The first round of clay pigeons are
free. Bring your own shot gun or
there will also be some there to use.
Refreshments will be served.
Following the trap shoot the reg-
ular Young Life meeting will be
held at the trap club. All 9th
through 12th grade students are
invited.
Young Life is a Christian na-
tional organization that specializes
in reaching out to high school stu-
dents with relationships, fun, food
and the message of Jesus Christ. In
the forty years of its existence it
has become a national and interna-
tional organization.
Young Life meets each Sunday
evening at 6:03 p.m. at the Young
Life building on Main Street in
Kadoka, which is open to all high
school students. Later this Fall,
hopes are to have a Wednesday
night Bible study with supper.
Young Life announces line up of activities
Carnival Games
Cake Walk • Bingo
Fish Pond • Ring Toss
Haunted House & More!
Costume Contest
Four different age groups
Bring your
carved pumpkins,
they will be
judged for the:
•Scariest
•Funniest
• Most Original
Halloween
Family
Fun
Carnival
Sunday, Oct. 28
2 to 5:30 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
Sponsored by
Kadoka National Honor Society
Tickets
Ages 0-13 yrs.: 25¢ each or 25 for $5
Ages 14 & up: 25 for $8
Bel videre News …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
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Fall Hours
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10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
“Dead skunk in the middle of
the road. You got yer dead skunk
in the middle of the road. Stinkin’
to high Heaven!” So go the lyrics of
a song written and performed by
Loudon Wainwright. It is espe-
cially appropriate right now since
skunks appear to have had a ban-
ner year. Not only are they dead in
the middle of the road but also on
the shoulder and even on some city
streets. I don’t know how many
carcasses I’ve seen, but there have
been a lot.
This is not hard to believe since
skunks often have multiple off-
spring. They are similar to cats as
far as reproduction goes, and you
know having four kittens in a
batch is fairly common. Sometimes
there are more that that. There-
fore, if you have ten female skunks
around, they could multiply them-
selves to forty by fall. I think that’s
what happened this year. There
must have been many large
batches and few stillborns
This, too, is the season you are
most apt to see the results of the
year’s production since they are all
drifting around looking for cozy
winter quarters. Culverts under
roads are quite popular. Buildings
are too. Just the other day, Wally
asked if I’d like to help him move
three dead skunks from under his
house. I said that, alas, I had a
very busy schedule for both the
morning and afternoon and
couldn’t possibly provide assis-
tance. What a pity I couldn’t help.
Over the years, I’ve dispatched
a whole lot of skunks. They partic-
ularly adore the cat food I usually
have sitting out in dishes in the
barn. What’s more, the cats just
accept them as kin without mak-
ing a fuss. Let a coon come in the
barn and eat cat food, and the cats
get nervous. You can tell right
away that something is wrong
when you walk in the barn and the
cats are all sitting on high places
looking nervously around. This is
a signal to grab your gun, walk
carefully, and check the rafters for
ringed tails. Cats give no warning
about skunks, though, so you’d
just better keep your wits about
you in the barn, especially after
dark. I’ve never been actually
sprayed by a striped kitty, but it
has been a near thing many times.
Early spring and fall are the times
one should be especially careful.
It’s not bad enough that these
striped beasts have potent stink
glands, but, what is worse, they
are the most common carrier of ra-
bies in this area. As far as I know,
we have never had rabies on the
place, but that doesn’t mean it
couldn’t happen. Any critter in-
cluding cats that acts strangely
needs to be closely watched. The
only thing worse than a rabid
skunk, as far as I’m concerned,
would be a rabid bat. You could
probably outrun a skunk, but bats
would be quite a bit trickier to
avoid. We sometimes get bats in
the barn too, and I really hate
that. I go in and out just as quickly
as possible when they are there.
According to recent statistics, not
many bats actually have rabies,
but I don’t trust them anyway, the
nasty things. If they were loveable
creatures, they wouldn’t be com-
monly displayed in conjunction
with the scariest time of year,
namely Halloween.
It is also almost impossible to
chase a skunk out of a building be-
fore shooting it. They won’t go even
if there are lots of doors, and
they’re all open. For one thing, you
have to stay a goodly distance
away so you can’t really force the
issue. Long ago I gave up trying to
get them outside and now just
shoot them where they stand.
Then I quickly exit the building
and wait at least a day before
going back, picking up the smelly
beast with a pitchfork, and dispos-
ing of it a considerable distance
away down a draw.
The only redeeming feature
about skunks might be that they
are fairly pretty. They usually
have glossy black hair punctuated
by a big white stripe or two. Their
beauty, though, could be compared
to that of creeping jenny which
also is somewhat pretty. Neither
one can be fully appreciated when
you know what problems they can
cause.
My favorite story in this regard,
however, might be the one from
schooldays in town. It was spring
and a lilac was blooming outside
the window. Mom said, “Open the
window so you can smell the
lilacs.” I did open the window but
just as a skunk walked by. I told
Mom, “I don’t think I care much for
the smell of lilacs.” She came to my
room right away to check this out,
smelled the skunk, and got a terri-
ble fit of the giggles.
So in conclusion, “It’s dead. It’s
in the middle. Dead skunk in the
middle of the road. It’s dead. It’s in
the middle, and stinkin’ to high,
high Heaven.”
Dead Skunk
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Clair Bitting got home late on
Sunday from the VA in Minneapo-
lis where he had a defibrillator in-
stalled to help keep his heart
beating correctly. He started out at
the VA in Sturgis last week and
was flown from there to Minneapo-
lis. His daughter, Kolette Struble,
drove to Minnesota and brought
Clair back. Son Curtis, meanwhile,
looked after things at the ranch
and kept his mom company.
Chad and Francie Davis were in
Sioux Falls last week where they
attended the Festival of Books.
This event tends to concentrate on
South Dakota and regional writers.
Since Francie is the membership
chairman of the SD Poetry society
and has edited their magazine, she
got to man a booth concerning that.
Chad and Francie got to be on their
own for a change since their three
boys were staying with Chad’s folks
in Pierre. On Oct. 6, Garrett cele-
brated his eleventh birthday by
having three friends stay with him
for a couple of days. Those boys are
home schooled like the Davis boys
so Francie just added them to the
classes. On one day, all six kids
helped Fortune’s preg check some
heifers. Francie said the procedure
grossed them out and also fasci-
nated them.
Larry Grimme has been writing
another new song lately. The cho-
rus goes in part, “I’m only seeing
souls. Is your name on Jesus’ roll?”
He said the idea was sparked in
part by a friend who advised him to
just see souls. It was reinforced by
a time when he was setting up an
amplifier and speakers at the audi-
torium in Scotland where he used
to teach. Although only connected
to the electricity and nothing else,
the system somehow picked up a
radio frequency or something and
played the song, “Bringing in the
Sheaves,” which deals with concern
for the eternal welfare of people.
Marie Addison attended the fu-
neral of Joyce Dykema in Murdo
this week. Joyce was the mother of
Marie’s hairstylist there in Murdo.
Marie said Joyce was a really
cheerful person who whistled a lot
and was fun to be around. She also
lived in apartment near Marie for
a while. Marie came to church in
Belvidere on Sunday as usual. She
often comes with Grace McKillip
who didn’t, however, come along
this time. Grace hadn’t been feeling
very well for a couple of weeks and
even spent a few days in the hospi-
tal. She is doing better now,
though, and hopes to be out and
about soon.
Mike, Marlene and Bert Perault
took advantage of Marlene’s long
weekend from her work at the
bank to do some painting and roof
repair at the river ranch. They
painted on the barn on Saturday,
tore the shingles off the bunkhouse
on Sunday, and tinned the roof on
Monday.
Brett and Nikki Bonenberger
and kids went to Rapid City on Sat-
urday to attend a high school vol-
leyball game in which Nikki’s niece
took part. The niece is Kendall Mc-
Daniel and attends school in Ab-
erdeen. They got in some visiting
and had a good time. Back at home,
Bonenbergers sold calves two
weeks ago and are getting the
weaned replacement heifers settled
in. Brett said his grandma, Delores
Bonenberger, spent the last week
in Mitchell looking after her grand-
daughter, Joshlyn, who is Alisha’s
daughter. Alisha had some work to
do that could be done better with
someone helping with Josh. Since
Josh is in kindergarten, Delores got
to take her to school, pick her up,
and do other grandmotherly
chores.
Charlene Ceniceros went to
Rapid City on Thursday, had a
heart monitor put in place for 24
hours, and then taken back off on
Friday. Results will be known later.
Charlene went with Rhonda Terk-
ildsen, and the two stayed at a
motel overnight. Back at home, you
might remember that Charlene’s
aunt, Martha Shot, lived with her
for several years, but moved to the
care center in White River last
May. That leaves just Charlene,
her granddaughter, also name
Charlene, and the younger Char-
lene’s husband, Daryl Romeo, and
their two children which are both
under two years of age. Daryl spent
six weeks in Artesia, New Mexico,
in August and September where he
gained addition training for his
work as a correctional officer. Daryl
has worked for a while over at Kyle
as a guard at a juvenile detention
facility there and will continue that
only with more training.
Kirby and Nancy Schofield and
John and Jamie Dolezal took in the
Rodney Carrington concert and
show in Deadwood on Friday
evening. Nancy said it was hilari-
ous and very enjoyable. The four-
some stayed overnight in Spearfish
before returning home on Satur-
day. When they got out of the show,
it was snowing so hard in Dead-
wood that it almost seemed like a
blizzard. They were glad all that
white stuff was confined to the
Black Hills. Nancy said her work is
winding down at 1880 Town, but
they will probably stay open until
the end of the month depending on
the weather. All the summer help
has now gone south which leaves
the local people left to carry on.
Cold mornings tend to be slow, but
more people stop after it warms up.
Nancy plans to take off Oct. 17,
though, to attend the lutefisk and
roast-beef supper at the Lutheran
Church in Midland. Nancy will
have the roast beef and leave the
lutefisk strictly alone.
Scot and Jodie O’Bryan finally
got acquainted with their newest
grandson, Nathanial Conn
O’Bryan. He is the son of Taylor
and Vicki of Yankton and was al-
ready five-weeks old before his
grandparents got to see him. Vari-
ous activities kept interfering with
a trip to Yankton, and Jodie was
starting to worry that they
wouldn’t get there until the his
graduation from something. Natu-
rally, Nathanial is awesome and
dearly loves his grandma. He is a
happy boy and enjoyed being held
a lot. On Sunday, Scot and Jodie
had supper in Quinn with Scot’s
mom, Lorna Moore. They enjoyed
chili and chocolate cake. Daughter
Faye was also there with her kids
although Scot and Jodie didn’t
know she was coming and Faye
didn’t know her folks were either.
After supper, a side trip to Wall
Drug was made to check out the
pictures there, etc. Last weekend,
Jodie went to the Gridiron barrel
racing Futurity in Huron. This is
for horses five years old and under.
Jodie got third place with one
raised horse, and first on another.
She came home with some money
in prizes. Jodie said she spent part
of last week teetering on some scaf-
folding while painting at 1880
Town. The diner there that Jodie
manages is closed for the season,
and Jodie figures Richard
Hullinger caught her at a weak mo-
ment that she would agree to the
painting detail.
Ideas are like children…
your own are wonderful.
Ed, Carol and Jesse Ferguson,
and Pete and Marla Ferguson were
in Rapid City on Saturday, Septem-
ber 27 to help Moya Brickman cel-
ebrate her 11th birthday. Ed and
Carol traveled on to Rochford and
spent the night at their cabin. They
drove through the Spearfish and
Vanocker Canyons on Sunday to
see more of the beautiful fall colors
displayed in the Black Hills.
September 30 guests at the
James Letelliers were Rev. Don
and Anna May Letellier of Wood
Lake, NE.
Sunday, September 30, Ida Kar-
lin and son, Paul, of Winner paid a
visit to the Robert and Sharon Ring
home. Ida went home with toma-
toes to can.
Carol Ferguson visited her
mother, Irene Kaufman, in Valen-
tine on Monday. Tuesday she con-
ducted business in Winner.
Tuesday, Maxine Allard accom-
panied June Ring to Valentine and
kept an appointment. The gals
stopped and enjoyed a visit with
Becky Patton and daughters at
Lakeview on the way home.
Robert and Sharon Ring made a
business trip to Winner on Tues-
day.
The community was shocked to
hear of the sudden loss of Lori
Schmidt’s brother, Robin
Bromwich, 49. Services were held
in Winner on Saturday. Our hearts
go out to his dear family and
friends at this sad time. Our
prayers are certainly with you.
May the Lord give you peace and
comfort at this sad time. Folks will
remember Rob in this community,
when he helped out at the gas sta-
tion.
Wednesday, James and Marjorie
Anne Letellier enjoyed taking in
the cross country meet held in
Presho. It is so fun to be from West
River South Dakota, you can cheer
for all the kids there, because you
know them or their parents and
grandparents at least, and perhaps
even related to a few! The Letel-
liers’ grandson, Beaver Burma, was
there running in the junior high di-
vision for Sunshine Bible Academy.
Beaver and his teammate, Chris
Haas, came in first and second.
Beaver is the son of Jason and Ja-
Lynn Burma.
Harry and Jeanne Merchen
planned to hold a moving/rummage
sale at the Norris Township Hall on
Thursday and Friday, but were all
sold out by Thursday afternoon.
There is no easy way to say good-
bye to lifelong residents in a little
burg like Norris; especially if those
folks are Harry and Jeanne
Merchen. What a lovable couple!
Jeanne’s rule was no one could ever
go away from their house hungry
and I don’t think anyone ever did.
Caramel rolls were her specialty.
Food, fun and foolishness was the
name of the game. Here’s wishing
you the best in your new venture,
we know that wherever you are you
will be a blessing. The Merchens
have recently purchased a home in
Black Hawk, SD.
June Ring rode with Jean Kary
and her daughter, Rae Beth
(Cookie) Staab, to the West River
History Conference held in Rapid
City Thursday through Saturday.
Both Jean and June presented pa-
pers and also presented one for
Cindy Brunson who was unable to
attend. They also visited with
Jean’s sister-in-law, Cordelia, and
husband, Bob Johnson, in Hill City.
Jean also enjoyed seeing her
nephew, Russell, and family while
visiting at the Johnson home.
Morgan Taft was a member of
the White River Middle School vol-
leyball team playing at Philip on
Thursday. Susan attended the
game after work that day.
Friday, Ed and Carol Ferguson
went to the cattle sale in Winner.
Howard and Nette Heinert hauled
cows back for them in the evening.
Ed and Carol Ferguson and Pete
and Marla Ferguson were among
those attending the services for
Rob Bromwich in Winner on Satur-
day.
Julie Letellier of Kilgore and
Andee Beckwith accompanied Jim
and Marjorie Anne Letellier to the
football game at Plankinton on Fri-
day night. Their grandson, DJ
Beckwith, plays for Sunshine
Bible. He had 20 tackles and a
touchdown in the game for the win-
ning cause. DJ is the son of Paul
and LuAnne Beckwith of Pierre. It
is so fun to watch the youth, so get
out and support your kids and their
team before the season ends.
Dan and Susan Taft sold calves
in Winner on Friday. Howard and
Nette Heinert hauled a load for
them. Susan went to the varsity
volleyball tournament in White
River on Saturday.
Saturday, Pastor Denke, Sharon
Ring and Jan Ring enjoyed attend-
ing the Lutheran Women’s Mission
League Zone Fall Rally in Winner.
The theme was Listen, Laugh and
Love with Pastor Roy Greenseth of
Murdo as speaker.
Darrel Totton and son were in
the area hunting antelope this
weekend. Sorry, I don’t have a re-
port of their hunt; but I do know
that in this four county corner is
nice if you have more than one
county license.
Sunday morning at the St.John
Lutheran Church LWML Sunday
was observed with the title being
“Salted for Service.” Cookies and
punch were served following the
service. In the afternoon, Sharon
Ring visited Marilyn Heinert and
shared the lesson and treats with
her. Marilyn was unable to attend
the service and had been president
of the zone LWML for many years.
Gene and Marjorie Popkes of
Lakeview, Pete and Marla Fergu-
son and Jesse Ferguson enjoyed
Sunday dinner at the Ed and Carol
Ferguson home. They worked a few
calves in the afternoon.
Maxine Allard was thrilled to
have her son, Stan, come down and
spend his Columbus Day holiday
with her. Stan spent some of the
time working on the Bronco.
The Dan Taft family took advan-
tage of the Columbus Day holiday
to preg check cows and have the
help of family and friends.
The array of fall colors has been
exceptional this year, with all the
different hues of gold, orange, rust
and reds. The beauty of the country
this time of year always bring with
it a ray of hope for the crops, cattle
and gardens to do even better next
year. It just doesn’t last long
enough. I was all set for a beautiful
warm Indian summer, but we were
shocked into Eskimo winter in-
stead. The temperatures reached
down into the low 20s for a few
days, freezing everything within
reach. It will be better next year,
you’ll see.
Have a great week.
Locals …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
News received by relatives on
Sunday told of the death of
Natascha Todd, 19-year-old grand-
daughter of Doug and Electa
(Briggs) Preslicka. She died as the
result of a car accident on Saturday
night near Bradshaw, NE, where
she lived. Funeral services will be
held on Wednesday. Electa’s family
members in Kadoka are her sister,
Bonnie Riggins and brothers, Paul
and Robert Briggs. Sympathy is ex-
tended to the family.
Chuck and Suzanne Parkinson
of Rapid City stopped in Kadoka to
visit with his parents, Larry and
Alvina Parkinson, to and from Ver-
million the past weekend. In Ver-
million they visited their children,
Alex and Sam, and attended
Dakota Day Homecoming. On Sat-
urday evening they got together for
dinner with Chuck’s brother, Jeff
Parkinson, of Rock Rapids, IA, and
his daughter, Jaime Parkinson, of
South Sioux City, NE, before re-
turning to Rapid City on Sunday.
Dick and Phyllis Stratton of
Sioux Falls and Rose Anne Wendell
of Pierre were weekend visitors at
the home of their parents, Joe and
Betty Lou Stratton.
Jerry Stilwell is a patient in
Rapid City Regional Hospital and
as of this writing, he had spent sev-
eral days in intensive care. Family
members are hoping he will be out
of ICU by the time the paper is
published and friends and family
can send get well cards to him.
Nick Willert of Aurora, CO,
came to the area for the opening
day of antelope season on Septem-
ber 29. He stayed one night with
Dale and Cindy O’Connell as he
went hunting with their son. He re-
turned to Aurora to finish some
carpentry work, but with no ante-
lope.
Merlin Wilson or Riverside, CA,
came by bus to Cheyenne, WY, last
week and then accompanied Terry
and Pauline Sawyer to Kadoka to
visit friends and relatives on Sun-
day. They stayed at the home of
Ron and Renate Carson while here.
Monday they all went to Philip and
had lunch with George and Kay
Ainslie and Tuesday they took a
drive to the Syd Iwan’s place near
Belvidere, where Ron goes hunting.
The visitors left for their homes on
Thursday. Merlin is a cousin of the
Kadoka Carsons.
A large crowd attended the West
Central dinner in Philip Wednes-
day evening. Larry and Alvina
Parkinson, Wanda Swan and
Sydne Lenox drove over for the din-
ner and the Parkinsons received a
monetary gift for being one of the
couples honored for 65 years of
marriage. Barbara Herber, Carol
Solon, Joe and Kathleen Leuteneg-
ger, Marvin Moor and Jim Jones
were also among Kadoka residents
seen at the dinner.
Jackson County American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit 27 will hold its
October meeting on Thursday, Oc-
tober 11 at 7 p.m., at the Commu-
nity Room of the Gateway
Apartments. Auxiliary members
are reminded that gifts for the
Christmas gift shop at the Hot
Springs VA Hospital should be
taken to the Jackson County Li-
brary by Saturday, October 20. Vet-
erans will be able to shop for their
families at the gift shop, free of
charge.
John and Sue Kaiser received
news of the death of Sue’s aunt,
Rose Russell, of Pierre. Rose
passed away Sunday afternoon at
home and funeral services will be
held later this week. She was the
wife of the late Robert Russell who
was a first cousin of Hazel Parkin-
son. Sue also said that Eldon and
Janice Russell’s daughter-in-law,
Krystal Russell, died in September
in Boise, ID. Many locals remem-
ber Eldon as he was head of the
South Dakota High Patrol for
many years.
Ty Thompson rode saddle bronc
in the Badlands Circuit finals held
in Minot, ND, Oct. 4-7 and placed
in three rounds with scores of 80,
78 and 77. He got checks of $829,
$691 and $691, placing tied for
fourth in the average, with 235
points and a check for $276. He is
the son of Roddy Thompson and
grandson of Stanley and Shirley
Porch.
Pasture, rangeland and forage
(PRF) insurance is available for
2013 in South Dakota based on a
Rainfall Index (RI). Haying and
grazing needs can be covered
against moisture shortages using
PRF-RI, says Matthew Diersen,
SDSU Extension Risk & Business
Management Specialist.
"While producers would prefer
to be paid if they did not have for-
age, PRF-RI relies on a close histor-
ical relationship between rainfall
timing and forage production
amounts," Diersen said.
He explains that producers can
guard against low precipitation
during insured intervals for local-
ized grids specific to haying or
grazing needs. Rainfall is grid-level
and not farm- or ranch-level when
measured.
November 15, 2012 is the dead-
line to purchase or change coverage
for the 2013 calendar year.
Diersen explains that the PRF-
RI coverage available in South
Dakota mirrors pasture rents (per
acre) for grazing.
"The coverage is constant at
$204.23 per acre for haying. In the
event that precipitation is low dur-
ing an insured interval, producers
could use indemnity payments to
replace income or to purchase re-
placement feed," he said. "Unfortu-
nately the coverage does not
increase should prices move higher
during the insured year."
