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Kadoka Press, November 8, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 17
November 8, 2012
News Briefs …
Veterans Day program
Thursday, November 8 at 9:00
a.m., Kadoka City Audito-
rium. Everyone encouraged to
attend.
Kadoka American Legion
& Auxiliary meetings will
be Thursday, November 8 at
7:00 p.m.
City Council meeting will
be Monday, November 12, 7:00
p.m. at the city office.
School Board meeting will
be Wednesday, November 14,
at the Midland School begin-
ning with a walk through of
the school at 3:00 p.m. and the
meeting to follow.
Operation Christmas Child
Drop off a packed shoe box at
the Kadoka Presbyterian
Church: Mon., Nov 12 through
Sat., Nov 17 from 1 - 5 p.m.;
Sun., Nov 18: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Contact Jean Weller for more
information at (605) 837-2233.
~ by Ronda Dennis ~
Hot Air
Balloon
Kate DeVries
Wi tch & Wicked
Becky Chapman & Bob Young
Mardi Gras
Alice Wilmarth
Scarey Dude
Mil ton Sorenson
Lovely Ladies
Joby Gerry • Cathy Stone • Emma Jarl
Seniors enjoying Halloween
Nursing Home
Style!
Bessy the Cow?
Dwight Louder
KCBA sponsors the trophies.
At last month’s meeting George
Sieler addressed the purchase of
advertising space on a new score-
board at the Jackson County
Sports Complex. He said the school
would like to have advertising to
pay for the scoreboard. KCBA
asked for more information before
making a decision. No one was
present at Thursday’s meeting to
discuss the scoreboard.
Under new business, Laurie Fu-
gate said the CBS sign at Mitchell
is “faded out” and it was supposed
to have been fixed.
Jackie Stilwell made a motion
to not pay any more sign rent until
the sign is fixed. The motion car-
ried.
Laurie Fugate felt if the sign is
not fixed by spring KCBA should
think about going with a different
sign.
The next meeting was tenta-
tively set for Thursday, December
6.
The Kadoka Community Better-
ment Association met on Thursday,
November 1 at Jigger’s Restaurant.
There was no treasurer’s report.
Under old business it was noted
that there was a Rails to Trails
meeting held in Kadoka. President
Jackie Stilwell stated that it could
be a benefit to the community.
The annual Christmas promo-
tion will be held on Sunday, Decem-
ber 9 at the Kadoka City
Auditorium. Activities will include
Bingo, Santa’s visit and more.
The Main Street Committee will
set up the activities for the day. Ko-
lette Struble stated that she would
like to have some new ideas for ac-
tivities. A tree contest between
businesses was discussed as well as
a scavenger hunt.
This year there were 81 partici-
pants (54 boys and 27 girls) in the
Punt, Pass & Pick on homecoming.
The Kadoka Area School will be
hosting their annual Veteran’s Day
program on Thursday, November 8,
9:00 a.m. at the city auditorium.
The Kadoka Area band, chorus
and elementary music programs
will feature special music.
All service veterans and service
members are being issued a special
invitation to attend. In addition,
everyone is invited to attend the
program and help pay tribute to
our veterans.
KCBA Country Christmas
to be held December 9
Due to the Veterans Day holiday,
we will have an EARLY DEADLINE
for the PROFIT
Thursday, November 8, at NOON
Paying tribute to our veterans
Remembering the vets … Harriet Noteboom, a resident at the
Kadoka Nursing Home, will be among many who remember to pay tribute
to the veterans on Sunday, November 11. Her husband, Dick, retired from
the US Army after serving 20 years. In addition to doing a five-year stint
in Germany during WWII, he was also stationed in Japan for many years
before retiring from his last station at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. In fact, she said,
they got married in Japan. She is pictured next to one of the pieces of
cherry furniture they brought home from Japan, Dick’s picture and the
American Flag she received from the Jones County American Legion.
“Towns always celebrate Veteran’s Day,” she said. “It’s important to honor
all of the veterans.”
--photo by Ronda Dennis
Remembering her late
husband on Veteran’s Day
The annual Community
Thanksgiving Service will be at the
Concordia Lutheran Church on
Sunday, November 18 at 6 p.m.
with a free soup and sandwich sup-
per at 5 p.m.
Each year the churches of our
community get together for a
Thanksgiving Service at one of our
three area churches. The ladies
from the Presbyterian, Lutheran
and Roman Catholic Churches will
be serving a free soup and sand-
wich supper before the service at 5
p.m.
This year they are very happy to
have the men’s singing group, the
Haakon County Crooners, from the
Philip area with them. There will
also be a childrens message. At con-
clusion of the this worship service,
they will be taking an offering for
the needs of stranded travelers and
the needy in our community.
The churches cordially invite
everyone to come to the worship
service at the Concordia Lutheran
Church, join them for supper, and
to hear the Crooners perform.
There is no charge for the sup-
per and you are invited to bring
someone with you; you will not be
disappointed.
For more details please call
Gary McCubbin at 837-2233.
Churches come together, plan
Community Thanksgiving Service
Jackson County Unofficial Election Results
Presidental Electors
q Obama & Biden
q Goode & Clymer
q Romney & Ryan
q Johnson & Gray
US Representative
q Matt Varilek
q Kristi Noem
Public Utilities Commissioner
q Matt McGovern
q Kristie Fiegen
q Russell Clarke
Public Utilities Commission
q Nick Nemec
q Chris Nelson
State Senator - Dist. 27
q Jim Bradford
State Rep. - Dist. 27
q Kevin Killer
q Elizabeth May
q Kathleen Ann
Jackson Co. State’s Attorney
q Daniel G. Van Gorp
q Gay Klima Tollefson
qAlvin Pahlke
Retain Supreme Court
Justice Glen A. Severson
q Yes
q No
Constitutional
Amendment M
q Yes will remove the
constitutional restrictions
q No will leave constitution as is
Constitutional
Amendment N
q Yes to eliminate fixed travel
reimbursement rate for
legislators
q No leave constitution as is
Constitutional
Amendment O
q Yes to change distribution
from cement plant trust fund
q No to leave constitution as is
Constitutional
Amendment P
q Yes will include balanced
budget requirements in the
constitution
q No to leave constitution as is
Initiated Measure 15
q Yes for a 1% increase in state
sales tax for education /
Medicaid
q No to the proposed law
Referred Law 14
q Yes to a large project
development fund
q No to the referred law
Referred Law 16
q Yes to enact the education
reform act
q No to the referred law
Vernon Uhlir, Oliver Willert, Russ Olney & Bud Olney
~ Kadoka Press file photo ~
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press@kadokatelco.com
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
2 Peter 3:17-18
All around the world, people go to church, bow their
head to pray, and hear sermons, but many are not
growing spiritually. I consider this a great tragedy.
It is all too common for believers to assume these ac-
tions fulfill Christian obligations. They may complete a checklist but experience no thriving relationship
with Jesus. Do you see evidence in your own life that you're maturing in your walk with Him?
To blossom spiritually, we must be saved. This happens the moment God makes us new, cleansing us
of unrighteousness and adopting us as His own. Upon that foundation, we can begin to grow. Yet even
with this new life, we can be stagnant.
Eight indicators reveal the quality of our Christian journey. Today, let's explore three of them. First,
growing believers should sense a deepening hunger for Christ. As we experience more of Jesus, who is
the bread of life (John 6:35), our desire for Him will increase. Second, believers dwelling closely with the
Savior will notice that their discernment of sin sharpens. Faulty teaching and thinking become more ob-
vious as we accumulate truth within our spirit. Third, our sphere of love should continuously expand. In
time, the Holy Spirit enables us to care for people who previously were either unnoticed or difficult to ac-
cept.
Do you have an insatiable hunger for God and an increasing awareness of sin? Is your love available
only for those who match your personal standard of performance--or are you caring even for difficult peo-
ple? These are important questions to ask when determining the quality of your spiritual growth.
Measuring Our Spiritual Growth
Inspiration Point
Monday, November 12
Hamburger on a bun with let-
tuce, oven browned potatoes,
baked beans, and bananas in pud-
ding with vanilla wafers.
Tuesday, November 13
Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and
gravy, broccoli, bread, and
peaches.
Wednesday, November 14
Vegetable beef soup, fruity slaw,
biscuit, and plums.
Thursday, November 15
Roast turkey, dressing and
gravy, sweet potatoes, green beans,
cranberry salad, dinner roll, and
pumpkin pie with topping.
Friday, November 16
Sausage gravy over biscuits,
peas, cottage cheese and mixed
fruit, juice, and applesauce.
Meals for
the Elderly
Terry A. Karrels_________________
Terry A. Karrels, age 58, of
Broadus, Mont., died Wednesday,
October 31, 2012, at the Hans P.
Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip.
Terry A. Trask was born June
10, 1954, at Rapid City, the daugh-
ter of Mark and Winifred “Winnie”
(O’Connell) Trask. She grew up on
the Spanish Five Ranch in the
Cheyenne River breaks and Elk
Creek in the Elm Springs commu-
nity.
Terry attended country school in
that area and high school at St.
Martin’s Academy in Rapid City
where she graduated in 1972. She
then attended South Dakota State
University in Brookings.
Terry was united in marriage to
Michael H. Karrels on December
27, 1991, on the Spanish Five
Ranch, and to this union was born
a son, James Michael Karrels.
They made their home on a
ranch south of Belvidere which
they operated until 2003 when they
moved to a ranch in Montana. They
continued to reside on the ranch
until her death.
Terry was generous and enjoyed
doing acts of kindness for people
privately, never wanting recogni-
tion, but ranching was the biggest
part of her life. The spring season
was her favorite, especially enjoy-
ing new colts being born and nam-
ing them, and baby calves being
born and watching them grow up.
Terry was her dad’s cowboy, and in-
herited his eye for good livestock
and her uncle Milton’s passion for
raising good horses.
Grateful for sharing her life are
her husband, Michael H. Karrels of
Broadus; her two brothers, Patrick
and Rose Mary Trask and their
family of Elm Springs, and Tom
and Shelia Trask and their family
of Elm Springs; special friends,
Chuck and Charlotte Hubing of
Miles City, Mont.; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Terry was preceded in death by
her son, James Michael Karrels,
and her parents, Mark and Winnie.
Funeral services were held Mon-
day, November 5, at the American
Legion Hall in Philip with Jim
Scott officiating.
Graveside services were held at
the Elm Springs Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials directed to the
Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospi-
tal, or the Silverleaf Assisted Liv-
ing Center, both of Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
I believe it is a moral duty to
provide comfort for the suffering.
