Login

Kadoka Press, November 22, 2012

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 19
November 22, 2012
News Briefs …
Pick up your book, We
Band of Angels, at the Jackson
County Library. Book discus-
sion, led by Dorothy Liegl, will
be held Sunday, January 6,
2013, 2:00 at the Library.
Bring a friend for this latest
discussion. Stop in the Jack-
son County Library to sign-up.
Call Deb Moor at 837-2689
with any questions.
How to cook Thanksgiving dinner
2012 Great Gobbler
Turkey Winners
Club 27 - Abbi McDaniel
BankWest - Chris Kusick
J&S Restore - Ken Kusick
Midwest Coop - Jim Rock
Jigger’s - Becca Nemecek
Creative Cuts - Carol Solon
Kadoka Press - Cathy Stone
People’s Market - Betty Berry
Discount Fuel - Iris Bearheels
Double H Feed - Lonnie Doney
Gas & Go - James Plaggemeyer
BankWest Insurance - Mary Short Bull
Hogen’s Hardware - Heather Hutchinson
Congratulations to all the winners!
Happy Thanksgiving
Working together …as a project everyone had to draw a body
part and then put the body pieces together to make a person. Lauri Fugate
shows the “person” created at her table. --courtesy photo
Madison Stilwell
How to a Cook an Apple Pie
Put in the apples.
Bake it at 3 degrees for 6 minutes.
Take it out and eat it.
Garrett Hermann
How to Cook a Turkey
All you have to do is …
Buy it
Thaw it out
Cook it half of a hour at medium hot.
Get it out
Set the table
EAT!
Isaac Sitting Up
How to Make the Meal
First put potatoes in the oven and put em in
the pan.
Then cook the turkey in the toaster then
take it out and
Put in the oven.
Slice it up with a fork cause we don’t have
sharp knives.
Put it on the table and eat it.
Don Schofield
How to Cook a Turkey
You usually put it the oven first.
Cook it at 4 degrees for 25 minutes.
Then when it’s done you take it out.
Then you eat it.
Talitha Ashley
How to Cook Turkey
Take a turkey that is dead.
Put it in the oven at a little bit hot
for 3 minutes.
When we take it out it’s done,
And we eat it all up.
Isabella Kay Williams
How to Cook a Turkey
Wash the blood off the turkey.
Put some eggs in it.
Put water in it.
Put it in the oven for 6 minutes at 5 degrees.
Take it out of the oven.
Put it in the pan.
Shut the lid.
All Done!
Justice Evan Child
How to Make Jello
Put some Jello stuff in it.
Put water five foot deep in it.
Put some sugar in it.
Mix it up and put it in the microwave.
Then put it in the oven.
Then it comes out fresh and clean.
Eat it.
Jacob High Horse
How to Cook a Turkey
First put it in the oven.
Cook it really long time at 1 degree.
Wait till it’s done, then take it out.
Grab a plate and eat it.
Laila Clairmont
How to Cook a Turkey
Put the thing in the oven.
Cook it for 3 hours at very hot.
Take it out.
Put it on the table.
Let it cool off.
Put it on each plate.
Everybody would eat it all up.
Makaylan Bonenberger
How to Cook a Turkey
First you shoot it.
Then you clean the feathers off.
Make sure there’s no poop on it.
Then put it in the oven.
Then put salt and pepper on it.
Cook it for 3 hours at 5 degrees.
Put some ketchup on it.
Eat it.
Mia Dartt
How to Cook a Pumpkin Pie
Put in a pumpkin in the pie.
You put it in the oven
for 2 minutes at a little bit hot.
Take it out of the oven.
Eat it.
Happy Thanksgiving
from all of us and our
teacher Mrs. Keegan!
Hailey MacFeat
How to Cook Mashed Potatoes
First we get the potato.
We peel the skin off.
We mash it.
Then we put it in a bowl.
Then we put some milk in it.
And stir it.
Then you EAT it!
Deanna Hagedorn
How to Cook a Turkey
You put it in the oven.
You put it at 40 degrees or something.
Then you wait till the oven bakes.
Then it’s time to take it out.
Stevoni Sitting Up
How to Cook a Turkey
Like I put it in the oven and cook it.
Like 10 degrees for 5 minutes.
Then we get it out and put it on the table.
Kash Pumpkin Seed
How to Cook a Turkey
First turn it to 100 degrees, for 5 minutes.
Then take it out.
Then eat it.
Jared Nemecek
How to Cook a Ham
You put it in the oven
for 3 hours at 30 hundred degrees
Put salt, apple pie, and lettuce on it.
Pepper it to taste.
Take it out of the oven and eat it all gone.
Ashlynn Carlson
How to Cook a Turkey
First put it in the oven.
Cook it at 4 degrees for 7 minutes.
Take it out.
Cut it up.
Then you eat it.
Gus Stout
How to Cook a Turkey
First kill it.
Then you take the skin off.
Then you wash it.
Then you cook it at kind of hot, 4 minutes.
Take it out of the oven and eat it.
“The SET program is a unique
opportunity for participants to
learn how to determine what eco-
nomic opportunities exist in the re-
gion and then develop a practical
plan to capitalize on their poten-
tial,” said Christine Sorensen, SET
program Coordinator with USDA-
Rural Development.
“In addition, the SET program
encourages involvement from all
regional residents as their diverse
personal and professional experi-
ences can add valuable perspective
to an economic development plan,”
Sorensen added.
All Jackson, Haakon and east-
ern Pennington county residents
including; business owners, farm-
ers/ranchers, employees, parents,
educators, healthcare profession-
als, elected leaders, seniors, minor-
ity groups, clergy and youth are
invited to participate in SET train-
ing sessions which will be held
monthly in various locations in the
west region.
The next training session is
scheduled for January 2 in Philip
from 5 p.m to 8:30 p.m. The loca-
tion will be announced and a light
meal will be provided. At this ses-
sion, participants will examine re-
gional demographic data and its
impacts on their economy.
For more information about the
SET program or upcoming training
sessions in the west region, local
residents are encouraged to contact
Jackie Stilwell at 605-441-0334.
--Kari O’Neill, SDSU Extension
Community Development
Interested residents from three
western counties met November 14
in Kadoka to learn more about a
year-long training program de-
signed to assist rural regional
teams in developing new ap-
proaches to strengthen and en-
hance regional economic
development activities.
Haakon, Jackson, and eastern
Pennington counties have part-
nered to become the West Region
Team, one of only two regions in
South Dakota selected to partici-
pate in the Stronger Economies To-
gether (SET) program.
Administered by USDA-Rural De-
velopment and South Dakota State
University Extension, the SET pro-
gram is an opportunity for current
or newly formed rural, multi-
county teams to receive the latest
tools, training, and technical assis-
tance to help their region move for-
ward and take advantage of
positive growth and quality of life
opportunities.
During the year-long program,
the selected regions will receive the
following: 1) Valuable intensive
strategic planning training for
their regional team; 2) Database
tools designed to examine the crit-
ical drivers of their region and
identify emerging growth sectors
and regional competitive advan-
tages; 3) Technical assistance and
educational support; and 4) Educa-
tional and information-sharing op-
portunities with more than 40
other SET regions around the
country.
Program seeks regional
perspective on economic
development issues
Kindergarteners making hand turkeys, share Thanksgiving recipes …Back row: Ashlynn
Carlson, Jared Nemecek, Jacob High Horse, Don Schofield, Garrett Hermann, Gus Stout, Justice Evan Child, Isabella Kay
Williams, Stevoni Sitting Up. Front row: Isaac Sitting Up, Hailey MacFeat, Kash Pumpkin Seed, Mia Dartt, Madison Stil-
well, Makaylan Bonenberger, Talitha Ashley, Laila Clairmont, Deanna Hagedorn. --courtesy photo
Business Open House
3:00 to 6:00
Creative Cuts & Fitness
Kadoka Nursing Home
Discount Fuel
Club 27
BankWest
BankWest Insurance
Jigger’s Restaurant
Main Street Salon
Farm Bureau Insurance
Hogen’s Hardware
Kadoka City Bar
Pocketful of Posies
Headlee Vet Clinic
Jackson County Library
People’s Market
Fresh Start
Double H Feed
Jackson County Title Company
Kadoka Press
West Central Electric
(at the Kadoka Press)
3:00 - 5:00
Oien Implement
Farmers Union Ins. Agency
~~~~~
The KCBA Country Christmas
will be held at the Kadoka City Au-
ditorium on Sunday, December 9
starting at 2:30 p.m.
Expect to play free Bingo for
prizes, Santa will be there to visit
the little ones, and a cake walk is
being planned in the annex.
Business are reminded to take
their donations to the auditorium
before 2:30 Sunday afternoon.
Anyone wishing to help out with
the cake walk ... donations of cakes,
cupcakes, bars and goodies will be
appreciated.
The Kountry Kousins 4-H Club
will be raising money for their club
and will be serving chili and home-
made cinnamon rolls following the
KCBA activities.
Look what’s new this year with
the Kadoka Community Better-
ment Association and Christmas in
Kadoka.
It will all start happening on
Thursday, December 6 when a
number of businesses will be hold-
ing their own individual open
houses.
Businesses will have an open
house from 3:00 to 6:00 p.m., how-
ever, times will be different at a
couple of locations. They are get-
ting in the spirit and many will be
decorated for the holidays. They
will also have a sign up for a door
prize and sample some goodies.
This will also be a time for busi-
ness owners to showcase some of
their holiday specials. Some may
have specials only good during
their open house, so be sure to
check them all out.
Make plans for Christmas in Kadoka
But wait, there’s more! The an-
nouncement of a Treasure Hunt
will be made, so make plans to be
there, get your first clue and be
ready to start hunting.
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
Monday, October 29
Creamed chicken over biscuits,
sliced beets, cottage cheese and
fruit, and apricots.
Tuesday, October 30
Swiss steak in tomato gravy,
baked potato, corn o’brien, bread,
and pears.
Wednesday, October 31
Fish portions, creamed potatoes
and peas, mandarin oranges salad,
bread, and cookie.
Thursday, November 1
Roast pork, mashed potatoes
and gravy, cooked cabbage, dinner
roll, and baked apples.
Friday, November 2
Homemade chicken and noodle
soup with vegetables, sunshine
salad, meat sandwich, and
peaches.
Meals for
the Elderly
James 4:8
I have a friend who, at one point, was a self-confessed
shopping addict. Recently, his family realized that this ac-
tivity had stopped, though he hadn't intentionally curtailed
it. Why, they wondered, did his longing to acquire more
goods seem to dissolve?
The reason was that my friend had become more satisfied with the Lord. He no longer needed fulfillment
from what the world had to offer. What a terrific illustration of growth in Christ.