Encouraging indicators at the
state level suggest that PRF-RI
would work well to manage forage
production risk. In years with
below-average rainfall in South
Dakota the hay yield was also often
below-average. In particular, no-
table drought years in South
Dakota (1976, 1988, 2002 and
2006) had sharply lower rainfall to-
tals and hay yields.
According to the Census of Agri-
culture there were 23 million acres
in permanent pasture and range-
land across South Dakota in 2007.
PRF has been available in South
Dakota since the 2007 crop year
using a vegetation index, but only
540,000 acres were insured with
PRF in 2012.
"As detailed in the crop insur-
ance provisions, catastrophic cover-
age is not available for PRF. Thus,
producers may also purchase Non-
insured Disaster Assistance Pro-
gram (NAP) coverage for the
pasture, rangeland, and non-alfalfa
hayland," Diersen said.
He says it is up to producers to
decide whether the insurance is
necessary and valuable.
"The high subsidy rate likely
gives the coverage value, but there
are no absolute guarantees that
precipitation shortages will always
line up with forage needs," he said.
Premiums for PRF-RI vary by
county, type, coverage level, prac-
tice/interval, and grid location. Pro-
ducers have to pick a coverage level
from 70 to 90 percent of the grid
base. A default to consider would be
the 70 percent level as it has the
highest subsidy rate. Producers
also have to pick a productivity
level from 60 percent to 150 per-
cent of the county base. This allows
for intra-county variability in soil
type, grade, and forage type.
Diersen explains that there are
many ways to allocate coverage.
"Not all acres need to be insured.
Selected acres are allocated across
11 two-month intervals. Intervals
cannot overlap a given month. At
most 70 percent and no fewer than
10 percent of acres can be in a sin-
gle interval," he said. "Ideally, a
producer will know key months
that a lack of precipitation would
result in less forage production."
For more information, visit
www.igrow.org. Interested insur-
able parties can also contact a crop
insurance agent or go on-line to the
RMA website www.rma.usda.gov.
South Dakota pastures now
insurable with rainfall index
and swimming, and meeting new
friends. His favorite project is
horses, and he likes the breakaway
roping class at the county show.
He believes 4-H helps him become
a better horseman because he prac-
tices for horse show and rodeo.
Dustin Enders is a Sr. member
and has enjoyed going to the SD
State Horse Show for the past
three years. He also enjoyed his ex-
perience showing beef at the West-
ern Junior Livestock Show. His
favorite project is wood science,
where he has built a bench and also
a saddle rack. He says 4-H really
helps him with public speaking.
Savannah Solon is a Jr. 4-H
member whose favorite project is
horses and she likes the county
horse show and the Black Hills
Stock Show quiz bowl. She also
thinks 4-H benefits her through
public speaking.
Hunter Johnson is a Jr. 4-Her
who has a great memory of riding
his bull to the six-second buzzer at
the State 4-H Rodeo this year. His
favorite project area is rodeo. He
thinks 4-H helps him meet new
friends and helps the community.
Tagg Weller just moved up
from being a Clover Bud to a Be-
ginner 4-Her. He is looking forward
to showing his cat, Boo, in 4-H. He
also collects rocks and will enter
them in the hobbies and collections
project area.
Gage Weller is a Jr. and his fa-
vorite 4-H experiences are attend-
ing Camp Bob and going to the
State Fair where he shows sheep.
He has several favorite projects:
Horse, beef, sheep and home envi-
ronment because he made a camo
chair this year and had a lot of fun
spray painting it. He says 4-H has
made him a better speaker and he
is looking forward to the scholar-
ship opportunities, and he hopes to
get a chance to go to Washington,
DC on the Citizen Washington
Focus trip when he is old enough.
4-H has something for all youth.
You don’t have to own livestock to
join. There are a wide variety of
projects: babysitting, bicycles, rock-
etry, horticulture, dogs, writing,
and many, many more.
If you are interested in joining,
contact me at 605.837.2133 or stop
by the office in the Jackson Co.
courthouse basement or contact
your local 4-H club leaders.
Carrie Weller, 4-H Youth
Program Advisor,
Haakon/Jackson/Jones/Mellette
4-H is one of the largest youth
development programs in America
with more than 6.5 million youth,
ages 5-19. It is the only develop-
ment program with direct access to
technological advances from uni-
versity research. 4-H is operated
and supported by a shared leader-
ship of public and private partners
including National 4-H Headquar-
ters, USDA within the Cooperative
State Research, Education and Ex-
tension Service; 3,500 Cooperative
Extension educators (called pro-
gram advisors in SD) associated
with 106 land-grant universities;
National 4-H Council; 4-H associa-
tions and foundations; and trained
youth and adult volunteers. This
is how SDSU, South Dakota’s only
land grant university, benefits the
4-H program.
Youth learn leadership, citizen-
ship and life skills through more
than 1,000 projects with topics var-
ied as public speaking, photogra-
phy, community service, rocketry,
livestock and graphic design.
“Learn by doing” is the fundamen-
tal 4-H ideal. Youth are encouraged
to experiment, innovate and think
independently.
4-H programs are offered
through community clubs, school-
based, after- school and camp set-
tings, and U.S. military
installations worldwide. Studies
show that 4-H members do better
in school, are more motivated to
help others, feel safe to try new
things, achieve a sense of self-es-
teem, and develop lasting friend-
ships.
More than 60 million young peo-
ple across American have been 4-H
members since 4-H began in 1902.
Famous alumni include Al Gore,
Faith Hill and David Letterman.
Also, 14 governors, 33 university
presidents, 31 CEOs and four as-
tronauts are 4-H alumni.
Here is what some of the area 4-
H members have to say about 4-H:
McKenzie Stilwell is a Sr. 4-H
member and his favorite 4-H expe-
rience was creating a European
mount for his home environment
project, where he received a purple
award. His favorite project is beef,
and he showed two calves at
achievement days. He says 4-H has
helped him become a better
speaker and it also builds charac-
ter.
Hudson Johnson is a Jr. mem-
ber. His favorite 4-H experience is
going to Camp Bob and canoeing
National 4-H Week - October 7-13
On September 30, 22 shooters
participated in the annual Town
Team Shoot held at the Kadoka
Trap Club.
Competing were shooters from
Winner, Belvidere, Pierre, Hamill,
Midland, Kadoka, Custer, Edge-
mont, Hot Springs, Wall and
Gillette, WY.
The team competition was held
first, with three teams shooting a
total of 125 targets each The team
from Wall/Edgemont consisting of
Garrett Bryan, Toby Wagner, Jes-
sica Wagner, Mick Stoddard and
Alfred Schutt was the winner.
Kadoka and Belvidere were the
other two competing teams.
After the team shoot, there were
three other competitions of 50 birds
each in singles, handicap and dou-
bles.
Champion in singles was Tom
Parquet, Midland, with 50/50.
Class A was Mick Stoddard, Edge-
mont, with 48/50. Class B was Jeff
Swartz, Pierre, with 40/50, and
Class C was Toby Wagner, Wall,
with 36/50.
Winning the handicap was Rudy
Reimann, Belvidere, with 44/50.
Class A was Swartz with 37/50 and
Class C was Stoddard with 33/50.
Doubles champion was Stoddard
with 47/50. Class A winner was
Stanley Reimann, Gillette, WY,
with 46/50. Class B was Russell
Cvach, Midland, with 36/50, and
Class C was Jessica Wagner, Wall,
with 33/50.
Winning the gorilla, the longest
streak in the 16-yard singles with-
out a miss, was Parquet with 50/50.
Kadoka trap shoot results
can prevent problems, 3) Google
Tools—which help make the most
of your computing experience, and
4) advice on other issues you may
have in computing. Evangelyn For-
tune will be available on Wednes-
days with 1 to 2 hour-long sessions.
Basic Computer Classes are also
available on a continuing basis. All
sessions are free but by appoint-
ment only, so call the library, 837-
2689 to schedule a time that works
for all.
Story Time will begin at the li-
brary on Thursday mornings,
10:15. Pre-school children are en-
couraged to attend.
Did You Know?
The SD Secretary of State has
published a 2012 General Election
Ballot Question Pamphlet which
contains the Attorney General’s ex-
planations and arguments for and
against the questions to be voted
upon at the upcoming election in
November. Stop in at the Jackson
County Library if you would like a
copy of this free pamphlet which
helps voters understand the ballot
issues. Large print, Braille and
audio tape versions available
through the SD State Library, 1-
800-423-6665.
We are working on getting the li-
brary automated with a barcoded
circulation system. There are nu-
merous books available for sale for
the next couple months, so stop in
often, as the selection changes
while progress continues.
“Library Friends”:
We plan to do a “Gift-Wrap” at
the Nursing Home’s Holiday Festi-
val on Sunday, Nov. 4. People may
bring their Christmas gifts to our
table and we will wrap the gifts for
them for a donation. We may also
have items for a Silent Auction at
that time. If you have gift-wrap-
ping items you would like to donate
for this project, please drop them
off at the library. Also, if you could
help us wrap items during the Hol-
iday Festival, please stop in at the
library to sign-up for a time so we
can have help spread out through-
out the time of the entire fair.
Please Remember:
There is no fine for overdue ma-
terial, but we would like to have
our files up-to-date for the new bar-
coded-circulation system.
Questions?
Call Jackson County Library,
837-2689, or you may e-mail, jcli-
brary2000@gmail.com or stop in for
a visit.
New Books In:
Wild: From Lost to Found on the
Pacific Crest Trail, by Cheryl
Strayed is a National Best Seller
and recommendation of Oprah’s
Book Club. Cheryl reveals her per-
sonal journey on the PCT as she
comes to terms with loss and its
parallel emotional odyssey.
PD James adds mystery to the
mix for this a new slant on this
classic favorite, borrowing charac-
ters from Jane Austen’s Pride and
Prejudice for this new title, Death
Comes to Pemberley.
David Baldacci has two books in;
Deliver Us from Evil and Zero Day,
Linda Miller has several books in
the “McKettricks” series and we
have obtained copies of various
Danielle Steel and Andrew Greeley
novels.
Also, a short list of the books
added to the collection (stop in to
see the “long” list): Jeffery Deaver,
XO; Barbara Delinsky, Facets;
John Eldgredge, Wild at Heart;
Julie Garwood, Mercy; Thomas E.,
Mails, Sundancing at Rosebud and
Pine Ridge; Judith McNaught,
Every Breath You Take; Becky
Melby, Illinois Weddings; Kim
O’Brien, A Wedding Blunder in the
Black Hills; Jodi Picoult, Handle
With Care
Author Profile:
Will James, born in 1982 was a
cowboy, rustler, writer, humorist,
and artist. He began drawing dur-
ing his stay at the Nevada State
Prison for rustling and continued
to write and illustrate more than
twenty books while contributing to
magazines and newspapers be-
tween 1920 and his death in 1942.
The library now has In the Saddle
with Uncle Bill, Flint Spears: Cow-
boy Rodeo Contestant, Smoky the
Cowhorse, Horses I’ve Known,
Sand, and All in a Day’s Riding.
Several others are on their way, so
check-out this classic western au-
thor/artist.
Current & Upcoming
Programs:
The Reading Group discussion
will be on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2:00 for
the book Fahrenheit 451. Join us
for this lively discussion with
Dorothy Liegl.
Advanced computer classes will
be available, covering issues such
as: 1) Basic Troubleshooting and
Maintenance-to help find and re-
move simple computer problems, 2)
Security Issues—will help patrons
know which sites are secure and
3 Check It Out at the Library 3
the grant application can not be
done.
The grant application can be
submitted at later time, but the
grant only provides funding for
50% of the total project. The project
is estimated at $300,000, and the
county does not have $150,000 for
the remaining costs.
The county could pass an opt-out
for the library, but the deadline to
do this was in July. If the opt-out is
pursued, it would need to be ap-
proved by July 2013, which would
be assessed in 2014, but revenue
from the opt-out would not be col-
lected until 2015.
In conclusion, whether the
county receives the grant or ob-
tains a loan from a lending com-
pany, it would be quite some time
before the county would have rev-
enue to pay for the library project.
The commissioners stated that
due to a lack of interest, the grant
would not be pursued at this time.
The commissioners entered ex-
ecutive session at 5:05 p.m. for per-
sonnel matters with Johnston and
Wilson in attendance. They re-
turned to open session at 5:07 p.m.
with no action taken.
With no further business to dis-
cuss, the meeting adjourned.
Continued from front page
Motion carried to hire Terry
Thomas as a part-time, seasonal
employee at an hourly rate of
$10.50.
Another motion carried to hire
Henry Bohannom as a full-time
employee at an hourly rate of
$10.50, with a 90 day probationary
period.
Discussion was held on the
washed culverts along Pass Creek
Road which leads to the Jim Berry
residence and whether it was a
FEMA project.
Twiss stated that he would be
attending a meeting concerning
changing the channel flow of Lost
Dog Creek. He said that a joint
agreement would be needed be-
tween the county and the
landowner.
Twiss requested a petition to ter-
minate county road CS 39, which is
north of Joe Amiotte’s.
Motion carried to offer flu shots
to all county employees.
Billings were denied to Rapid
City Regional Reference Lab in the
amount of $379.
Discussion was held on the li-
brary building project. The grant
application deadline is October 15,
and since no further information
has been gathered, proceeding with
Jackson County Commissioners meet
Open to all Kadoka Area students, faculty,
and community members…
Auditions at in the Kadoka School Music Room
Please enter through the north door
Wednesday – Oct. 17 at 4:00 and 6:00
Friday – Oct. 19 at 4:00 and 6:00
Production dates:
Friday, Nov. 30 at 7:00 • Saturday, Dec. 1 at 7:00
Sunday, Dec. 2 at 2:00
If interested in auditioning please contact
Mr. Shuck (837-2171 ext. 409) or Mrs. Shuck
(837-2171 ext. 403) for an audition packet.
If for some reason you can’t make the audition time, contact
Mr. Shuck or Mrs. Shuck before the first audition time.
Pre-school – 3rd grade students will need to have an adult
representing them at all rehearsals and performances.
A Christmas Carol
Musical Auditions
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens
A Baby Shower For
Ridge Solon
born July 26, 2012
son of Patrick & Heather Solon
on Saturday, October 20
at 10 a.m. at the
Kadoka Presbyterian Church
This & That …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
press@kadokatelco.com
Buy • Rent
Sell • Trade
or Giveaway
Classifieds Work!
Call 837-2259
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
When living at home becomes
difficult, most people would rather
remain in a home-like setting than
move to an assisted living center.
In moments like this, the Veterans
Affair’s Medical Foster Home pro-
gram can help.
“Some veterans do not have any-
one they can live with when they
need a higher level of care,” said
Michelle Hough, MFH coordinator
at VA Black Hills Health Care Sys-
tem “For many, that has meant
going into a facility. MFH offers
them the option of staying in a
home setting, with the care they
need and deserve.”
MFH provides an alternative to
nursing home placement for a vet-
eran who may be chronically or ter-
minally ill with limited social
support. The program begins when
a private individual or couple de-
cides they want to become care-
givers, and take veterans into their
home. VA ensures the home and
caregivers meet high standards
through inspections, background
checks, references and CPR and
first aid certifications.
Once the home and caregivers
are approved, the MFH coordinator
will work with veterans and family
members towards placement. This
involves the veteran, and any fam-
ily members, visiting the MFH and
meeting the caregivers to ensure a
good fit.
When a veteran is placed in a
home, they are assisted through
the VA home based primary care
program. This program provides a
team of medical professionals who
offer primary care in the home set-
ting. The veteran pays the care-
giver directly and VA continues to
provide the medical care and over-
sight.
The MFH program at VA
BHHCS was officially certified Au-
gust 29. There is currently one ap-
proved home in the Black Hills
with two veterans placed. If inter-
ested in becoming a caregiver to a
veteran in need, contact Gary Mc-
Clure at 605-745-2000, extension
92325.
Veterans Affairs medical
foster home project certified
The Internal Revenue Service
has urged taxpayers whose tax-fil-
ing extension runs out on Oct. 15 to
double check their returns for
often-overlooked tax benefits and
then file their returns electroni-
cally using IRS e-file or theFree
File system.
Many of the more than 11 mil-
lion taxpayers who requested an
automatic six-month extension this
year have yet to file. Though Oct.
15 is the last day for most people,
some still have more time, includ-
ing members of the military and
others serving in Iraq, Afghanistan
or other combat zone localities who
typically have until at least 180
days after they leave the combat
zone to both file returns and pay
any taxes due. People with exten-
sions in parts of Louisiana and
Mississippiaffected by Hurricane
Isaac also have more time, until
Jan. 11, 2013, to file and pay.
Check Out Tax Benefits
Before filing, the IRS encour-
ages taxpayers to take a moment to
see if they qualify for these and
other often-overlookedcredits and
deductions:
•Benefits for low-and moderate-
income workers and families, espe-
cially the Earned Income Tax
Credit. The special EITC Assistant
can help taxpayers see if they’re el-
igible.
•Savers credit, claimed on Form
8880, for low-and moderate-income
workers who contributed to a re-
tirement plan, such as an IRA or
401(k.
•American Opportunity Tax
Credit, claimed on Form 8863, and
other education tax benefits for
parents and college students.
E-file Now: It’s Fast,
Easy and Often Free
The IRS urged taxpayers to
choose the speed and convenience
of electronic filing. IRS e-file is fast,
accurate and secure, making it an
ideal option for those rushing to
meet the Oct. 15 deadline. The tax
agency verifies receipt of an e-filed
return, and people who file elec-
tronically make fewer mistakes too.
Everyone can use Free File, ei-
ther the brand-name software, of-
fered by IRS’ commercial partners
to individuals and families with in-
comes of $57,000 or less, or online
fillable forms, the electronic ver-
sion of IRS paper forms available to
taxpayers at all income levels.
Taxpayers who purchase their
own software can also choose e-file,
and most paid tax preparers are
now required to file their clients’
returns electronically.
Anyone expecting a refund can
get it sooner by choosing direct de-
posit. Taxpayers can choose to have
their refunds deposited into as
many as three accounts. See Form
8888 for details.
Quick and Easy
Payment Options
For unemployed workers who
filed Form 1127-A and qualified to
get an extension to pay their 2011
federal income tax, Oct. 15 is also
the last day to pay what they owe,
including interest at the rate of 3
percent per year, compounded
daily. Doing so will avoid the late-
payment penalty, normally 0.5 per-
cent per month.
Taxpayers can e-pay what they
owe, either online or by phone,
through the Electronic Federal Tax
Payment System(EFTPS), by elec-
tronic funds withdrawal or with a
credit or debit card. There is no IRS
fee for any of these services, but for
debit and credit card payments
only, the private-sector card proces-
sors do charge a convenience fee.
For those who itemize their deduc-
tions, these fees can be claimed on
Schedule A Line 23. Those who
choose to pay by check or money
order should make the payment
out to the “United States Treas-
ury”.
Taxpayers with extensions
should file their returns by Oct. 15,
even if they can’t pay the full
amount due. Doing so will avoid
the late-filing penalty, normally
five percent per month, that would
otherwise apply to any unpaid bal-
ance after Oct. 15. However, inter-
est and late-payment penalties will
continue to accrue.
Fresh Start for
Struggling Taxpayers
In many cases, those struggling
to pay taxes qualify for one of sev-
eral relief programs, including
those expanded earlier this year
under the IRS "Fresh Start" initia-
tive.
Most people can set up a pay-
ment agreement with the IRS on
line in a matter of minutes. Those
who owe $50,000 or less in com-
bined tax, penalties and interest
can use the Online Payment Agree-
ment to set up a monthly payment
agreement for up to six years or re-
quest a short-term extension to
pay. Taxpayers can choose this op-
tion even if they have not yet re-
ceived a bill or notice from the IRS.
Taxpayers can also request a
payment agreement by filing Form
9465-FS. This form can be down-
loaded from IRS.govand mailed
along with a tax return, bill or no-
tice.
Alternatively, some struggling
taxpayers qualify for an offer-in-
compromise. This is an agreement
between a taxpayer and the IRS
that settles the taxpayer’s tax lia-
bilities for less than the full
amount owed. Generally, an offer
will not be accepted if the IRS be-
lieves the liability can be paid in
full as a lump sum or through a
payment agreement. The IRS looks
at the taxpayer’s income and assets
to make a determination regarding
the taxpayer’s ability to pay.
Details on all filing and payment
options are on IRS.gov.
Tax-filing, payment extension
to expire Monday, October 15
Influenza has been detected in
South Dakota, prompting a state
health official to urge universal
vaccination.
“We have already reported four
confirmed cases of influenza, all
children,” said Dr. Lon Kightlinger,
State Epidemiologist for the de-
partment. “Fortunately the vaccine
is readily available this year and
now is a good time to be vacci-
nated.”
Kightlinger noted that 51.1% of
South Dakotans over age 6 months
were vaccinated against the flu
during the 2011-2012 season, the
highest rate in the nation.
Annual flu vaccination is recom-
mended for everyone, but some
groups are at higher risk for com-
plications – pregnant women, peo-
ple over 50 years and people with
chronic medical conditions. Health-
care workers and household con-
tacts of high risk populations such
as those with young infants in the
household should especially be vac-
cinated.
Dr. Kightlinger encouraged par-
ents to take advantage of the free
flu vaccine the state offers for kids
from six months to 18 years. Kids
account for a significant number of
flu cases and hospitalizations each
year and also help spread the ill-
ness in the community. Vaccinating
children protects them and the peo-
ple around them.
South Dakotans can also pre-
vent the spread of the flu by prac-
ticing the common sense measures
of the department's "Stopping the
flu starts with you" campaign:
•Wash your hands often with
soap and water or use alcohol-
based hand gel if you can’t wash;
•Cover your mouth when you
cough or sneeze;
•Don't touch your eyes, nose or
mouth;
•Stay home if you're sick.