About twenty years ago my Fa-
ther was dying of metastatic colon
cancer spread to bone. Dad was
one of those unusual cases in
which meds were simply inade-
quate for his unrelenting pain. Ei-
ther he was totally unconscious, or
awake and very uncomfortable.
There seemed no helpful in-be-
tween, and too often pain meds
brought wild and scary dreams,
caused him to be combative, and
frightened him and all us involved.
I should add here, we do better
now-a-days.
Mom called me one evening and
warned that Dad was talking
about driving into a bridge abut-
ment. Then she handed him the
phone and I pleaded with him not
to do such a thing. “I will talk with
your doctor and find a better pain
reliever,” I said. “How can I get re-
lief, and how will this end?” he
replied. I explained in cases like
his, people often develop pneumo-
nia, and since he directed us not to
use antibiotics, this might do it,
“But don’t kill yourself.”
Indeed, in less than two days he
developed pneumonia, his need for
pain medicines lessened due to
natural pain relief mechanisms
that kick in when lungs start to
fail. In less than two more days he
escaped his cancer dying from
pneumonia. The death certificate
called it death by natural causes,
but I suspect he voluntarily
stopped coughing after our talk
that night, which allowed for the
blessing of a rapid case of pneumo-
nia. Still, I would agree on the nat-
ural cause statement.
There are those who request
that physicians should, by law, be
allowed to prescribe death-induc-
ing poisons for patients who are
similarly suffering. These people
could then fill the prescription,
take the poison on their own time,
and thereby choose to die on their
own terms instead of having to
wait for pneumonia. Although this
is law in some states in the US, I
struggle with that prescription for
death.
In my opinion the issue turns
around the word “intent.” It runs
against my moral duty to give a
poison intended to kill. On the
other hand, I consider it also my
moral duty to prescribe enough
medicine intended to relieve suf-
fering, even if it might hurry
death.
I believe there is a huge differ-
ence between the intent to kill and
the intent to comfort.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Comfort not poison
The Presbyterian Church in
Kadoka will have their annual Loy-
alty Sunday and potluck dinner
this Sunday, November 11. Sunday
School will be at 10 a.m. and the
worship service at 11 a.m. The Loy-
alty Sunday dinner will follow the
Worship Service.
The ladies of the church will pro-
vide the turkeys for the potluck
dinner. At 1:15 p.m. the Presbyte-
rian Women and the Elders will
have their monthly meetings.
Everyone is cordially invited to
attend the Loyalty Sunday service,
potluck and any of the meetings.
Please call the pastor, Gary Mc-
Cubbin, at 837-2233 if you would
like any details on Loyalty Sunday
or any other activities.
Loyalty Sunday set
at Presbyterian
Chuch November 11
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HWY:
August 2012
Evelynn Cabrera, Laurel, MD $125
Carlyn Hood, Bend, OR $105
SPEED LIMITS IN AREAS OF ROAD
CONSTRUCTION:
August 2012
Jody Ramon, Burneyville, OK $265
FAIL TO USE CHILD
PASSENGER RESTRAINT SYSTEM:
August 2012
Daryl Romero $25
NO DRIVERS LICENSE:
August 2012
Russell Eschliman, Wisner, NE $170
CARELESS DRIVING:
August 2012
Thomas Lundquist, Onalaska, TX $120
NO MOTORCYCLE LICENSE:
August 2012
Shane Nelson, Nickerson, NE $120
OPERATE OVERSIZE OR OVERWIDTH
VEHICLE:
August 2012
Russell Eschliman, Wisner, NE $170
OPERATE TRAILER OVER MAXIMUM
LENGTH:
August 2012
Russell Eschliman, Wisner, NE $170
Driving Under the Influence - 1st Offense:
07-02-12: John Dolezal, Belvidere: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-25-12;
Fines and costs $654; 30 days jail with 28 days suspended based on the
following conditions: pay fine and costs including any blood tests if appli-
cable, obey all laws for one year, report to serve two days jail, report no
later than 09-22-2012 and let sheriff know one week in advance.
Driving Under the Influence & Speeding on Other Roadways:
07-30-12: Beau Yonkee, Gillette, WY; Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12;
Fines and costs $889; obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, in-
cluding blood test costs and restitution by 10-01-12; driving privileges in
South Dakota revoked for 30 days.
Allow Illegal Underage Person On On-Sale Premises:
No date listed: Gregory Barber, Interior: Plea: Nolo Contendere; Plea
date: 08-29-12; Fine and costs $120; 10 days jail suspended based on
the following conditions: no violations of law for one year; pay fine and
costs.
Driving Under the Influence - 1st Offense:
08-11-12: Harold Red Owl, Kyle: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12; Fine
and costs $669; 30 days jail with 28 days suspended based on the fol-
lowing conditions: serve two days in jail and report no later than 9-15-12
at 8 p.m.; obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any
blood test costs if applicable, date fine and costs due will be determined
at 11-28-12 Rev. Hearing; obtain behave health evaluation, attend and
successfully complete any recommendations, and file proof with the clerk
by date stated.
Driving Under the Influence & Possession of Alcohol by Minor:
08-22-12: Jordan Into, Ashtabula, OH: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-
12; Fines and costs $789; 30 days jail suspended based on the following
conditions: SD privilege to drive suspended for 60 days; obey all laws for
one year; pay fine and costs, including any blood test costs if applicable.
Their honor, duty, and patriotism
make us proud to call them family,
friends, and neighbors, and we
honor the memory of those who
have fallen, keeping all who serve
in our prayers.
While we honor our veterans
sacrifice, we are also aware of the
continued struggles for many of the
men and women in the military
who have returned home from
tours of duty. As the son of a World
War II veteran, I believe we have
an important responsibility to care
for our veterans who have sacri-
ficed so much for our freedom. I am
a strong supporter of programs
that benefit our veterans and be-
lieve more can be done in terms of
enacting pro-growth policies to ad-
dress the needs that veterans have
during this exceptionally difficult
period of slow economic growth. I
will continue to work across the
aisle to come up with viable solu-
tions to stimulate growth, boost job
creation in the private sector, and
assist those who have given so
much to their country.
I invite all South Dakotans to
join me in honoring the sacrifice of
our veterans and to keep the brave
members of our military and their
families in our thoughts and
prayers as they continue to serve
on our behalf.
Battles fought in wars around
the world, both past and present,
have been depicted for many Amer-
icans through the lens of a camera.
Behind the triumphs and the
sadness of the photographs, are the
men and women who have so
valiantly honored the call to duty
in defense of freedom. These men
and women, some of whom made
the ultimate sacrifice, have pro-
tected our nation from foreign and
domestic threats, and fought in the
name of liberty all over the world.
This September, I had the great
opportunity to help welcome home
the 842nd Engineer Company of
the South Dakota National Guard.
The 160 men and women of the
Spearfish, Belle Fourche and Stur-
gis based unit represent some of
the best that both South Dakota
and our nation have to offer. These
servicemen and women, like so
many before them, honored the call
to duty and selflessly put the wel-
fare of our nation before their own
personal needs.
This Veterans Day we pause to
thank and pay tribute to the veter-
ans and active members of the mil-
itary who have risked life and limb
protecting our freedoms. South
Dakota veterans, young and old,
connect us to the past and present
struggles for freedom and peace.
Honoring defenders of liberty
by Senator John Thune
were countless men and women
like him who bravely answered the
call to serve, placing themselves
into harm’s way and enduring
unimaginable hardships. More
World War II veterans die every
day, but their contributions to our
country’s history will never be for-
gotten.
A common characteristic among
veterans across the generations is
humility. I can’t tell you the num-
ber of times I’ve thanked a veteran
for their service and their response
has been, “I’m no hero; I was just
doing my job.” When they make
these humble remarks, these men
and women aren’t acknowledging
that their work is something that
in the past decade only one half of
one percent of the population was
willing to do. They aren’t recogniz-
ing that their job pulls them away
from their families and puts them
in dangerous situations, all so that
we may live safely in America and
the freedoms we hold dear may be
preserved. If there was ever reason
to be a little boastful, this would be
the time.
With this modest attitude, our
veterans may not ask for extra ben-
efits, attention or praise, but they
are deserving of all that and more.
This year we saw the welcome
return of over 500 South Dakota
National Guardsmen who had de-
ployed in support of Operation En-
during Freedom and Operation
New Dawn.
These men and women join the
more than 72,000 veterans who call
South Dakota home. Residents in
communities across the state
turned out to show their support in
welcome home parades and cere-
monies.
This Veterans Day, communities
will again gather together to honor
those who have served in our coun-
try’s military. As we celebrate this
holiday, we not only honor the re-
cently returned National Guard
veterans, but all those who have
worn our nation’s uniform and sac-
rificed so much in service to our
country.
With the recent passing of Sen-
ator George McGovern, we’re re-
minded again of the valor of the
Greatest Generation. As a young
pilot, George flew 35 B-24 Libera-
tor missions over Europe. When his
plane was struck by enemy fire, he
adeptly crash-landed it, earning
the Distinguished Flying Cross and
the Air Medal.
While his actions were certainly
heroic they were not unique. There
Honoring our veterans
by Senator Tim Johnson
Filling:
1 package (3 oz) cream cheese,
softened
1/2 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin
pie mix)
1 egg
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Brownies:
1 box brownies ultimate fudge mix
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons water
1 egg
Directions:
1. Heat oven to 350°F (325°F for dark or nonstick pan). Grease bottom only of
9-inch square pan with shortening or cooking spray. In small bowl, beat all filling
ingredients with electric mixer on low speed until smooth. Set aside.
2. Make brownie batter as directed on box, using 1/4 cup oil, 2 tablespoons
water and the egg. Spread 3/4 of the batter in pan. Spoon filling by tablespoon-
fuls evenly over batter. Spoon remaining brownie batter over filling. Cut through
batter several times with knife for marbled design.
3. Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until toothpick inserted 1 inch from side of pan
comes out almost clean. Cool completely. Cut into 4 rows by 4 rows. Store cov-
ered in refrigerator.
Pumpkin
Swirl Brownies
Bel videre News …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
press@kadokatelco.com
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
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USED VEHICLES!
Do you suffer from anatidaepho-
bia? That is the fear that some-
where, somehow, a duck is always
watching you. Actually this is
more a made-up fear by humorist
Gary Larson in his Far Side comics
that an actual one, but probably
somewhere, somehow, there is a
person who worries about being
spied on by ducks.
Rationally speaking, there isn’t
all that much to be afraid of when
it comes to ducks. They seldom go
on the attack, and how dangerous
can the awkward things be with
flat feet and blunt bills? Now geese
are a different story. I’ve been bit-
ten on the rear by a gander once or
twice, and that can hurt. In other
words, keep an eye on geese but
don’t fuss that much about ducks.