In addition to finding fulfillment in God, there are many other growth indicators that are noticeable to the
believer. For instance, offering forgiveness becomes easier over time. Consider our Savior, who asked God to
forgive even those who crucified Him on the cross.
Also, as we mature, our faith will increase. God loves us, and He gracefully and gently builds our confidence
in Him. Then, as our trust grows, we realize how faithful He truly is--which grows our assurance even more.
Another mark of a closer walk with Christ is an expanding concern for others' spiritual condition. And finally,
as our relationship with the Lord deepens, we will increasingly desire to obey Him. This desire is born not out
of fear but out of love for our heavenly Father. Similarly, when we do sin, our hearts will become saddened and
repentant.
Are you satisfied spiritually? Or do you have a growing, insatiable hunger for more of Jesus? Friend, if you
think that you've come far enough in your journey with Christ, you have made a terrible mistake. You are miss-
ing great fulfillment and the excitement that comes from getting closer to Him.
Evidence of a Growing Believer
Inspiration Point
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HWY:
August 2012
James Wanless, Kyle $125
Patricia Staerker, Phoenix, AZ $105
Joselito Llamas, Cerritos, CA $125
Norman Knight, Gladstone, VA $105
Chad Hindal, York, NE $105
Lance Ragan, Andover, MN $125
Michael Cable, Bridgewater $125
Eliza Stanford, Park Ridge, IL $125
Jeremy Sprang, Sioux Falls $105
Lindsey Jacobson, Tigard, OR $105
Virginia Holiday, Cody, WY $145
Anthony Charles, Rockford, IL $105
Melanie Rehkamp, Tocoma, WA $145
Nicholas Wesell, Oconomowoc, WI $125
Jennifer Underhill, Rapid City $105
Ryan Kirkpatrick, Mitchell $110
Alisa Aimsle, Turlock, CA $125
Annette Haber, Grenville $105
Nitu Desal, Passaic, NJ $105
Dylan Gartity, Corvallis, OR $105
Asit Merchant, Fremont, CA $145
Cynthia Houska, Box Elder $145
Avery Palms, Tocoma, WA $145
Angela Bean, Excelsior, MN $105
Michael Anderson, Madison, WI $125
Rhonda Fatland, Sisseton $145
Patricia Huebner, New Haven, MO $105
Alton Morrell, Fairfax, VA $165
James Bennett, Poolesville, MD $105
Daniel Casto, St. Louis, MO $105
SPEED LIMITS IN AREAS OF ROAD
CONSTRUCTION:
August 2012
Eugene Ebert, Osage, WY $260
SPEEDING OTHER ROADWAYS:
August 2012
Fred White, Scenic $125
William Clifford, Kyle $165
Garrik Stands, Kyle $145
Arnell Brown Bull, Kyle $220
Kayla Thomas, Wanblee $125
Kelly Starchief, Rosebud $165
Joya Ellendorf, Spearfish $105
Waldemar Stasiak, Chicago, IL $145
Tangerine Lebeau, Porcupine $165
Adrian Yellowkidney, Mission $145
Nathan McDonald, Madeira Beach, FL $125
FOERATOR ASSURE PASSENGERS
5-18 WEAR SEAT BELTS:
August 2012
Erik Cherveny, Granite Falls, MN $25
RENEWAL REGISTRATION
DURING ASSIGNED MONTH:
August 2012
Tangerine Lebeau, Porcupine $120
NO DRIVERS LICENSE:
August 2012
Kenny Stands, Kyle $120
Miguel Gonzalez-Garcia, Stillwater, MN $120
Kayla Thomas, Wanblee $120
RENEWAL REGISTRATION
DURING ASSIGNED MONTH:
August 2012
James Wanless, Kyle $120
Kaleb Woods, Custer $120
FAILURE TO DISPLAY
COMMERCIAL LICENSE:
August 2012
Vladimir Dmitriyevich, Sacramento, CA $170
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
07-20-12: James Wanless, Vale: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12; Fines
and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the following condi-
tions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any blood
test costs if applicable.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
08-10-12: Garrik Stands, Kyle: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12; Fines
and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the following condi-
tions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any blood
test costs if applicable.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
08-11-12: Arnell Brown Bull, Kyle: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12;
Fines and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the following
conditions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any
blood test costs if applicable.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
08-10-12: David White Bull, Wanblee: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-
12; Fines and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the following
conditions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any
blood test costs if applicable.
Recently National Geographic
had an article addressing the mys-
tery of prehistoric human migra-
tion. Paleontologists have been
able to trace the journey by using
mitochondrial DNA for the
mother-to-daughter lineage, and
the Y gene, for father-to-son line-
age.
The magazine illustrated how
40 to 50,000 years ago, starting in
Africa, early humans spread out
very gradually up through the
middle-eastern countries, turning
west into Europe, and turning east
across Asia, and over the Bering
Strait to the Americas.
What is so amazing to me is how
Scientists tie humanity together
genetically by a common ancestor
in Africa and how our genes are all
so incredibly similar. Indeed we
are so very much like our great
grandparents of 40-50,000 years
ago that one should proclaim all
humans alive today truly are
cousins, and certainly “family”.
And yet over time, we have be-
come separated not only by geog-
raphy, language, and cultural
barriers, but also by differences of
education and economics. In many
distant countries, members of the
family of humanity struggle with
terrible poverty, isolation, inade-
quate education, and political
chaos. Add to this out-of-control tu-
berculosis, AIDS, and water-borne
illnesses especially affecting the
very young.
Solutions for struggling coun-
tries could come with adequate ed-
ucation. Training people in
medicine and nursing could pro-
vide for structure to give appropri-
ate prenatal, hospital, and
outpatient care. Sharing education
in community organization could
give needed emergency services,
disaster relief, proper water man-
agement, and modern medical
care. Planting knowledge could
grow stability, out of disorder.
Some would say the US is
viewed by the rest of the world, es-
pecially those living in the Middle
East, as a big bully intent on push-
ing our customs and our way of
thinking down everyone’s throat.
Many believe our emphasis has
been more with military and polit-
ical control rather than commu-
nity education and understanding.
This is not to say chaos should
be left to run without rules and
control, but I submit the true
enemy is ignorance: theirs and
ours.
I believe we could fare better in
the eyes of our neighbors if we pro-
vided more humanitarian good by
sharing our resources of education,
especially in medicine and nurs-
ing. And then we could get to know
our neighbor too.
We could do better for our
cousins in need.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Ignorance is the Enemy
Bart Clennon___________________
Always known as a “Cowboy's
Cowboy,” Bart Clennon, age 101,
died November 4, 2012, at his
home in Tucson, Ariz., two hours
and 40 minutes before his 102nd
birthday.
Clennon was the last living
member of the original Cowboys’
Turtle Association – the forerunner
of today's PRCA – one of the 61
men who stepped up and signed
the petition that demanded fair
treatment from the sport's promot-
ers on October 30, 1936.
"We called ourselves Turtles,"
Clennon said in a 2010 interview
with the ProRodeo Sports News,
"because we were so damn slow in
getting it started before we finally
stuck our necks out."
Clennon was a saddle bronc
rider from South Dakota who rode
in his first competition at Post's
Trading Post in Ash Creek, S.D., in
1928, and was hooked from the
start. He went to work for a Wild
West show in Wisconsin and
slipped off to compete in rodeos as
often as possible. He rode as many
broncs as they would give him,
sometimes as many as 30 to 40 a
week.
When he quit the Wild West
show in 1936 and began competing
full time, he rode with a loose and
careless posture and the audiences
loved his nonchalance.
All that practice had taught him
to anticipate a bronc's actions and
he won or placed often.
He never kept a record of his
wins, but when asked about his ca-
reer he was quick to point out that
he made a living at it for 20-plus
years.
The late Casey Tibbs, a six-time
world champion saddle bronc rider
and one of Clennon's long-time
friends said, "Bart was one of the
best bronc riders I've ever seen. I
don't understand why he was
never a world champion."
Perhaps Clennon's greatest sad-
dle bronc riding victory came in
1945 at Madison Square Garden,
when they had 50 performances
and 13 go-rounds in what was then
considered the year-end champi-
onship.
Clennon married Geraldine
“Gerry” Parker in 1941 and they
had two boys, Bart Jr., and Terry.
His wife died in 1982.
Roy Roseth____________________
Roy Roseth, age 96, of Midland,
S.D., died Sunday, November 18,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Leroy “Roy” M. Roseth was born
August 11, 1916, in Moenville, the
third child of Julius and Mary
(Olson) Roseth. He grew up in that
area where he attended rural
school. Upon completion of his
schooling, he began his life on the
family ranch.
Roy enlisted in the U.S. Navy
shortly after the Japanese attack
on Pearl Harbor. He served four
years in the Pacific Theater on the
destroyer USS Dale. Roy returned
home on furlough to marry his
childhood sweetheart, Clara Fos-
heim, on September 18, 1944.
After completing his service, Roy
and Clara made their home on the
ranch in Moenville for the next 62
years. In September 2006, they
moved into the Silverleaf Assisted
Living Center in Philip.
Roy’s wife, Clara, preceded him
in death on January 10, 2007. Roy
continued to reside in Philip.
Roy was a lifetime member of
the Deep Creek Lutheran Church,
the Elks, and the American Legion
Post #143 of Midland. He also
served as a Haakon County com-
missioner for 12 years, held vari-
ous positions on the Deep Creek
Lutheran Church Board of Direc-
tors, and a member of the South
Dakota Stockgrowers Association.
Roy dedicated his life to the
ranch, and was very proud of the
trees that he had planted and nur-
tured there. He lived a full life,
still riding horses at the age of 83.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Carmen Alleman and her
husband, Clark, of Hayes, and So-
phie Foley and her husband, Pat,
of Midland; two sons, Duane
Roseth and his wife, Lola, of Mid-
land, and Julian Roseth and his
wife, Coreen, of Midland; 11 grand-
children, Kayce (John) Gerlach,
Thor (Jackie) Roseth, Rhett
Roseth, Kristin (Vance) Martin,
Adam (Jodi) Roseth, Nicholas
Roseth, Clint (Laura) Alleman,
Kelly (Anthony) Nelson, Renee
Schofield, and Todd (Barb) Larson,
and Jim Larson; 14 great-grand-
children; a sister, Marie Anderson
of Midland; a sister-in-law, Ida
Hunt of Midland; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
In addition to his wife, Clara J.
Roseth, Roy was preceded in death
by his parents; two brothers, Paul
(Charlotte) Roseth and Clarence
(Marjorie) Roseth; and a son-in-
law, Charlie Larson.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, November 21, at the
Deep Creek Lutheran Church
north of Midland, with Pastor
Frezil Westerlund officiating.
Music was provided by Frank
and Shirley Halligan. Ushers were
Billy Markwed and Dick Hudson.