Influenza is a viral respiratory
illness marked by the sudden onset
of fever, headache, extreme tired-
ness, dry cough, sore throat, runny
or stuffy nose and muscle aches. It
spreads when an infected person
coughs, sneezes or talks, sending
the highly contagious virus into the
air. Learn more at http://flu.sd.gov.
Time for influenza vaccination
could be used as an exit from each
room.
•Agree on a meeting place out-
side the home where family mem-
bers can make contact after
escaping from the house.
•Practice the plan at least twice
a year, with everyone in the home
involved in the practice.
•Make sure to have smoke
alarms in the home and make sure
the batteries are fresh.
“Firefighters in South Dakota do
a great job. Fire Prevention Week
is a time to recognize that,’’ Merri-
man said. “It’s also a good time to
remember that each of us is re-
sponsible for our own safety and
the safety of our loved ones in the
event of a fire.’’
National Fire Prevention Week
is a good time for families to sit
down and plan at least two ways to
safely escape a burning structure,
State Fire Marshal Paul Merriman
says.
National Fire Prevention Week
runs Oct. 7-13, 2012. This year’s
theme is “Have 2 Ways Out.’’ Mer-
riman says the theme is a reminder
that a good fire safety plan includes
more than one exit strategy from a
burning home.
“Fire can be unpredictable, and
it moves more quickly than most
people realize,’’ Merriman said.
“Having an escape plan with at
least two ways out is essential to
protect your family in the event of
a fire in your home. And the escape
plan should be reviewed from time
to time. Fire Prevention Week is a
good time to do that.’’
Statistics from the National Fire
Protection Association say that in
2010, firefighters in the United
States responded to nearly 370,000
home structure fires. Those fires
caused 13,350 civilian injuries and
2,640 civilian deaths, as well as
$6.9 billion in direct damage.
Merriman recommends that
families:
•Make a map of their home,
marking each door or window that
Fire Prevention Week
focuses on safe escapes
With archery deer, firearms an-
telope and the waterfowl seasons
upon us, the South Dakota Game
Fish and Parks Department is urg-
ing sportsmen to be aware of the
extreme fire dangers that exist
across the entire state.
“Hunters in the field can help be
an extra set of eyes this time of
year to help report fires,” said Em-
mett Keyser, Division of Wildlife
assistant director. “GFP is taking
some proactive steps to help ease
landowner concerns, and over the
past couple of weeks we’ve worked
with South Dakota Wildland Fire
to coordinate placement of a single
engine air tanker (SEATs) aircraft
in Lemmon.”
“We’re also working to contract
with a couple of volunteer fire de-
partments who will be out conduct-
ing patrols during the antelope
season, and we’re pleased that
South Dakota Wildland Fire has
volunteered to dispatch two of their
own fire units as well,” said Keyser.
Keyser advised that a GF&P air-
craft will also conduct patrols over
the weekend in those counties
along the Missouri River.
Keyser asked that sportsmen
take a few simple precautions so
they are prepared. He urges them
to:
Equip their vehicles with a large
fire extinguisher, shovel and water
in case they may need to extin-
guish a fire. Extinguish cigarettes
with water or dirt or use an ash-
tray inside their vehicle. Walk
rather than drive and limit all ve-
hicle travel to designated roads and
trails. Never park a vehicle over
dry vegetation.
“By sticking to these rules and
using extra caution, hunters can
safely enjoy their time in the field
and help ease landowner concerns,”
Keyser said.
GF&P urges hunters to be
aware of fire dangers
Sports …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
by Clint Stout with 14, and he also
recorded his third interception of
the year. Sam Pretty Bear recorded
an individual season high 13 tack-
les.
We had to play team defense
this week to keep their athletes
under wraps and that was evident
when you look at the tackling stats.
Everyone contributed.
Rounding out the rest of the de-
fensive statistics were Chris Ander-
son with 9 tackles and 1 sack, Klay
O’Daniel had 8 tackles and 1 sack,
Lane Patterson 7 tackles, Logan
Ammons had 6 tackles, True Buch-
holz 5, Chandlier Sudbeck 4,
Chance Knutson 3, Herbie O’-
Daniel and Dylan Riggins each had
2, and Ryder Sanftner had 1 tackle.
Offensively it took us a while to
get going this week. With a combi-
nation of some new starters on of-
fense, coming off a bye week and it
being a while since we’ve seen
game speed, and of course facing
our toughest opponent to date, it
took us some time to get our timing
down and get into a rhythm. Once
we were able to do that we did
much better.
Lane Patterson started his first
game of his career at quarterback
and did a nice job. Our biggest con-
cern was ball security and Lane did
a very good job of taking care of the
ball and managing the football
game.
Chandlier Sudbeck led the team
in rushing this week with 17 car-
ries for 75 yards. Chance Knutson
ran the ball tough as he had 10 car-
ries for 47 yards and 1 touchdown.
Lane Patterson had 11 carries for
15 yards. Our offensive line did a
good job as well this week.
I think that we started to find
our rhythm again in the second
half of this game so hopefully we
can take that momentum into our
next game as we host the Colome
Cowboys for our last regular sea-
son home game of the year, Friday
night October 12th at 6:00 p.m.
Colome comes in sporting a nice 5-
1 record having only lost to Gre-
gory. They’ve got a very big
offensive and defensive line as well
as a talented back field that we will
have to contain.
Come out Friday night to sup-
port your Kougars on Senior Recog-
nition night. We will be honoring
our 10 seniors prior to the start of
the game.
--by Chad Eisenbraun
Kadoka Area – 6
White River – 22
The Kougar football team trav-
eled to White River last Friday
night for our sixth game of the sea-
son. The boys played tough against
a very talented White River team,
but in the end we came up short
losing 22-6.
Defensively we played a little
flat in the first half and didn’t
tackle as well as we have this sea-
son, but the defense got better as
the game went on and we ended up
allowing White River the fewest
points they’ve been able to score all
season.
We were led this week in tackles
Coming off injuries, a bye week,
Tigers were a tough match for Kougars
Athlete
of the
Week
Sam Pretty Bear
Football
Sam had a personal best 13 tack-
les against White River. Sam is one
of the fastest kids on the team and
also one of our best tacklers. He
hustles all the time and always has
a smile on his face. He’s a great kid
and he’s fun to coach!
Sponsored by
Jackson County
Title Company
and
Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2286
Aggressive offense …Chandlier Sudbeck #21 stiff arms the de-
fense to prevent the tackle and gains some yards for the Kougars.
--photo by Robyn Jones
On Tuesday, October 2 the
Kadoka Lady Kougars hosted the
Lyman County Raiders.
Lyman defeated Kadoka 25-21,
25-18, 25-19.
Mariah Pierce had 8 service
points and 2 aces. Raven Jorgensen
had 8 kills and 5 digs. Taylor
Merchen had 7 set assists and
Tessa Stout added 5.
This was not one of our best
played matches, but Lyman had a
lot to do with that. Lyman had
more height than us and used that
to block and hit very well. We had
a huge lead in the third set but
couldn't manage to hold it.
Our next action is Thursday, Oc-
tober 11, in New Underwood for a
triangular with Jones County and
New Underwood. On Saturday, Oc-
tober 13 we will travel to Douglas
High School.
--by Barry Hutchinson
Face to face
challenge
at the net
with Lyman
Preventing the kill …Mariah Pierce #20 keeps the play alive
on a spike from the Lyman Raiders.
--volleyball photos by Robyn Jones
Back at ya …Raven Jorgensen #2 goes in between the defensive blo
cks and gets the kill.
On the return …Taylor Merchen (L) receives the serve and bumps
the ball to the front row to set up the play, while Marti Herber is ready to
assist.
Aggressive offense …
Myla Pierce #16 stops the play with
this spike.
Camps …the Kadoka girls won thePhilip Invitation cross country meet on Saturday, October 6. The winning
team picture shows Marti Herber (L), Victoria Letellier, Scout Sudbeck, Shaley Herber and Kwincy Ferguson.
--photo by Del Bartels
second-place Todd County team
with a time of 49:11. The girls com-
pete in a 4K run.
Scout Sudbeck came in 2nd with
a time of 15:43; Victoria Letellier
was 7th in 16:39; Shaley Herber
9th in 16:44; Marti Herber 16th in
17:31; Kwincy Ferguson 22nd in
17:56.
In the boys division Bobby An-
derson took 16th with a time of
19:52 in the 5K run.
Bryan Letellier placed 14th in
the junior varsity 4K run with a
time of 17:53.
The Kadoka varsity girls
brought home the winning plaque
from the Philip Invitational Cross
County Meet on Saturday, October
6.
With a team total of 48:06,
Kadoka ranked just ahead of the
In the varsity girls 4K run, three
Kadoka runners claimed 5th, 6th
and 7th places: Scout Sudbeck in
16:31, Victoria Letellier 16:49, Sha-
ley Herber 16:51. Kwincy Ferguson
was 16th in 18:41.
Bobby Anderson took 8th with a
time of 21:35 in the varsisty run
and Brian Letellier was 6th in the
junior varsity with a time of 17:32.
Katy O’Daniel claimed 2nd in
the middle school girls run with a
time of 11:26.
The Kadoka varsity girls took
2nd at the Lyman Raider Nation
Invitational Cross Country Meet
on Wednesday, October 3rd.
The Lyman host team won the
meet.
Girls take 2nd at Lyman Invitational
Cross country team takes all at Philip
October is
National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
Support Breast Cancer Awareness
Wear Pink
Football
Friday, Oct. 12 - KAHS hosts Colome
Thursday, Oct. 18 - Philip hosts Kadoka
Volleyball
Thursday, Oct. 11 - New Underwood Triangular
Saturday, Oct. 13 - Douglas Tourney
Tuesday, Oct. 16 - at Jones County
Monday, Oct. 22 - Kadoka hosts RC Christian
Public Notices …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
2012
Constitutional
Amendments
The following amendments to the State
Constitution are submitted to the voters
by the Legislature. The amendments will
not become effective unless approved by
majority vote.
Constitutional Amendment M
Title: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution regarding certain
provisions relating to corporations.
Attorney General Explanation:
The Constitution currently contains
certain restrictions on the Legislature’s
authority to enact laws regarding corpo-
rations. For example, corporate directors
must be elected by cumulative voting, in
which a shareholder may choose to cast
all votes for a single candidate or spread
the votes among two or more candi-
dates. Corporate stock or bonds may
only be issued for money, labor or prop-
erty received by the corporation. Corpo-
rate stock or debt may not be increased
without prior notice to and consent of cur-
rent stockholders.
Constitutional Amendment M removes
these restrictions, and allows the Legis-
lature to: (1) authorize alternative meth-
ods of voting in elections for corporate
directors; (2) expand the types of contri-
butions a corporation may receive for the
issuance of stock or bonds; and (3) es-
tablish procedures governing the in-
crease of corporate stock or debt.
A vote “Yes” will remove the constitu-
tional restrictions.
A vote “No” will leave the Constitution
as it is.
Full Text of Constitutional Amend-
ment M:
That Article XVII, section 1 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 1. No corporation shall be created or
have its charter extended, changed or
amended by special laws, except those
for charitable, educational, penal or re-
formatory purposes, which are to be and
remain under the patronage and control
of the state; but the Legislature shall pro-
vide, by general laws, for the organiza-
tion of all corporations hereafter to be
created. The Legislature shall have the
authority to enact laws governing the op-
eration and dissolution of corporations.
That Article XVII, section 5 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 5. In all elections for directors or
managers of a corporation, each mem-
ber or shareholder may cast the whole
number of his votes for one candidate, or
distribute them upon two or more candi-
dates, as he may prefer votes in the
manner consistent with laws enacted by
the Legislature.
That Article XVII, section 8 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 8. No corporation shall issue stocks
or bonds except for money, labor done,
or money or property actually received,
or for the reasonable value of other con-
tribution to the corporation; and all ficti-
tious increase of stock or indebtedness
shall be void. The stock and indebted-
ness of corporations shall not be in-
creased except in pursuance of general
law, nor without the consent of the per-
sons holding the larger amount in value
of the stock first obtained, at a meeting
to be held after sixty days notice given in
pursuance of law the manner consistent
with laws enacted by the Legislature.
Constitutional Amendment N
Title: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution repealing certain re-
imbursement restrictions for travel by
legislators to and from a legislative ses-
sion.
Attorney General Explanation:
The Constitution fixes the mileage re-
imbursement rate for legislators at five
cents per mile for their travel to and from
a legislative session.
Constitutional Amendment N repeals
this constitutional limitation and allows
legislator travel reimbursement to be set
by the Legislature.
A vote “Yes” will eliminate the fixed
travel reimbursement rate.
A vote “No” will leave the Constitution
as it is.
Full Text of Constitutional Amend-
ment N:
That Article III, section 6 of the Consti-
tution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 6. The terms of office of the mem-
bers of the Legislature shall be two
years; they legislators shall receive for
their services the salary fixed by law
under the provisions of § 2 of article XXI
of this Constitution, and five cents for
every mile of necessary travel in going to
and returning from the place of meeting
of the Legislature on the most usual
route.
No person may serve more than four
consecutive terms or a total of eight con-
secutive years in the senate and more
than four consecutive terms or a total of
eight consecutive years in the house of
representatives. However, this restriction
does not apply to partial terms to which
a legislator may be appointed.
A regular session of the Legislature
shall be held each year and shall not ex-
ceed forty legislative days, excluding
Sundays, holidays and legislative recess,
except in cases of impeachment, and
members of the Legislature shall receive
no other pay or perquisites except salary
and mileage.
Constitutional Amendment O
Title: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution changing the
method for distributions from the cement
plant trust fund.
Attorney General Explanation:
In 2001, the $238 million in proceeds
from the sale of the state cement plant
were placed in a constitutionally created
trust fund. Currently, the Constitution re-
quires a yearly transfer of $12 million
from the cement plant trust fund to the
state general fund. In addition, under cer-
tain circumstances the Legislature must
authorize distributions of cement plant
trust fund earnings for the support of ed-
ucation.
Amendment O replaces the existing
method for cement trust fund distribu-
tions. The amendment would require a
yearly transfer of 4% of the market value
of the cement plant trust fund to the state
general fund for the support of education.
A vote “Yes” is for changing the
method for distributions from the cement
plant trust fund.
A vote “No” will leave the Constitution
as it is.
Full Text of Constitutional Amend-
ment O:
That Article XIII, section 20 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 20. The net proceeds derived from
the sale of state cement enterprises shall
be deposited by the South Dakota Ce-
ment Commission in a trust fund hereby
created to benefit the citizens of South
Dakota. The South Dakota Investment
Council or its successor shall invest the
trust fund in stocks, bonds, mutual funds,
and other financial instruments as pro-
vided by law. Each fiscal year beginning
in fiscal year 2001, a transfer of twelve
million dollars shall be made from the
trust fund to the state general fund as
provided by law.
That Article XIII, section 21 of the Con-
stitution of the State of South Dakota, be
amended to read as follows:
§ 21. Except as provided in Article XIII,
section 20 of the Constitution of the State
of South Dakota, the original principal of
the trust fund shall forever remain invio-
late. However, the The Legislature shall,
by appropriation, make distributions from
the difference between the twelve million
dollar annual general fund transfer and
five percent of the market value of the
trust fund for the support of education,
but not for the replacement of state aid to
general education or special education,
if the increase in the market value of the
trust fund in that fiscal year was sufficient
to maintain the original principal of the
trust fund after such distributions. Begin-
ning with fiscal year 2006, the market
value of the trust fund shall be deter-
mined by adding the market value of the
trust fund at the end of the sixteen most
recent calendar quarters, and dividing
that sum by sixteen transfer from the
trust fund to the state general fund four
percent of the lesser of the average mar-
ket value of the trust fund determined by
adding the market value of the trust fund
at the end of the sixteen most recent cal-
endar quarters as of December thirty-first
of that year and dividing that sum by six-
teen, or the market value of the trust fund
at the end of that calendar year for the
support of education in South Dakota.
The transfer shall be made prior to June
thirtieth of the subsequent calendar year.
Constitutional Amendment P
Title: An Amendment to the South
Dakota Constitution adding balanced
budget requirements.
Attorney General Explanation:
While the constitution currently re-
stricts the State from incurring debt, it
does not expressly require the State to
have a balanced budget. Amendment P
requires the Governor to propose a bal-
anced budget. In addition, Amendment P
prohibits legislative appropriations from
exceeding anticipated revenues and ex-
isting available funds. The amendment is
not intended to affect other constitutional
provisions
A vote “Yes” will include balanced
budget requirements in the Constitution.
A vote “No” will leave the Constitution
as it is.
Full Text of Constitutional Amend-
ment P:
That Article XII of the Constitution of
the State of South Dakota, be amended
by adding a NEW SECTION to read as
follows:
§ 7. The Governor shall propose a
budget in which expenditures or appro-
priations may not exceed anticipated rev-
enue and existing funds available for
expenditure or appropriation. Appropria-
tions by the Legislature may not exceed
anticipated revenue and existing funds
available for expenditure or appropria-
tion. Nothing in this section is intended to
limit, restrict, expand, modify, or other-
wise affect any other provision of this
Constitution, including Article XIII.
2012 Initiated Measure
The following initiated measure was pro-
posed by petition for submission to the
voters. This initiated measure will not be-
come effective unless approved by ma-
jority vote.
Initiated Measure 15
Title: An initiated measure to increase
state general sales and use taxes for ad-
ditional K-12 public education and Medi-
caid funding
Attorney General Explanation:
The initiated measure increases the
state general sales and use tax rate from
4% to 5%. The additional tax revenue will
be split evenly between K-12 public edu-
cation and Medicaid. The education
funds will be provided to school districts
based on enrollment, to be spent on im-
proving education as school boards de-
termine. The Medicaid funds will be
spent only on payments to Medicaid
providers and related state expenses.
The additional funds cannot replace or
reduce state funding levels set for fiscal
year 2012 relating to existing Medicaid
and K-12 public education programs, in-
cluding state aid to education. Currently,
state aid is to be adjusted annually by 3%
or the rate of inflation, whichever is less.
Under the measure, this annual adjust-
ment cannot exceed the growth rate in
state general fund revenues. Any result-
ing shortfall in state aid will be made up
in subsequent years.
A vote “Yes” is for the proposed law.
A vote “No” is against the proposed
law.
Full Text of Initiated Measure 15:
1. Commencing January 1, 2013,
twenty percent of the monies collected
pursuant to the South Dakota sales and
use taxes imposed by SDCL chapters
10-45 and 10-46 shall be placed in a spe-
cial fund known as the Moving South
Dakota Forward fund. The monies in the
Moving South Dakota Forward fund shall
be allocated into the following two sub-
funds within the Moving South Dakota
Forward fund (1) fifty percent shall be al-
located to the Moving K-12 Education
Forward subfund; and (2) fifty percent
shall be allocated to the Moving Health-
care Forward subfund.
2. Monies allocated in Section 1 of this
initiated measure shall be disbursed as
follows:
(1) Monies in the Moving K-12 Edu-
cation Forward sub-fund are continu-
ously appropriated to the public school
districts of South Dakota, to be distrib-
uted pro rata based upon each school
district’s relative share of fall enrollment
as defined in SDCL chapter 13-13, com-
pared to the fall enrollment of all school
districts. Funds deposited in the Moving
K-12 Education Forward subfund in the
preceding calendar quarter shall be dis-
tributed, provided above, to the public
school districts of South Dakota by the
first business day of February, May, Au-
gust, and November of each year, com-
mencing May 1, 2013. Funds received by
a school district form the Moving K-12
Education Forward subfund shall be
used at the sole discretion of the public
school district’s governing board for the
purpose of improving public education;
(2) Eighty percent of the monies in
the Moving Healthcare Forward subfund
shall be spent only for the purpose of
funding payments to providers to the
South Dakota Medicaid program, which
are incurred due to increases in ex-
penses related to the reimbursement
rates paid to service providers per unit of
service in excess of such reimbursement
rates in effect as of July 1, 2011; and
(3) Twenty percent of the monies in
the Moving Health Care Forward sub-
fund shall be spent only for the purpose
of funding expenses related to payments
to providers to the South Dakota Medi-
caid Program, which are incurred due to
increases in the case load volume expe-
rienced by the South Dakota Medicaid
program from the case levels as of July
1, 2011.
3. No monies deposited in the Moving
K-12 Education Forward subfund may be
spent in any way, either directly or indi-
rectly, to reduce, supplant, or replace ap-
propriations for any state K-12 education
program in existence for state fiscal year
2012, including specifically the state aid
to education and special education pro-
grams established in SDCL chapters 13-
13 and 13-37. The per student allocation
in SDCL chapter 13-13 and the per stu-
dent allocation for each specified disabil-
ity in SDCL chapter 13-37 shalll be
adjusted by the annual application of
their respective index factors, as set forth
in SDCL subdivisions 13-13-10.1(3) and
13-37-35.1(6), as in effect on July 1,
2011. However, the index factor adjust-
ment shall, in no case, exceed the actual
percentage growth in state general fund
revenues for the most recently com-
pleted fiscal year. If the percentage
growth in state general fund revenues is
less than the index factor sin any year,
the difference shall be made up in the im-
mediately following years to the extent
the percentage growth in state general
fund revenues exceeds the index factors.
4. No monies deposited in the Moving
Health Care Forward subfund may be
spent in any way, either directly or indi-
rectly, to reduce, supplant, or replace
state appropriations for any state Medi-
caid program in existence for state fiscal
year 2012.
5. Effective January 1, 2013, any sales
or use tax imposed at a rate of four per-
cent by the provisions of SDCL chapters
10-45 or 10-46 are hereby increased by
one percent each to a total rate of five
percent each.
2012 Referred Laws
The following laws were adopted by the
Legislature and referred to the voters by
petition. These laws will not become ef-
fective unless approved by majority vote.
Referred Law 14
Title: An Act to establish the Large Proj-
ect Development Fund.