There are a lot of phobias out
there, however, that have been
classified and are real “excessive,
irrational, and persistent fears” as
Webster’s dictionary puts it. One of
the most common might be acro-
phobia, which is the fear of
heights. Luckily, I don’t have it
and could happily climb to the top
of the water tower to take aerial
pictures of Myrt’s auction sale
since she wanted it visually
recorded. I did learn that you
shouldn’t look up and see clouds
floating over since that gives you
the nasty feeling that the tower is
falling over backwards. Looking
down is fine with me but not up.
On the other hand, wife Corinne
seldom climbs up over one or two
steps on a stepladder. Heights
don’t do a thing for her. Even pic-
tures of someone up high give her
pause. Neither is it a good idea to
hold hands with her while watch-
ing a movie where someone is dan-
gling in space or up too high.
Seeing such things will make her
hands sweat. On the ranch, I
found that repairing windmills is
not a job for a lot of guys. It makes
them really nervous to work on
something too far above ground
level, if you can even get them to
climb up there in the first place.
Claustrophobia is another com-
mon problem which troubles those
who dislike confined spaces. I have
a bit of that. Actually, I’m okay in
a small space if there is no one else
there with me. Neither do I care
much for crowds or even sitting on
a couch with people on both sides.
On the other hand, I certainly
don’t suffer from autophobia which
is nervousness caused by being
alone. I can exist for days or weeks
by myself with no problem at all.
If you live on a ranch in the middle
of nowhere, this is fortunate. It’s
too many people that bother me
and not too few.
Now there are quite a few
things that are a danger and need
to be watched. Snakes, prairie
fires, spiders and bats come to
mind. I don’t go into a panic with
any of those, but I don’t like them
much. I am not so afraid of snakes,
though, that I can’t run and find a
hoe or other implement to remove
their heads. Nevertheless, I don’t
run through tall grass or pick up a
log without kicking it first. This
habit came in very handy indeed
one day when I went to pick up a
stump that was supporting the
tongue of a hay rake. I kicked it
over only to find a rattlesnake
below it. The thought of putting
my fingers under there without
looking strongly reinforced my
habit of kicking or shifting first
and picking up second. The same
applies to feed sacks on the floor
where spiders and other crawly
things like to hide.
I do come down with a bit of
ablutophobia in the winter which
has to do with bathing or washing.
The reason is acarophobia which is
about itching. If I bathe every day,
I also itch every day. Washing up
is fine, but daily showers are not.
This is only a problem in cold
weather and not warm. Neither do
I suffer from ataxophobia which is
fear of disorder or untidiness. Ask
Corinne if you don’t believe me.
She has a bit of that condition but
has learned to put up with my
messes without too much distress.
Finally we come to luposlipa-
phobia which is the fear of being
pursued by timber wolves around
a kitchen table while wearing
socks on a newly waxed floor. As
you might guess, this is another
humorist’s invention. Socks on a
newly waxed floor are actually
kind of fun since you can take a
run and slide across until your
mother tells you to quit. The tim-
ber-wolf part not so much.
Actually, I am basically saved
from excessive fear by trusting in
my heavenly father. He looks after
me and keeps me out of trouble as
he promises to do and has done re-
peatedly. He says not to worry
about anything but to pray about
everything. I try to do that and
highly recommend it. Being a
fraidy cat isn’t much fun. I can live
without it.
Fraidy Cat
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Larry Johnston survived the
storm in New York without too
much difficulty. He had flown there
previously to visit his son,
Laramie, and family and accom-
pany Laramie and three of his
hunting friends back here. It was
windy there where Laramie lives
and blew over a tree nearby, but
Larry said it wasn’t too bad. He
had a good time with his three
granddaughters, helped them with
trick-or-treating on Halloween, etc.
The girls are eight, five and three-
years old. On the trek back here on
Nov. 1, however, it rained for the
first 500 miles. Laramie and
friends dropped Larry off at
Mitchell while they continued on to
North Dakota to visit Laramie’s
mom. Jo and Jenny then picked
Larry up and continued to Huron
where they visited Jo’s sister before
returning home on Saturday
evening. The trip from New York
was started at 8:00 a.m. on Thurs-
day and went straight through to
Mitchell by 1:30 the next morning.
On Sunday, Laramie and friends
did archery deer hunting at Thad
Stout’s. Thad is Laramie’s uncle.
They were also planning to do some
pheasant hunting at Larry’s and
other places and return to New
York late in the week.
Former area resident, Terry
Karrels, passed away last week at
the hospital in Philip where she
had been for several weeks. She
was 58. Funeral services were held
Monday morning at the Legion
Hall in Philip with burial later at
Elm Springs. Many will remember
her bright and cheerful personality
and her lovely singing voice. She
and her husband, Mike, moved to
Broadus, Montana, in 2003 and
have lived there since.
Roy and Rose Albin of Maryland
were in church in Belvidere on
Sunday with Roy’s aunt, Cloreta
Eisenbraun. They had survived the
storm on the East Coast which de-
livered something like nine inches
of rain in a day and a half. After
that, they came here to visit friends
and relatives and check on the
graves of Roy’s folks, Woody and
Ercel. They hadn’t been here yet
this year and decided it was time to
come. Roy’s brother, Ross, of Pow-
ell, WY, was going to meet them
here but ran into scheduling con-
flicts and couldn’t make it. He had
visited them in Maryland a couple
of months ago however. Ross’s wife,
Mable, had died some time ago.
Roy taught school for thirty years
before retiring.
Phyllis Word attended the re-
gional chorus concert held in
Kadoka last Friday. Kids from sev-
eral local schools practiced all day
from 9:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. and
then presented a concert at 6:00
p.m. Trisha (DeVries) Bork helped
accompany the singers. Phyllis’
granddaughter, Mackenzie Word,
was a member of the combined cho-
rus.
Jamie and Travis Dolezal and
Jamie’s sister, Jackie, attended the
Lutheran Church in Midland on
Sunday. Then they ate at the an-
nual Catholic dinner in Midland
before heading to Kadoka for the
Holiday Festival at the auditorium.
Jamie found a bit of Tupperware at
one booth that she though might be
useful in her kitchen. The festival
is a fundraiser for the Kadoka
Nursing Home. Joy and Larry
Dolezal were also at the festival
and helped where needed since
Larry is on the board for the nurs-
ing home. This week, the Dolezals
are planning to wean their calves
and are getting ready for that.
Jo Rodgers didn’t put many
miles on her car this week for a
change since she mostly worked at
the Belvidere Post Office. She had
a quiet week as did son Jory who is
between the football and wrestling
seasons.
Frank Carlson and Casey
Jensen visited Clair and Joanne
Bitting on Sunday afternoon.
Frank said they went to see how
Clair was getting along after hav-
ing a defibrillator installed a couple
of weeks ago. He seems to be doing
just fine. Casey continues to work
with Brent Peters and his excava-
tion business out of Kadoka while
working with some horses and also
living in the former Ilove Sanftner
house there in Belvidere. Casey
says Ilove’s old house suits him
quite well and he likes living there.
Wally and Cheryll Wells visited
briefly on the phone with Bunny
Green this weekend. She was back
at her house across the street for a
bit and said she is feeling better
and doing better. She hopes to be
back to stay before long but for now
is staying with her granddaughter
in Ft. Pierre.
Betty Kusick was visited by her
daughter, Loretta Schreiber, of
Quinn on Saturday. Loretta cut
Betty’s hair and then beat her at a
game of cribbage. On Tuesday,
Betty is planning to serve on the
election board with Carol Badure
and Georgann Addison. She was
planning to meet the sheriff at the
church hall on Monday so he could
deliver a voting machine. On Sun-
day, Betty had a long phone call
from Buck Carrico in Arizona.
Buck is currently living there in his
motor home and said the tempera-
ture there was 78 degrees. They
had a good visit.
She did not make us perfect
But nature still was kind
To our own faults she made us
Amazingly blind.
Last Sunday morning, October
28, Irene Kaufman came from
Valentine, NE, and she and Carol
Ferguson drove on to visit Irene’s
sister, Ellen Totton, in Philip. They
enjoyed lunch with Bob and Ellen
and their grandson, Justin Holm,
and his daughter, Adriana, of
Rapid City. Friday had been Bob
and Ellen’s 60th wedding anniver-
sary and they celebrated with a
party, cake and all.
Carol Ferguson and Irene Kauf-
man traveled on to Rapid City
were supper guests at the home of
Cora, Scott and Moya Brickman on
Sunday evening. On Monday, Irene
kept an appointment and they also
made time for a visit with Charity
Weiss in the morning and then
spent time with Kaitlyn Ferguson
in the afternoon. The two tired
ladies returned home to Norris on
Monday night. Irene spent the
night at Carol’s home in Norris be-
fore returning to Valentine on
Tuesday.
Dan, Susan and Morgan Taft at-
tended an auction up by Enning a
week ago Sunday. They enjoyed
seeing some different country, but
it is dry up there, too. We did re-
ceive .09 of an inch a rain or a mist
this last week, hope it is a good
primer for a three-day soaker.
June Ring went into White
River and renewed her drivers li-
cense. She passed, so has the run of
the road now. That afternoon she
was busy making her popular pop-
corn balls for trick-or-treaters.
The Kratovil Electric crew, from
Martin were busy at the James
Letelliers on Tuesday. Couldn’t
help but think of the millions in
distress up and down the East
Coast. We know what it is like to be
without electricity for days down
here, but that was nothing com-
pared to what those folks are expe-
riencing. Please keep them in your
prayers.
Wednesday, Tom and Shauna
Brewer of Montana stopped by and
visited a couple hours with his
uncle and aunt, Evan and Dorothy
Bligh.
Halloween was such a nice day
every spook and goblin was out and
about. James and Marjorie Anne
Letellier had the usual open house
with 125 trick-or-treaters. We even
ran out of treats! Sorry kids. To be
honest, I have been here for so long
that anyone that comes to the door
is a “kid” to me.
Sharon Ring took her candy over
to Torey’s to pass out to the kids be-
cause they had to be gone to Rapid
City for an appointment.
The St. John Lutheran Ladies
Aide met at the home of Sharon
Ring on Thursday afternoon. Al-
berta Allard visited at the June
Ring home later that same after-
noon.
Guys are really busy working
and moving cattle this time of year.
Dan Taft helped Cheyenne
Schmidt load out cattle on Thurs-
day. On Friday Dan and Morgan
helped Jerry Hicks work cattle.
The Ed and Pete Fergusons
branded some late calves on Satur-
day afternoon. Besides family, Gra-
cie Charging Hawk, Jerry Hicks,
John WoodenKnife, Jace Hutchin-
son and Harold Standing Bear
were there to help.