Pallbearers were Thor, Rhett,
Adam and Nicholas Roseth, Clint
Alleman, and Todd and Jim Lar-
son. Honorary pallbearers were
Kayce Gerlach, Kristin Martin,
Kelly Nelson and Renee Schofield.
Interment was at the Deep
Creek Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Wanda Heeb____________________
Wanda Heeb, age 94, of Philip,
S.D., died Saturday, November 17,
2012, at the Philip Nursing Home.
Wanda Bernice Bowen was born
October 8, 1918, in Elrod, the
daughter of Charles H. and Minnie
(Thompson) Bowen. At the age of
10, she moved with her family to
western South Dakota. She was
educated in rural schools in Pen-
nington and Haakon counties.
Wanda was united in marriage
to Floyd “Jim” Heeb on December
30, 1935, in Kadoka. They lived in
the Ottumwa area until moving
into Philip, where she has since
resided.
Survivors include a daughter,
Barbara Kroetch of Philip; a son,
Dean Heeb and his wife, Cheri, of
Midland; six grandchildren, Brad
Kroetch (Donna) of Bossier City,
La., Renea Koupal (Greg) of Rapid
City, Matt Heeb of Mandan, N.D.,
Dawn Schwinler (John) of Brook-
ings, Rose Heeb of Brookings, and
Cecil Heeb in the U.S. Marine
Corps; four great-grandchildren,
Chris and Ryan Kroetch and Riley
and Anora Schwinler; a great-
great-granddaughter, Norah; and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
Wanda was preceded in death by
her husband, Jim; her parents;
two brothers, Dale and Marvin
Bowen; a sister, Irene Triolo; and a
son-in-law, Fritz Kroetch.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Wednesday, November
21, at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Philip, with Father
Kevin Achbach as celebrant.
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frein, pianist, and Rose
Heeb, vocalist. Lector was Lloyd
Frein. Eucharistic ministers were
Chuck Kroetch, Kay Ainslie and
Joann Pearson.
Ushers were Bill Stahl and Jeff
Nelson. Altar servers were John
and Brett Daly. Pallbearers were
Brennan and Mickey Daly, Mark
Foland, Bruce Kroetch, Tom
Konst, Alvin Pearson and Steve
Van Tassel.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to the EMS of Midland and
Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Bel videre News …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
To Place a
Classified Ad
in the Press
Call 837-2259
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
All others . . . . . . . . .911
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Fall Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
We live in a land of plenty. The
question is not so much, “Will we
eat?” as “What should we eat?”
There are so very many choices
when it comes to food that some-
times it’s hard to make up your
mind and actually pick something
from the staggering variety.
Even take the many choices
there are when it comes to pizza.
Most pizzas contain tomato sauce
of some kind as a base, and cheese
as the final topping. Between the
two, though, there might be pep-
peroni, sausage, Canadian bacon,
hamburger, anchovies, onions,
green peppers, black olives, and
various other things. If I buy a
pizza, either frozen or hot, my pref-
erence is for the “deluxe” models
which have practically everything
on them. Those are quite fine. If I
make my own from the bottom up,
I generally stick with just one
meat plus the tomato sauce and
cheese. Those are good too.
Even when you go to the frozen-
food section of the grocery store, all
the different brands of pizzas can
be confusing. You might want to
get expert advice before buying as
I did from William one day. He was
a young fellow who worked at the
store and claimed that, if you are
what you eat, he was at least
twenty-percent pizza if not more. I
figured he was probably an expert
so I asked his advice. Pointing at
one brand he said, “Those are the
best.” Another brand had his ap-
proval as well except he said they
were more expensive than the first
one but not any better. A third kind
was labeled as okay in a pinch, and
a fourth was said to be “really bad!
Save your money.” Out of curiosity
over several months, I tried all
four kinds and found William’s ad-
vice to be sterling. He knew what
he was talking about.
Pizza, however, is generally not
considered proper fare for Thanks-
giving. Traditions must be upheld,
you know. As a result, cooking
might take up a good part of the
morning on that holiday. Natu-
rally, you want to make dressing
and stuff it into a turkey about
daylight. Then it will roast all
morning and smell so good that
you are completely ravenous by
noon. With the turkey, you obvi-
ously need mashed potatoes and
gravy, candied yams, a vegetable of
some sort like corn, some cran-
berry sauce, perhaps a fruit salad,
some buns with butter and jelly,
and possibly olives, pickles, carrot
or celery sticks with the celery
sticks preferably being stuffed
with cheese spread. Dessert al-
most certainly has to include
pumpkin pie, but some might pre-
fer pecan or fruit pie or various
others such as banana or coconut
cream. Ice cream might also be re-
quired.
When you cook that much all at
one time, however, you are proba-
bly going to have to deal with left-
overs. That’s generally okay for a
day or two, but then you might
consider sharing some with the
dog or cats or even the chickens.
Some of the excess can be frozen
for later consumption, of course, if
you ever remember to take it back
out of the freezer. I do like to re-
move all the meat from the turkey
carcass and boil the bones up for
soup base. It makes excellent
broth and can quite easily be
frozen with some meat for later
use. I do usually remember to use
that up before it gets ancient.
In this country, even if you are
of middle, low or no income, you
can usually have a turkey-and-
dressing meal on Thanksgiving
thanks to the generosity of many
of our people. One local fellow,
many years ago, started making a
huge traditional meal to which
everyone was invited. He, with the
help of some others, has been
doing it for many years, and they
get a big turnout. It’s a neat social
event, especially for those who ei-
ther aren’t able to cook for them-
selves or have no local relatives to
share with. In other words, this is
not only a land of plenty but also a
land with many kind and generous
people. For that I am thankful.
As usual, when you think or
talk about food too much, you get
hungry. That is now the case with
me. It’s a little too late in the day
to cook a turkey, but it doesn’t take
very long to make a pizza. I think
I’ll go do that. If all this culinary
discussion has made you hungry
as well, I recommend a deluxe
pizza. You can’t really go wrong
with that.
Land of Plenty
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Clay Hindman and Winter
Langdeau were married at the
Belvidere Church on Saturday
with Justice-of-the-Peace, Janet
Magelky, officiating. A reception
followed at the church hall with a
dance after that at JR’s. This was a
fairly large wedding since both the
bride and the groom had seven at-
tendants. Clay’s included his broth-
ers, Cole and Wayne, plus Jake
Nelson and several rodeo buddies.
Winter’s attendants included her
sister plus three sisters-in-law in-
cluding Clay’s sisters, Bridget and
Abby. Honorary best men were
Winter’s sons, Jamison and Hud-
son. Flower girls were Abby and
Bridget’s daughters, and ring bear-
ers were Winter’s nephews. Win-
ter’s folks are John and Berdinia
Langdeau of Pierre. Clay’s folks are
Troy and Ella Hindman of Kadoka
but who lived in Belvidere a num-
ber of years so that the family sort
of thinks of it as home, thus it
being chosen as a wedding site.
Special guests included Winter’s
paternal grandmother, Marie
Langdeau, of Rapid City and Clay’s
maternal grandmother, Bonnie
Riggins, of Kadoka. Clay and Win-
ter will be living in Pierre where
Winter works as a special-ed in-
structional aide in the school sys-
tem. Clay works for Dave Word and
is involved with reseeding road-
ways after construction work and
so on. They travel to various places
doing this. Previously, he had
worked in the oil fields of North
Dakota and with concrete work at
Pierre after last year’s flood. He
also rides bulls in rodeos whenever
he can fit it in. Ella had her broth-
ers and sister there, namely Ster-
ling and Stephen Riggins, and
Marla Nelson. Troy’s brother, John,
was there from Belle Fourche with
his niece, Joni. Ella said there were
probably 125 people in attendance
with about half of those being rela-
tives. Many of the people arrived
on Thursday, practice was on Fri-
day, the wedding was on Saturday,
and many people were still around
on Sunday including quite a num-
ber of Troy and Ella’s fourteen
grandkids. Ella also said it turned
out to be a very nice affair.
Joy Dolezal said their grandson,
Jacob Nemec, is currently back on
land after being underwater in a
submarine for an extended time.
This makes his mother, Carmen,
happy since she can talk to him on
the phone now and again and make
sure he’s doing okay. Jacob isn’t so
sure about his ship being in dry-
dock on the West Coast since there
isn’t always enough to do. He does,
however, enjoy occasionally getting
up to six hours of uninterrupted
sleep which is uncommon when the
sub is underway. Jacob recently
earned his dolphins which is a
breast pin for his uniform indicat-
ing he is qualified in submarines.
The qualification process takes
about a year and covers virtually
all of the submarine’s systems with
special emphasis on damage con-
trol. Back at the Dolezal ranch, the
main activity is working cattle and
then working cattle some more.
Rudy Reimann recently got back
from elk hunting in Colorado. He
went in company with his dad,
Rick, and his brothers, Stan and
Pete. Rick took his pickup, and
Pete drove a semi pulling the horse
trailer and horses. The horses were
needed to pack gear and supplies in
for camping. The group left on Oct.
31 and returned on Nov. 12. The
season was only open for a week,
but it took some time to get in and
back out. Rudy said, “It was a
blast” and a very good time. All the
guys came home with a bull elk.
Rudy continues to work over at
Philip at Konst Machine but
thought he needed a vacation. On
Sunday, he moved an old pickup up
to Tojo Osborn’s old shop where he
works on things from time to time.
The front end of the old pickup was
no longer operational so the move
was made with a tractor and loader
holding up the front end while
pulling it north to the shop.
Chad and Francie Davis and
boys were in Faulk County near
Faulkton this weekend doing some
deer hunting although without a
lot of success. The lack of snow on
the ground didn’t help. This is an
annual event on the land of a cou-
ple of Chad’s uncles. Chad’s folks
and a sister with her son and the
two uncles completed the group.
Francie and Grady had rifle tags
and Chad had one for archery, but
few deer came close enough to be
endangered. The Davis family
stayed with Chad’s uncle, Marlin,
from Friday night until Sunday
evening. Last week, the three boys,
Grady, Garrett and Gage, helped
Bob, Chuck and Abby Fortune
move cattle 20 miles from the Carr
place over by Cedar Butte back
home. The drive started in the dark
at 15 degrees and ended quite a bit
later at home where it was 30 de-
grees. A hot meal helped warm the
riders. This weekend, Bob went to
Lander, WY, to spend the week and
Thanksgiving with his wife, Ruth.
Before going, however, he left word
that there were three colts in the
corral for the boys to halter break
and start working with this winter.
They were eager to get on with
that.
Bill and Norma Headlee were
visited briefly at the vet clinic on
Friday by their daughter, Monica.