Attorney General Explanation:
The referred law establishes the
“Large Project Development Fund.” Be-
ginning January 1, 2013, 22% of contrac-
tors’ excise tax revenues would be
transferred from the state general fund to
the Large Project Development Fund.
The South Dakota Board of Economic
Development would use Large Project
Development Fund monies to provide
grants for the construction of large eco-
nomic development projects within the
state. To be eligible, a project must have
a cost exceeding $5 million. Examples of
eligible projects include laboratories and
facilities for testing, manufacturing,
power generation, power transmission,
agricultural processing, and wind energy.
Examples of ineligible projects include
retail establishments; residential hous-
ing; and facilities for lodging, health care
services and the raising or feeding of
livestock.
A vote “Yes” is for the establishment of
the Large Project Development Fund.
A vote “No” is against the referred law.
Full Text of Referred Law 14:
Section 1. That § 1-16G-1.2 be
amended to read as follows:
1-16G-1.2. The Board of Economic
Development may take title by foreclo-
sure to any property given as security if
the acquisition is necessary to protect
any economic development grant or loan
or any large project development grant
made under pursuant to the provisions of
this chapter, and may sell, transfer, or
convey any such property to any respon-
sible buyer. Any sale of property hereun-
der pursuant to the provisions of this
chapter shall be performed in a commer-
cially reasonable manner. If the sale,
transfer, or conveyance cannot be ef-
fected with reasonable promptness, the
board may, in order to prevent financial
loss and sustain employment, lease the
property to a responsible tenant or ten-
ants.
All sale proceeds or lease payments
received by the board pursuant to this
section shall be deposited in the fund
from which the original grant or loan was
made.
Section 2. That § 1-16G-8 be
amended to read as follows:
1-16G-8. The Board of Economic De-
velopment shall promulgate rules pur-
suant to chapter 1-26 concerning the
following:
(1) The existing barriers to eco-
nomic growth and development in the
state;
(2) Developing investment in re-
search and development in high technol-
ogy industries;
(3) The submission of business
plans prior to the approval of economic
development grants or loans or large
project development grants. Business
plans shall include the products or serv-
ices to be offered by the applicant, job
descriptions with attendant salary or
wage information by job category, educa-
tional requirements by job category,
methods of accounting, financing other
than that provided by the economic de-
velopment grant or loan or a large project
development grant, and marketing,
sales, merchandising, and other disci-
plines proposed to be used for business
growth and expansion;
(4) The cooperation between agen-
cies of state government and applicant
businesses for nonfinancial services in-
cluding loan packaging, marketing assis-
tance, research assistance, and
assistance with finding solutions for com-
plying with environmental, energy,
health, safety, and other federal, state,
and local laws and regulations;
(5) Regular performance monitoring
and reporting systems for participating
businesses to assure compliance with
their business plans and, terms of repay-
ment of an economic development loan
and compliance with terms of an eco-
nomic development grant or a large proj-
ect development grant;
(6) Establish eligibility criteria for
grants and loans;
(7) Establish application procedures
for grants and loans, including a require-
ment that grant and loan applications be
signed under penalty of perjury;
(8) Establish criteria to determine
which applicants will receive grants or
loans;
(9) Govern the use of proceeds of
grants and loans;
(10) Establish criteria for the terms
and conditions upon which loans shall be
made, including matching requirements,
interest rates, repayment terms, and the
terms of security given to secure such
loans; and
(11) Establish criteria for the terms
and conditions upon which grants shall
be made, including permitted uses, per-
formance criteria, and matching require-
ments; and
(12) Establish criteria for the terms
and conditions upon which grants shall
be repaid for noncompliance with the
terms and conditions upon which the
grant was made.
Section 3. That § 1-16G-16.1 be
amended to read as follows:
1-16G-16.1. The Board of Economic
Development may use the revolving eco-
nomic development and initiative fund for
the purpose of paying taxes and liens
and for the procuring of legal services
and other services necessary to protect,
recover, maintain, and liquidate the as-
sets of the revolving economic develop-
ment and initiative fund and the large
project development fund. Such costs
may be incurred and paid up to ten per-
cent of the loan or grant balance with a
majority vote of the board of economic
development. Costs in excess of ten per-
cent shall be approved by a two-thirds
vote of the board. Such services are not
subject to state bid laws so long as such
services are procured in a commercially
acceptable manner.
Section 4. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
Terms used in this Act Mean:
(1) "Large project," a project with a
total project cost exceeding five million
dollars; and
(2) "Project cost," the amount paid
in money, credits, property, or other
money's worth for a project.
Section 5. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
For the purposes of this Act, the term,
project, means a new building or struc-
ture or the expansion of an existing build-
ing or structure, the construction of which
is subject to the contractor's excise tax
imposed by chapters 10-46A or 10-46B.
A project includes laboratory and testing
facilities, manufacturing facilities, power
generation facilities, power transmission
facilities, agricultural processing facilities,
and wind energy facilities. A project does
not include any building or structure:
(1) Used predominantly for the sale
of products at retail, other than the sale
of electricity at retail, to individual con-
sumers;
(2) Used predominantly for residen-
tial housing or transient lodging;
(3) Used predominantly to provide
health care services;
(4) Constructed for raising or feed-
ing of livestock; or
(5) That is not subject to ad valorem
real property taxation or equivalent taxes
measured by gross receipts.
Section 6. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
There is established in the state treas-
ury a fund to be known as the large proj-
ect development fund for the purpose of
making grants for large project develop-
ment.
Section 7. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
The Board of Economic Development
may make grants from the large project
development fund for the purpose of pro-
moting large project development in
South Dakota.
Section 8. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
All money in the fund is hereby appro-
priated for the purpose of making grants
as provided in this Act. Any repayment of
grants from the large project develop-
ment fund and any interest thereon shall
be receipted into the large project devel-
opment fund.
Section 9. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
The Board of Economic Development
may accept and expend for the purposes
of sections 6 and 7 of this Act, inclusive,
any funds obtained from federal sources,
gifts, contributions, or any source if such
acceptance and expenditure is approved
in accordance with § 4-8B-10.
Section 10. That chapter 1-16G be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
There is hereby continuously appropri-
ated to the large project development
fund the amount of twenty-two percent of
all deposits into the general fund of the
contractors' excise tax imposed by chap-
ter 10-46A and the alternate contractors'
excise tax imposed by chapter 10-46B.
Transfers from the general fund to the
large project development fund pursuant
to this provision shall be made on a
monthly basis by the Bureau of Finance
and Management.
Section 11. The provisions of section
10 of this Act are effective on January 1,
2013.
Referred Law 16
Title: An education reform act to estab-
lish a teacher scholarship program; cre-
ate a program for math and science
teacher bonuses; create a program for
teacher merit bonuses; mandate a uni-
form teacher and principal evaluation
system; and eliminate state requirements
for teacher tenure.
Attorney General Explanation:
Referred Law 16 is an education re-
form act with five key components. First,
it establishes a scholarship program for
eligible college students who commit to
teach in South Dakota in critical need
subject areas.
Second, the referred law creates a
program to provide state-funded annual
bonuses for eligible math and science
teachers.
Third, the referred law develops a sep-
arate “Top Teachers” bonus program.
This program provides annual state-
funded merit bonuses for up to 20% of
each school district’s full-time certified
teachers, as awarded by the local school
boards. Alternatively, a school board may
enact its own program for teacher
bonuses, using these state-provided
funds. A school board may opt out of
these merit bonus programs altogether,
resulting in re-allocation of its merit
bonus funds to other participating school
districts.
Fourth, the referred law mandates a
uniform statewide system for evaluating
teachers and principals, including a rat-
ing system.
Fifth, the referred law eliminates state
requirements for continuing contracts
(“tenure”) for teachers who do not
achieve tenure by July 1, 2016. School
boards may, in their discretion, choose to
offer continuing contracts to non-tenured
teachers.
A vote “Yes” is to enact the education
reform act.
A vote “No” is against the referred law.
Full Text of Referred Law 16:
Section 1. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
Beginning in the 2013-2014 academic
year, there is hereby established the
South Dakota critical teaching needs
scholarship program. The purpose of the
program is to encourage South Dakota's
high school graduates to obtain their
postsecondary education in South
Dakota for teaching, to remain in the
state upon completion of their education,
and to contribute to the state and its citi-
zens by working in a critical need teach-
ing area.
Section 2. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
The South Dakota critical teaching
needs scholarship program shall be ad-
ministered by the Critical Teaching
Needs Scholarship Board which is
hereby established. The board shall con-
sist of five members appointed by the
Governor for a term of five years, except
that the initial appointments shall be for
periods of one, two, three, four, and five
years. A majority of the board shall be
present either personally or by telecon-
ference to constitute a quorum.
The Department of Education shall
provide necessary support services to
the board.
Section 3. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
From the total pool of applicants, the
Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship
Board shall award no more than one
hundred critical teaching needs scholar-
ships for each academic year. The board
shall award scholarships based on the
requirements of sections 5 and 6 of this
Act, the filling of critical teaching needs
areas, and other academic and personal
characteristics of each applicant as de-
termined by the board. Notwithstanding
the provisions of this section, if the board
rescinds a scholarship that has been
awarded, the board may award the
amount of the rescinded scholarship to
an alternate.
Section 4. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
All accredited South Dakota public
and nonpublic postsecondary institutions
which offer a baccalaureate degree in el-
ementary or secondary education are el-
igible to participate in the scholarship
program. Each institution may choose
whether to participate in the program and
may limit the number of scholarship re-
cipients the institution will accept in each
academic year.
Section 5. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
In order to be eligible for a critical
teaching needs scholarship, a student
shall:
(1) Agree, in writing, to stay in South
Dakota and work in a critical teaching
needs area for five years after graduation
from a participating postsecondary insti-
tution;
(2) Agree, through a promissory
note, that failure to abide by the provi-
sions of subdivision (1) will result in the
scholarship being converted into an in-
terest bearing loan;
(3) Attend a participating South
Dakota postsecondary institution as an
undergraduate junior or senior and be
accepted in an elementary or secondary
education program at the institution that
will prepare the student to work in a crit-
ical need teaching area; and
(4) Be a United States citizen or
lawful permanent resident.
For purposes of subdivision (3), a jun-
ior is a student who has earned sixty
credit hours prior to the beginning of the
third year of instruction, and a senior is a
student who has earned ninety credit
hours prior to the fourth year of instruc-
tion.
A student is eligible to participate in
the South Dakota critical teaching needs
scholarship program for the equivalent of
two academic years (four consecutive
spring and fall terms) or until the attain-
ment of a baccalaureate degree in ele-
mentary or secondary education in a
critical teaching needs area, whichever
comes first. However, the Critical Teach-
ing Needs Scholarship Board may grant
exceptions to the continuous enrollment
requirements for good cause.
Scholarships are not provided for
summer session students enrolled in tra-
ditional four year programs.
Section 6. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
In addition to the eligibility criteria iden-
tified in section 5 of this Act, the Critical
Teaching Needs Scholarship Board may
require applicants to submit a written
essay or other information by which to
judge the academic and personal qualifi-
cations of the applicant.
Section 7. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
The amount of the annual scholarship
shall equal the tuition and generally ap-
plicable fees for thirty credit hours at a
South Dakota public postsecondary insti-
tution as of July 1, 2013. The scholarship
amount paid to a recipient attending a
participating nonpublic postsecondary in-
stitution shall equal the amount paid to a
recipient attending a public postsec-
ondary institution.
One-half of the annual scholarship
shall be paid to public postsecondary in-
stitutions on behalf of eligible students
there enrolled or directly to eligible stu-
dents enrolled at nonpublic postsec-
ondary institutions at the beginning of the
fall semester, and the other half shall be
paid at the beginning of the spring se-
mester.
If, in any year, the total funds available
to fund the critical teaching needs schol-
arships are insufficient to permit each el-
igible recipient to receive the full amount
provided in this section, the available
moneys shall be prorated and distributed
to each recipient in proportion to the en-
titlement contemplated by this section.
The total amount of the scholarship may
not exceed the amount stipulated in this
section.
Section 8. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
In order to maintain eligibility for the
critical teaching needs scholarship pro-
gram, a student shall:
(1) Maintain a cumulative 2.8 grade
point average on a 4.0 scale. The stu-
dent shall complete consecutive spring
and fall terms in order to remain eligible
for continuation of the scholarship pro-
gram from term to term;
(2) Make satisfactory academic
progress towards a degree by earning
thirty credit hours per year;
(3) Attend and graduate from a par-
ticipating South Dakota postsecondary
institution with an elementary or second-
ary education degree which qualifies the
student to teach in a critical teaching
needs area in South Dakota; and
(4) Upon graduation, stay in South
Dakota and teach in a critical teaching
needs area for five years.
If factors beyond the control of a stu-
dent who has been awarded a critical
teaching needs scholarship prevent the
student from meeting any of the require-
ments in subdivisions (1) to (3), the Crit-
ical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board
may temporarily waive the requirements
of those subdivisions. The board may re-
scind a scholarship award if the student
does not maintain eligibility as prescribed
in those subdivisions.
Failure to fulfill the requirements of
subdivision (4) shall result in the critical
teaching needs scholarship being con-
verted into an interest bearing loan. The
board shall set the rate of interest, as al-
lowed by law. The five years of employ-
ment referenced in subdivision (4) shall
be fulfilled consecutively unless the
board waives this requirement for good
cause, and the five years of employment
may be fulfilled at more than one school
district in South Dakota.
Section 9. That chapter 13-55 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
The Department of Education may re-
ceive gifts, donations, grants, or endow-
ments for the purposes of sections 1 to
8, inclusive, of this Act.
Section 10. The Board of Education
may promulgate rules pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26 to define areas of critical teach-
ing need for the purposes of sections 1
to 8, inclusive, of this Act, to establish ap-
plication requirements for the critical
teaching needs scholarship, and to fur-
ther accomplish the purposes of sections
1 to 8, inclusive, of this Act.
Section 11. Beginning in the 2014-
2015 school year, there is hereby cre-
ated the math and science teacher
incentive program within the Department
of Education to provide funds to public
school districts for the purpose of provid-
ing rewards to attract certified teachers
who teach in math and science subject
areas in middle school and high school
or who are certified with a math or sci-
ence specialist endorsement which they
are utilizing for any grade, kindergarten
through twelve. By January 31, 2014, the
South Dakota Board of Education shall
promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-
26 establishing which courses qualify as
math and science courses for purposes
of the program. For purposes of this Act,
math and science courses are those
courses established by the Board of Ed-
ucation pursuant to this section. For pur-
poses of this Act, middle school is a
school consisting of any combination of
two or more consecutive grades, five to
eight, inclusive, and high school is a
school consisting of any combination of
three or more consecutive grades, in-
cluding ninth grade to twelfth grade, in-
clusive.
Continued on page 8
Public Notices …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
2012
Constitutional
Amendments
Continued from page 7
Section 12. Participation in the math
and science teacher incentive program is
voluntary for teachers, and incentive re-
wards are to supplement but not replace
what a teacher receives under a contract
between the teacher and the school dis-
trict or a collective bargaining agreement
between a district and the district's teach-
ers. No collective bargaining agreement
between a district and the district's teach-
ers may limit the ability of a teacher to
qualify for or receive an incentive reward.
Nothing in sections 11 to 16, inclusive, of
this Act is intended to create a contractual
right or property right in the math and sci-
ence teacher incentive program.
Section 13. The Department of Educa-
tion shall provide application forms for
teachers wishing to participate in the
math and science teacher incentive pro-
gram. A teacher wishing to participate in
the program shall complete and sign the
form and provide the form to the business
office of the school district by the close of
business on October first to be eligible for
the program for that school year. A
teacher wishing to participate shall submit
a new application for each school year.
Completed applications are a public
record pursuant to chapter 1-27, but per-
sonal information in the applications may
be redacted as allowed by that chapter.
Section 14. To be eligible for the math
and science teacher incentive program, a
teacher shall fulfill the following require-
ments:
(1) Comply with section 13 of this
Act;
(2) Receive a distinguished rating or
proficient rating, as referenced in section
38 of this Act, on the teacher's most re-
cent evaluation;
(3) Teach math or science courses
in middle school or high school for at least
fifty percent of a full-time equivalent posi-
tion's assignments submitted in the an-
nual teacher data collection pursuant to §
13-3-51, and any rules promulgated pur-
suant thereto, and be currently certified
with a middle school or high school en-
dorsement to teach each course, or utilize
a math or science specialist endorsement
for any grade, kindergarten through
twelve; and
(4) Be in full-time status for the en-
tire school year.
Nothing in subdivision (3) shall entitle
any teacher to receive more than the
amount stipulated in section 16 of this
Act.
Section 15. By September first of each
year, the school board of each district
shall submit to the Department of Educa-
tion a copy of the application of each
teacher eligible for the math and science
teacher incentive program for the previ-
ous school year pursuant to the require-
ments of this Act. The Department of
Education may require additional informa-
tion from the district as necessary to ver-
ify each teacher's eligibility for the reward.
The department may refuse to issue a re-
ward for any teacher for whom the infor-
mation required by this section is not
provided by the deadline.
Section 16. The amount of the reward
under the math and science teacher in-
centive program is two thousand eight
hundred fifty dollars per eligible teacher
to be distributed as described in this sec-
tion. No later than October first of each
year, at the same time that foundation
program state aid is distributed to school
districts pursuant to §§ 13-13-10.1 to 13-
13-41, inclusive, the secretary of the De-
partment of Education shall distribute
funds for the math and science teacher
incentive program for teachers that qual-
ify pursuant to this Act. These funds shall
be distributed in lump sum payments.
Subject to the requirements of this Act,
the department shall pay to the school
district two thousand eight hundred fifty
dollars per eligible teacher in that district.
Within thirty days of receipt from the de-
partment, the school district shall distrib-
ute the funds as follows:
(1) Two thousand five hundred dol-
lars shall be paid to each eligible teacher
in the district; and
(2) Three hundred fifty dollars may
be retained by the district to pay the dis-
trict's share of applicable federal taxes,
the district's share of contribution to the
South Dakota Retirement System, and
administrative costs.
Section 17. Beginning in the 2014-
2015 school year, there is hereby created
the top teachers reward program within
the Department of Education to provide
funds to public school districts for the pur-
pose of providing top teacher rewards for
certified teachers.
Section 18. Participation in the top
teachers reward program is voluntary for
teachers, and such rewards shall supple-
ment but not replace what a teacher re-
ceives under a contract between the
teacher and the school district or a collec-
tive bargaining agreement between a dis-
trict and the district's teachers. No
collective bargaining agreement between
a district and the district's teachers may
limit the ability of a teacher to qualify for
or receive a top teacher reward. Nothing
in sections 17 to 25, inclusive, of this Act
is intended to create a contractual right or
property right in the top teachers reward
program.
Section 19. In each school year, up to
twenty percent of each school district's
full-time equivalent certified teaching po-
sitions, as measured by the district's an-
nual teacher data collection pursuant to §
13-3-51 and any rules promulgated pur-
suant to that section, shall be eligible to
receive a top teacher reward, subject to
the requirements of this Act. The Depart-
ment of Education shall multiply the num-
ber of full-time equivalent certified
teaching positions in the district by twenty
percent. If this calculation results in a frac-
tion, the maximum number of eligible po-
sitions may not exceed the next lowest
whole number. If there are fewer than five
full-time equivalent certified teaching po-
sitions in a school district, the maximum
number of eligible positions shall be one.
Section 20. No later than May first of
each year, at the same time that founda-
tion program state aid is distributed to a
school district pursuant to §§ 13-13-10.1
to 13-13-41, inclusive, the secretary of
the Department of Education shall inform
each school district of the number of eli-
section.
Section 51. That § 13-43-6.3 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.3. Until a teacher is in or be-
yond the fourth consecutive term of em-
ployment as a teacher with the school
district, a A school board may or may not
renew the teacher's contract of a non-
tenured teacher. The superintendent or
chief executive officer shall give written
notice of nonrenewal by April fifteenth but
is not required to give further process or
a reason for nonrenewal.
After a teacher is in or beyond the
fourth consecutive term of employment
as a teacher with the school district, §§
13-43-6.1 and 13-43-6.2 apply to any
nonrenewal of the teacher's contract. A
school board may refuse to renew the
teacher's contract of a tenured teacher for
just cause, including breach of contract,
poor performance, a rating of unsatisfac-
tory on two consecutive evaluations pur-
suant to section 38 of this Act,
incompetency, gross immorality, unpro-
fessional conduct, insubordination, neg-
lect of duty, or the violation of any policy
or regulation of the school district. On or
before April fifteenth, the superintendent
or chief executive officer shall notify the
tenured teacher and the school board in
writing of the recommendation to not
renew the teacher's contract.
Acceptance by the a tenured or non-
tenured teacher of an offer from the dis-
trict to enter into a new contract with the
teacher shall be in the manner specified
in the offer. Failure of the teacher to ac-
cept the offer in the manner specified
constitutes the termination of the existing
contract between the teacher and the dis-
trict at the end of its term.
Section 52. That § 13-43-6.4 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.4. Notwithstanding §§ 13-43-
6.1 to §§ 13-43-6.2 and 13-43-6.3, inclu-
sive, if a teacher's contract is not renewed
due to a reduction in staff, only written no-
tice is required, which shall be provided
by the school board to the teacher by
April fifteenth.
Section 53. That § 13-43-6.6 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.6. Although a collective bar-
gaining agreement between a district and
its teachers may set forth specific addi-
tional grounds for termination or set forth
provisions as to the procedure or notice,
no agreement may limit the district's right
to terminate or refuse to renew the con-
tract of a tenured or nontenured teacher
for the grounds set forth in §§ 13-43-6.1
to 13-43-6.3, inclusive. No agreement
may limit the protection afforded to a
teacher under § 13-43-6.5.
Section 54. For purposes of this Act,
the term, school year, means the regular
school term as referenced in § 13-26-2.