JoAnn Letellier was busy deco-
rating and helping with the
Kadoka Nursing Home benefit
Christmas fair on Saturday and
Sunday. It was a great success
again this year. It is always so fun
to attend, lots of food, fun and vis-
iting and you can even shop!
Saturday, Susan and Morgan
Taft attended the cow sale in
Philip.
Evan and Dorothy Bligh enjoyed
attending the Casey Tibbs Founda-
tion Tribute dinner at Ft. Pierre on
Saturday evening.
The South Dakota Plains Chap-
ter of Thrivent held their annual
election of officers meeting at the
Norris Township Hall on Saturday
evening. The delicious supper was
catered by the ladies group.
Andee Beckwith visited Maxine
Allard a bit on Sunday afternoon.
Several area folks enjoyed the
Kadoka Nursing Home Holiday
Festival and delicious dinner on
Sunday. Maxine Allard and Jean
Kary accompanied June Ring to
the event. Maxine enjoyed seeing
many friends including her neice,
Terry Baldwin, at her South
Beekota honey table. June visited
in the home of her son, Bruce, and
Jessie Ring after she got home.
Sunday afternoon visitors at the
Robert Ring home were hunters,
Mike, Todd and Justin, from Ne-
braska.
Have a great week!
“Rail service is extremely impor-
tant in South Dakota, and I’m
pleased to see successful comple-
tion of this multi-year effort,’’ Gov.
Daugaard said. “The economic ben-
efits of this project are immeasura-
ble.”
The sale of South Dakota’s 369
miles of Core Line railroad track to
the Burlington Northern/Santa Fe
Railway (BNSF) in 2005 led to im-
proved rail service to elevators in
Highmore and Harrold from
BNSF’s shuttle program.
“Rehabilitation of the tracks be-
tween Mitchell and Chamberlain
has further enhanced shipping
choices,” Bergquist said. “It will be
great to see South Dakota’s farm-
ers reaping the financial benefits of
the improved and expanded rail
service that not only provides more
economical transportation of grain,
but it also takes many heavy grain
trucks off our roads.”
For more information, contact
Bruce Lindholm at the South
Dakota Department of Transporta-
tion at 605-773-3574.
The South Dakota Department
of Transportation and the Dakota
Southern Railway Company are
wrapping up a two-year, $28 mil-
lion rehabilitation project on the
state-owned, short-line rail system
between Mitchell and Chamber-
lain.
Gov. Dennis Daugaard said com-
pletion of the 61.6 mile rail project
gives the state’s farmers more op-
tions for storing, hauling and sell-
ing their crops.
Rehabilitation of the rail line fa-
cilitated construction of Gavilon
Liberty Grain Terminal, as well as
created opportunities for further
economic development in the area.
The new elevator in Kimball will
result in lower shipping costs, ex-
panded markets and better prices
for grain producers.
Dedication of the rail line, as
well as a grand opening of Liberty
Grain, which is located five miles
east of Kimball, took place Thurs-
day, Nov. 1. Gov. Dennis Daugaard,
U.S. Sen. Tim Johnson and state
Transportation Secretary Darin
Bergquist were speakers.
Railroad rehabilitation brings
new business, profits to SD
The breeding success in the
South Dakota cowherd was quite
variable this summer because of
heat and drought. Extension Beef
Reproduction Specialist George
Perry explains cows that were bred
in the early part of the summer set-
tled a pregnancy quite well but
when summer temperatures began
to spike, many cows were just too
hot to breed.
"Where we've seen the majority
of problems occurring this year are
actually the animals trying to be
bred end of June and into July
when we had the really hot
weather," Perry said. "If we raise
the rectal body temperature as lit-
tle as 2 degrees, we can actually re-
tard embryo growth and therefore
we don't get near as good of preg-
nancy rates."
Perry says heat stress may also
have impacted semen quality of
bulls.
"On bulls there is more of a last-
ing effect of that heat, even heat for
a short period of time, since sper-
matogenesis in the bull is a 61-day
process, if the bulls get too hot or
their testes get too hot, the sperm
that is actually being formed can be
impacted and actually impact fer-
tility up to two months later de-
pending on how severe it was."
The heat stress was com-
pounded by the drought, with sum-
mer pastures falling short for many
cows' nutritional needs.
"When she starts losing condi-
tion, unless that embryo is well es-
tablished it's one of the first things
that can be lost," he said.
Perry urges cattlemen to moni-
tor and boost their herd's body con-
dition now if needed before winter
sets in as after weaning is the eas-
iest time to improve body score -
setting the stage for successful
calving.
To learn more about this topic,
visit the beef tab on igrow.org.
More information on fertility and
body condition scoring will also be
presented at the 2012 Applied Re-
productive Strategies in Beef Cat-
tle Conference. The conference will
be held in Sioux Falls S.D., Dec. 3
and 4. The full program and list of
speakers is available at http://mu-
conf.missouri.edu/ARSBC-South-
Dakota.
The iGrow Radio Network and
SDSU Extension bring listeners an
informative show each day. For
more information on the iGrow
Radio Network, or to listen to
archived shows, visit
www.igrow.org.
2012 drought impact on breeding
success in the South Dakota cowherd
Coyote calling contest
The Bad River Sportsman’s Club
held its annual West River coyote
calling contest, Saturday, October
27.
There were 23 two-person teams
entered, with 20 returning with a
total of 90 coyotes. The first place
team of Jeff Nelson, Philip, and
Jake Nelson, Creighton, brought in
11 coyotes.
The second place team of Calvin
Ferguson, Kyle, and Darrell
Hunter, Kyle, brought in nine coy-
otes. The third place team of Tan-
ner Lolley, White River, and Matt
Glynn, Belvidere, brought in eight
coyotes.
Three teams each brought in
seven coyotes. Those team were Joe
Reddest and Cornell Reddest, Kyle,
Rod Kirk, Tuthill, and Jared
Schofield, Okaton, and Bryce Van-
derMay, Long Valley, and Chad
Cerney, Wall.
Winners of the big dog contest
were Lonnie Lesmeister, Dupree,
and Dakota Longbrake, Dupree,
who got a coyote weighting 40.5
pounds. This dog outweighed the
next heaviest one by four and one
half pounds.
The little dog contest was a tie.
The team of Jace Shearer, Wall,
and his partner, Neal Muscat, Sun-
dance, Wyo., and the team of J.
Reddest and C. Reddest each
brought in a coyote weighing 16
pounds.
Locals …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Email news, classified ads or photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
Hosted by Save the Pearl
Sat., Nov. 17 • 6 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
Everyone Welcome!
Lunch & refreshments will be available.
“It’s Time For A Change”
Tammy’s Tresses
will be closing after November 9.
We sold our house and moving to the country.
I will be relocating to Main Street Salon
starting November 14.
Wednesday • Thursday • Friday
Call for appointments
837-2301 or 415-5793
Lumber … from
the Hubbard Elevator
that was torn down
recently came from
the Pacific National
Lumber Co., head-
quartered in Tacoma
and a sawmill and
logging operation at
National in 1922. The
town of National is on
the Mount Rainier
Highway near the park. It was a company town established by the lumber
company that once housed 300 people who worked for or were dependent
on the sawmill and logging operation. The sawmill burned May 13, 1912,
but was rebuilt. Jerry Baldwin took these photos and did the research
from the markings on a piece of lumber. He also said it’s believed the ele-
vator in Kadoka was built between 1924-1926.
--photos by Jerry Baldwin
Dave and Denise Ehlers of New-
castle, WY, were brief Kadoka visi-
tors on Wednesday of last week.
They stopped to visit with some of
the coffee drinkers at Jigger’s as
they were on their way to the east-
ern part of the state on family busi-
ness.
Vernon and Hellen Uhlir made a
trip to Rapid City on Tuesday, Oc-
tober 30, to keep a doctor appoint-
ment. Vernon is now able to remove
his neck brace for a few hours each
day, after his neck surgery several
weeks ago.
Betty (Pearson) and Jerry Boyer
of rural Keystone were in Kadoka
for the funeral of Barbara Stone on
Thursday. Some of Barbara’s out-
of-town relatives who attended her
funeral included Andy Anderson,
his two daughters, and some
grandchildren of the Watertown/
Waubay area; Bill Birkholz of Red-
field; Dick and Joanne Stone and
Marvin Marlow of Rapid City, and
friends Diane (Olney) and Gordon
Paulson of Rapid City. All of Barb’s
children and their extended fami-
lies were in Kadoka also.
Courtney Mistelski, Kyler and
Bodey of Spearfish spent the week-
end in Kadoka visiting her mom,
Joy Schmidt. They all attended the
Holiday Festival Sunday afternoon
before returning home.
Tim and Carmen Huffman, ac-
companied by his dad, Jim Huff-
man, of Hill City, drove to
Fairmont, MN, on Friday after-
noon. They picked up Keith Huff-
man at Sioux Falls that day and on
Saturday they attended the wed-
ding of Tim’s oldest sister’s daugh-
ter at Truman, MN. All returned to
their homes on Sunday.
Jim and Robyn Jones spent the
night at her parent’s home, Ray
and Florence Osburn, in Valentine,
NE. On Saturday they visited her
aunts, Betty Copeland and Hazel
Brown, before returning home later
that evening.
Roy and Rose Albin of Balti-
more, MD, arrived on Saturday
and visited at the home of Cloreta
Eisenbraun over the weekend.
They said that the big storm in
their state left 8 1/2 inches of rain
in the area before they left for
South Dakota. They also visited
several relatives in the Belvidere
area and planned to return home
sooner because of another storm
coming Baltimore’s way this week.
Sue and John Kaiser and Sydne
Lenox were among relatives going
to Blunt on Saturday where they
attended a memorial service for
Roberta Russell, 100, who died re-
cently in Dewey, AZ. Roberta was
Sue’s aunt and the late Hazel
Parkinson’s first cousin. They re-
turned to their homes Saturday
evening.
Kieth and Nona Prang drove to
Rapid City early Thursday morn-
ing where Kieth entered the sur-
gery center for surgery on his back.
He had to stay overnight and was
released to come home on Friday.
While there they found out that his
brother, Loren, was also a patient
there. He was having complications
from recent shoulder surgery.
Gene Stevens of Rapid City
spent some time in the Kadoka
area this weekend. He did some
coyote hunting, but said he wasn’t
successful even though he saw
quite a few. He attended the nurs-
ing home dinner and Holiday Fes-
tival with Jerry Baldwin on
Sunday.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit
27 will hold its November meeting
on Thursday, the 8th, at 7 p.m.
Members are urged to attend and
to also attend the Veterans’ Day
program at the auditorium at 9
a.m. on the 8th.