She had been to a seminar for sci-
ence teachers in Rapid City in con-
nection with her teaching duties at
the Brookings middle school and
was on her way home. Bill said the
cattle work at the clinic hasn’t
slowed down very much yet since
they are pretty much booked up
until the first of December. After
that it might pause, or not.
Dave and Jean Calhoon enter-
tained their three grandsons this
weekend, namely James, Carter,
and Evan. They are the sons of
Dave and Jean’s daughter, Dixie,
and her husband, Karsten, of Vi-
vian. James just turned 15 and is a
freshman in high school. Carter is
six and Evan is one. They keep
things lively. James had a doe tag
which he filled on Saturday. He has
bagged other deer in other years,
though, so it was not a first-time
thrill. On Sunday, Dave and James
attended church in Belvidere while
Dixie looked after the other two
boys at home. Josh Calhoon seems
to keep busy taking care of the cat-
tle including the weaned calves. He
also has a job probing grain cars on
the railroad. When elevators get
cars loaded at Philip, Midland,
Pierre, Onida and sometimes High-
more, Josh drives over and probes
them which is fine on good days but
harder when it is too hot, cold or
windy. He usually does some of this
kind of work every week.
“Praise to our beneficent Father
who dwelleth in the heavens.”
Abraham Lincoln (Proclamation
of Thanksgiving, Oct.3, 1863)
Veteran’s Day the James Letel-
liers took advantage of no school
and worked cattle. Helping them
were Julie Letellier of Kilgore, NE,
Paul and LuAnne Beckwith of
Pierre. And besides family helping
were DVM Boyd Porch, Tim
Merchen and Ray Berry.
June Ring went to Kadoka and
had her hair trimmed at Jody’s
Main Street Salon and donated it
to Locks of Love. So if a stranger
says “hello” to you, look again it
probably is June. Locks of Love
makes wigs for cancer patients.
Monday afternoon, LuAnne
Beckwith visited the Norris School.
She enjoyed a tour and got to meet
the teachers and staff and see her
daughter, Andee, on the job. She
was real impressed with all the
new improvements.
Robert and Sharon Ring went to
Winner on Tuesday.
Wednesday, Evan Bligh had eye
surgery in Rapid City, that night
Evan and Dorothy were overnight
guests of their nephew, Nick Knut-
son, and family. They headed home
on Thursday after Evan’s post-op
checkup. Praying your vision im-
proves every day, Evan.
The big news at the Norris
School this week was the Thursday
morning visit by a celebrity. South
Dakota First Lady Linda Daugaard
toured the school, visited with all
the students and staff and read to
the third, fourth, and fifth grade
classes. She read a fable about how
the turtle cracked his shell. It was
a memorable day for all of them.
The school is busy practicing
Christmas carols for the program
coming up soon. School will be dis-
missed this Wednesday at 2:00
p.m. for the Thanksgiving holiday
weekend.
Andrea Beckwith visited Maxine
Allard on Thursday evening.
Folks were shocked to hear of
the sudden loss of former Norris
resident, Allen Kellogg, 75, of St.
Lawrence, SD. Allen and JoAnn
lived in the Norris area in the late
1950s when they were first mar-
ried and worked for local ranchers
Loyd Letellier and then for
Grandpa Frank and Frankie Bau-
mans families. What a guy! He will
certainly be missed. Allen loved
west river South Dakota folks with
all his heart and we loved him, too.
Several folks from this area at-
tended the services for Allen Kel-
logg held in St. Lawrence on Friday
morning.
James and Marjorie Anne Letel-
lier attended the family services for
Allen Kellogg on Thursday evening
and the funeral on Friday. They
spent the night at Sunshine Bible
Academy in the Jason and JaLynn
Burma home. Jason and JaLynn
are the senior sponsors so were
gone on the senior trip to Missouri
at the New Tribes Missions train-
ing camp so Beaver, Jade, Jakki
and Jimmy returned home with
them for the weekend. Julie and
Marjorie Anne took them back to
Pierre on Sunday afternoon to
catch their ride back to SBA with
Paul Beckwith.
Susan Taft has been working a
few days in the Belvidere Post Of-
fice this last week.
Dan Taft is helping Cliff and
Pam Allard work cattle on Monday.
Heather Taft has been enjoying
helping out at Blighs recently.
Just about everyone had
hunters in this area for over the
last week.
Deer hunters from Pennsylva-
nia, Bob Kreider, Cliff Swartwood,
Gene Spade and Denny Bryner,
spent a week and had real good
luck as well. They enjoy meeting
the folks in this area about as
much as hunting. They returned
home on Thursday evening.
Scott, Cora and Moya Brickman
were out for the weekend to deer
hunt on the Ferguson place. Moya
spent the night with her grandpar-
ents, Ed and Carol Ferguson, and
Scott and Cora were guests of her
brother, Jess Ferguson.
Pheasant hunters at the home of
June Ring this weekend were Ted
Sartin of Florida, Steve Nichols
and Willard Gerken of Missouri.
They report real good luck, too.
Sharon Ring and JoAnn Letel-
lier had a fun time taking in the
Christmas Fair at Wood on Sunday
afternoon.
We were surprised a while back
to receive a box of pecans fresh
picked in Texas by E4 Specialist
Jarrod Dunham and his wife,
Lacey. We have pumpkin pecan
and pecan pies and plan to make
more this week. What a special
surprise, Jarrod. Specialist Dun-
ham is serving in the United States
Army in Ft. Hood, TX, and has
been overseas as well. We are so
proud of you both.
Happy Thanksgiving to you and
yours; may your day make many
new treasured memories. We are so
blessed and seldom express our
gratitude, please take time this
year to do so. Have a great time.
Sharing the joy of reading …The South Dakota First Lady
Linda Daugaard visited Norris School on the morning of Thursday, No-
vember 15, 2012. The third, fourth and fifth graders enjoyed having her
read a fable to them. Mrs. Daugaard also toured the school and visited
with the other students while there.
--courtesy photo
Locals …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
It’s A Girl!
Daughter of
Lucas & Hayli
Mayfield
Kado|a
8orr:
Vay 18, 2012
Paternal GrandparentsVarc|a & Ed Vorr|sor
Maternal Grandparents
3rery| & 8||| 8ourar, V||e 3lroppe|
Paternal Great-Grandparents
8oo & Ard|s VcCorr|c|
Maternal Great-Grandparents
0eorge & A||ce 3lroppe|
Tre |ale E|rer & Varlra larsor
Raegan
Lynn
Lester (Curly) Clarke, Liane and
Brian Shishnia of Aberdeen. They
had gone to Sturgis to visit at the
National Cemetery where Curly’s
wife, Charlotte, is buried. All en-
joyed supper at Club 27 on Friday
evening.
Justin and Leslie Riggins of
Casper, WY, visited at the parental
Bonnie Riggins home for a few days
last week. They arrived on Wednes-
day and also visited a cousin, Jan
Schaefer, in Wall while here. They
returned to their home on Satur-
day.
Wilma Stout underwent hip sur-
gery at the surgery center in Rapid
City last week. According to her
daughter, Kathy Mansfield, Wilma
will be discharged to the Philip
hospital early this week where she
will recouperate and get physical
therapy. Cards and visits will be
appreciated at the Philip facility.
Ted Pettyjohn of Sturgis and his
daughter, Jana, spent a couple
days in the Kadoka area visiting
relatives and friends. Jana at-
tended the Save the Pearl Bingo
event on Saturday night and was
one of the lucky winners. A large
crowd attended Bingo and it was
especially fun for everyone, includ-
ing lots of families and their chil-
dren.
Marv and Deb Moor spent the
weekend in Mitchell and attended
the annual workshop meeting with
his brother, Harlan. On their way
home they stopped in Pierre and
visited with their son, Mitch.
Linda Riggins attended the wed-
ding of her nephew, Clay Hindman,
to Winner Langdeau of Pierre on
Saturday, November 17. It was
held in the Belvidere Church.
Stephen joined her later and both
went to the wedding reception.
Clay is the son of Ella and Troy
Hindman.
Happy Thanksgiving to every-
one.
Charles Willert reports that his
daughter, Jackie, who is the direc-
tor of nursing at the Morning Star
Care Center in Fort Washakie, WY,
sent him an article about the 45-
bed nursing home she works at.
Even though it has had its share of
struggles throughout the years, it
has been ranked five out of five
stars by the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services. At
the nursing home 95 percent of the
residents are Medicaid patients,
which places a financial burden on
the home. The nursing home has
58 employees. “We have a team en-
vironment, and we take time for
our residents,” said Jackie Ca-
vanaugh. “Our goal is to make
their life worth living.”
A daughter was born to Inga
(Oyan) and Wil Longbrake on Octo-
ber 31. Don and Randi Oyan went
to Denver recently to spend a few
days and get acquainted with their
new granddaughter. She has been
named Eva Lucia.
Gary Plaggemeyer, 67, of Stur-
gis lost his battle with cancer on
Wednesday, November 14. Sympa-
thy is extended to the Jim Plagge-
meyer family of Kadoka and other
relatives and friends. Gary’s fu-
neral was held at the First Presby-
terian Church in Sturgis on
Monday of this week.
Wynona Carson was guest of
honor at a party to celebrate her
94th birthday on November 14, at
the Kadoka Nursing Home. Many
relatives and friends enjoyed cake
and ice cream with her including
her children, Wilma Carleton and
Ron Carson; her sister, Joy Parker;
Beverly Howe, Renate Carson, Va-
lerie Cork, Melvin Carleton and
Pastor Gary McCubbin. This past
Sunday Ron and Renate drove to
Wood where she had a booth at a
craft show there.
Visitors at the home of Glenn
and Lucy Freeman on Friday were
But the worst was yet to come.
As Bataan and Corregidor fell, a
few nurses escaped three years of
fear and starvation. Once liber-
ated, they returned to an America
that at first celebrated them, but
later refused to honor their leaders
with the medals they clearly de-
served. Here, in letters, diaries,
and firsthand accounts, is the story
of what really happened during
those dark days, woven together in
a compelling saga of women in war.
The discussion, led by Dorothy
Liegl, will be held Sunday, January
6, 2013, 2:00 at the Jackson County
Library. Join us for this latest book
talk and bring a friend. Stop in the
Jackson County Library to sign-up,
and get a book or call Deb Moor at
837-2689 with any questions.
WE BAND of ANGELS
by Elizabeth M. Norman
In the fall of 1941, the Philip-
pine Islands were a gardenia-
scented paradise for the American
Army and Navy nurses stationed
there. War was a distant rumor, life
a routine of easy shifts and
evenings of dinner and dancing
under the stars. On December 8 all
that changed, as Japanese bombs
rained on American bases in
Luzon, and the women's paradise
became a fiery hell. Caught in the
raging battle, the nurses set up
field hospitals in the jungles of
Bataan and the tunnels of Corregi-
dor, where they saw the most dev-
astating injuries of war, and
suffered the terrors of shells and
shrapnel.