Section 55. That § 13-3-73 be re-
pealed.
13-3-73. There is hereby created the
teacher compensation assistance pro-
gram within the Department of Education
to provide funds to school districts for the
purpose of assisting school districts with
teacher compensation. School districts
are eligible to receive funds from the
teacher compensation assistance pro-
gram based on their fall enrollment num-
bers. The department shall provide
four-fifths of the funds for the teacher
compensation assistance program to
each participating school district. The
Board of Education shall promulgate
rules, pursuant to chapter 1-26, to create
an oversight board appointed by the sec-
retary of education for approval of appli-
cations as well as guidelines for district
applications based on district instructional
goals, market compensation or other spe-
cific district requirements as approved by
the department. Participation in the pro-
gram is discretionary. District applications
shall be approved by the local board of
education. The applications shall be re-
viewed by the teacher compensation as-
sistance program oversight board and
shall be recommended to the Board of
Education for final approval.
The Legislature shall review the
teacher compensation assistance pro-
gram in 2012 to determine its effective-
ness and to determine whether to
continue the program.
Section 56. That § 13-3-74 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74. The Teacher Compensation
Assistance Program Oversight Board
shall annually monitor the progress of
participating school districts with their
teacher compensation assistance plans,
and submit its findings to the Board of Ed-
ucation.
Section 57. That § 13-3-74.1 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74.1. There is hereby established
the Teacher Compensation Assistance
Program Advisory Council. The council
shall be under the supervision of the De-
partment of Education. The speaker of
the House of Representative shall ap-
point three members of the House of
Representatives to the council, including
at least one member from each political
party, and the president pro tempore of
the Senate shall appoint three members
of the Senate to the council, including at
least one member from each political
party. The Governor shall appoint the re-
maining members of the council, includ-
ing at least one teacher, one school
administrator, and one representative of
a statewide education organization.
Section 58. That § 13-3-74.2 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74.2. The council shall examine
how teacher quality and teacher salaries
in the state can be enhanced, and how
the funds appropriated in fiscal year 2010
and in subsequent fiscal years by the
state for the teacher compensation assis-
tance program established in § 13-3-73
can best be utilized to assist in that effort.
The council shall consider a variety of is-
sues surrounding teachers including mar-
ket compensation, a tiered licensure
system, a system for evaluating teachers,
mentoring and induction programs for
teachers, and continuing contracts for
teachers.
Section 59. That § 13-3-74.3 be re-
pealed.
13-3-74.3. The council shall complete
its work and the secretary of education
shall provide its recommendations to the
Governor and to the Executive Board of
the Legislative Research Council no later
than November 15, 2008.
Continued on page 9
and to establish best practices for the
evaluation of the performance of certified
principals that shall be used by individual
school districts. The South Dakota Board
of Education shall promulgate rules pur-
suant to chapter 1-26 establishing stan-
dards for defining the four-tier rating
system required by section 44 of this Act
and adopting the model evaluation instru-
ment referenced in section 45 of this Act.
Section 44. Beginning in the 2014-
2015 school year, any public school dis-
trict seeking state accreditation shall
evaluate the performance of each certi-
fied principal not less than every other
year.
Each school district shall adopt the
model evaluation instrument required by
section 45 of this Act and procedures for
evaluating the performance of certified
principals employed by the school district
that:
(1) Are based on the minimum pro-
fessional performance standards estab-
lished by the Board of Education pursuant
to section 43 of this Act;
(2) Require multiple measures of
performance;
(3) Serve as the basis for programs
to increase professional growth and de-
velopment of certified principals;
(4) Include a plan of assistance for
any certified principal whose performance
does not meet the school district's per-
formance standards; and
(5) Are based on the following four-
tier rating system:
(a) Distinguished;
(b) Proficient;
(c) Basic; and
(d) Unsatisfactory.
Section 45. A work group appointed by
the secretary of education shall provide
input in developing the standards refer-
enced in section 43 of this Act, the four-
tier rating system required by section 44
of this Act, and in developing a model in-
strument for principal evaluation that shall
be used by school districts for the 2014-
2015 school year and each school year
thereafter. The work group shall consist
of the following members:
(1) Six principals: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school;
(2) Three teachers: one from an el-
ementary school, one from a middle
school, and one from a high school;
(3) Two superintendents;
(4) Two school board members;
(5) Four parents who have students
in various levels of the K-12 system;
(6) One representative of the South
Dakota Education Association;
(7) One representative of the School
Administrators of South Dakota; and
(8) One representative of the Asso-
ciated School Boards of South Dakota.
Section 46. All persons conducting
teacher or principal evaluations required
by sections 38 to 45, inclusive, of this Act
shall participate in training conducted by
the Department of Education before con-
ducting the evaluations.
Section 47. That chapter 13-43 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
For purposes of this chapter, the term,
tenured teacher, means a teacher who is
in or beyond the fourth consecutive term
of employment as a teacher with the
school district prior to July 1, 2016. If,
prior to July 1, 2016, the school district
and the teacher have entered into a con-
tract pursuant to §§ 13-43-4 and 13-43-5
for the teacher's fourth consecutive term
of employment with the district or a sub-
sequent consecutive term of employment
with the district, then that teacher is a
tenured teacher for purposes of this chap-
ter. The term, nontenured teacher, means
a teacher who is not yet in or beyond the
fourth consecutive term of employment
as a teacher with the school district prior
to July 1, 2016. Any teacher who is not in
or beyond the fourth consecutive term of
employment with the school district prior
to July 1, 2016, need not acquire contin-
uing contract status under this chapter.
Nothing in this section or section 53 of
this Act prohibits a school district from
choosing to provide continuing contract to
a nontenured teacher beyond what is pro-
vided for in this chapter.
Section 48. That § 13-43-6 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6. The contract shall specify the
date at or about which the school shall
begin, the term of employment, the
wages per month, and the time of pay-
ment thereof; such of wages. The con-
tract shall be signed in duplicate and one
copy filed in the office of the business
manager and the other retained by the
teacher. Such The contract may be is-
sued covering any period of years, not to
exceed three employment up to one year,
over which a teacher holds a certificate
which will shall remain valid without re-
newal.
Section 49. That § 13-43-6.1 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.1. A tenured or nontenured
teacher may be terminated, by the school
board, at any time for just cause, includ-
ing breach of contract, poor performance,
incompetency, gross immorality, unpro-
fessional conduct, insubordination, neg-
lect of duty, or the violation of any policy
or regulation of the school district. A
school district may nonrenew a teacher
who is in or beyond the fourth consecu-
tive term of employment as a teacher with
the school district pursuant to § 13-43-6.3
for just cause, including breach of con-
tract, poor performance, incompetency,
gross immorality, unprofessional conduct,
insubordination, neglect of duty, or the vi-
olation of any policy or regulation of the
school district.
Section 50. That § 13-43-6.2 be
amended to read as follows:
13-43-6.2. If nonrenewal of a tenured
teacher is contemplated under § 13-43-
6.1 § 13-43-6.3, the superintendent or
chief executive officer shall give written
notice of an intention to recommend non-
renewal to the teacher and the school
board; a written statement of the reasons
for the recommendation; access to the
employment records of the teacher; the
opportunity to the teacher for a hearing
before the school board to present rea-
sons in person or in writing why the non-
renewal should not occur; and the
opportunity to be represented. The
teacher shall request the hearing as pro-
vided in § 13-43-6.9. The school board
shall conduct the hearing not sooner than
fourteen days, nor later than forty-five
days, after receipt of the teacher's re-
quest for hearing. The parties may waive
the time limitations provided for in this
gible positions in that district for the cur-
rent school year, based on the calculation
in section 19 of this Act, and distribute to
each school district five thousand seven
hundred dollars per eligible position.
These funds shall be distributed in lump
sum payments. The school district shall
retain these funds until distribution pur-
suant to section 21 of this Act.
Section 21. No later than September
first of each year, the school district shall
distribute the funds received pursuant to
section 20 of this Act as follows:
(1) Five thousand dollars shall be
paid to each teacher selected for a top
teacher reward pursuant to section 24 of
this Act for the previous school year; and
(2) Seven hundred dollars may be
retained by the district to pay the district's
share of applicable federal taxes, the dis-
trict's share of contribution to the South
Dakota Retirement System, and adminis-
trative costs.
Any funds received pursuant to section
20 of this Act which are not distributed ac-
cording to this section shall be returned
to the Department of Education within
thirty days.
Section 22. The Department of Educa-
tion shall provide application forms for
teachers wishing to participate in the top
teachers reward program. A teacher wish-
ing to participate in the program shall
complete and sign the form and provide
the form to the business office of the
school district by the close of business on
October first to be eligible for the program
for that school year. A teacher wishing to
participate shall submit a new application
for each school year. Completed applica-
tions are a public record pursuant to
chapter 1-27, but personal information in
the applications may be redacted pur-
suant to that chapter.
Section 23. A participating teacher
shall be full-time and receive a distin-
guished rating, as referenced in section
38 of this Act, on the teacher's most re-
cent evaluation to be eligible for a top
teacher reward. In addition, a distin-
guished teacher's selection for the reward
may be based on consideration of the fol-
lowing factors as determined by the
school board:
(1) Mentoring of less experienced
teachers;
(2) Curriculum development;
(3) Assessment development;
(4) Data analysis;
(5) Service to the local district, state,
or national committees or task forces;
(6) Leadership in a professional
learning community;
(7) National board certification;
(8) Other leadership activities or
recognitions; and
(9) Other additional criteria as deter-
mined by the school board.
Section 24. No later than August first of
each year, the school board of each
school district shall determine which par-
ticipating teachers, if any, are selected to
receive top teacher rewards for the previ-
ous school year according to the criteria
in section 23 of this Act. The number of
teachers selected may not exceed the
number of eligible positions referenced in
sections 19 and 20 of this Act.
Section 25. Department of Education
may require each school district to pro-
vide any information necessary to verify
the district's compliance with sections 20
to 24, inclusive, of this Act. Upon a finding
of noncompliance, the department may
require the district to return any funds dis-
tributed contrary to the requirements of
this Act.
Section 26. Notwithstanding any other
provisions of this Act, public school dis-
tricts may opt out of the top teacher re-
ward program by providing written notice
to the Department of Education. The no-
tice shall be approved by a majority of the
school board and signed by the school
board president. The department shall
provide forms for this purpose. Beginning
in 2014, the notice shall be postmarked
no earlier than January first, and no later
than January thirty-first, of each year in
order to be effective for the next school
year. The district shall provide a separate
form for each school year for which the
district desires to opt out. If a school dis-
trict fails to follow the requirements of this
section, the attempt to opt out is void, and
the district shall comply with the require-
ments of the top teacher reward program.
If a district opts out pursuant to this
section, the teachers employed in the dis-
trict are not eligible to participate in the
top teacher reward program. The district
shall provide written notice to each certi-
fied teacher of the teacher's ineligibility for
the program before executing a teaching
contract with the teacher for the school
year for which the opt out is effective.
School districts may not opt out of the
math and science teacher incentive pro-
gram established pursuant to this Act.
Section 27. If a school district opts out
pursuant to section 26 of this Act, all
funds which the district would have been
eligible to receive for the top teacher pro-
gram pursuant to this Act shall be redis-
tributed as follows:
(1) To obtain the redistribution
amount, the Department of Education
shall calculate the number of positions
that would have been eligible for the top
teacher reward program in each opt out
district pursuant to section 19 of this Act,
and multiply that calculation by five thou-
sand seven hundred dollars;
(2) No later than May first of each
year, at the same time that foundation
program state aid is distributed to a
school district pursuant to §§ 13-13-10.1
to 13-13-41, inclusive, the department
shall allocate the redistribution amount,
on a pro rata basis, to each public school
district that did not opt out of the top
teacher reward program or is participating
in a local teacher reward program pur-
suant to sections 28 to 35, inclusive, of
this Act. Each district's pro rata share of
the redistribution amount shall be based
on the number of full-time equivalent cer-
tified teacher positions in the district, as
measured by the district's annual teacher
data collection pursuant to § 13-3-51 and
any rules promulgated pursuant to that
section; and
(3) No later than September first of
each year, the redistribution amount re-
ceived by each district pursuant to subdi-
vision (2) shall be distributed equally
among all teachers receiving top teacher
rewards in the district pursuant to sec-
tions 17 to 25, inclusive, of this Act, or
among all teachers receiving local
teacher rewards pursuant to sections 28
to 35, inclusive, of this Act, but each dis-
trict may withhold an amount necessary
to pay the district's share of applicable
federal taxes, the district's share of con-
tributions to the South Dakota Retirement
System, and administrative costs. Any
funds not distributed according to this
subdivision shall be returned to the De-
partment of Education within thirty days.
Section 28. Notwithstanding any other
provision of this Act, a public school dis-
trict may create a local teacher reward
plan to act as a substitute for the top
teacher reward program beginning in the
2014-2015 school year. If the local
teacher reward plan is developed in com-
pliance with sections 28 to 35, inclusive,
of this Act, the district may utilize the local
teacher reward plan to provide the district
with the flexibility to use the funds that
would otherwise be provided to the dis-
trict through the top teachers reward pro-
gram.
Participation in the local teacher re-
ward plan is voluntary. Rewards shall
supplement but not replace what a
teacher receives under a contract be-
tween the teacher and the school district
or a collective bargaining agreement be-
tween a district and the district's teachers.
No collective bargaining agreement be-
tween a district and the district's teachers
may limit the ability of a teacher to qualify
for or receive a local teacher reward.
Nothing in sections 28 to 35, inclusive, of
this Act, is intended to create a contrac-
tual right or property right in local teacher
rewards.
Teachers in the district may not partic-
ipate in the top teacher reward program
for any school year for which the district
has adopted a local teacher reward plan.
The district shall provide written notice to
each certified teacher of the teacher's in-
eligibility for the top teacher reward pro-
gram and provide a copy of the district's
local teacher reward plan to each certified
teacher before executing a teaching con-
tract with the teacher for the school year
for which the local teacher reward plan is
effective.
Section 29. The local teacher reward
plan shall reward certified teachers in the
district based upon one or more of the fol-
lowing criteria:
(1) Demonstrating an impact on stu-
dent achievement;
(2) Demonstrating teacher leader-
ship; or
(3) Market based needs of the
school district based upon critical teach-
ing area needs of the school district.
Section 30. There is hereby estab-
lished the Local Teacher Reward Plan Ad-
visory Council. The council shall provide
input in developing one or more model
local teacher reward plan applications
based upon the criteria in section 29 of
this Act. The work group shall be ap-
pointed by the secretary of education and
consist of the following members:
(1) A combination of six principals
and superintendents: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school;
(2) Six teachers: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school; and
(3) Three school board members:
one from a small school district, one from
a medium-sized school district, and one
from a large school district.
Section 31. The Board of Education
shall promulgate rules, pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26, establishing the application form
for the local teacher reward plan, further
guidelines for district applications based
on the criteria in section 29 of this Act, a
system to monitor whether each partici-
pating school district is complying with the
local teacher reward plan, and penalties
for noncompliance.
Section 32. There is hereby estab-
lished the Local Teacher Reward Plan
Oversight Board. The board shall consist
of the following members:
(1) One member of the Senate ap-
pointed by the president pro tempore of
the Senate;
(2) One member of the House of
Representatives appointed by the
speaker of the House of Representatives;
(3) Two representatives of the busi-
ness community appointed by the Gover-
nor;
(4) One representative of an educa-
tional association appointed by the Gov-
ernor;
(5) One current or former teacher
appointed by the Governor; and
(6) The secretary of the Department
of Education.
Section 33. A school district shall sub-
mit the local teacher reward plan applica-
tion to the Department of Education no
later than January thirty-first of each year,
beginning in 2014, to be eligible to apply
the local teacher reward plan to the up-
coming school year.
By March fifteenth of each year, the
Local Teacher Reward Plan Oversight
Board shall review all applications to de-
termine compliance with this Act, and any
rules promulgated thereto. The board
may request additional information from
the district as part of the review of the ap-
plication. By April first of each year, the
board shall inform each district whether
the district's local teacher reward plan has
been approved for the upcoming school
year. If the application is denied, the dis-
trict may adopt a model plan established
pursuant to section 30 of this Act or opt
out pursuant to sections 26 and 27 of this
Act.
Section 34. If a district's local teacher
reward plan is approved, the Department
of Education shall calculate the number
of positions in the district that would have
been eligible for the top teacher reward
program pursuant to section 19 of this Act
and multiply that calculation by five thou-
sand seven hundred dollars. No later than
May first of each year, at the same time
that foundation program state aid is dis-
tributed to the district pursuant to §§ 13-
13-10.1 to 13-13-41, inclusive, the
secretary of the Department of Education
shall distribute this amount to the district
in a lump sum payment.
Section 35. No later than September
first of each year, the district shall distrib-
ute the funds received pursuant to section
34 of this Act to each certified teacher se-
lected for a reward under the local
teacher reward program for the previous
school year, but the district may withhold
an amount necessary to pay the district's
share of applicable federal taxes, the dis-
trict's share of contributions to the South
Dakota Retirement System, and adminis-
trative costs. Any funds not distributed ac-
cording to this section shall be returned
to the Department of Education within
thirty days.
Section 36. A teacher may apply for
both the math and science teacher incen-
tive program and the top teachers reward
program established pursuant to this Act
or both the math and science teacher in-
centive program and the local teacher re-
ward plan established pursuant to this
Act.
Section 37. That § 13-42-34 be
amended to read as follows:
13-42-34. Any public school district
seeking state accreditation shall evaluate
the performance of each certified teacher
in years one through to three, inclusive,
not less than annually, and each certified
teacher in the fourth contract year or be-
yond, not less than every other year.
Each For the 2012-2013 school year
and the 2013-2014 school year, each
school district shall may adopt proce-
dures for evaluating the performance of
certified teachers employed by the school
district that:
(1) Are based on the minimum pro-
fessional performance standards estab-
lished by the Board of Education pursuant
to § 13-42-33;
(2) Require multiple measures;
(3) Serve as the basis for programs
to increase professional growth and de-
velopment of certified teachers; and
(4) Include a plan of assistance for
any certified teacher, who is in the fourth
or subsequent year of teaching, and
whose performance does not meet the
school district's performance standards.
Section 38. That § 13-42-34 be
amended to read as follows:
13-42-34. Any public school district
seeking state accreditation shall evaluate
the performance of each certified teacher
in years one through three not less than
annually, and each certified teacher in the
fourth contract year or beyond, not less
than every other year. Beginning in the
2014-2015 school year, each certified
teacher shall be evaluated on an annual
basis.
Each school district shall adopt the
model evaluation instrument required by
section 40 of this Act and procedures for
evaluating the performance of certified
teachers employed by the school district
that:
(1) Are based on the minimum pro-
fessional performance standards estab-
lished by the Board of Education pursuant
to § 13-42-33;
(2) Require multiple measures of
performance as follows:
(a) Fifty percent of the evaluation of
a teacher shall be based on quantitative
measures of student growth, based on a
single year or multiple years of data. This
quantitative data shall be based on re-
ports of student performance on state val-
idated assessments established pursuant
to § 13-3-55. For those teachers in
grades and subjects for which there is no
state-validated assessment for the quan-
titative portion of the evaluation, teachers
shall demonstrate success in improving
student achievement using objective
measures, which can include portfolio as-
sessments, end-of-course exams, or
other district approved assessments
which demonstrate student growth; and
(b) Fifty percent of the evaluation of
a teacher shall be based on qualitative,
observable, evidence-based characteris-
tics of good teaching and classroom prac-
tices as further defined in the model
evaluation instrument referenced in sec-
tion 40 of this Act. Districts may collect
additional evidence using any of the fol-
lowing if not required by the model evalu-
ation instrument:
(i) Classroom drop-ins;
(ii) Parent surveys;
(iii) Student surveys;
(iv) Portfolios; or
(v) Peer review;
(3) Serve as the basis for programs
to increase professional growth and de-
velopment of certified teachers; and
(4) Include a plan of assistance for
any certified teacher, who is in the fourth
or subsequent year of teaching, and
whose performance does not meet the
school district's performance standards;
and
(5) Are based on the following four-
tier rating system:
(a) Distinguished;
(b) Proficient;
(c) Basic; and
(d) Unsatisfactory.
Section 39. The provisions of section
38 of this Act are effective July 1, 2014.
Section 40. That § 13-42-35 be
amended to read as follows:
13-42-35. A work group appointed by
the secretary of education shall provide
input in developing the standards for
defining the four-tier rating system re-
quired by section 38 of this Act and shall
develop in developing a model evaluation
instrument that may shall be used by
school districts for the 2014-2015 school
year and subsequent school years. The
work group shall consist of the following
members:
(1) Six teachers: two from an ele-
mentary school, two from a middle
school, and two from a high school;
(2) Three principals: one from an el-
ementary school, one from a middle
school, and one from a high school;
(3) Two superintendents;
(4) Two school board members;
(5) Four parents who have students
in various levels of the K-12 system:
(6) One representative of the South
Dakota Education Association;
(7) One representative of the School
Administrators of South Dakota; and
(8) One representative of the Asso-
ciated School Boards of South Dakota.
Section 41. That chapter 13-42 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
Pursuant to chapter 1-26, the South
Dakota Board of Education shall promul-
gate rules establishing standards for
defining the four-tier rating system re-
quired by section 38 of this Act and adopt-
ing the model evaluation instrument
referenced in section 40 of this Act.
Section 42. That chapter 3-18 be
amended by adding thereto a NEW SEC-
TION to read as follows:
Beginning with the 2014-2015 school
year, the procedures for evaluation and
the model evaluation instrument refer-
enced in sections 38 to 41, inclusive, of
this Act may not be the subject of any col-
lective bargaining agreement between a
district and the district's teachers.