Jerry Stilwell remains hospital-
ized in Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal and this past week JoAnne
Stilwell was admitted to the Philip
Hospital and at this writing is still
there. We wish both of them a
speedy recovery.
The Grand Chapter of the Order
of the Eastern Star of South
Dakota Grand Officers this year
are represented by three from the
Kadoka area. Elected and installed
on October 13, 2012, were Brother
Kenneth Ireland as Worthy Grand
Patron and Sister Ruby Sanftner
as Associate Grand Conductress.
Brother Leonard Sanftner was ap-
pointed and installed as Grand
Chaplin. WGP Kenny is joined by
Worthy Grand Matron Gayle
Parmeter of Huron, and they along
with a total of six others are elected
to their positions by the members
present at the Grand Chapter
meeting. Sister Gayle and Brother
Kenny appoint ten other members
to serve with them in different po-
sitions for a period of one year, cul-
minating next October at their
“Believe in Miracles” session in
Pierre. Associate Grand Conduc-
tress Ruby will serve the South
Dakota Grand Chapter for three
additional years in different elected
positions, culminating with her
election as Worthy Grand Matron.
Both Gayle and Kenny have ex-
tensive backgrounds in serving the
Order of the Eastern Star, actually
it has been a lifetime labor of love
for them. The Order of the Eastern
Star is the largest fraternal organ-
ization in the world to which both
women and men belong. Worldwide
there are more than 500,000 mem-
bers under the General Grand
Chapter. This organization is com-
posed of men who are Masons and
women who are related to them.
Parmeter will join Ireland in pro-
viding leadership to more than 50
OES Chapters in South Dakota.
The degrees of the Order of the
Eastern Star teaches lessons in fi-
delity, constancy, loyalty, faith and
love. Eastern Star is a social order
comprised of persons with spiritual
values who take part in character
building lessons. This is an Order
composed of people of deep spiri-
tual convictions, and is open to all
faiths. The organization has raised
millions of dollars within the mem-
bership to support different chari-
table acts. These include providing
scholarship help to people attend-
ing seminaries preparing their way
for our future ministers, general
scholarships, and supporting the
Easter Star Home in Redfield,
which is composed of apartments,
assisted living facilities and a nurs-
ing home.
Two projects that Parmeter and
Ireland plan to focus on are the
scholarships for those entering the
ministry, and Assisting Children to
Smile, also known as the ACTS
program of the Grand Chapter of
South Dakota. The ACTS program
is a partnership between the
Grand Chapter of South Dakota
Order of the Eastern Star, the
South Dakota Orthodontic Society,
and the South Dakota Sunshine
Smiles Dental Foundation. There
will be a special Worthy Grand Pa-
tron’s Project this year raising
funds for research on cystic fibro-
sis.
Evergreen Chapter #97 O.E.S.
represented well at Grand Chapter
Order of the Eastern Star …Associate Grand Conductress
Ruby Sanftner (L), Worthy Grand Patron Kenneth Ireland and Grand
Chaplin Leonard Sanftner. --courtesy photo
Club 27
Kadoka, SD • 837-2241
Enjoy the
entertainment of
Brock Finn
Saturday, Nov. 17
Friday & Saturday Special
Prime Rib & Salad Bar
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Community Christmas Cantata
in Memory of Grace DeVries
Keep Grace’s memory alive through the spirit
of Christmas and the music she so loved!
All ages welcome!
Practice on Sundays at 3 p.m.
Kadoka Presbyterian Church
Tentative performance date • Sun., Dec. 16
eral layers of loose-fitting, light-
weight clothing and water repel-
lent outer garments. Cover all
parts of your body; especially your
head, face, and hands.
- When working outdoors, do not
overexert yourself. Remove damp
clothing as soon as possible to
avoid becoming chilled.
Additional information on
preparing for winter weather is
available from your county emer-
gency management office, the
Rapid City National Weather Serv-
ice at http://weather.gov/RapidC-
ity, and the South Dakota “bReady”
web site http://www.breadysd.com/
Winter Storm And Blizzard
Warnings are issued when a dan-
gerous storm is imminent.
- Do not travel unless it is an ex-
treme emergency. You are safer to
stay where you are rather than risk
getting stranded along a highway.
- If you have no heat, close off
unneeded rooms and wear extra
clothes.
- Do not operate power genera-
tors indoors.
Wind Chill Warnings And Ad-
visories emphasize the increased
risk of frostbite and hypothermia
during cold and windy conditions.
- Stay inside as much as possi-
ble. If you go outdoors; wear sev-
Time to prepare
for winter weather
Sports …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
E-mail Your News Items, Classified
Advertisements or Cards of Thanks to:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
Deadline Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
Informational Kick-Off Event
West Region
Stronger Economies Together
Wed., Nov. 14 • Club 27, Kadoka
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. meeting
Join us to...
•Learn about the SET program.
•Understand how you can be involved.
•Network with other communities in your region.
•Build enthusiasm for a stronger, successful region.
Contact Jackie Stilwell at
488-0334 for more
information.
This year there were several
Jackson County 4-Hers that at-
tended Camp Bob Marshall near
Custer.
While Camp Bob is labeled 4-H
camp, you do not have to be a 4-H
member to attend. Here is what
Gage Weller, Hudson Johnson and
Tagg Weller had to say about sum-
mer camp.
Gage Weller: This was my 4th
year going to Camp Bob and I’m
going next summer too. My favorite
part about camp is going canoeing
and the dance the last night of
camp. My favorite camp song this
year was “Dog, Cat, Mou-ooose!”
and my favorite food at camp is the
homemade pizza. You always get
enough to eat at camp. I liked
archery, too.
The thing I dislike is this: if you
lose or leave an item at camp, like
shampoo in the shower, a hat, or
your towel, someone turns it in to
the camp director, and then at meal
time, you have to claim the item
and sing in front of all the kids at
meal time. So you want to keep
close tabs on your stuff. The other
thing I don’t like is if someone in
your cabin snores.
This year camp was about Greek
Heroes. I learned a lot about an-
cient Greece: Olympus, cities,
heard stories, like why we call a
weakness an Achilles Heel, and we
made some Greek food and I tried
feta cheese.
Camp is really a great value. It
only costs $40 to attend for four
days and three nights. We have
cabins, and a big green to play
sports on, a dance, a campfire and
we get to swim and canoe in the
lake. You also meet a lot of new
friends.
Hudson Johnson: This summer
was my 2nd year at camp. My fa-
vorite part is the talent show night.
Each cabin comes up with some
kind of skit or song and performs in
front of everyone. My favorite
breakfast was the scrambled eggs
and you get a lot to eat. Tetherball
is another favorite thing I like to do
at camp.
I learned to make Greek
Brushetta bread. I like to play with
friends and I like the going to the
dance. I would ask other kids to go
to camp and I would tell them you
get to play games, do the talent
show, go canoeing and go to the
dance. You get to make new
friends, too.
Tagg Weller: This was the first
time I went to camp. My favorite
part was that my mom was a chap-
erone and I learned to canoe. I
liked music and lights at the dance.
My favorite food was grill cheese
sandwiches. I liked learning camp
songs and being at the campfire
and tetherball. I made new friends,
too.
By talking about their Camp
Bob Marshall experiences, the boys
will apply for a $25 Camp Scholar-
ship sponsored by the SD 4-H
Leader’s Association.
If you are interested in attend-
ing Camp Bob, contact your local 4-
H advisor at 837-2133. There are
three sessions of camp scheduled
for 2013: June 17-20, 21-24, and 25
– 28. Camp is for ages 8 to 13.
Adult chaperones are always wel-
come, too.
--by Carrie Weller
4-H members share Camp
Bob Marshall experiences
Camp Bob Marshall …Campers raise the flag to start the day
at camp. --courtsey photo
Kadoka traveled to Murdo on
Tuesday, October 30 for the district
tournament.
Jones County defeated Kadoka
25-21, 25-9, 25-18 in the first round
of the district tournament.
Mariah Pierce had 6 service
points, Raven Jorgensen had 8
kills, and Tessa Stout and Taylor
Merchen combined for 12 set as-
sists.
This was not the way we wanted
to end our season. We did not play
well, and it was very disappointing.
Jones County is a good, young, ath-
letic team, and we just had no an-
swer for their tough attacking. We
had some chances in the first and
third sets, but they were just too
good for us that night.
Overall, we had a good season,
finishing with a winning record of
15-14. I'm proud of the girls for
their effort during the season.
--by Coach Barry Hutchinson
Kougars end volleyball season with 15-14 record
For the spike …Mariah Pierce #20 ends the play and gets the point
for the Kougars. --photos by Karlee Barnes
At the net…Kwincy Ferguson #10 and Raven Jorgensen #2 block the
spike attempt from the Lady Coyotes.
Choir Students of the Week
All State Choir
Taylor Merchen, Foster Berry, Racheal Shuck, Herbie O’Daniel
Sponsored by
Jackson County Title Company
and Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543 • 605-837-2286
Public Notices …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
COMMUNITY BANK,
AVON, SOUTH DAKOTA,
a South Dakota
Banking Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRADLEY PORCH, JACKSON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA,
SOUTHSIDE REBUILDERS,
KELLIE M. PORCH, CREDIT
COLLECTIONS SERVICES, INC.,
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA (DEPART-
MENT OF REVENUE
& REGULATION),
and BENNETT COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA,
Defendants.
CIV. NO. 10-42
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on
June 25, 2012, the Honorable John L.
Brown, Circuit Court Judge acting in and
for the Sixth Judicial Circuit, entered an
Order Granting Plaintiff’s Motion for
Summary Judgment, stating that the
Mortgage held by Plaintiff, dated July 14,
2006, and filed for record in the office of
the Jackson County, South Dakota, Reg-
ister of Deeds on July 19, 2006, in Book
36 of Mortgages, on pages 157-165,
upon the following described real prop-
erty, is a valid lien upon the premises and
which Mortgage was thereby foreclosed
and that the said real estate as here-
inafter described is to be sold at public
auction by the Sheriff of Jackson County,
South Dakota, or his authorized deputy,
retaining his fees, disbursements, and
commissions, and payment shall be
made to Plaintiff for Plaintiff’s judgment
amount.
The real estate upon which the
Mortgage is herein foreclosed and
upon which the Order of Sale is di-
rected is described as follows:
The Northwest Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter (NW¼NW¼)
and the East Half of the Northwest
Quarter (E½NW¼) of Section
Twenty-Four (24), in Township Forty
(40) North, Range Thirty-Eight (38),
West of the 6th P.M., Jackson
County, South Dakota.
The amount claimed to be due on this
Mortgage is the sum of $85,717.06, plus
interest accrued through the date of sale
and any redemption period, plus costs of
sale.