3 Check It Out at the Library 3
eastern South Dakota residents
were confused when they received
a political campaign piece in the
mail just before the Nov. 6 election
that looked very similar to a local
weekly newspaper. The campaign
mailer included a flag that was
similar in design and type style to
the local weekly newspaper, the
Dakota Dunes North Sioux City
Times.
The campaign mailer, called the
"Lincoln Union County Times,"
was paid for by the Union County
Republican Party, whose chairman
is state Sen. Dan Lederman, as a
promotional piece for GOP candi-
dates.
Shortly after the campaign
mailer showed up in mailboxes,
Times Publisher Bruce Odson
began receiving calls from local res-
idents confused by it. Was his
newspaper responsible for this
campaign literature? Odson as-
sured them he was not.
Nevertheless, the confusion was
out there. A few days later, Odson
published a front-page story in his
newspaper, telling readers that the
real Times was not responsible for
the political campaign "Times" and
that he did not appreciate confu-
sion by it or the apparent deception
intended by those responsible for
it.
Newspaper publishers take seri-
ously their job of publishing accu-
rate, fair information and building
trust with their readers.
Businesses big and small invest
millions of dollars to build and pro-
mote their image and brand. Ford's
blue oval. McDonald's golden
arches. Apple's little apple. All de-
signed to instantly connect with
their customers.
Newspapers do the same thing
with their flag. Most South Dakota
newspapers have been conveying a
connection with their readers and
a sense of public trust via their
newspaper flag for more than a
century.
Any unauthorized use of that
newspaper's brand and trademark
undermines that connection and
trust. Apple would not like it if
someone misused its iconic logo.
South Dakota newspaper publish-
ers don't like it either when some-
one abuses the trust and
connection they have worked hard
to build with their readers and
community.
It's been said that imitation is
the sincerest form of flattery. And
perhaps we should be flattered that
a political campaign would emulate
one of our newspapers to further its
agenda. But the risk of confusing
our readers and potentially weak-
ening our credibility as an inde-
pendent source of information is
simply too steep a price to pay.
--by David Bordewyk
South Dakota
Newspaper Association
Every day and every week,
newspapers package and publish
news, information and advertise-
ments in a product that is made
available to the public.
A common piece in all of it is the
name of the newspaper. The news-
paper name almost always domi-
nates the top of the front page of
the printed newspaper or the top of
the newspaper's website. In the
newspaper business, we call it the
"flag" or the "nameplate." But it is
much more than just a newspaper
name.
A newspaper's flag is a represen-
tation of a newspaper's credibility
and brand. It is a newspaper's
trademark. It tells those who read
the newspaper that the publisher
stands behind the information
found in the newspaper.
In short, a newspaper flag con-
veys instant familiarity and con-
nection for those who read it. A
newspaper's flag is a powerful
thing.
So it is no wonder some south-
Political campaign mailer confuses readers,
treatens newspaper’s independent credibility
The
Kadoka
Press
will be
CLOSED
Thursday,
Nov. 22
Happy
Thanksgiving
Don & Tami
Ronda
&
Robyn
NOTICE
There will be NO driver’s
license testing or renewals on
Wednesday, December 5
and Thursday, December 6
at the Jackson County
Courthouse in Kadoka.
This & That …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
The Academic Challenge that
was held at Stanley County on No-
vember 7. The tests were compre-
hensive and many of them had few
points separating the positions.
Ties were broken based on the time
it took students to take their tests.
Geometry-
Jerica C. 3rd, Destiny D. 12th
Trig/Calc
Kwincy F. 4th, Katie L. 10th
Pre Calc-
Racheal S. 9th, Austin T. 12th
Algebra 2
Myla P. 10th, Aage C. 13th
Algebra 1
Cami U. 9th, Braden L. 11th
Health/PE
Chance K. 7th, Katie L. 9th
Physical Science
Jerica C. 13th
Biology
Dylan R. 14th, Destiny D. 15th
Chemistry
Chandlier S. 14th
English 11
Taylor M. 9th, Logan C. 16th
English 10
Myla P. 6th, Destiny D. 10th
English 9
Jerica C. 7th, Scout S. 15th
History of Sports
Kenar V. 1st, Zach Stone 12th
American History
Austin T. 1st, Foster B. 5th
American Gov’t.
Clint S. 3rd, Kwincy F. 14th
Geography
Scout S. 4th, Jerica C. 8th
World History
Myla P. 11th, Destiny D. 14th
Lakota History/Language
Aage C. 7th, Chance K. 9th
Academic
Challenge
results
award are high school chorus, high
school band, the drumline, pep
band, Kadoka Area Christmas and
spring musicals, All-State Chorus
members and alternates, and stu-
dent’s involvement in various hon-
ors bands, vocal festivals, concerts
and contests.
Kadoka Area Music Department
was one of only seven departments
in South Dakota’s 185 high schools
to achieve this prestigious award.
The award was presented at the
South Dakota All-State Chorus and
Orchestra Concert, receiving this
award were Mr. Colby Shuck, Mr.
Benjamin E. Latham, Taylor
Merchen, Racheal Shuck, Kole O’-
Daniel and Foster Berry. Three of
the state wide award recipients are
from the nine schools in Region
VII, which includes Kadoka, Philip,
and Jones County High Schools.
Kadoka Area High School Music
Department has been awarded
with the South Dakota Music Edu-
cators Association Participation
Award. This recognition is given
annually to any South Dakota high
school whose music programs
demonstrate high involvement in
music courses and activities. This
recognizes the effectiveness of pro-
grams that offer attractive music
curricula as well as those that excel
in recruitment and retention of stu-
dents.
Schools which meet the criteria
will hold the award for three years.
If selected the school agrees to
serve SDMEA as resource on the
topics of programming, scheduling,
recruitment and retention of music
students if called upon.
Some of the Kadoka Area pro-
grams that helped in achieving this
Kadoka music department
wins state participation award
Receiving the award … Ben Latham, Taylor Merchen, Foster
Berry, Racheal Shuck, Kole O’Daniel and Colby Shuck.
--courtesy photo
TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
vehicle maintenance!
Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
Mechanic
Shop!
J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
ground information on FFA activi-
ties, benefits and opportunities
that every FFA student needs. In
addition to the handbooks, FS-
CAmerica provided (instructor’s
last name) with the Advisor’s
Guide, which contains lesson plans,
teaching ideas, transparency mas-
ters, handouts, quizzes and games.
Farm Credit Services of America is
proud to finance the growth of
rural America, including the spe-
cial needs of young and beginning
producers. With over 76,500 cus-
tomers, assets of $13 billion, and a
patronage program, FCSAmerica is
the leading provider of credit and
insurance services to farmers,
ranchers, agribusiness and rural
residents in Iowa, Nebraska, South
Dakota and Wyoming. Learn more
at HYPERLINK "file:///C:\\DOC-
U ME ~ 1 \ \ B o o n e T \ \ L O -
CALS~1\\Temp\\FrontPageTem
pDi r\\www. f csameri ca. com"
www.fcsamerica.com.
Local FFA Chapter
with student handbooks
Farm Credit Services of America
continues its commitment to sup-
port youth in agriculture by en-
couraging participation in FFA.
Farm Credit Services of America
donated FFA handbooks to the
Kadoka FFA chapter, led by in-
structor Brandy Knutson, for the
2012 – 2013 school year.
“Farm Credit Services of Amer-
ica is pleased to make this invest-
ment in the youth of tomorrow’s
agriculture,” stated Doug Theel,
Vice President of the Rapid City
Marketplace. “The future of agri-
culture lies within its youth. That
is why Farm Credit Services of
America is so heavily involved in
FFA, 4-H and other local, state and
national agricultural youth pro-
grams.”
The handbooks provide back-
Farm Credit Services of
America presents
ballot. They were given sample bal-
lots and went to the voting booth to
pick their candidate.
Following the voting, the stu-
dents took a tour of the old jail and
the courtroom. The students de-
cided they did not want to end up
in jail, because there is no privacy.
Daniel Van Gorp explained what
his job is as state’s attorney and he
showed the students his office. He
then took them to the courtroom
and explained the function of each
person associated with a trial.
As the fourth grade studies
South Dakota history, this was a
great learning experience for them.
On Wednesday, Nov. 7, the
fourth graders from the Kadoka
school traveled down to the Jack-
son County Courthouse to do their
own Presidential Election.
Vicki Wilson, Kerri Enders and
Barb Clements took the students
through the process of casting a
Fourth graders vote for president
Top: Voting
Right: Turning in the ballots
Bottom: The jury
Bottom Left: Checking in to vote
--courtesy photos
Public Notices …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
Notice of Meeting
The annual meeting of the Tri-County
Predator District will be held Tuesday, De-
cember 4, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at The
Steakhouse in Philip, S.D.
[Published November 15, 22 & 29, 2012,
at the total approximate cost of $10.83]
Bzll 0rkg 8 0zk6tz Ntrtzztllt
8t6rtwl4t 8zlt
N0VEMBER Z3RD · üECEMBER 31S1, Z01Z
Z5½ 0FF AII ÍN·S10CK MERCRANDISE.
AIREADY SAIE PRICED I1EMS AN ADDI1I0NAI Z5½ 0FF.
ÏREE LIF1 WRAPPING.
EXCIUDING PRESCRIP1I0N DRUGS & RES1AURAN1 MENU
*óÍ£ÍS0H Q butt£y HuÍS *W£SÍ£tH Lt0ÍhtH§ Q FHtS£S *Lu2y UH£ L0HH§£W£ut
*b00ÍS *b£tÍS *MtHH£Í0HKu M0££uStHS *M0HÍuHu óttv£t
*Utu Ïtt£Hu óttþþ£tS *Lhttut£H'S W£ut *L00KD00KS Q b00KS
*H0m£muu£ ÏHu§£ *HuHuþutHÍ£u útuSS *btu£K HtttS ú0tu
*1HtqH0tS£ /£W£tty *út££ÍtH§ LutuS *10yS
*btu£K F0Wu£t úHHS *Ztþþ0S *b0K£t Q bH£K KHtv£S
*KHSS£tt, ót0HX, F0ttSh Q H0tS£hutt F0ÍÍ£ty *W£SÍ£tH ÅtÍ FutHÍtH§S, FttHÍS Q ó£HtþÍHt£S
*ÅNP MULH MULH MUKL!!!.
WAII üRUG
S10RE
Z79·Z175 * WAII, Sü
Unapproved Minutes
Kadoka City Council
REGULAR MEETING
NOVEMBER 12, 2012
7:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert, Dick Stolley, Kieth
Prang and Brad Jorgensen. Members
absent: Colby Shuck and Micki Word.