Section 43. The Board of Education
shall promulgate rules pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26 to establish minimum profes-
sional performance standards for certified
principals in South Dakota public schools,
Public Notices …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
2012
Constitutional
Amendments
Continued from page 8
Section 60. That § 13-3-75 be re-
pealed.
13-3-75. The South Dakota Board of
Education shall promulgate rules pur-
suant to chapter 1-26 establishing the ap-
plication process; application timelines;
the guidelines for district applications
based on school district instructional
goals or market compensation; and a sys-
tem to monitor the progress of participat-
ing school districts with their
compensation assistance plans and to
ensure that each participating school dis-
trict is complying with the plan as submit-
ted to the board.
Section 61. That § 13-3-83.1 be re-
pealed.
13-3-83.1. Once all the school districts
with approved applications have received
their funding pursuant to § 13-3-73, the
Department of Education may set aside
from any funds remaining, a sum not to
exceed one hundred thousand dollars
from the teacher compensation assis-
tance program appropriation for the pur-
pose of providing grants to educational
cooperatives and multi-district centers
that employ teachers for public schools.
The South Dakota Board of Education
may promulgate rules, pursuant to chap-
ter 1-26, to establish the granting
process.
Section 62. The following groups shall,
no later than January 15, 2013, provide a
progress report to the Legislature outlin-
ing the work accomplished:
(1) The Critical Teaching Needs
Scholarship Board, established in section
2 of this Act;
(2) The Local Teacher Reward Plan
Advisory Council established in section
30 of this Act;
(3) The Local Teacher Reward Plan
Oversight Board established in section 32
of this Act;
(4) The teacher evaluation work
group appointed pursuant to section 40 of
this Act; and
(5) The principal evaluation work
group appointed pursuant to section 45 of
this Act.
Section 63. Sections 47 to 53, inclu-
sive, of this Act are effective on July 1,
2016.
Section 64. There is hereby estab-
lished the South Dakota Education Re-
form Advisory Council. The council shall
advise upon the implementation of this
Act, and shall examine further education
reform issues including:
(1) The advantages and disadvan-
tages of initiatives designed to provide for
increased compensation for teachers;
(2) Future teaching areas of critical
need, and solutions to recruit, retain, and
train teachers in these critical need areas;
and
(3) Other ideas to improve student
achievement.
The council shall report its initial find-
ings to the Legislature and the Governor
no later than December 1, 2012.
Section 65. The South Dakota Educa-
tion Reform Advisory Council established
in section 64 of this Act shall consist of the
following members:
(1) Three members of the Senate,
including at least one member of each
political party, appointed by the president
pro tempore of the Senate;
(2) Three members of the House of
Representatives, including a member of
each political party, appointed by the
speaker of the House;
(3) The secretary of the Department
of Education, who will serve as chair;
(4) Three superintendents, jointly
appointed by the president pro tempore
of the Senate and the speaker of the
House;
(5) Three principals, one each from
an elementary school, a middle school,
and a high school, jointly appointed by the
president pro tempore of the Senate and
the speaker of the House;
(6) Five teachers, jointly appointed
by the president pro tempore of the Sen-
ate and the speaker of the House;
(7) Three school board members,
jointly appointed by the president pro
tempore of the Senate and the speaker of
the House;
(8) One member of the Board of Re-
gents, selected by the board;
(9) One representative of the post-
secondary technical institutes, selected
by the presidents of the respective insti-
tutions;
(10) One representative selected by
the School Administrators of South
Dakota;
(11) One representative selected by
the South Dakota Education Association;
and
(12) One representative selected by
the Associated School Boards of South
Dakota.
[Published October 11, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $760.63]
NOTICE OF
DEADLINE FOR
VOTER
REGISTRATION
Voter registration for the General Elec-
tion to be held on November 6, 2012, will
close on October 22, 2012. Failure to
register by this date will cause forfeiture
of voting rights for this election. If you are
in doubt about whether you are regis-
tered, check the Voter Information Portal
at HYPERLINK "http://www.sdsos.gov"
www.sdsos.gov or call the county audi-
tor at 605–837–2422.
Registration may be completed during
regular business hours at the county au-
ditor’s office, municipal finance office,
secretary of state’s office and those loca-
tions which provide driver’s licenses,
food stamps, TANF, WIC, military recruit-
ment, and assistance to the disabled as
provided by the Department of Human
Services. You may contact the county
auditor to request a mail-in registration
form or access a mail-in form at HY-
PERLINK "www.sdsos.gov "
www.sdsos.gov .
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in voter registration, absentee
voting or polling place accessibility.
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Jackson County, SD
[Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the
total approximate cost o at an estimated
cost of $27.96]
Official Proceedings
REGULAR MEETING
Board of Jackson
County
Commissioners
September 10, 2012
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in regular session at 9:00
a.m., Monday, September 10, 2012 at
the Jackson County Courthouse.
Chairman Jim Stilwell called the meeting
to order with members Bennett, Bonen-
berger, and Denke present. Twiss arrived
at 9:10 a.m. Larry Johnston was also
present.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Denke moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that the minutes of the August meeting
be approved.
The Auditor’s account with the County
Treasurer was approved as of August 31,
2012:
Total amount of
deposits in banks . . . . . . . . . .355.19
Total amount of
actual cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,760.08
Total amount of
Register of Deeds cash . . . . .250.00
Total amount of checks . . . . .26,793.32
Returned checks . . . . . . . . . . .1,639.48
Money Market account . . . .697,517.60
Time Deposits . . . . . . . . . . .117,132.00
JCFSA Passbook
savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,377.51
Total Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . .779,683.22
TOTAL COUNTY
FUNDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .675,524.84
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .406,918.80
Road & Bridge . . . . . . . . . .162,642.09
CH & BR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,658.54
Sec. Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77,875.32
911 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,197.55
Other Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,608.02
Emer./Disaster . . . . . . . . . . . . - 736.98
Abuse Center . . . . . . . . . . . .11,907.98
Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,904.93
L. E. S. T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,452.59
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96.00
TOTAL TRUST &
AGENCY FUNDS . . . . . .174,300.34
Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90,468.61
Townships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373.70
Towns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,481.02
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38,124.42
Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .727.03
JCFSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,377.51
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23,748.05
Register of Deeds August collections:
$2,823.87.
The following bills from the files of the
County Auditor were presented, exam-
ined, allowed and ordered paid:
Salaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31,792.56
BankWest, payroll tax . . . . . . .7,647.55
AFLAC, ins. prem. . . . . . . . . .1,008.42
Jackson Co. Flexible
Spending Acct.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .339.08
Chase, def. comp. ded. . . . . . . . .30.00
S. D. Retirement,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,892.94
Wellmark, group
health ins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,930.42
Boston Mutual Ins.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214.08
Credit Collection
Bureau, payroll ded. . . . . . . . .460.00
Hauge Assoc., payroll ded. . . . .100.00
S. D. State Treasurer,
08/12 cash rec. trans. . . . .39,549.42
To Whom It May Concern,
07/12 tax apport. . . . . . . . .24,356.52
S. D. Game, Fish & Parks,
game licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . .110.00
U. S. Postal Service,
certified mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23.35
S. D. Emergency Mgmt.
Assoc., conf. registration . . . . .40.00
Raymond Clements,
refund ins. prem. . . . . . . . . . . .134.48
Pennington County 911,
E911 PSAP services . . . . . .3,769.61
S. D. Assn. of Assessing
Officers, registration . . . . . . . .300.00
City of Kadoka, service . . . . . . .208.66
Golden West, service . . . . . . .1,089.72
LaCreek Electric, service . . . . . . .36.61
S. D. Bureau of Info. &
Tech., internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90.00
Verizon, service . . . . . . . . . . . . .185.72
West Central
Electric, service . . . . . . . . . .1,179.51
West River Electric, service . . . . .40.41
West River Lyman Jones
Water, service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.50
Century Link, 911 access
& database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146.17
Golden West, 911
access & database . . . . . . . . .765.45
Kadoka Telephone, 911
access & database . . . . . . . . .160.43
Knology, 911 servic e line . . . . . .52.60
Bank West, Cashier’s Ck.
To Brookings Co. . . . . . . . . .$436.00
Haakon County, Adm.
Asst. salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .695.71
Carrie Weller, expenses . . . . . . .132.23
Best Western
Huron, lodging . . . . . . . . . . . .147.00
Crossroads Hotel, lodging . . . . . .37.50
Reliable Office
Supplies, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .97.20
Ken Bartlett, repair
Interior Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . .331.50
Bear Automotive, tire repair . . . . .10.60
Black Hills Truck & Trailer,
exhaust parts . . . . . . . . . . . . .230.46
Book of the Month
Club, books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112.29
Butler Machinery,
batteries & parts . . . . . . . . . . .630.53
Heidi Coller, B/A draws . . . . . . .100.00
D-Ware, Inc., registration . . . . . . .50.00
Dakota Business
Center, supplies . . . . . . . . . . . .23.00
Terry Deuter, expenses . . . . . . . .79.25
Diesel Machinery,
JCB loader glass . . . . . . . . .1,870.18
Discount Fuel, gas . . . . . . . . . . .111.00
Jamie Dolezal, expenses . . . . . . .36.00
Ernie’s Building Ctr.,
courthouse windows . . . . . .3,910.18
Great Western Tire, tires . . . . . .124.20
Hoag Diesel, exhaust
repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,548.91
Hogen’s Hardware,
supplies, parts, tools . . . . . . . .553.18
Hughes Co. Sheriff,
serve papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.30
J S Construction, install
8 windows, . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,632.65
J & S ReStore, repairs . . . . . . . .597.60
Jackson Co. Cons. Dist.,
’12 approp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,500.00
Kadoka Care Center,
office rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500.00
Kadoka Press, publications . . . .381.56
Kemnitz Law Office,
office exp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .405.00
Kennedy Implement,
2 Woods mowers . . . . . . . .15,300.00
Kevin Lewis, ct. appt. atty. . . . . .794.00
McLeods, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .104.99
Jeremy Mansfield,
equip. a/c repair . . . . . . . . . . .695.00
Marshall & Swift, handbook . . . .238.55
Microfilm Imaging
Systems, scanner rent . . . . . . .75.00
Midwest Coop., gas & fuel . . .8,992.46
Miller Garbage, service . . . . . . . .96.40
Debra Moor, books &
ink cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90.99
Patty Moran, B/A draw . . . . . . . . .60.00
Oien Implement, parts . . . . . . . .131.38
Lisa Patterson, witness fee . . . . .20.74
Joseph Parr, ct. appt. atty. . . . . .296.80
Pennington Co. Jail,
prisoner board . . . . . . . . . . . . .504.00
People’s Market, supplies . . . . .197.74
Rapid City OB/Gyn,
employee physical . . . . . . . . .125.00
Runnings, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .64.17
Servall, rugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146.69
Sheehan, parts, turbo . . . . . . .1,931.07
S. D. Continuing Legal
Education, Dakota Disc . . . . .550.00
S. D. Federal Property
Agency, tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.00
S. D. Public Assurance
Alliance, screener
coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00
S. D. Dept. of Health,
lab fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .350.00
S. D. Sheriff’s Assoc.,
registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75.00
Jackie Stilwell, expenses . . . . . . .83.00
Jackie Stilwell, cell
phone costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00
TruGreen Chemlawn,
lawn service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100.00
Twilight First Aid, supplies . . . . . .79.95
U P S, shipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.40
Upstart, library supplies . . . . . . .166.90
Voyager, gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84.20
W. W. Tire, tires . . . . . . . . . . . .2,712.68
West Publishing, law books . . . . .85.00
West River International,
muffler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104.58
Winner Police Dept.,
prisoner board/trans. . . . . . .4,019.11
Glen Bennett, expenses . . . . . . .19.24
Delores Bonenberger,
expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.92
Larry Denke, expenses . . . . . . . .84.36
Ron Twiss, expenses . . . . . . . . . .99.90
S. D. Assn. of Co. Comm.,
08/12 Mod. &
Preserv. fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42.00
Data Spec., Inc., VSO
computer program &
signature pad . . . . . . . . . . . . .514.00
The S. D. Developmental Center, Red-
field, SD has billed Jackson County an
additional $60.00 for an accrued total of
$360.00 for client assessment. Jackson
County responded in June 2012 that
charges should be assessed to the ap-
propriate federal government agency as
per SDCL 27B-3-27. Bonenberger
moved, Bennett seconded, that the
billing be denied.
Two notices of hospitalization were re-
ceived from Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal. The board took no action at this time.
One notice of hospitalization was re-
ceived from Sanford Medical Center,
Sioux Falls. The patient is eligible for IHS
benefits. The board took no action.
A notice of hospitalization was received
from Regional Behavioral Health, Rapid
City. The notice states the person is eli-
gible for IHS benefits. The board took no
action.
The monthly analysis of the County Road
fund was presented to the board and re-
viewed. Vicki Wilson, Auditor, presented
the monthly financial report.
Bonenberger moved, Denke seconded,
that the following amount be transferred
from General Fund to the following Spe-
cial Revenue Fund.
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2012 – 18
WHEREAS, counties are al-
lowed to make operating
transfers from the General
Fund to Special Revenue
Funds; and
WHEREAS, the following
transfers were scheduled as
per the 2012 Jackson County
budget;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, that the following
amount be transferred from
General Fund to the following
Special Revenue Fund:
Emergency
Management
Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000.00
Resolution adopted this 10th
day of September, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
Discussion was held on the second Mon-
day of October being a holiday and alter-
nate days to hold the October meeting.
Twiss moved, Bennett seconded that the
October meeting be held at 9:00 a.m.,
Monday, October 1, 2012.
Correspondence was received from Wal-
worth County Title Company that they
have accepted Jackson County’s estab-
lished fee of $125.00 per book to obtain
scanned records from the Jackson
County Register of Deeds office.
Vicki Wilson reported that loss control
surveys are not completed, as waiting for
a response from the insurance carrier.
The City of Philip is hosting a property
taxation meeting at 1:00 p.m., Septem-
ber 25, 2012. Representatives from the
S. D. Dept. of Revenue will be present for
the workshop / discussion.
Sheriff Clements met with the board. He
reported that he had spoken with the
contractor in charge on the SD Hwy 73
project. The contractor informed Sheriff
Clements that they are no longer using
the county road for hauling water to the
Hwy 73 project.
Information on Correctional Risk Serv-
ices was presented to the board. They
provide coverage for prisoner medical
costs that exceed $10,000.00. The board
took no action at this time.
A copier rental agreement from Century
Business Products on the current copier
being used by the county was presented
to the board. The monthly base rental
charge will remain at $54.98 per month.
Bonenberger moved, Stilwell seconded,
that the agreement be approved and au-
thorized Vicki Wilson to sign the rental
agreement.
The group health insurance renewal
quote from WellMark Blue Cross Blue
Shield was received. Premiums for the
current policy have increased $28 per
month per employee. The renewal
amount is lower than the amount pro-
posed in the 2013 budget. Bonenberger
moved, Twiss seconded, that Jackson
County stay with the current WellMark
Blue Cross Blue Shield for the coming
year.
Information on GAP insurance to reduce
employee’s out of pocket medical ex-
penses was presented to the board. Es-
timated cost to Jackson County would be
$997.91 per month. No action was taken
by the board at this time.
Surplus property was discussed. Three
parcels of land taken by the county by tax
deed were presented to the board. The
board was also informed that old book
covers from the Register of Deed need
to be disposed of. Bonenberger moved,
Stilwell seconded that the three parcels
of land be declared surplus and be sold
at auction on October 1, 2012, and that
the old book covers be declared surplus
and be disposed of at the Kadoka Trans-
fer Site.
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners, acting as the Jackson County
Appraisal Board, appraised the three
parcels of land to be sold at public auc-
tion on October 1, 2012.
At 11:28 a.m., Denke moved, Bonen-
berger seconded, that the board go into
executive session to discuss personnel
matters. Larry Johnston was present.
Denke moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that the board come out of executive ses-
sion at 11:32 a.m. The board took no ac-
tion at this time.
The voucher submitted by Rapid City
Ob/Gyn, physical, $225.00 was dis-
cussed. Bonenberger moved, Bennett
seconded, that Jackson County pay
$125.00 of the amount billed and that the
employee be responsible for the remain-
der.
The voucher submitted by Clinical Labo-
ratory of the Black Hills for an autopsy in
the amount of $2,042.00 was discussed.
Denke moved, Twiss seconded, that pay-
ment of the billing be denied.
A voucher for Prevention Magazine, sub-
scription, $15.97, was discussed. Denke
moved, Twiss seconded, that payment of
the billing be denied.
At 11:30 a.m., as was advertised, a pub-
lic hearing was held on a petition submit-
ted by Vona Fite to have a section of
road added to the county highway sys-
tem. No persons appeared in favor of or
objection to the proposed addition to the
county highway system. Following dis-
cussion by the board, Bonenberger
moved, Twiss seconded, that the board
deny addition of the section of road to the
county highway system as the section of
road is the driveway at the petitioner’s
residence.
A utility easement submitted by Veryl
Prokop to have a water line placed
through Redstone Road (CS 80) in Sec.
33, T 44 N, R 35 W was presented to the
board. Bennett moved, Bonenberger
seconded, that the easement be ap-
proved.
A petition submitted by Jeff Willert,
Belvidere, to have three-quarters of a
mile of road added to the county highway
system was presented to the board.
A public hearing has been scheduled for
October 1, 2012.
Twiss moved, Denke seconded, that the
board recessed for lunch. The board re-
convened at 1:00 p.m. with all members
present. Larry Johnston, Mitch Olney,
Hwy. Supt., and Kolette Struble, Highway
Secretary, were also present.
Mitch Olney, Hwy. Supt. reported that
they were finding veins of gravel at the
Guptill Pit and have stopped screening
there due to dry conditions. He reported
they have moved the loader to the May
Pit and are fixing blow outs in that area.
Mitch Olney reported that West River
Lyman Jones would charge $500 to hook
onto the rural water line at Interior for
water, plus they would charge $1.13 per
gallon for any water obtained. Mitch
Olney also reported that T. K. Sampson
would have about 4,000 gallon of water
available for use in graveling the road to
his place. Twiss suggested using water
out of a nearby creek.
Report was made of severe washboard-
ing north of the truck stop on South
Creek Road.
Mitch Olney reported that windshields of
two pickups have been replaced.
Twiss reported that concrete from bridge
repair on Hwy. 44 south of Interior is
being stockpiled near the road. Discus-
sion was held on erosion from Lost Dog
Creek, using the concrete rubble, and
changing the channel of the creek back
to it’s original channel.
A contract to purchase 10,000 (+/-) ton of
gravel at $0.60 per ton from Dennis
Sharp at a pit located in the SE4, Sec.
34, T 43 N, R 39 W was presented to the
board. Twiss moved, Bennett seconded,
that the contract be approved and
signed.
Discussion was held on repair costs for
storm damage to the JCB loader.
Mitch Olney reported that the John
Deere loader has fuel system problems,
and that the exhaust has been repaired
on the red Volvo truck.
Mitch Olney reported that CDLs would be
obtained this week.
Cattle guards were discussed and re-
vised Ordinance 94-1 (2007) was re-
viewed. Denke reported on a proposed
cattle guard in the Long Valley area that
could be of concern to the county if it is
placed on a sidehill.
Discussion was held on a payloader
scale being sold by sealed bids by
Brookings County. Bennett reported that
the scale has never been used, and the
company that makes the scale will mount
the scale for an additional $1,700.00.
Following discussion, Bennett moved
that Jackson County submit a sealed bid
of $4,300.00 for the payloader scale
being sold by Brookings County and pay
the company that makes the scale an ad-
ditional $1,700.00 to install the scale on
a Jackson County loader if Jackson
County is the successful bidder. Denke
seconded the motion.
Applications for the Highway Worker po-
sition were reviewed. The board took no
action at this time.
At 1:54 p.m., Twiss moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Larry Johnston and Mitch Olney, Hwy.
Supt. were present.
Denke moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that the board come out of executive ses-
sion at 2:33 p.m.
Following executive session, Twiss
moved, Bonenberger seconded, that the
board accept the resignation of Mitch
Olney, Hwy. Supt.
Twiss moved, Denke seconded, that the
Highway Superintendent position be ad-
vertised, and that salary be dependent
upon experience.
Denke moved, Bennett seconded, that
the position of Interim Highway Superin-
tendent be offered to Aaron Richardson
for a 90 day probationary period at
$33.000.00 per year.
The board reviewed the proposed 2013
Jackson County Budget. Bennett re-
ported that the current county cell phone
plan has three phones and the basic
charge is $129.00 per month. To add an
additional phone would increase the
basic charges to $185.00 per month. The
board instructed the amounts for group
health insurance be reduced in all de-
partmental budgets to the new premium
renewal rate, correct the total amount for
Emergency & Disaster to $13,430, that
$25,000 be added to the Road & Bridge
budget for repair of the Kadoka Shop,
and that up to $5,000 be added to the
Building budget to replace the remaining
windows in the courthouse.
Denke moved, Bennett seconded, that
the 2013 salaries of the Jackson County
Commissioners remain at the 2012
amount.
Discussion was held on the proposed Li-
brary Building project. The timeline for
proposing an opt out, applying for the
CDBG grant, the time frame to have the
project completed if a grant is obtained,
applying for a loan for the county’s share
of the costs, and possible donations
were discussed. Denke moved, Stilwell
seconded, that Jackson County draw up
a public notice requesting monetary do-
nations for the Library Building project.
Motion carried with the following vote:
Bennett, yea; Bonenberger, yea; Denke,
yea; Twiss, nay.
This being the time to adopt the Jackson
County Annual Budget, Denke moved,
Bonenberger seconded, that the follow-
ing 2013 budget be adopted.