Said real estate shall be sold to the high-
est bidder, for cash, at the hour of 9:00
a.m. (mountain) on the 20th day of No-
vember, 2012, at the front door of the
Jackson County Courthouse, Kadoka,
Jackson County, South Dakota.
In accordance with the terms of the
Order, Defendant, Bradley Porch, and all
persons claiming under him to be and
they are forever barred and foreclosed of
all equity of redemption and claim to the
mortgaged property and all parts thereof,
except for statutory right of redemption
within 180 days from the date of record-
ing the certificate of sale. Further, any
lien held by any other Defendant and any
person in possession of the above-de-
scribed real estate are inferior to the lien
of Plaintiff.
Dated this 19th day of October, 2012.
/s/ Daniel G. Van Gorp
Attorney for Plaintiff
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605/859-2540
[Published October 25, November 1, 8 &
15, 2012]
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NOTICE FOR BIDS
Vehicle and Heating
Fuel Bids
City of Kadoka
The City of Kadoka will be accepting bids
for the calendar year of January 1, 2013
to December 31, 2013, until 4:00 p.m. on
Monday, November 12, 2012 for the fol-
lowing:
• Dyed #1 Diesel Fuel
• Dyed #2 Diesel Fuel
• Propane Heating Fuel
• Unleaded Gasoline for City Vehicles
Delivered to
• City Owned Tank Located at City
Shop
Bids will be opened at 7:00 p.m. at the
Kadoka City Council Meeting on Monday,
November 12, 2012 and award made as
soon as possible. The City reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all bids.
Please put bid for each item in a sepa-
rate envelope and denote contents on
outside of envelope.
[Published November 1 & 8, 2012 at the
total approximate cost of $23.40]
Public
Notice
Deadline
Friday at Noon
AT&T IS
COMING
T
O
Y
O
U
!
Pro Cellular, AT&T authorized retailer
of Pierre will be in Kadoka
Thursday November 15 - 10am-6pm
& Friday November 16 - 10am-6pm
Visit them at Peters Excavation Office at
700 Hickory St. (1/2 block off Main St)
605-945-0563 - Pierre (store)
9/5,,"%!",%4/
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We look forward to seeing you!
For directions call 605-220-3987.
AT&T IS AAT&T IS T&T IS T&T IS T&T IS A
COMIN COMIN
T&T IS AAT&T IS
COMIN COMIN COMIN COMIN
T&T IS
COMIN COMIN COMIN
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Thursday
of Pierre will be in Kadoka
Pro Cellular
COMIN COMIN COMIN COMIN
ovemb N Thursday
of Pierre will be in Kadoka
T&T authorized retailer , A , AT&T authorized retailer Pro Cellular
COMIN COMIN COMIN
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of Pierre will be in Kadoka
T&T authorized retailer
COMIN COMING
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NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Commissioners are accepting
sealed bids to crush and stockpile gravel
at the following site:
20,000 ton (+ or – 1%) of
gravel at the Harvey pit: NW4,
Section 29, T 43 N, R 38 W,
Jackson County, South
Dakota
Gravel to be crushed to one inch (1")
maximum.
Gravel stockpile to be neatly piled within
the pit site.
Gravel to be weighed on either a belt
scale or on a truck scale before being put
in stockpile. A comparison shall be made
against a scale reading from a certified
scale by measuring a minimum of Ten
(10) tons with the scale used and loading
it into a truck. The truck shall be weighed
loaded and empty. A conversion factor
from belt scale weight to truck scale
weight will be calculated by the County
and applied to the payments. Contractor
must perform this comparison during the
first One Thousand (1,000) tons of pro-
duction and during the final One Thou-
sand (1,000) tons of production. County
will calculate the average conversion fac-
tor and the final payment will be deter-
mined.
County is to pay all royalties to the pit
owner.
Contractor may be required to do such
other incidental work including, but not
limited to, minimal stripping, at the pit.
County will backfill pit at the landowner
and County’s discretion upon completion
of the project.
Contractor is to be responsible for any
damage to land, fences or cattle guards.
Contractor shall clean the pit site of all
garbage, oil filters, metal or plastic con-
tainers, equipment, equipment parts, etc.
to the satisfaction of the landowner and
county.
Contractor is to complete work within
Sixty (60) calendar days after the notice
to proceed has been issued by the
County Highway Superintendent. No
work shall begin until such notice has
been presented to Contractor. Any exten-
sion of time to complete work must be
agreed to by County, in writing, in ad-
vance of the expiration of the Sixty (60)
calendar days.
Certified Check or Bid Bond: A certified
check or a cashiers check drawn on a
South Dakota bank in the amount of five
percent (5%) of the amount of the bid,
made payable to Jackson County, shall
accompany the bid. In lieu of a bid check
the bidder may submit a surety bond for
ten percent (10%) of the amount bid. The
surety is to be payable to Jackson
County as a guarantee that such bidder
will enter into a contract with Jackson
County. Bid bond is waived as per SDCL
5-18B-3 if the bid does not exceed Fifty
Thousand Dollars ($50,000.00).
Performance Bond: The successful bid-
der must provide either a performance
bond with property surety or a certified
check in the amount of the contract price,
delivered and accepted by Jackson
County prior to signing of a contract
guaranteeing the faithful performance
and the payment for labor and materials
by the successful bidder. Successful bid-
der is to enter into a contract with Jack-
son County within ten (10) days after the
date of bid letting. Performance Bond is
waived as per SDCL 5-21-1.1 if the bid
does not exceed Twenty-Five Thousand
Dollars ($25,000.00).
The successful bidder will be required to
provide a certificate of insurance in the
amount of Two Million Dollars
($2,000,000.00) to Jackson County,
South Dakota.
All bids must be submitted in a sealed
envelope plainly marked as “Bid on
Gravel Crushing and Stockpile - Harvey
Pit”.
All bids must be filed in the Jackson
County Auditor’s Office, 700 Main Street,
Kadoka, SD or mailed to Jackson
County, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD 57543.
Bids must be received no later than 1:00
p.m., Wednesday, November 21, 2012.
Bids will be opened at 1:05 p.m. (Moun-
tain time), Wednesday, November 21,
2012.
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to accept or re-
ject any or all bids, to waive any
irregularities or technicalities therein, to
advertise for new proposals, and to ac-
cept the bid that is to the best advantage
of and is in the best interest of Jackson
County.
For further information you may contact
Aaron Richardson, Jackson County
Highway Department at 605-837-2410.
Vicki D. Wilson
Jackson County Auditor
[Published November 8 & 15, 2012, at an
estimated cost of $87.78]
Public Notices
The People’s Right
to Know
Town of Belvidere
Regular Meeting
October 8, 2012
Rudy Reimann made a motion to call the
meeting to order. Wayne Hindman sec-
onded the motion. The following people
were present: Rudy Reimann, Wayne
Hindman, John Rodgers, and Jo
Rodgers.
OLD BUSINESS:
Minutes from the September 10, 2012
meeting were read. With there being no
changes, Rudy Reimann made a motion
to accept the minutes as read. Wayne
Hindman seconded the motion.
NEW BUSINESS:
The second readings were held for Res-
olution 12-01-2013 Estimated Annual
Budget and Ordinance 12-02-2013 Ap-
propriation Ordinance. All present voted
yea. Nays none.
A letter was received from a retired post-
master informing the council about a let-
ter or survey that may be coming from
the United States Postal Service regard-
ing the reduction in hours for our post of-
fice. The most important part of the
process will begin on how citizens an-
swer their survey. A copy of the letter will
be hung on the community bulletin
board.
A letter was received from ING USA An-
nuity and Life Ins. Co. indicating the
Town of Belvidere may be a beneficiary
for a client. Jo will fill out the necessary
paperwork and send back into the com-
pany.
John Rodgers informed the council that
he will try to cut some of the tall weeds
around town before winter.
BILLS APPROVED AND PAID:
Golden West, phone
& internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103.40
Jo Manke-Rodgers, wages . . . .78.48
Jo Rodgers, toliet . . . . . . . . . . .144.84
Kadoka Press,
publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.62
Ray Williams, labor . . . . . . . . . .118.95
US Postal Service, stamps . . . . .45.00
West Central, electricity . . . . . .477.86
WR/LJ, water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.00
With there being no further business,
Wayne Hindman made a motion to ad-
journ the meeting. Rudy Reimann sec-
onded the motion. The next meeting will
be November 5, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the
city office.
John L. Rodgers
Council President
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published November 8, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $25.02]
Town of Belvidere
Ordinance #12-02
2013 Appropriation
Ordinance
Be it ordained by the Town of Belvidere
that the following sum will be appropri-
ated to meet the obligations of the mu-
nicipality.
General Fund . . . . . . . . . . .16,264.00
Adopted this 10th day of September,
2012.
John Rodgers
Council President
Rudy Reiman, Trustee
Wayne Hindman, Trustee
First Reading: September 10, 2012
Second Reading: October 8, 2012
Adoption: January 1, 2013
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published November 8, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $11.70]
Town of Belvidere
Resolution 12-01
2013 Estimated
Annual Budget
Be it resolved by The Town of Belvidere
Whereas, the town council deems that
the following estimated sums are needed
for the obligations of the municipality.
410 General
Governments . . . . . . . . .44,660.00
431 Streets & Highways . . . .5,610.00
460 Economic
Development . . . . . . . . . .3,450.00
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53,720.00
The following designates the fund of
funds that the money is derived from.
310 Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23,856.00
320 Licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,900.00
335 State
Shared Revenue . . . . . . .5,970.00
360 Miscellaneous
Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,730.00
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37,456.00
Need from Tax Levy . . . . . .16,264.00
The finance officer is directed to certify
the following dollar amount of tax levies
made in the Resolution to the county au-
ditor.
Dated this 8th day of October, 2012.
John Rodgers
Council President
Rudy Reimann,
Trustee
Wayne Hindman,
Trustee
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published November 8, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $18.53]
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Deadline 10 a.m. Tuesday
Kadoka Press
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
POLICY
Please read your
classified ad the first
week it runs.
If you see an error,
we will gladly rerun
your ad correctly.
We accept
responsibility
for the first
incorrect
insertion only.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
requests that all
classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid
for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is
not paid at the time
the order is place.
Payment by cash,
check or credit card
is accepted.
ADOPTION
ADOPT - WE WILL PROVIDE a
happy, loving home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn baby. Ex-
penses paid. Married couple
Walt/Gina. Call for info: 1-800-315-
6957.