Others present: Patty Ulmen, Finance
Officer; Jackie Stilwell; Ronda Dennis;
Forrest Davis, JoBeth Uhlir; and Patrick
Solon.
Willert made Motion 12-11-12:105 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of August 13, 2012, with two corrections
being made. On page 1, names were
corrected to show Jerry Willert was in at-
tendance; and on Page 2, a statement by
Eileen Stolley was corrected. The motion
was seconded by Stolley, with all mem-
bers present voting yes and the motion
carried 4-0.
Stolley made Motion 12-11-12:106 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of October 9, 2012. The motion was sec-
onded by Willert, with all members pres-
ent voting yes and the motion carried
4-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
After review by all council members,
Willert made Motion 12-11-12:107 to ap-
prove the bills as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Jorgensen. A roll call
vote was taken, with all members pres-
ent voting yes and the motion carried 4-
0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
NOVEMBER 12, 2012 MEETING
SD Dept. of Revenue, Sales Tax
1,569.66; AFLAC, Monthly Premium
85.82; Delta Dental, Monthly Premium
551.50; Independent Audit Services,
Final Audit Payment 1,175.00; SD Re-
tirement, Monthly Contribution 3,150.78;
Verizon Wireless, Cell Phone 78.32;
Bank West Insurance, Insurance Pre-
mium Adjustment/Bar 120.00; Best
Western Ramkota Hotel, Room/SDML
Meeting 91.99; Buxell, Wendell, Port-a-
Potties/Softball Fields 200.00; Dakota
Supply Group, Supplies 642.66; Double
H Feed, Supplie 234.00; Ecolab, Pest
Control 192.42; Golden West, Tele-
phone/Cable 711.71; Harvey's Lock
Shop, Repairs 45.00; Headlee Enter-
prises, Animal Testing 103.90; Heartland
Paper, Supplies 373.06; Hogen's Hard-
ware, Supplies/Repairs 892.53; J&S Re-
store, Vehicle Repairs 703.05; Jensen,
Roger, Refund Meter Deposit 35.00;
John Deere Credit, Monthly
Payment/Front End Loader 2,023.03;
Kadoka Oil, LLC, Heating/Equipment
Fuel/Propane Tank 4,186.60; Kadoka
Press, Publishing 260.64; Kadoka Water
Dept., Refund Meter Deposit 70.00; Mid-
American Research Chemical, Supplies
61.99; Midwest Cooperatives, Vehicle
Fuel/Equipment 1,791.37; Neve's, Sup-
plies 164.85; Northwest Pipe Fittings,
Supplies 1,007.87; Oien Implement,
Supplies 28.18; Pahlke, Alvin, Legal
Services 397.10; People’s Market, Sup-
plies 399.69; Pierre Landfill, Tipping
Fees 534.40; Quill, Supplies 631.40;
SaniChem, Supplies 343.80; SD Dept. of
Revenue, Sales Tax 1,736.13; SD One
Call, Message Fees 12.21; Servall,
Laundry 251.15; United States Postal
Service, Postage 270.00; West Central
Electric, Electricity 4,742.37; West River
Excavation, Solid Waste Transporta-
tion/Backhoe 2,957.36; West River
Lyman Jones, Water Payment 5,723.75;
Chamberlain Wholesale, Liquor Supplies
1,781.42; Coca Cola, Liquor Supplies
97.50; Dakota Toms, Liquor Supplies
67.38; Eagle Sales, Liquor Supplies
7,045.05; Jerome Beverage, Liquor Sup-
plies 2,715.45; Johnson Western Whole-
sale, Liquor Supplies 3,241.00; Republic,
Liquor Supplies 4,219.06; ACH With-
drawal for Taxes, Federal Employment
Taxes 5,816.74; ACH Withdrawal for
Dakota Care, Health Insurance Premium
6,531.68; Total Bills Presented:
70,065.57
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of October was distributed. After a
review of the information, Willert made
Motion 12-11-12:108 to approve the fi-
nancial report. The motion was seconded
by Prang. A roll call vote was taken, with
all members present voting yes and the
motion carried 4-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 10-31-12:
Revenue: General Fund - $41,356.82; 3
B’s Fund - $4,405.99; Street Fund -
$6.55; Liquor Fund - $33,899.02; Water
Fund - $13,518.38; Sewer Fund -
$2,847.89; Solid Waste Fund -
$5,946.47.
Expense: General Fund - $59,855.64;
3B’s Fund - $679.91; Liquor Fund -
$39,208.93; Water Fund - $14,743.25;
Sewer Fund - $2,076.69; Solid Waste
Fund - $5,412.11.
Payroll: Mayor/Council - $2,130.00; Ad-
ministration - $4,495.53; Streets -
$3,311.60; Police - $3,865.41; Audito-
rium/Parks - $3,499.20; Liquor -
$7,431.13; Water/Sewer – $4,033.46;
Solid Waste - $1,121.46; Group
Health/Dental - $7,083.18; Retirement -
$3,150.78; Social Security/Medicare -
$5,816.74.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$745,143.46; ATM Account - $3,096.17;
Certificates of Deposit - $775,253.70.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$576,728.32; ATM Account - $3,055.60;
Certificates of Deposit - $805,248.18.
Citizen Input: No one was present to ad-
dress the council.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. Approve 2013 Liquor Licenses: Jor-
gensen made Motion 12-11-12:109 to
approve the 2013 Liquor License Appli-
cations for: Kadoka City Lounge; Kadoka
City Liquor Store; and Club 27. The mo-
tion was seconded by Stolley. A roll call
vote was taken, with all members pres-
ent voting yes and the motion carried 4-
0.
B. Bids for Heating and Vehicle Fuel for
2013: Bids were received from Midwest
Cooperatives, Kadoka Oil, L.L.C. and
Discount Fuel for #1 and #2 Diesel for
Equipment Fuel; LP Gas (propane) and
Unleaded Gasoline for city vehicles.
•Bids for #1 and #2 Diesel for Equipment
are as follows: Midwest Cooperatives:
.05 below cash price/delivered; Kadoka
Oil, L.L.C.: .05 below current charge
price/delivered; Discount Fuel: current
pump charge price.
•Bids for LP Gas (propane) are as fol-
lows: Midwest Cooperatives: .05 below
cash price; and Kadoka Oil, L.L.C.:
$1.32/gallon (fixed bid).
•Unleaded Gasoline for City Vehicles:
Midwest Cooperatives: .05 below cash
price/delivered; Kadoka Oil, L.L.C.: .05
below current charge price/delivered;
and Discount Fuel: current pump charge
price.
After review and discussion, Willert made
Motion 12-11-12:110 to accept all bids as
submitted by Kadoka Oil, L.L.C. The mo-
tion was seconded by Stolley. A roll call
vote was taken, with all members pres-
ent voting yes and the motion carried 4-
0.
C. Dakota Care/Delta Dental Insurance:
Jorgensen made Motion 12-11-12:111 to
approve the Dakota Care and Delta Den-
tal insurance policies for city employee’s
health and dental coverage. The motion
was seconded by Willert. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members present vot-
ing yes and the motion carried 4-0.
D. Audit Report for 2010 and 2011: The
audit for the years of 2010 and 2011 has
been completed and accepted by the
Dept. of Legislative Audit. Prang made
Motion 12-11-12:112 to approve the audit
report as submitted. The motion was sec-
onded by Jorgensen. A roll call vote was
taken, with all members present voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: no report
B. Streets: Jorgensen presented prelim-
inary information regarding the cost of re-
placing the sidewalk on the west side of
the firehall. No action was taken.
C. Solid Waste: A copy of the latest land-
fill inspection report was reviewed. Dis-
cussion was held on the repairs required
for both the red and white pickups re-
spectively.
D. Liquor: no report
E. Auditorium/Park: Stolley presented
preliminary information regarding a pos-
sible upgrade to the lighting in the audi-
torium. No action was taken.
F. Public Safety: The monthly report was
distributed.
G. Mayor’s Report: The mayor asked
council members if they would like to
have the monthly meeting begin at 5:00
during the winter months. Council mem-
bers present did not wish to change the
meeting time.
Prang made Motion 12-11-02:113 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Willert, with all members present voting
yes and the meeting was adjourned at
8:00 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published November 22, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $89.36]
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
October 11, 2012
CALL TO ORDER:
The West River Water Development Dis-
trict convened for their regular meeting at
the West River Water Development Dis-
trict Project Office in Murdo, SD. Chair-
man Joseph Hieb called the meeting to
order at 10:27 a.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
Review FY 2013 Tax Levy
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Smith to approve the agenda
with additions. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the September 20, 2012,
meeting were previously mailed to the
Board for their review.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the September
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Joseph Hieb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Marion Matt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Lorne Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000.00
Internal Revenue
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95.76
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the September Financial Report is on
file at the District office in Murdo.
Director Prokop, seconded by Director
Smith to approve the September Finan-
cial Report. Motion carried unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his Octo-
ber report to the Board.
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Matt to approve the Man-
ager’s Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
REVIEW FY 2013 TAX LEVY:
We received the individual county tax
levies from the Department of Revenue
for the FY 2013 Tax Resolution and the
Board reviewed the numbers.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:33 A.M.
(CT).
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
ATTEST:
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
[Published November 22, 2012 at the
total approximate cost of $33.48]
Senator John Thune (R-S.D.)
was re-elected Chairman of the
Senate Republican Conference
today by his fellow Republican Sen-
ators. Thune was originally elected
to the post in December of 2011,
but officially assumed the position
of Senate Republican Conference
Chairman in January of 2012 when
Senator Lamar Alexander (R-
Tenn.) stepped down from the posi-
tion. The Chairman of the Senate
Republican Conference is the num-
ber three leadership position for
Senate Republicans and is tasked
with spearheading messaging ef-
forts for the conference.
“I thank my Republican Senate
colleagues for again electing me to
serve as Chairman of the Senate
Republican Conference,” said
Thune. “Our country is at a critical
point and the stakes have never
been higher. As our conference
works to address the major chal-
lenges facing our nation, including
the fiscal cliff, rampant unemploy-
ment, and the crippling debt, we
also stand ready and willing to
work across the aisle in order to
meet these challenges. I will con-
tinue to work hard to ensure that
issues important to our nation and
to South Dakota, like agriculture,
transportation, and defense are
brought to the forefront of policy
discussions, and that Republicans
help shape the national conversa-
tion to make the case for these and
other South Dakota priorities.”
Prior to being elected Chairman
of the Senate Republican Confer-
ence, Thune previously served as
Chairman of the Senate Republi-
can Policy Committee and as Vice
Chairman of the Senate Republi-
can Conference. The Senate Repub-
lican Conference helps senators
communicate their priorities to the
American people through a wide
variety of communications re-
sources, including television, radio,
and web technology, among other
services.