ADOPTION OF ANNUAL
BUDGET
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2012 – 19
Whereas, SDCL 7-21-5 thru
13 provides that the Board of
County Commissioners shall
each year prepare a Provi-
sional Budget of all contem-
plated expenditures and
revenues of the County and all
its institutions and agencies for
such fiscal year; and
Whereas, the Board of County
Commissioners did prepare a
Provisional Budget and cause
same to be published by law;
and
Whereas, due and legal notice
has been given to the meeting
of the Board of County Com-
missioners for the considera-
tion of such Provisional
Budget and all changes, elim-
inations and additions have
been made thereto.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, That such provi-
sional budget as amended
and all its purposes, sched-
ules, appropriations, amounts,
estimates and all matters
therein set forth, SHALL BE
APPROVED AND ADOPTED
AS THE ANNUAL BUDGET
OF THE APPROPRIATIONS
AND EXPENDITURES FOR
Jackson County, South
Dakota and all its institutions
and agencies for calendar
year beginning January 1,
2013 and ending December
31, 2013 and the same is
hereby approved and adopted
by the Board of County Com-
missioners of Jackson County,
South Dakota this 10th day of
September, 2012. The annual
budget so adopted is available
for public inspection during
normal business hours at the
office of the County Auditor,
Jackson County, South
Dakota. The accompanying
taxes are levied by Jackson
County for the year January 1,
2012 through December 31,
2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
See the budget on page 10
There being no further business to come
before the board, Twiss moved, Bonen-
berger seconded, that the meeting be
adjourned and that the board meet in
regular session on Monday, October 1,
2012 due to holiday on October 8, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
[Published October 11, 2012 at the total
approximate cost of $240.12]
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Lana F. Sanftner,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 12-13
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NO-
TICE OF INFORMAL PROBATE AND
APPOINTMENT OF
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Notice is given that on 19th day of Sep-
tember, 2012 in Circuit Court of Jackson
County, South Dakota, BankWest, Inc.
Trust Department, whose address is 420
S. Pierre Street, Pierre, South Dakota
57501, was appointed as Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of Lana F. San-
ftner.
Creditors of Decedent must file their
claims within four (4) months after the
date of the first publication of this notice
or their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk of Courts with a copy of the claim
mailed to the Personal Representative.
Dated this 1st day of October, 2012.
/s/ Greg Litton
Greg Litton, Trust Officer
BankWest, Inc. Trust Department
420 S. Pierre Street
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 399-2265
Jessica L. Larson
Beardsley, Jensen & Von Wald,
Prof. L.L.C.
4200 Beach Dr., Ste. 3
P.O. Box 9579
Rapid City, SD 57709
Tel: (605) 721-2800
Fax: (605) 721-2800
Ms. Carol Schofield
Jackson County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 128
Kadoka, South Dakota 57543
1-605-837-2122
[Published October 11, 18, & 25, 2012]
)
)SS
)
Public Notices…
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
2013 ANNUAL BUDGET FOR JACKSON COUNTY
January 1, 2013 thru December 31, 2013
GENERAL GOVERNMENT:
Bd. of County Commissioners 71,470
Contingency 30,000
Elections 6,050
Judicial System 49,500
Auditor 89,775
Treasurer 81,785
Data Processing 2,450
States Attorney 61,210
General Gov’t. Building 59,035 12,625
Director of Equalization 81,145
Register of Deeds 55,555 1,440
Veterans’ Service Officer 10,505
Predatory Animal (GFP) 3,440
HIPA 200
Building Acquistion 2,500
TOTAL GENERAL GOV’T. 604,620 -0- -0- -0- -0- 12,625 -0- -0- 1,440
PUBLIC SAFETY:
Sheriff 165,145 2,150
Jail 36,000
Coroner 8,115
Emergency & Disaster Services 0 13,430 10,000
911 Communication Center 46,250
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 209,260 -0- 46,250 13,430 -0- -0- 2,150 10,000
PUBLIC WORKS:
Highways, Roads, Bridges 836,620
TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS -0- 836,620 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0--0-
HEALTH & WELFARE:
Support of Poor 10,000
Food Stamp Distribution 400
Community Action Program 3,810
Community Health Nurse 18,920
Ambulance 7,700
Board of Health 60
WIC 17,775
Domestic Abuse 0 12,040
Mentally Ill 5,000
Mental Health Centers 1,000
Mental Illness Board 3,500
TOTAL HEALTH & WELFARE 68,165 -0- -0- -0- 12,040 -0- -0- -0- -0-
CULTURE & RECREATION:
Public Library 61,005
Memorial Day Expense 150
County Fair Board 1,000
TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 62,155 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES:
County Extension 17,140
Conservation Districts 18,000
Weed & Pest Control 5,000
TOTAL CONS. NAT. RESOURCES 40,140 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
URBAN & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT:
Enterprise Facilitation 6,105
TOTAL URBAN & EC. DEV. 6,105 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
SUBTOTALS 990,445 836,620 46,250 13,430 12,040 12,625 2,150 10,000 1,440
OTHER USES:
Operating Transfers Out
To Emergency/Disaster 5,137
To Building 7,500
To Co. Road & Bridge 342,199
To 911 Service 16,718
TOTAL OTHER USES 371,554 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
FOR 2012/2013 BUDGET 1,361,999 836,620 46,250 13,430 12,040 12,625 2,150 10,000 1,440
TOTAL BUDGET 2,296,554
MEANS OF FINANCE
Cash Balance Applied 274,378 77,869 966 -0- 12,173 5,790 1,513 -0- -0-
Cash Balance Applied CH & BR -0-
Cash Balance Applied Sec. Rd. -0-
Current Property Tax Levy 597,265 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Opt Out Amount 150,000 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Current Property Tax Levy CH & BR 1,130 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Current Property Tax Levy Sec. Rd. 29,825 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Less 25% to Cities -2,460 -100 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Other Taxes 45,975 1,730 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Net Total Taxes 790,780 32,585 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Licenses & Permits 2,865 -0- -0- -0- 300 -0- -0- -0- -0-
Intergovernmental Revenue 297,100 425,650 -0- 9,000 -0- -0- -0- -0- -0-
Charges for Goods & Services 52,660 31,000 200 750 -0- 1,515
Fines & Forfeits 3,750
Miscellaneous Revenue 11,900 1,850
Other Financing Sources 250 500
Transfers In 342,199 16,718 5,137 7,500
Subtotal Other Revenue 368,525 770,199 47,718 14,137 500 7,500 750 10,526 1,515
SUBTOTAL 1,433,683 880,653 48,684 14,137 12,673 13,290 2,263 10,526 1,515
Less 5% (SDCL 7-21-18) - 71,684 - 44,033 - 2,434 - 707 - 633 - 665 - 113 - 526 - 75
NET MEANS OF FINANCE 1,361,999 836,620 46,250 13,430 12,040 12,625 2,150 10,000 1,440
2012 TOTAL 2,296,554
MAXIMUM LEVIES ALLOWED 2012/2013:
Within Limited Levy: General 597,265 3.741 $3.741 per thousand dollars of valuation
Opt Out Amount 150,000 0.940 $0.940 per thousand dollars of valuation
Outside Limited Levy: CH & BR 1,130 0.007 $0.007 per thousand dollars of valuation
Other Special: Sec. Road 29,825 0.233 $0.233 per thousand dollars of valuation
TOTAL LEVIES 778,220 4.921 $4.921 per thousand dollars of valuation
ESTIMATED VALUATION 2012/2013
General & CH & BR 159,647,784
Secondary Road 127,751,584
[Published October 11, 2012 at the total approximate cost of $254.41]
GENERAL
FUND
ROAD &
BRIDGE
FUND
“911”
FUND
EMGCY
DISASTER
FUND
ABUSE
CENTER
FUND
BUILDING
FUND
LEST
FUND
OTHER
GRANTS
M&P
FUND
Town of Belvidere
Regular Meeting
September 10, 2012
A motion was made by Rudy Reimann to
call the meeting to order. John Rodgers
seconded the motion. The following peo-
ple were present: John Rodgers, Rudy
Reimann, and Jo Rodgers. Absent was
Wayne Hindman.
OLD BUSINESS:
Minutes from the August 6, 2012 meeting
were read. With there being no objec-
tions, a motion was made by Rudy
Reimann and seconded by John
Rodgers to accept the minutes as read.
NEW BUSINESS:
Discussion was held on winterizing the
pump house and water tower buildings.
Jo will contact someone to replace the
toilet in the city office.
Hagen Benefits sent a renewal packet for
our property insurance and valuation for
fiscal year 2013. John Rodgers made a
motion and was seconded by Rudy
Reimann to renew the insurance and
keep the property valuation as is.
The reading of Resolution #12-01 2013
Estimated Annual Budget and first read-
ing of Ordinance #12-02 2013 Appropri-
ation Ordinance was held. The second
reading will be held at the October 8,
2012 meeting.
BILLS APPROVED AND PAID:
Golden West, phone
& internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103.24
Jo Manke-Rodgers, wages . . . .47.17
Kadoka Press,
publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.49
Reliable Office
Supplies, ink . . . . . . . . . . . .117.00
West Central, electricity . . . . . .677.87
WR/LJ, water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.00
With there being no further business
Rudy Reimann made a motion to adjourn
the meeting. John Rodgers seconded
the motion. The next meeting will be Oc-
tober 8, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the city of-
fice.
John L. Rodgers
Council President
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published October 11, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $21.78]
Town of Belvidere
Ordinance #12-02
2013 Appropriation
Ordinance
Be it ordained by the Town of Belvidere
that the following sum will be appropri-
ated to meet the obligations of the mu-
nicipality.
General Fund . . . . . . . . . . .16,264.00
Adopted this 10th day of September,
2012.
John Rodgers
Council President
Rudy Reiman, Trustee
Wayne Hindman, Trustee
First Reading: September 10, 2012
Second Reading: October 8, 2012
Adoption: January 1, 2013
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published October 11, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $11.70]
Town of Belvidere
Resolution 12-01
2013 Estimated
Annual Budget
Be it resolved by The Town of Belvidere
Whereas, the town council deems that
the following estimated sums are needed
for the obligations of the municipality.
410 General
Governments . . . . . . . . .44,660.00
431 Streets & Highways . . . .5,610.00
460 Economic
Development . . . . . . . . . .3,450.00
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53,720.00
The following designates the fund of
funds that the money is derived from.
310 Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23,856.00
320 Licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,900.00
335 State
Shared Revenue . . . . . . .5,970.00
360 Miscellaneous
Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,730.00
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37,456.00
Need from Tax Levy . . . . . .16,264.00
The finance officer is directed to certify
the following dollar amount of tax levies
made in the Resolution to the county au-
ditor.
Dated this 8th day of October, 2012.
John Rodgers
Council President
Rudy Reimann,
Trustee
Wayne Hindman,
Trustee
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published October 11, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $18.53]
Chances are, if you receive So-
cial Security benefits, Supplemen-
tal Security Income (SSI), or any
federal payment, you receive it
electronically. If you don’t yet,
that’s about to change.
There is a U.S. Department of
Treasury rule that does away with
paper checks for most federal ben-
efit and non-tax payments by
March 1, 2013. With a few excep-
tions, this mandate includes Social
Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs,
Railroad Retirement Board, Office
of Personnel Management benefits,
and other non-tax payments.
People required to switch have
the option of direct deposit to a
bank or credit union account or
they can have their monthly pay-
ment directed into a Direct Ex-
press® debit card account
(Treasury’s debit card program).
Please visit www.godirect.org to
learn more.
So, why the push for electronic
payments instead of paper checks
received in the mail? There’s a list
of reasons an electronic payment
is better than an old-fashioned
paper check.
It’s safer: no risk of checks being
lost or stolen; it’s easy and reliable:
no need to wait for the mail or go
to the bank to cash a check; it
saves taxpayers money: no cost for
postage and paper and printing;
Treasury estimates this will save
taxpayers $1 billion over 10 years;
and it’s good for the environment:
it saves paper and eliminates the
need for physical transportation.
If you still get your check in the
mail, don’t wait for the new rule to
go into effect next year, sign up for
electronic payments now.
Social Security benefits
by electronic payments
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 11
AUCTIONS
LAND AUCTION: 230+/- Acres Gre-
gory County, Cropland and Grass-
land, 12 miles northwest of Burke,
SD, October 26th, 2012. Call
Dakota Properties, Todd Schuetzle,
Auctioneer, 605-280-3115,
www.DakotaProperties.com.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
BUYING GOLD/SILVER
CONVERT YOUR GOLD, silver,
platinum into cash. Top price paid, 24
hr turn around for mail in. SD owned
business. Visit www.midwestgold-sil-
ver.com for instructions or call 605
260 4653.
EMPLOYMENT
CHRYSLER CERTIFIED TECHNI-
CIAN needed for Chadron Chrysler
Dodge Jeep Ram in Chadron Ne-
braska. $30.00/hour, relocation plan,
benefits, training, 5-day work week,
great work environment. Jeremy:
3 0 8 - 4 3 2 - 9 0 0 4 ;
jkennedy@hotmail.com.
DEPUTY SHERIFF’S POSITION:
Haakon County. Competitive
wages/excellent benefits. Send state
applications or resumé: Haakon
County Sheriff, Box 249, Philip, SD
57567. Information: 605-859-2741.
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
FULL-TIME PARKS MAINTE-
NANCE: City of Canton, SD. CDL &
commercial pesticide applicator li-
cense required within 6 months.
Deadline: October 17th. www.cityof-
cantonsd.com or 605-987-2881.
EOE.
MANAGER NEEDED for progres-
sive credit union. Excellent benefits
and salary. Resumes only submitted
to Box 69, Gregory, SD 57533.
EEOC.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applictions for full-time Dou-
glas County Highway Superintend-
ent. Must have valid Class A Driver’s
License. Experience in road/bridge
construction/maintenance preferred.
For application contact: Douglas
County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
WANTED: EXPERIENCE APPREN-
TICE or journeyman electrician. Ex-
cellent wages and benefits. LEC Inc,
Gettysburg. Call 800-568-4324 or
send resume to kevin@loganelec-
tric.biz
LOTS / ACREAGE / LAND
LAKEFRONT BANK LOAN Liquida-
tion $29,900 lake property, 100’ clear
water shore; Glacial Lakes region NE
SD. Thousand Lakes Realty of Min-
nesota. 866-346-7006
www.1000LakesMN.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
NOTICE
The Jackson County Assessor’s Office is in the process
of updating property cards for the City of Kadoka. This
includes a picture of the property, usually from the
nearest street. We hope this causes no inconvenience
for you; it is just part of the valuing process.
Any questions, please feel free to call the office at 837-2424.
Brad Stone, Jackson County Director of Equalization
The members of the Long Valley Fire Department
would like to extend a hearty THANK YOU to
everyone who played a role in this year’s
hog roast and dance.
A special thank you to: Jim Antonsen for his help with the
hogs, the ladies of our community who brought desserts,
salads and other foods, the fire department members who
gave a lot of time in preparation for the supper and dance,
and the local businesses who donated door prizes for us to
give away: Long Valley Store, Double H Feed,
Headlee Vet Clinic, Discount Fuel / Kadoka Oil LLC,
Kadoka Gas & Go, Kadoka Press, Bankwest,
Crew Agency, Hogen’s Hardware, Rock Paper Scissors,
Martin Auto Parts II, GE Associates, Titan Machinery
To our community members and other patrons who attended
the supper/dance or sent donations - your generous financial
support this year, and every year, allows us to better serve
you as a department and we thank you for all that you do.
Sincerely, the members of the Long Valley Fire Department
Thank You ~ Thank You ~ Thank You
Philip
League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers........................................13-7
Shad’s Towing .............................12-8
Petersen’s ....................................11-9
Dakota Bar..................................9-11
Handrahan Const .......................9-11
Badland’s Auto............................6-14
Highlights:
Andrew Reckling...................225/596
Bryan Buxcel.........................219/545
Trina Brown..........................222/567
Jerry Mooney.........................211/589
Arlene Kujawa ......................178/490
Neal Petersen........................221/581
Vickie Petersen .....................178/487
Jason Petersen......................218/569
Tena Slovek ........................8-10 split
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
Philip Health Service ...................3-1
Philip Motor..................................3-1
Kennedy Imp.................................3-1
People’s Mkt..................................2-2
George’s Welding ..........................2-2
Bear Auto ......................................1-3
G&A Trenching.............................1-3
Kadoka Tree Service.....................1-3
Highlights:
Earl Park.......................235, 235/663
James Mansfield...................205/582
Dakota Alfrey ......3-10 split; 200/563
Bill Bainbridge......................203/560
Matt Schofield.......................207/534
Tony Gould ...................................521
Fred Foland..................................517
Wendell Buxcel .....................5-7 split
Norm Buxcel......................4-7-9 split
Terry Wentz ........................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ............................14-6
Cutting Edge...............................14-6
Invisibles.....................................13-7
Jolly Ranchers ..........................10-10
State Farm Ins............................7-13
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........202, 189, 184/575
Jennifer Schriever .......................165
Charlene Kjerstad.................153/446
Sandee Gittings............2-7 split; 157
Deanna Fees...............3-10 split; 152
Sandra O’Connor.............5-6-10 split
Donna King...........................4-5 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Morrison’s Haying ................14.5-5.5
Dakota Bar..................................12-8
First National Bank ...................11-9
Chiefie’s Chicks.....................10.5-9.5
Hildebrand Concrete ............10.5-9.5
Dorothy’s Catering......................9-11
Wall Food Center ........................7-13
Just Tammy’s........................5.5-14.5
Highlights:
Lindsey Hildebrand..............213/518
Jackie Shull ................9-10 split; 190
Amy Morrison .......................177/503
Val Schulz..............................182/501
Cristi Ferguson.....................182/489
Marlis Petersen....................2-7 split
Ashley Reckling..................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.............9-10 split x 2
Thursday Men’s
McDonnell Farms .........................3-1
O’Connell Const ............................3-1
A&M Laundry...............................3-1
WEE BADD...................................2-2
Dakota Bar....................................2-2
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................1-3
The Steakhouse ............................1-3
West River Pioneer Tanks............1-3
Highlights:
Randy Boyd .........3-10 split; 226/558
Matt Reckling .......................209/573
Greg Arthur...........................201/510
Haven Hildebrand ................204/578
Harlan Moos ........3-10 split; 201/567
Ronnie Coyle .........................200/564
Jay McDonnell .............................215
Bryan Buxcel ..5-10 & 3-10 x 2 splits
Scott Brech .........................5-10 split
Alex Moos......................3-10 x 2 split
Stan Anderson......................2-7 split
John Heltzel .......................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................15-5
King Pins...............................14.5-5.5
Roy’s Repair ..........................13.5-6.5
Randy’s Spray Service..................9-7
Lee and the Ladies .....................4-12
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Ed Morrison.................216 clean/551
Cory Boyd..............................204/551
Annette Hand...............................150
Duane Hand..........................219/574
Brian Pearson .......................205/580
Cristi Ferguson....5-10 & 3-10 splits;
...............................................191/510
NOW HIRING! Certified Nurses
Aide Position. Full/part-time avail-
able. Benefits for full time. Please
Contact Heidi or Nikki at 837-2270.
KP12-2tc
HOLIDAY FESTIVAL: Sunday, No-
vember 4, 2012 at the Kadoka City
Auditorium. Booths available. Call
Ruby at 605-837-2270. KP12-2tc
POSITIONS OPEN: Kadoka Area
School District is looking for coaches
for the upcoming winter sports:
Head girls basketball coach; 5-6
Girls basketball Kadoka; 7-8 girls
basketball Kadoka; 5th-8th girls bas-
ketball Interior; Assistant boys bas-
ketball coach; 5th-6th Boys
basketball coach Kadoka; 7th-8th
Boys basketball coach Kadoka. If in-
terested send a letter of interest and
resume to Kadoka Area School, At-
tention George Seiler, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543 or complete and
submit a non-certified application
that is available on the web-site
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us EOE.