AUCTION
LARGE NATIVE AMERICAN collec-
tion of prints, pictures, plates and
decorative items for sale at in-doors
Two-Ring Auction, Carpenter Auction
Center, Lake Benton, MN, Saturday,
Nov. 10, 9:30 a.m. Pickups, boat,
firearms, antiques, furniture, house-
hold, miscellaneous. www.carpen-
terauction.com.
EMPLOYMENT
KTC CONSTRUCTION SEEKS EM-
PLOYEES, both part-time and full-
time. Excellent pay/benefits!
Underground plumbing, digging,
trenching, operating equipment.
Willing to train. Submit resumes to
rodb@kennebectel ephone.com.
Questions, call 605-869-2220.
SALES AGRONOMIST/PRECISION
AG position at Howard Farmers
Coop, Howard SD. Sales experi-
ence, knowledge of Ag chemicals
and precision Ag/VRT is preferred.
Call Colby 605-772-5543.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
FOR SALE
AKC black and yellow lab puppies,
male and female, ready to go Nov.
14, good hunting parents, dew claws
removed, $250.00. Ringneck Roost,
Gregory. Ph: (605) 835-9629.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program! *Earn
up to 50 cpm *Home Weekly *2500+
miles, 95% no-tarp. Must be Cana-
dian eligible (888) 691-5705.
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
Stop by the
Kadoka Press
for back issues of the paper
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Great Gobbler Give-away!
J& S
Restore
Jigger’s
Restaurant
Double H
Feed
Club 27
Kadoka Press
BankWest
Insurance
Creative
Cuts
Discount Fuel
Hogen’s
Hardware
BankWest
Kadoka
Gas & Go
People’s
Market
Midwest
Coop
Each of the businesses listed below will be giving away a turkey, so stop in and sign up to win!
Drawings will be Thursday, Nov. 15 at 4:00 p.m. Businesses will notify the winners.
Winners MUST pick up their turkeys at People’s Market by Tuesday., Nov 20.
Shopping at home supports local business!
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing ...........................24-12
Rockers................................22.5-13.5
Petersen’s ..................................19-17
Handrahan Const .....................17-19
Dakota Bar................................13-23
Badland’s Auto....................12.5-23.5
Highlights:
Venessa Buxcel......................147/417
Kim Petersen ........................215/475
Andrew Reckling 225, 205 clean/633
Tena Slovek...........................173/504
Arlene Kujawa ......................198/501
Bryan Buxcel.........................211/589
Gail Reutter .................................199
Ronnie Coyle .............. 3-6-7-10 split;
.............................................203 clean
Brian Pearson.............2-10 split; 540
Jim Kujawa ........................200 clean
Jerry Mooney....5-10 & 4-5 split; 204
Jason Petersen ...................3-10 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................17-3
Philip Motor................................12-8
Kennedy Imp...............................11-9
George’s Welding ......................10-10
Kadoka Tree Service.............9.5-10.5
Philip Health Service............8.5-11.5
Bear Auto ....................................7-13
G&A Trenching...........................6-14
Highlights:
Fred Foland .................5-7 split; 202,
.....................................220 clean/613
Randy Boyd...........................216/600
Jim Larson...3-10 split; 215, 221/596
Bill Stone...............................202/574
Terry Wentz ...4-5 split; 208, 212/558
Wendell Buxcel ...........3-10 split; 555
Earl Park .............3-10 split; 212/548
Ryan Seager................3-10 split; 543
Cory Boyd.....................................540
Ed Morrison ..........................228/539
Ronnie Williams......5-8-10 split; 536
Steve Varner.................................527
James Mansfield...................204/523
Tony Gould..................2-10 split; 508
Alvin Pearson .......................5-7 split
Matt Schofield ....................5-10 split
Norm Buxcel .......................5-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................30-6
Bowling Belles ..........................21-15
Invisibles...................................21-15
Jolly Ranchers ..........................18-18
State Farm Ins..........................16-20
Highlights:
Shirley Parsons.....................189/416
Judy Papousek..............176, 152/465
Karen Foland ........176, 167, 163/506
Sandra O’Connor .........................163
Donna King...... 3-10 & 3-7-10 splits;
........................................161,157/424
Cindy Wilmarth ...........................154
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.....................2-7 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................17-3
Dakota Bar..................................14-6
McDonnell Farms .....................10-10
O’Connell Const ........................10-10
Coyle’s SuperValu .......................9-11
WEE BADD.................................8-12
The Steakhouse ..........................6-14
West River Pioneer Tanks..........6-14
Highlights:
Ky Bowen .....................................206
Neal Petersen........................202/554
Alex Moos .....................................200
Harlan Moos..........................216/578
Brian Pearson..............5-7 split; 210,
..................195 & 190 both clean/595
Doug Hauk ............................213/550
Jan Bielmaier........................212/563
Jack Heinz.............................202/559
Ronnie Coyle..............5-10 split; 200,
.....................................189 clean/554
Nathan Kjerstad ..........3-7 split; 203
Mike Moses.........................5-10 split
Wendell Buxcel .....................5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ........................4-5 split
Alvin Pearson .....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................29-7
King Pins.............................19.5-16.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............19-13
Roy’s Repair ........................18.5-17.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................16-16
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Brain Pearson........2-9 split; 232/548
Robin Bierle..................5-6 split; 153
Theresa Miller.................4-7-10 split
Aaron Richardson................3-7-10 &
...........................................5-10 splits
John Heltzel .........................6-7 split
Duane Hand .......................5-10 split
Deb Neville .........................5-10 split
Annette Hand.......................5-6 split
FOR SALE: Hereford bull calves.
Will keep until December 1, 2012.
Hovland Herefords, Allen Hovland,
605-544-3236, or Miles Hovland,
544-3294. KP16-2tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
The Kadoka Nursing Home resi-
dents and staff would like to thank
the Senior Class of 2011 for the
money gift given to the activity de-
partment at the nursing home.
Thanks to all the Legion Auxiliary
members and other friends who so
generously supported the gifts for
the Veterans Gift Shop and our an-
nual bake sale. It is greatly appreci-
ated.
Sydne Lenox, President
Thank Yous
Coordinating efforts with the
Governor’s Drought Task Force,
the South Dakota Department of
Agriculture (SDDA) is asking farm-
ers and ranchers who struggled
with this year’s extreme drought
conditions to send their ideas on
drought disaster relief.
“SDDA wants to know how we
can best help our producers
through this drought year,” said
South Dakota Secretary of Agricul-
ture Walt Bones. “Hearing their
ideas first-hand is the best way to
do that.”
Producers are encouraged to e-
mail their comments and sugges-
tions by Friday, Nov. 16, to ag-
mail@state.sd.us, call 605-773-
5425, or write the South Dakota
Department of Agriculture, 523 E
Capitol Ave., Pierre, SD 57501.
Agriculture is South Dakota’s
No. 1 industry, generating nearly
$21 billion in annual economic ac-
tivity and employing more than
80,000 South Dakotans. The South
Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture’s mission is to promote, pro-
tect, preserve and improve this
industry for today and tomorrow.
Visit us online at
http://sdda.sd.gov/ or follow us on
Facebook and Twitter.
SD Dept. of Ag seeks producer
input on disaster relief
Caffeine
Many people depend on some
type of caffeine to get their day
started. It is one of the most com-
monly consumed stimulants in the
world. It is found in natural
sources such as tea, coffee, soft
drinks, cocoa and chocolate. Coffee
is the most popular item consumed
at breakfast. The average Ameri-
can adult drinks nine gallons of
coffee annually.
The caffeine content of coffee or
tea is increased the longer it is
brewed. A typical eight-ounce (1
cup) of drip method, brewed coffee
has 85 milligrams of caffeine, com-
pared to decaffeinated with only
three milligrams. One cup of in-
stant coffee has 75 milligrams. A
one-ounce cup of espresso has 40
milligrams.
Soft drinks are the second most
popular dietary source of caffeine
for adults and the primary source
for children ages 2 to 17. The caf-
feine content of 12-ounce soft
drinks varies from 0 to 70 mil-
ligrams. Diet soft drinks contain
more caffeine than regular soft
drinks. Water with added caffeine
and energy drinks can contain
from 50 to 300 milligrams of caf-
feine per can or bottle. Chai and
Espresso teas may contain more
caffeine. Milk chocolate contains
less caffeine then dark chocolate.
Other non-dietary caffeine can
be found in over-the-counter med-
ications like cold remedies, weight
control aids and diuretics. It can
also be found in various prescrip-
tion medicines.
Caffeine provides some individ-
uals with a safe boost to begin
their day, but caffeine can become
habit-forming. There are currently
no recognized health standards for
caffeine intake or a safety limit es-
tablished. For most healthy adults,
200-300 milligrams of caffeine
daily is not considered harmful.
This is equal to 2-4 (8-ounce) cups
of coffee or 3-4 (12-ounce) cans of
soft drinks daily. Higher levels of
caffeine can cause increased heart
rate, headaches, dehydration, dif-
ficulty sleeping, irritability, upset
stomach, anxiety and difficulty
concentrating, among other symp-
toms.
Caffeine affects different people
differently. Individuals who regu-
larly drink beverages with caffeine
may find that they have to in-
crease consumption to get the
same effects. Some people find
that when they stop caffeine con-
sumption, they experience drowsi-
ness, nausea, headaches and lack
of motivation. To avoid this, slowly
cut back on your caffeine consump-
tion over several days. Water
would be a great alternative to
drink.
For a chart listing the caffeine
content of food, beverages and
drugs go to
http://www.cspinet.org/new/cafcha
rt.htm, courtesy of the Center for
Science in the Public Interest.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Agricul ture …
November 8, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Notice
to our
Subscribers:
When sending
subscription
payments
PLEASE return
the entire pink
postcard
with the payment.
Winner Regional
Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology
Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Crop Variety Trial Results
Many farmers look forward
each year for the various SDSU
crop variety trial results. The win-
ter wheat trial results are always
the first completed and published
in August to help producers make
variety decisions. Spring wheat,
oats, alfalfa (if applicable), corn,
soybeans, sunflowers and flax fol-
low as the plots are harvested and
the data compiled.
Trial results for 2012, and sev-
eral years back can be found on
iGrow at: http://igrow.org/agron-
omy/ profit-tips/ variety-trial-
results/. The documents generally
include an explanation of test pro-
cedures, current and multiyear av-
erage of yields, and test weight of
each entry. Depending on the crop,
additional information is provided,
potentially including relative ma-
turity or maturity, lodging rating,
stand count, seed traits, origin,
grain color, disease resistance,
plant variety protection status,
height, protein content, area of
adaptation, top yield group per-
centage, oil content and composi-
tion, weather data, herbicide
resistance, harvest moisture, seed
size, and highlights of the trials by
the researchers.