Thune re-elected
Senate Republican
Conference Chairman
Public Notice
Deadline
Friday at Noon
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
EMPLOYMENT
CONSTRUCTION: SIOUX FALLS
TOWER provides year-round work
constructing, and maintaining tow-
ers. No fear of heights, extensive
travel, drug free and valid Driver’s li-
cense required. CDL preferred,
Scott 605-331-6972 www.siouxfall-
stower.com.
STANLEY COUNTY SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT is seeking Superintendent of
Schools. Applicants must be licensed
or eligible for licensures as a Super-
intendent of Schools in South
Dakota. Send application
(http://www.stanelycounty.k12.sd.us/
employment.htm), cover letter, and
resume with three references: Mrs.
Jessi Fromm, Business Manager,
Stanley County School District 57-1,
PO Box 370, Fort Pierre, SD 57532,
jessi.fromm@k12.sd.us. Position
closes 1/31/2013. EOE.
OUTPATIENT COUNSELOR:
Spearfish, SD. Contingency-based
pay, excellent opportunity for moti-
vated professional. Master’s pre-
pared, SD licensed w/QMHP, MSW,
CCDC preferred. Details/Application:
BMSCares.ORG.
MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN:
Rapid City, SD. Fulltime pay, bene-
fits, working 8-days/month. Master’s
in human services field, SD licensed
w/QMHP certification. Details/Appli-
cation: BMSCares.ORG.
CUSTODIAL MAINTENANCE
WORKER - City of Custer, seeking
an individual to perform custodial du-
ties and building & ground mainte-
nance. Info
atwww.custer.govoffice.com or 605-
673-4824. EOE.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Tag Board • Envelopes
Rubber & Self-inking Stamps
Stamp Pads & Ink • Paper
Check with
us first
Let us give you
all your price
quotes
Ravellette
Publications does
ALL types of
printing jobs!
Call the Kadoka Press
for more info at
837-2259
or 859-2516
Help Wanted/Drivers: OWNER OP-
ERATORS NEEDED Refrigerated
Division, join our experienced team
of seasoned professionals. Termi-
nals in KS, SD, TN, NM. 2 years
OTR experience. Call 800-796-8200
x103.
SKILLED MEAT CUTTER POSI-
TION available at West Side Meats,
Mobridge, SD. Competitive wages,
good benefits, affordable housing
available. For application or more in-
formation call 605-845-2271 or email
grandriverbison@yahoo.com.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for Mechanic
and Equipment operators. Good
Benefits. Applications are available
at Courthouse in Bison, SD or call
605-244-5629.
FOR SALE
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Kadoka Clinic
Holiday Schedule
Chestnut Street • 837-2257
Kadoka Clinic
will be CLOSED
on the following dates:
Closed Nov. 22 and 23 for Thanksgiving
Closed on Dec. 24 and 25 for Christmas
Closed on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 for New Years
We will have the Digital Mammography
Unit here on December 13, 2012.
Unfortunately, this will be the last time they can
come here or to Philip due to the fact that they
will be discontinuing the traveling unit.
Please call Kadoka Clinic if you would like to be
put on the schedule in December.
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
FOR SALE BY SEALED BI DS:
1984 Bluebird bus and 1987 IHC
bus. Sold as is. Bids will be opened
on Friday, November 30 at 1 p.m.
MT at the Kadoka School Business
Office. Question contact Supt. Jamie
Hermann at 605-837-2175 or e-mail
at jamie.hermann@k12.sd.us. Bids
may be submitted to Kadoka Area
School District, PO Box 99, Kadoka,
SD 57543. KP19-1tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
A BIG thank you to everyone that
donated food, worked, the set up
and clean up crews, vendors, and
the support from the community for
our Holiday Festival and Roast Beef
Dinner. The continued support for
the Kadoka Nursing Home is greatly
appreciated.
Residents and staff of the
Kadoka Nursing Home and the
Board of Directors
A big thank you to everyone who
came to our Community Thanksgiv-
ing Service at the Concordia
Lutheran Church that was held on
Sunday, November 18. Thank you to
the ladies of the three area churches
for the wonderful supper. The music
of the The Crooners was a highlight
of the evening. We appreciate the
generous offering to help the poor in
our community and those travelers
who are stranded here.
Bryan Sorenson
Gary McCubbin
Thank Yous
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing ...........................30-14
Rockers................................26.5-17.5
Handrahan Const .....................23-21
Petersen’s ..................................21-23
Dakota Bar................................17-27
Badland’s Auto....................14.5-29.5
Highlights:
Jason Petersen..............230, 237/661
Jim Kujawa...........................247/598
Neal Petersen....................3-10 split;
.............................209, 198 clean/601
Bryan Buxcel.........................235/593
Trina Brown..........................202/506
Marlis Petersen.....7-8 split; 176/485
Andrew Reckling...................222/551
Jackie Shull ..............3-6-7-8-10 split
Carl Brown .................3-10 split; 556
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................24-4
Kennedy Imp.............................18-10
Philip Motor ..............................17-11
George’s Welding ......................15-13
G&A Trenching.........................10-18
Bear Auto ..................................10-18
Philip Health Service ...........9.5-18.5
Kadoka Tree Service.............8.5-19.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd..............225, 248, 202/675
Matt Schofield.............229 clean/592
Alvin Pearson..............3-7-8-10 split;
..............................206 clean, 211/583
Randy Boyd...........................214/581
Earl Park...............................206/579
Wendell Buxcel......3-6-7 & 3-10 split
...............................................223/558
Fred Foland...........................205/551
Tony Gould...........3-10 split; 201/540
Bill Stone ........3-6 & 7-10 splits; 517
Ronnie Williams...........................505
Todd Radway.........................235/500
Les Struble ...........................2-7 split
Norm Buxcel .......................5-10 split
Gene Jones.........3-10 & 3-7-10 splits
Ed Morrison........................3-10 split
Jerry Iron Moccasin ...........3-10 split
Dale O’Connell ..................4-5-7 split
Dakota Alfrey .....................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................37-7
Bowling Belles ..........................25-19
Invisibles...................................24-20
State Farm................................23-21
Jolly Ranchers ..........................20-24
Highlights:
Judy Papousek ...............3-9-10 split;
...............................194, 163, 154/508
Charlene Kjerstad.................178/479
Donna King ...........................172/435
Sandra O’Connor ..................170/465
Shirley O’Connor ..................159/418
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................24-16
Chiefie’s Chicks...................23.5-16.5
Wall Food Center ......................22-18
Morrison’s Haying ..............20.5-19.5
Dorothy’s Catering....................19-21
Hildebrand Concrete ..........17.5-22.5
First National Bank .................17-23
Just Tammy’s......................16.5-23.5
Highlights:
Amy Morrison .......................210/531
Cheryl Behrends ..........................157
Kalie Kjerstad..............................312
Christy Park..........................192/527
MaryLynn Crary ................4-10 split
Shar Moses ......................3-5-10 split
Brittney Drury .....................2-7 split
Kathy Gittings......................2-7 split
Annette Hand.......................2-7 split
Sandee Gittings..................9-10 split
Kathy Arthur........................4-5 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................21-7
Dakota Bar................................18-10
McDonnell Farms .....................14-14
O’Connell Const ........................14-14
WEE BADD...............................13-15
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................12-16
The Steakhouse ........................10-18
West River Pioneer Tanks........10-18
Highlights:
Matt Schofield.......................230/578
Neal Petersen..............203 clean/553
Dean Schulz .................................203
Haven Hildebrand.............3-10 split;
...............................................202/536
Chad Walker ................................177
Steve McDonnell ..3-10 split x 2; 223
Doug Hauk...........3-10 split; 213/585
Jason Petersen.............................211
Jan Bielmaier ......3-10 split; 201/582
Jay McDonnell .............................547
Ronnie Coyle ................................545
Mike Moses ..................................540
John Heltzel .......3-7, 3-10, 4-7-9, 2-7
.........................................& 4-5 splits
Brian Pearson...............3-10 split x 4
Randy Boyd ...2-10, 4-5 & 3-10 splits
Wendell Buxcel ...................3-10 split
Corky Thorson....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................37-7
King Pins.............................27.5-16.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............22-22
Roy’s Repair ........................19.5-24.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................19-25
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Kristin Schmidt ....................139/402
Duane Hand..........................228/555
John Heltzel ........216 clean, 201/596
Ed Morrison .................................200
Lee Neville....................2-7 split; 179
Brian Pearson..............217 clean/618
Cory Boyd..............................212/586
Alvin Pearson........................202/559
Annette Hand...2-7-8 & 5-6-10 splits
Jerry Iron Moccasin..................5-7 &
...........................................3-10 splits
Tanner Norman............3-10 split x 2
Dorothy Hansen ...................2-7 split
Agricul ture …
November 22, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Notice:
When sending
subscription
payments
PLEASE return
the entire pink
postcard
with the payment.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. CALVES: 11 A.M.