KP11-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Agricul ture …
October 11, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 12
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upcoming Cattle Sales:
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE. YEARLINGS: 10 A.M. CALVES:
11 A.M. MT. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 10,000 HEAD.
YEARLINGS: NI=NO IMPLANTS, HR=HOME RAISED
FAIRBANKS RANCH 130 BLK & BWF STRS....................................................775800#
MCILRAVY RANCH 100 RED ANG CHAR X STRS & OPEN HFRS...............650750#
NESS 100 BLK STRS ....................................................................................................750#
O’DEA 35 BLK & BWF OPEN HFRS..........................................................................900#
BUCHANAN 22 BLK STRS..................................................................................900950#
CALVES: FS=FALL SHOTS, NI=NO IMPLANTS, AN=ALL NATURAL, ASV=AGE &
SOURCE VERIFIED
STILWELL 700 CHAR X CLVS; FS,ASV.............................................................550700#
ANDERS RANCH 675 BLK CLVS; FS,NI,AN,ASV............................................400550#
DIAMOND S RANCH 600 BLK, BWF & A FEW RED CLVS; FS,NI.................450600#
DEAL 400 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................525600#
YOUNG 330 CHAR X & A FEW BLK & HERF CLVS; FS ..................................500650#
COOPER 300 BLK, BWF, & FEW RED CLVS; FS,NI ........................................400550#
BERNDT 275 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI .............................................................500550#
LEVIN & CASTEEL 270 BLK & BWF LCVS; FS,NI,ASV...................................475575#
GUN N & CASPERS 250 BLK STRS; FS,NI,ASV................................................500600#
HICKS 250 BLK & RED STRS; FS, ASV..............................................................600650#
BRENNAN 250 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................450550#
COINSIGNMENT 250 BLK STRS; FS.................................................................450525#
FOLAND RANCH 250 BLK & BWF STRS; FS ...................................................450550#
JOHNSTON RANCH 230 CHAR X & RED ANG CLVS; FS,NI .........................500550#
SCHOFIELD 200 BLK, BWF & HERF CLVS; FS ................................................450550#
SMITH 200 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS......................................................................500600#
WILSON BROTHERS 200 BLK CLVS; FS ..........................................................500600#
WILLUWEIT RANCH 200 BLK, BWF, RWF & HERF CLVS; FS,NI,AN .................400#
FEES 185 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI ....................................................................500600#
DEERING 180 CHAR X CLVS; FS.......................................................................550600#
WICKS RANCH 160 BLK, BWF, & FEW CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI.......................500600#
JOHNSON & LAMONT 140 BLK HFRS; FS,NI .................................................400500#
WILLIAMS 140 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS...............................................................550600#
ZELFER 140 BLK, BWF, & A FEW HERF CLVS; NI ..........................................450550#
ADDISON 136 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI...........................................................450500#
FISHER 130 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.......................................................................550#
KRUSE 112 BLK CLVS; FS,NI .....................................................................................500#
RADWAY 110 BLK STRS; FS...............................................................................500550#
CANTRELL & WHEELER 100 BLK CLVS; FS....................................................450550#
REEVES 100 BLK STRS; FS,NI ...................................................................................550#
HOVLAND HEREFORDS 100 BWF 1ST X CLVS; FS,NI ..................................550600#
AMIOTTE 100 CHAR X & RED CLVS; FS.................................................................525#
MCGRIFF 100 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................400#
GRUBL 90 BLK & BWF STRS; FS,NI ..................................................................500600#
WHIRLWIND HORSE 90 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.........................................500550#
KNIGHT & KNIGHT 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................450525#
KRUSE 90 BLK CLVS; FS,NI................................................................................500550#
LURZ 85 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS...........................................................................500550#
CUNY 85 BLK STRS; FS,NI .................................................................................550600#
HERRINGTON 75 BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI.........................................................550#
JULSON & JULSON 75 BLK MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI ..........................................450550#
SIELER & SIELER 75 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.................................................500525#
REINDL 75 BLK & CHAR X CLVS; FS,NI ..........................................................575675#
NAESCHER 74 BWF & HERF CLVS ...................................................................500550#
HOBART & HOBART 70 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI..........................................550800#
DEDIC TRUST 55 HERF CLVS; FS,NI .......................................................................500#
DAVEY 50 BLK & RED CLVS; FS,NI...................................................................400450#
HANSON 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS ...........................................................................550#
BILLS 40 BLK & BWF CLVS; FS,NI.....................................................................525550#
KELLY 38 BLK CLVS; FS,NI ................................................................................525575#
HARRIS 30 BLK CLVS; FS,NI..............................................................................575600#
NEVILLE 30 BLK & BWF MOSTLY STRS; FS,NI......................................................550#
BOEDING 18 BLK CLVS; FS ...............................................................................400500#
MORE CONSIGNMENTS BY SALE DAY. CALL THOR ROSETH AT
6058592577 OR 6056855826 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e [Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an
additionaI service to our consignors, with questions about the video
pIease caII, Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 17: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE 10:00 A.M. MT
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND BRED HEIFER SALE & WEIGH
UP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: WEIGHUP COW, BULL & HFRT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 27: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS PRECONDITIONED CALF SALE & REG
ULAR CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOR THIS SALE, MUST BE WEANED, AT LEAST 6
WEEKS, & HAVE PRECONDITIONING SHOTS FOURWAY, PASTEURELLA, 7WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & BRED HEIFER SALE & REGULAR
CATTLE SALE & WELLER ANGUS ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 18: SPECIAL ALLBREEDS CALF SALE & REGULAR CATTLE SALE
& THOMAS RANCH FALL BULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 25: NO SALE
WEIGHUP COWS, BULLS & HEIFERETTES WILL SELL
ON WEDNESDAYS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES:
OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, & NOV. 7.
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. 9, 2DJ2
We Þod o reo1 b1g run o] Þ1gÞ quo111g oo1ves ]or our
speo1o1 so1e. We Þod over SD s1ro1gÞ1 po1 1oods 1n 1Þe
o]]er1ng. Reo1 b1g oroud o] bugers ond 1Þe morKe1
uos verg s1rong. Runs o] oo1ves, ue1gÞ-ups ond bred
oous u111 s1og b1g. 9,SDD ]eeder oo111e Þere ne×1
ueeK.
CALVES:
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
104.......................................CHAF STFS 582=........$170.50
126.......................................CHAF STFS 502=........$175.50
67...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 435=........$186.00
109 ......................................CHAF HFFS 557=........$162.75
124 ......................................CHAF HFFS 499=........$163.25
61 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 434=........$165.50
MARTY BURNS - PHILIIP
91.........................................CHAF STFS 616=........$164.25
83...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 539=........$166.75
19...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 406=........$187.50
100 ......................................CHAF HFFS 585=........$158.50
71 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 507=........$157.00
22 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 403=........$153.00
JW CATTLE COMPANY INC - BELVIDERE
87.........................................CHAF STFS 638=........$163.00
47.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 516=........$168.50
92 ........................................CHAF HFFS 606=........$154.75
MARK WILLIAMS - KADOKA
85 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 663=........$161.50
80 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 585=........$161.25
16.........................................CHAF STFS 477=........$180.50
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
84.........................................CHAF STFS 711=........$156.25
112.......................................CHAF STFS 617=........$161.75
DAN PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
101.......................................CHAF STFS 607=........$167.25
98 ........................................CHAF HFFS 572=........$160.00
GLEN SPRING - UNION CENTER
98 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$178.25
104 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 502=........$178.25
76 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 441=........$187.75
92 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 581=........$161.75
DANNY & MELVIN ARNESON - ENNING
100.........................................DLK STFS 510=........$177.00
95...........................................DLK STFS 551=........$167.00
121.........................................DLK STFS 444=........$191.50
LEE BALDWIN - ELM SPRINGS
91...........................................DLK STFS 503=........$178.00
27 ..........................................DLK HFFS 464=........$158.50
17 ..........................................DLK HFFS 401=........$162.75
WALLY & 2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
82 ................................FED & DLK STFS 470=........$180.75
27 ................................FED & DLK STFS 346=........$207.50
31................................DLK & DWF HFFS 399=........$171.50
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
131.........................................DLK STFS 461=........$184.00
55...........................................DLK STFS 404=........$199.00
71 ..........................................DLK HFFS 409=........$169.25
TERRY & MICHAEL MCPHERSON - PIEDMONT
137 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 460=........$183.25
120 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 405=........$206.50
128..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 431=........$167.50
67................................DLK & DWF HFFS 372=........$177.75
WADE & WYATT PETERSON - ENNING
41...........................................DLK STFS 537=........$170.25
18...........................................DLK STFS 440=........$185.00
30................................DLK & DWF HFFS 483=........$153.50
17 ..........................................DLK HFFS 427=........$164.00
WATERLAND & WONDERCHECK - MARCUS
92...........................................DLK STFS 502=........$174.00
51 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 410=........$194.75
55 ..........................................DLK HFFS 444=........$164.25
MORELL LIVESTOCK - UNION CENTER
48 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 444=........$187.00
36 ..........................................DLK HFFS 433=........$160.50
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
95 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 518=........$171.25
26.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 400=........$190.50
98................................DLK & DWF HFFS 500=........$153.25
LONG & SIMONS - ENNING
105.......................................CHAF STFS 541=........$168.50
118.....................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 447=........$185.00
TODD & NANCY COLLINS - STURGIS
105 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$173.50
85................................DLK & DWF HFFS 481=........$156.50
ROBERT MCCORMICK - KADOKA
40 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 528=........$172.75
11................................DLK & DWF HFFS 468=........$157.50
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS - MIDLAND
64...........................................DLK STFS 521=........$172.50
15...........................................DLK STFS 430=........$190.00
33 ..........................................DLK HFFS 466=........$158.25
REINERT, JONES & SALT FORK RANCH - HOWES
102 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 558=........$168.00
118 ..............................DLK & DWF STFS 492=........$179.00
72 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 415=........$197.00
101..............................DLK & DWF HFFS 514=........$161.00
99................................DLK & DWF HFFS 438=........$167.50
KELLY RICARD - PIEDMONT
63 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 435=........$185.00
14 ................................FED & DLK STFS 328=........$195.00
52................................DLK & DWF HFFS 398=........$169.00
11................................DLK & DWF HFFS 302=........$173.00
11 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 414=........$153.50
DON & VI MOODY - PHILIP
64 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 503=........$170.00
16 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 379=........$206.50
54................................DLK & DWF HFFS 487=........$160.00
16................................DLK & DWF HFFS 398=........$162.00
RON JENSEN - EAGLE BUTTE
58...........................................DLK STFS 558=........$166.00
20...........................................DLK STFS 447=........$190.50
73................................FED & DLK HFFS 520=........$145.25
15 ..........................................DLK HFFS 393=........$164.00
FRED KARP FAMILY - OWANKA
35 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 552=........$166.75
12 ..............................CHAF & FED STFS 467=........$177.50
28..............................CHAF & FED HFFS 525=........$148.00
14..............................CHAF & FED HFFS 427=........$157.50
FLOYD GABRIEL ESTATE - CREIGHTON
62................................FWF & DWF STFS 467=........$183.50
101..............................FWF & DWF STFS 567=........$162.00
WHITEHEAD, LAMPHERE & GRUBL - STURGIS
45...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 586=........$161.75
20...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 458=........$182.00
48 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 554=........$157.25
15 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 458=........$156.00
JOESPH URBANIAK - UNION CENTER
45 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 487=........$179.00
24................................DLK & DWF HFFS 473=........$154.00
12 ..........................................DLK HFFS 377=........$168.50
DENNIS SHARP - INTERIOR
30 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 494=........$171.00
12 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 402=........$192.50
11 ..........................................DLK HFFS 422=........$160.50
BAKER & THOMPSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
47 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 574=........$162.75
13 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 504=........$164.00
38................................DLK & DWF HFFS 522=........$155.00
13 ..........................................DLK HFFS 435=........$158.50
CACTUS FLAT CATTLE COMPANY - CACTUS FLAT
34.......................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 468=........$182.75
28 ......................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 444=........$152.00
10 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 309=........$168.00
PAUL & LARRY KEARNS - HIGHMORE
40 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 523=........$165.25
16 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 515=........$165.25
10...........................................DLK STFS 425=........$195.50
48................................DLK & DWF HFFS 485=........$155.00
10................................DLK & DWF HFFS 387=........$171.00
HUNSACKER CATTLE COMPANY - FAIRBURN
16 ..........................................DWF STFS 546=........$163.75
22..........................................DWF HFFS 558=........$150.00
13..........................................DWF HFFS 457=........$156.00
JUSTIN RANTAPAA & JULIE STRAGNER - DEADWOOD
32 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 565=........$161.50
29................................DLK & DWF HFFS 512=........$152.00
JOHNA ROVERE - STURGIS
27...........................................DLK STFS 553=........$163.50
17...........................................DLK STFS 423=........$189.00
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 484=........$150.50
10 ..........................................DLK HFFS 359=........$171.00
SONNY POURIER - SCENIC
36...........................................DLK STFS 566=........$162.75
11...........................................DLK STFS 396=........$204.50
40 ..........................................DLK HFFS 534=........$154.75
ROY & MARGARET PFEIFER - PHILIP
32...........................................DLK STFS 567=........$162.50
17 ..........................................DLK HFFS 539=........$147.50
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
91 ................................FED & DLK STFS 630=........$158.25
81 ................................FED & DLK STFS 541=........$159.00
56................................FED & DLK HFFS 525=........$146.50
BOB AMIOTTE - WANBLEE
57 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 591=........$161.25
17 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 454=........$184.50
30................................DLK & DWF HFFS 531=........$154.00
15................................DLK & DWF HFFS 418=........$155.50
JUSTIN WULF - OWANKA
50................................FWF & DWF STFS 580=........$161.25
38 ...............................FWF & DWF HFFS 528=........$156.00
STUCK & LUNDQUIST - RAPID CITY
48...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 618=........$159.00
20...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 485=........$179.50
20 ..........................................DLK HFFS 522=........$153.00
23...............................CHAF & DLK STFS 522=........$148.75
15 ..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 649=........$140.25
BUDDY SIMONS - HOWES
17 ........................................CHAF HFFS 541=........$159.00
HUNSAKER RANCH - KEYSTONE
18...........................................DLK STFS 571=........$157.25
12................................DLK & DWF HFFS 508=........$150.00
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
21 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 630=........$156.50
BILL BURGAN - ROUND UP, MT
28 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 621=........$156.00
21................................DLK & DWF HFFS 599=........$142.00
DAVE & BILLIE HUMPHREY & DARLA WOLF - WALL
35...........................................DLK STFS 551=........$156.00
11...........................................DLK STFS 440=........$180.00
21 ..........................................DLK HFFS 494=........$153.00
STABEN & CURTIS - ORAL
81 ................................FED & DLK STFS 634=........$155.50
18 ................................FED & DLK STFS 503=........$158.00
46................................FED & DLK HFFS 562=........$152.00
KEN COUCH - BUFFALO GAP
20 ..........................................FED STFS 562=........$155.00
SALMON'S INC. - DEADWOOD
10 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 638=........$153.00
TABLE TOP RANCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
15.........................................DLK DULLS 351=........$171.00
ED & MATT MILLER - FAITH
15 ................................FED & DLK STFS 368=........$202.00
6 ............................................FED STFS 295=........$209.00
RUTH & ISAACS - FAITH
17 ................................DLK & DWF STFS 604=........$155.25
YEARLINGS:
PETERSON RANCH - PHILIP
79...........................................DLK STFS 769=........$156.00
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
26 .......................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 919=........$133.50
BILL GOTTSLEBEN - PHILIP
10........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 871=........$135.00
BILL BURGAN - ROUND UP, MT
9.................................CHAF & DLK STFS 841=........$141.50
GARY HOWIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
10...........................................DLK STFS 843=........$140.50
BRAD & SHAWNA ROGHAIR - OKATON
17..................................DLK OPEN HFFS 863=........$129.00
PAT & GARY DEERING - STURGIS
22........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 810=........$138.50
LONNIE HALL - SPEARFISH
29........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 731=........$145.75
54........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 614=........$149.50
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
18..................................DLK OPEN HFFS 835=........$132.50
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Heart Healthy Dessert Ideas
Heart healthy eating refers to
choosing foods that are low in sat-
urated fat and sodium and high in
fiber. Healthy eating doesn’t mean
giving up the foods and beverages
you like the best. Desserts, though
not a food group, can serve a spe-
cial role within healthy eating. By
choosing low-calorie, low-fat
desserts, you can end your meal
with something sweet, that doesn’t
have to be unhealthy.
When we think of desserts, we
often think of traditional sweets
such as ice cream, cake, and cook-
ies. The ingredients in these types
of desserts often provide little nu-
trition, and in large amounts can
be harmful to your health. These
dessert choices are often high in
saturated fat and trans fat that
raise the bad cholesterol and in-
crease total cholesterol overall. Too
much added sugar and fat in your
diet may increase your risk of
weight gain, cardiovascular dis-
ease and diabetes.
Desserts can be included in a
healthy diet as long as your calorie
budget is not exceeded and food
group recommendations are met.
As an example, if your My Plate
daily food plan allows 2,000 calo-
ries, then you have 267 discre-
tionary calories each day, but no
more than half of these calories
should come from added sugar.
Discretionary calories can be de-
fined as the balance of energy calo-
ries remaining after eating
sufficient amounts of nutrient-
dense foods.
Identify challenging ingredients
and modify your dessert recipes for
healthier ways to enjoy an after-
meal dessert. If a recipe calls for
sour cream, replace it with fat-free
plain yogurt or fat-free sour cream.
Replace cream cheese with a fat-
free or low-fat version. When a fa-
vorite recipe calls for butter, use
applesauce, pumpkin puree or
prune puree instead, for half of the
butter, shortening or oil. In most
baked goods, you can reduce the
amount of sugar by one-half.
Heavy cream can be replaced with
1 cup evaporated skim milk or 1/2
cup low-fat yogurt plus 1/2 cup
plain low-fat unsalted cottage
cheese. Intensify sweetness by
adding cinnamon, vanilla or nut-
meg. Sugar-sweetener blends can
also be used. You can still enjoy the
wonderful desserts that you love so
much. By making a few adjust-
ments in ingredients, you can
make these foods healthier, with-
out sacrificing the taste.
Healthier dessert options in-
clude naturally sweet, fresh fruit
such as peaches, berries, melons
and bananas. They provide fiber
and are fat-free. Also consider low-
fat frozen yogurt, fruit sorbet or
sherbet (these are often fat-free),
or angel food cake topped with
fresh fruit.
If your family has a tradition of
eating dessert at the end of each
meal or you simply crave sweet
treats, try a few new, healthy
dessert recipes by going to
http://bit.ly/Q1Y18U, courtesy of
Oregon State University Exten-
sion Service. American author,
Ernestine Ulmer is quoted as say-
ing, “Life is uncertain. Eat dessert
first.” Eating a healthy dessert
choice would result in less guilt.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Dogs Pocket Gophers vs.
Moles and Their Control
Pocket gophers and moles have
similarities, and distinct differ-
ences. Both animals spend the ma-
jority of their time below ground,
and cause homeowners headaches
with their burrowing activity.
Pocket gophers also cause prob-
lems for farmers and ranchers,
particularly in hayfields, where
the dirt mounds they create inter-
feres with hay harvest.
Determining which pest is in-
volved is important in implement-
ing a control method, and the best
way to do so is by the signs that
can be seen above ground. Often,
the only visible sign of pocket go-
phers is the mounds they construct
as they return below ground after
their occasional visits into the
open air. Pocket gopher mounds
are generally fan or kidney-
shaped, as opposed to the smaller,
usually round mounds made by
moles. Pocket gopher burrows are
typically deep enough to remain
largely undetected from the soil
surface, whereas at least some of
the burrows moles create show up
as undulating, raised runways.
Pocket gophers are rodents, and
therefore plant feeders, not only
causing damage and being a nui-
sance because of their mound
building habits, but cause some di-
rect loss by feeding on the roots of
plants, somewhat on aboveground
vegetation, and pulling vegetation
into their tunnels from below.
They are also known to damage
plastic water lines and electrical
cables by chewing on them.
Moles on the other hand, are
not rodents, but insectivores. Their
diet consists mainly of the insects,
grubs, and worms they find in the
soil. Moles are thought to damage
roots and tubers by feeding on
them, but rodents usually are to
blame. Although moles remove
damaging insects from lawns and
gardens, their burrowing habits
are not viewed favorably.
Due to the mole’s exclusive diet
of insects, toxic grain baits are sel-
dom effective, although two poi-
sons are federally registered for
use on them. Pocket gophers how-
ever, being herbivores, can be con-
trolled with poison baits. The baits
can be applied in burrows by hand
on a small scale, or with a mechan-
ical burrow builder if dealing with
a field scale infestation.
Fumigants are possible meth-
ods of controlling both pocket go-
phers and moles, but they have
been known to close off burrows so
the fumigant cannot get to them.
The fumigant may also move too
slowly through the burrow system
to be effective. Carbon monoxide
from automobile exhaust can be ef-
fective due to its greater volume
and pressure. Fumigating can also
be quite time-consuming and labor
intensive.
Due to their somewhat solitary
nature, and the fact that one
pocket gopher or one mole can con-
struct an extensive burrow system,
trapping is considered very suc-
cessful for both pests. For pocket
gophers, trapping is best for small
areas and animals not controlled
with a poisoning control program.
Because of somewhat different
habits and size, different traps are
intended for each pest. Both go-
pher traps and mole traps can be
purchased at many hardware
stores.
There are also cultural and
other methods of minimizing dam-
age from both pocket gophers and
moles. More information on pre-
venting and stopping damage from
pocket gophers, moles and other
wildlife can be obtained from the
“Internet Center for Wildlife Dam-
age Management”:
http://icwdm.org/ or contacting
your Regional Extension Center.
Calendar
•10/16-18/2012 – SDSU Exten-
sion Annual Conference, Brook-
ings, SD
•11/27-28/2012 – Ag Horizons
Conference, Pierre, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Farmers and ranchers who pre-
viously were forced to sell livestock
due to drought, like the drought
currently affecting much of the na-
tion, have an extended period of
time in which to replace the live-
stock and defer tax on any gains
from the forced sales, the Internal
Revenue Service announced today.
Farmers and ranchers who, due
to drought, sell more livestock than
they normally would may defer tax
on the extra gains from those sales.
To qualify, the livestock generally
must be replaced within a four-
year period. The IRS is authorized
to extend this period if the drought
continues.
The one-year extension of the re-
placement period announced today
generally applies to capital gains
realized by eligible farmers and
ranchers on sales of livestock held
for draft, dairy or breeding pur-
poses due to drought. Sales of other
livestock, such as those raised for
slaughter or held for sporting pur-
poses, and poultry are not eligible.
The IRS is providing this relief
to any farm located in a county,
parish, city or district, listed as suf-
fering exceptional, extreme or se-
vere drought conditions by the
National Drought Mitigation Cen-
ter (NDMC), during any weekly pe-
riod between Sept. 1, 2011, and
Aug. 31, 2012. All or part of 43
states are listed. Any county con-
tiguous to a county listed by the
NDMC also qualifies for this relief.
As a result, farmers and ranch-
ers in these areas whose drought
sale replacement period was sched-
uled to expire at the end of this tax
year, Dec. 31, 2012, in most cases,
will now have until the end of their
next tax year. Because the normal
drought sale replacement period is
four years, this extension immedi-
ately impacts drought sales that oc-
curred during 2008. But because of
previous drought-related exten-
sions affecting some of these local-
ities, the replacement periods for
some drought sales before 2008 are
also affected. Additional extensions
will be granted if severe drought
conditions persist.
Details on this relief, including
a list of NDMC-designated coun-
ties, are available in Notice 2012-
62, posted today on IRS.gov.
Details on reporting drought sales
and other farm-related tax issues
can be found in Publication 225,
Farmer’s Tax Guide, also available
on the IRS web site.
Drought-stricken farmers
and ranchers have more
time to replace livestock

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