Dormant Seeding Spring
Wheat
Dwayne Beck, Manager of the
Dakota Lakes Research Farm re-
cently wrote an article for iGrow
Wheat: http://igrow.org/agron-
omy/wheat/ on dormant seeding
spring wheat; which will soon be
on the website in its entirety, and
provide more detail. Dormant
seeding is planting a crop long be-
fore soil temperatures and/or mois-
ture conditions allow the seed to
germinate and grow, i.e. in early
winter, for growth the following
spring. This technique is com-
monly used for plants like native
grasses and forbs. It is less com-
mon with grain crops.
The reason for considering dor-
mant seeding is to assure early
seeding of cool-season crops like
spring wheat where it is important
to avoid hot weather that occurs
when they are planted too late in
the spring. It also helps to spread
workload. Dormant seeding spring
wheat may provide an alternative
for growers with large acreages of
winter wheat that were not
planted in the fall because of dry
soil conditions.
Dormant seeding spring wheat
is not a substitute for planting
winter wheat at the proper time
when conditions are suitable. It is
a viable alternative to a traditional
spring wheat seeding program and
as a means to keep wheat in the
rotation when dry weather pre-
cludes winter wheat seeding in the
fall.
Research at the Dakota Lakes
Research Farm has produced the
highest yields with winter wheat
planted at the recommended time,
followed by dormant seeded spring
wheat, then spring wheat planted
in early spring, closely followed by
dormant planted winter wheat.
Dormant seeded wheat should al-
ways be done with spring wheat,
not winter wheat. Winter wheat
will most likely vernalize and pro-
duce heads the next summer when
dormant seeded, but research at
Dakota Lakes indicates that dor-
mant seeded winter wheat heads
and matures later than spring
wheat seeded the same day and
the winter wheat yields are less.
Dormant seeding should not be
considered in situations where
residue and soil conditions will re-
sult in increased wind erosion po-
tential, which has already
occurred with winter wheat plant-
ing this fall. Crop insurance may
be questionable. The best recom-
mendation is to check with your
agent.
Calendar
•11/27-28/2012: Ag Horizons
Conference, Pierre, SD
•12/11/2012: Soil Health Info
Day- Davison County Extension
Complex, Mitchell, SD
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT -
TU£SDAY, NOV. t, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] oo1ves ond o
reo1 b1g oroud o] bugers. MorKe1
uos good. Reo1 b1g so1e Þere Tues-
dog u11Þ SDDD Þeod oo1ves ond
geor11ngs.
FEEDER CATTLE:
MATT, STANLEY & COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
119 .................................DLK STFS 548= ....$176.00
95 ...................................DLK STFS 617= ....$164.00
TRIPLE T ENTERPRISES - NEWCASTLE, WY
96 ...................................DLK STFS 597= ....$166.00
39 ...................................DLK STFS 509= ....$172.50
30...................................DLK HFFS 501= ....$154.00
MILES WHEELER - PHILIP
46.........................DLK & DWF STFS 538= ....$170.25
13 ...................................DLK STFS 455= ....$173.50
38 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 478= ....$153.25
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
105.......................DLK & DWF STFS 514= ....$170.00
33.........................DLK & DWF STFS 391= ....$185.25
108 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 484= ....$154.25
41 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 403= ....$167.50
JOE WISHARD - LANTRY
102.......................DLK & DWF STFS 500= ....$170.00
58.........................DLK & DWF STFS 414= ....$189.50
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 334= ....$192.25
40....................................DWF HFF 494= ....$156.50
47 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 374= ....$167.00
BCR INC - HERMOSA
109.......................DLK & DWF STFS 516= ....$172.00
62.........................DLK & DWF STFS 418= ....$185.00
24 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 432= ....$163.00
RICK JOHNSTON - UNION CENTER
97 ...................................DLK STFS 446= ....$186.25
21 ...................................DLK STFS 365= ....$206.50
86...................................DLK HFFS 425= ....$165.00
24...................................DLK HFFS 351= ....$175.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
127.......................DLK & DWF STFS 489= ....$175.75
104.......................DLK & DWF STFS 559= ....$168.00
31.........................DLK & DWF STFS 400= ....$198.00
99 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 524= ....$155.00
38 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 390= ....$167.00
KELLY BLAIR - MILESVILLE
91.........................DLK & DWF STFS 606= ....$163.75
18 ...................................DLK STFS 517= ....$171.50
94 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 570= ....$147.00
19...................................DLK HFFS 456= ....$155.50
TRAVIS & TATE THOMPSON - WANBLEE
115.......................DLK & DWF STFS 535= ....$168.25
92.........................DLK & DWF STFS 458= ....$185.50
107 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 464= ....$161.25
30 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 395= ....$164.00
DENNIS HULM - MEADOW
79 .................................CHAF STFS 750= ....$149.75
31 .................................CHAF STFS 662= ....$150.00
79.................................CHAF HFFS 723= ....$142.75
31.................................CHAF HFFS 647= ....$136.25
220 ...HEAD OF STEEFS & HEIFEFS AVC ....$1037.751HD
JIM EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
98.........................DLK & DWF STFS 579= ....$166.50
41 ...................................DLK STFS 501= ....$174.00
113 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 531= ....$154.00
36 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 457= ....$154.50
PHILIPSEN & STOVER - NEW UNDERWOOD
95.........................DLK & DWF STFS 576= ....$165.00
42.........................DLK & DWF STFS 464= ....$174.75
11 .................................CHAF STFS 597= ....$156.00
45...................................DLK HFFS 574= ....$142.50
18...................................DLK HFFS 476= ....$146.00
TROY & DAWN RICHTER - QUINN
102 ...............................CHAF STFS 564= ....$167.00
31 .................................CHAF STFS 451= ....$180.75
105...............................CHAF HFFS 544= ....$150.75
30.................................CHAF HFFS 468= ....$153.00
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
105 .............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 592= ....$164.25
19 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 518= ....$170.50
27...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 512= ....$153.00
10.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 463= ....$150.00
DAYCO LTD INC - SCENIC
43 ...................................DLK STFS 529= ....$167.50
22 ...................................DLK STFS 437= ....$176.50
17 ...................................DLK STFS 333= ....$196.00
28...................................DLK HFFS 418= ....$163.50
ROGER LARSON FAMILY - MURDO
80.........................DLK & DWF STFS 554= ....$167.00
18 ...................................DLK STFS 438= ....$189.00
KEITH SMITH - MILESVILLE
42.........................FED & DLK STFS 524= ....$167.00
30.........................FED & DLK STFS 440= ....$178.00
25 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 474= ....$144.00
15 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 404= ....$166.00
JAY VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
26.........................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ....$166.00
52.........................DLK & DWF STFS 435= ....$185.00
37 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 469= ....$159.00
15 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 384= ....$156.00
SCOTT EDOFF - HERMOSA
97.........................DLK & DWF STFS 525= ....$166.00
53.........................DLK & DWF STFS 435= ....$188.00
94 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 482= ....$154.00
31 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 408= ....$155.00
GORDON & KURT FLESNER - MILESVILLE
60.........................DLK & DWF STFS 547= ....$165.00
27 ...................................DLK STFS 447= ....$177.75
55...................................DLK HFFS 497= ....$156.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 394= ....$164.00
ROCKY WILLIAMS - PHILIP
66 ...................................DLK STFS 473= ....$176.50
20 ...................................DLK STFS 397= ....$193.50
50...................................DLK HFFS 460= ....$159.50
15...................................DLK HFFS 397= ....$163.00
WAYNE MICKELSON - WHITE OWL
34.........................FED & DLK STFS 500= ....$170.00
18.........................FED & DLK STFS 411= ....$174.00
32 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 451= ....$150.00
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
14 ...................................DLK STFS 537= ....$165.00
16...................................DLK HFFS 493= ....$153.00
GEORGE GITTINGS - PHILIP
24.........................DLK & DWF STFS 537= ....$164.00
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 423= ....$180.75
8 .....................................DLK STFS 367= ....$190.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 364= ....$164.50
DALE SAWVELL - QUINN
33 ...................................DLK STFS 543= ....$164.25
37...................................DLK HFFS 508= ....$146.50
BLOOM RANCH LLC - RAPID CITY
47 .................................CHAF STFS 498= ....$170.00
10 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 384= ....$185.00
42.................................CHAF HFFS 492= ....$147.00
14.................................CHAF HFFS 414= ....$160.00
CHASE STRAND - TUTHILL
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 507= ....$169.50
20.........................DLK & DWF STFS 406= ....$179.00
8.....................................DLK HFFS 459= ....$152.00
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
29 ...................................DLK STFS 470= ....$173.00
66...................................DLK HFFS 466= ....$155.50
KELVIN POPPEN - RAPID CITY
10 ...................................DLK STFS 491= ....$166.00
GEORGE PAUL MICHAEL - WALL
16 ...................................DLK STFS 527= ....$165.00
DOUG HAUK - PHILIP
9 .....................................DLK STFS 566= ....$160.00
9.....................................DLK HFFS 534= ....$142.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
64.........................FED & DLK STFS 597= ....$159.25
28.........................FED & DLK STFS 510= ....$169.00
20...................................DLK HFFS 559= ....$143.50
HOWIE & PAULTON - NEW UNDERWOOD
55.........................DLK & DWF STFS 457= ....$166.75
15 ...................................DLK STFS 350= ....$184.50
39...................................DLK HFFS 446= ....$152.00
27...................................DLK HFFS 355= ....$162.00
BROKEN BRIDGE LIVESTOCK - STURGIS
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 364= ....$189.00
19 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 331= ....$190.50
9.................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 442= ....$135.00
24...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 305= ....$165.00
R&G SMITH RANCH LLC - PHILIP
42 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 586= ....$159.75
15 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 500= ....$170.50
50.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 560= ....$143.00
18.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 463= ....$151.00
KURT KETELSEN - BOX ELDER
57 ...................................DLK STFS 588= ....$157.50
52 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 565= ....$143.50
STEVE DODSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
33 ...................................DLK STFS 502= ....$157.50
31...................................DLK HFFS 515= ....$137.50
C & J RANCH - NORRIS
35 ...................................DLK STFS 611= ....$151.50
29...................................DLK HFFS 584= ....$138.25
TOM COOLAHAN - HERMOSA
17 ...................................DLK STFS 641= ....$150.25
15 ...................................DLK STFS 560= ....$161.50
KELLY FEES - PHILIP
29.........................DLK & DWF STFS 626= ....$147.50
24 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 602= ....$139.50
JERAMY WARD - MARTIN
3 .........................CHAF & DLK STFS 662= ....$136.00
7...........................DLK & DWF STFS 421= ....$177.50
8 .....................................DLK STFS 325= ....$190.00

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