(MT}. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTING 5UU-
lUUU HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NAT-
UHAL, ASV÷AGE ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
ROGHAIR - 130 DLK ANCUS CLVS FS &
DOOSTEFED & POUFED .................................400-500=
CAPP RANCH INC. - 100 DWF & FWF STFS; FS.500-550=
BRINK - 60 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS ......................450-550=
TOPE & TOPE - 60 DLK STFS;
FS,NI,AN ..........................................................450-550=
KEESTER - 50 X DFED CLVS; NI .......................300-600=
GOOD - 35 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI...................500-550=
COLLINS - 34 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ..............450-550=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH
AT tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
PFECONDITIONED CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST
DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFE-
CONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-WAY, PAS-
TEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11. SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
& WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE, &
THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S. NO SALE
WEIGH-UPS:
CHUCK & ELEANOR 2UCCARO - MIDLAND
31 ...................................FED HFFS 994=......$130.75
HOWARD INGALLS & SONS - OPAL
5......................................DLK HFFS 904=......$130.00
LL & RE KJERSTAD LIVING TRUST - QUINN
12 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 891=......$129.00
2...............................DLK COWETTES 1033=......$95.00
1......................................DWF COW 1315=......$69.00
GOLDEN WILLOW SEEDS - MIDLAND
4......................................DLK HFFS 965=......$121.00
CLEVE PRICHARD - KADOKA
2......................................DLK HFFS 965=......$119.00
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
12 ..................................DLK HFFTS 937=......$126.00
9.....................................DLK COWS 1152=......$81.00
FRANK BLOOM - SCENIC
5....................................DLK HFFTS 901=......$122.50
DALLIS BASEL - UNION CENTER
1 .....................................FED HFFS 855=......$119.00
JIM BOB & KAYLA EYMER - MILESVILLE
11..................................FED HFFTS 841=......$119.00
BILL MUNROE - UNION CENTER
4....................................DLK HFFTS 738=......$116.00
3....................................DLK HFFTS 867=......$114.00
R & G SMITH RANCH - QUINN
6...............................DLK COWETTES 978=......$101.00
JAY VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
9 .........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 859=......$114.00
COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
1 ................................DLK COWETTE 1000=......$96.00
FRANK BLOOM - SCENIC
32........................DLK & DWF HFFTS 916=......$113.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1229=......$73.25
PAULA VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
1......................................DLK HFFT 890=......$112.00
2...............................DLK COWETTES 948=........$93.00
WAYNE ARP & SHARON JAHRAUS - MASON CITY, IA
3....................................DLK HFFTS 878=......$112.00
STEVE & TUCKER MCDANIEL - MIDLAND
25........................FED & DLK HFFTS 887=......$111.50
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
6...............................DLK COWETTES 937=......$109.00
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
4...............................DLK COWETTES 919=......$108.00
COLTON CARTER - MIDLAND
10.............................DLK COWETTES 979=......$105.00
DENNIS & GWEN 2ELFER - SCENIC
1....................................HEFF DULL 2155=......$92.50
RON HOWIE - WHITE OWL
1 ......................................DLK COW 1855=......$79.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1615=......$79.50
ROBERT THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
2...................................CHAF COWS 1100=......$79.00
5...............................DLK COWETTES 1072=......$86.00
KUDRNA RANCH - SCENIC
1 ......................................DLK COW 1295=......$78.00
1......................................DWF COW 1545=......$75.00
5...........................FED & DLK COWS 1308=......$72.00
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
1......................................DLK DULL 2015=......$91.50
2 ....................................DLK DULLS 1945=......$82.50
RON HOWIE - WHITE OWL
1 ....................................HEFF COW 1570=......$76.00
RUSSELL SIMONS - FAITH
2 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1493=......$75.50
DOUG HUSTON - MIDLAND
1......................................DWF COW 1270=......$75.50
DONNA ALEXANDER - HILL CITY
1......................................FWF COW 1280=......$75.00
JIM HUGHES - CUSTER
4.....................................DLK COWS 1463=......$74.50
DALE JARMAN - MIDLAND
1......................................FWF COW 1290=......$74.00
JAMES LOFTUS - BOX ELDER
6 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1588=......$73.00
GLENN JONES - WHITE OWL
1......................................FED COW 1365=......$73.00
2 ..............................FED COWETTES 1000=......$92.00
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
1......................................DWF COW 1340=......$73.00
KADEN DEAL - DUPREE
1......................................FWF COW 1305=......$72.00
KUDRNA RANCH - SCENIC
1......................................DLK DULL 1765=......$92.00
1......................................DLK DULL 1875=......$88.00
SHAWN FUGIER - BUFFALO GAP
3.........................DLK & HEFF COWS 1288=......$71.75
SHAW RANCH INC - WHITE OWL
1 ......................................DLK COW 1305=......$71.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1395=......$69.00
KAREN BRYAN - VALE
5.....................................DLK COWS 1139=......$71.50
BRAD & JODY STOUT - KADOKA
1 ......................................DLK COW 1495=......$71.00
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
7...........................FED & DLK COWS 1613=......$70.50
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
5.....................................DLK COWS 1455=......$70.50
DEAN HEEB - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1345=......$70.50
SLC TRUST - HERMOSA
9 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1277=......$70.50
MARTY PRINT2 - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ......................................DLK COW 1475=......$70.00
SOUTH DAKOTA
BRAND SELLING
TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 11,
AT 12:00 MT RH CATTLE
CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£S., NOV. 2D, 2DJ2
B1g run o] bred oo111e ond on e×1ro b1g run o] ue1gÞ-
ups. Hoppg TÞonKsg1v1ng ]rom PÞ111p L1ves1ooK.
BRED CATTLE:
JEFF MADSEN - QUINN
29.........................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 977=...........$1,560.00
25............................................FED 3 & 4 YF OLD 978=...........$1,550.00
42.........................FED & DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1165=.........$1,400.00
23.........................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1225=.........$1,050.00
KUDRNA RANCH - SCENIC
31.........................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1138=.........$1,500.00
46.........................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1350=.........$1,440.00
21........................................................DLK HFFS 1000=.........$1,300.00
44 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1380=.........$1,150.00
42 .....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1374=.........$1,050.00
CHRIS & LEO GRUBL - STURGIS
13 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 10, 30 DAYS} 1100=.........$1,390.00
11 ..................................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1275=.........$1,125.00
HOWARD INGALLS & SONS - OPAL
55 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 10, 30 DAYS} 961=...........$1,425.00
35 ............................DLK HFFS (MAF 10, 30 DAYS} 872=...........$1,200.00
CLEVE PRICHARD - KADOKA
66 .............................DLK HFFS (FED 20, 15 DAYS} 948=...........$1,410.00
23 .............................DLK HFFS (FED 20, 15 DAYS} 896=...........$1,360.00
13 .............................DLK HFFS (FED 20, 15 DAYS} 905=...........$1,330.00
21 ..............................DLK HFFS (MAF 7, 15 DAYS} 935=...........$1,400.00
36 ..............................DLK HFFS (MAF 7, 15 DAYS} 947=...........$1,370.00
21 ..............................DLK HFFS (MAF 7, 15 DAYS} 896=...........$1,175.00
DALLIS BASEL - UNION CENTER
21 ...........................................FED HFFS (MAF 1} 888=...........$1,400.00
8 .............................................FED HFFS (MAF 1} 825=...........$1,300.00
PAUL SCHNOSE - BUFFALO GAP
30 ...................................DLK 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1014=.........$1,470.00
KAREN BRYAN - VALE
14.......................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1172=.........$1,350.00
11 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1426=.........$1,060.00
34......................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1320=............$910.00
SHAWN FUGIER - BUFFALO GAP
9..........................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1254=.........$1,200.00
7 ..........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1412=............$960.00
5 ...................HEFF SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1351=............$920.00
5 .......................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1323=............$910.00
JAY LIVERMONT - WANBLEE
11.............................................DLK YOUNC COWS 1097=.........$1,150.00
15...................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1258=............$960.00
26....................................DLK DFKN MOUTH COWS 1262=............$900.00
DEAN HEEB - MIDLAND
4.........................DLK & DWF 4 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1196=.........$1,100.00
MORTENSON CATTLE CO. - HAYES
26 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1315=.........$1,070.00
55......................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1370=............$950.00
WILLIAM SCOTT PHILLIPS - NEW UNDERWOOD
7..........................DLK & DWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1075=.........$1,050.00
ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
14...................................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1239=.........$1,025.00
17.................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1263=............$900.00
JOE HARMON - VALE
10 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1321=.........$1,010.00
19 ......................................DLK & DWF DM COWS 1374=............$980.00
BRAD & JODY STOUT - KADOKA
22................................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1390=.........$1,004.28
15 ...........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1424=............$985.00
DARREN GEBES - MILESVILLE
3 ...................................DLK 5 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 1330=.........$1,000.00
DILLON & JEREMIAH WHITCHER - RAPID CITY
19...................DLK & DWF YOUNC TO SOLID MOUTH 1246=............$985.00
TROY & DAWN RICHTER - QUINN
10............................DLK 5 TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1266=............$980.00
22 .....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1300=............$900.00
SCOTT EDOFF - HERMOSA
17 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1144=............$980.00
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
11.........................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 1315=............$960.00
24.........................DLK & DWF DFKN MOUTH COWS 1318=............$885.00
STERLING RIGGINS - PHILIP
13 ...........DLK & DWF 5 YFS TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1318=............$950.00
2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
11........................FED & FWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1204=............$950.00
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
44.........................DLK & DWF DFKN MOUTH COWS 1362=............$935.00
15 ........................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1339=.........$1,000.00
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
8 .......................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1359=............$930.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
The Kadoka Press
will be closed
Thursday, November 22nd
Happy Thanksgiving!
AG CEOGrain Storage Tips
The dry conditions of 2012
prompted cautions regarding pos-
sible molds; with the potential of
producing mycotoxins in corn and
other crops. Reports of molds were
minimal, but improper storage can
only cause existing mold and in-
sect infestations to get worse.
Standard grain storage recom-
mendations are to: dry corn down
to 13% moisture if storing for more
than a month, run aeration fans
when the air temperature is 10 de-
grees lower than the grain temper-
ature and cool stored grain to 25 -
35 degrees Fahrenheit to stop
mold growth and insect activity.
Checking grain bins is not the pre-
ferred task for most producers, but
can be important as detecting
problems early can pay off well.
Checking bins every two weeks is
considered a minimum, with a
thorough inspection once a month
highly recommended.
A good practice is to run the aer-
ation fan at least once per month
when the humidity is low and the
air temperature is 30 to 35 de-
grees. Climbing up to the access
door and checking the air coming
out can tell a lot about the condi-
tion of the grain.
If the air coming through the
grain is warmer than you ex-
pected, has a musty odor, or con-
densation forms on the underside
of the bin roof on a cold day, there
may be problems developing. If
any of these conditions exist, it
would be recommended to run the
fan long enough to push the tem-
perature front completely through
the bin. A rule of thumb is that the
time (in hours) to push a tempera-
ture front through the bin is 15 di-
vided by the airflow in cubic feet
per minute per bushel (cfm/Bu).
For example, many aeration sys-
tems move 0.1 cfm/Bu. In that
case, it would take 150 hours, or
6.25 days to push the temperature
front through the grain (15/0.1 =
150).
It can be easy to get a false
sense of security if you put grain in
a bin that is at or near the recom-
mended moisture content. Remem-
ber that as the air temperature
drops over the fall and into the
winter, grain close to the bin wall
will cool faster than the grain in
the center. Since cool air drops and
warm air rises, air can migrate
from the outside of the bin to the
center, picking up moisture, which
can be deposited at the top of the
grain, and cause the grain to go
out of condition.
If the grain is warm enough for
microbial activity, and/or insect ac-
tivity, damage can occur. Warmth,
moisture, microbial activity and
insect activity can also promote
more of the same, accelerating the
potential of problems.
To protect the investment you have
in stored grain, check them often.
Calendar
•11/27-28/2012: Ag Horizons
Conference, Pierre, SD
•12/11/2012: Soil Health Info
Day- Davison County Extension
Complex, Mitchell, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
This Ad
will
vanish
in
seconds
if we put
it on
the radio.
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
with offices at:
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Philip
605-859-2516
Wall
605-279-2565
Faith
605-967-2161
Bison
605-244-7199
Murdo
605-669-2271
New
Underwood
605-754-6466

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
E-Press 11-22-12_Layout 1.pdf4.31 MB