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Kadoka Press, November 15, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 18
November 15, 2012
~ by Ronda Dennis ~
National Anthem
Kadoka Area School Chorus & Band
Student Council
Taylor Merchen & Raven Jorgensen
Guest Speaker
Doris Werlinger
National American Legion Auxiliary
Veteran
Pat Kozlik
Air Force
Honoring Veterans
Vernon Uhlir (Air Force) • Bob McCormick (Army) • Larry Parkinson (Navy)
Saying thank you to our veterans
Veteran
Jason Hamar
Marines
This year’s them, she added, is
“Soaring to New Heights.”
“We need members to carry out
the mission,” she said.
There are homeless veterans,
the poppy program, Girls State and
Boys State, which are a few of the
programs sponsored by the Auxil-
iary and Legion.
She said, “When someone sees
your resume that you attended
Boys or Girls State you are looked
at as a pretty good person.”
Werlinger reminded everyone
that they can make a difference by
asking to help a family who might
have a family member serving in
the military.
All of the veteran’s in atten-
dance were asked to stand and be
recognized when the band played
each of military branch songs.
In closing Werlinger said,
“Thank you veterans, take care and
God bless you and God bless Amer-
ica.”
The Kadoka Area Schools hosted
a Veteran’s Day program Thursday,
November 8.
Student Council President
Raven Jorgensen, and Vice Presi-
dent Taylor Merchen gave the wel-
come and introductions.
The band and chorus led the Na-
tional Anthem and Pledge of Alle-
giance.
Missing from this year’s pro-
gram was the Kadoka American
Legion’s color guard, however,
there were six empty chairs in the
front row, each signifying the dif-
ferent branches of the military.
Student council gave a brief his-
tory of Veteran’s Day, staring with
Armistice Day, which continued
through to the name change of Vet-
eran’s Day and the date of celebra-
tions.
Emily Knutson ready “In Flan-
ders Field.”
This year’s guest speaker was
Doris Ann Werlinger, who is the
great-aunt to Kadoka’s band direc-
tor, Ben Latham.
Werlinger is the National Vice
President for the Northwest Divi-
sion of the American Legion Auxil-
iary.
Turning to the students, she
said, “The kids are the future of
America.”
She noted that this year the
American Legion has been going
for 93 years and the Auxiliary for
92 years.
Thank you veterans
Health insurance totals will cost
$6,898.44 and dental $575.50 per
month.
A motion carried to approve the
policies.
The audit report for the City of
Kadoka (two years ended Decem-
ber 31, 2011) was reviewed and ap-
proved.
There was no report to be given
from the water department.
From the street department,
Brad Jorgensen presented quotes
from Hildebrand Steel to replace
the sidewalk and curb and gutter
in front of the Kadoka Fire Hall
and the Masonic Temple. There
was a suggestion to cut the side-
walk down to level. There is no
money budgeted for the project,
however, it gave the council a dol-
lar figure to look at for next year’s
budget.
Inspection was completed at the
transfer station/rubble site with re-
ports being acceptable.
It was also noted that two of the
city pickups have maintenance is-
sues.
Dick Stolley said he’d received a
call regarding the installation of
new professional lighting in the au-
ditorium. The salesman would look
at the facility if the council so de-
sired, to recommend the best type
of lighting and prepare an esti-
mated cost. No decision was made.
The Kadoka City Council met on
Monday, November 12 for their reg-
ular meeting. Council members
Colby Shuck and Micki Word were
absent.
The minutes from the regular
meeting held on Monday, August
13 were approved, with corrections
made.
The bills and the financial state-
ments were approved as presented.
A motion carried to approve
three liquor license applications:
City of Kadoka (Club 27), City of
Kadoka (City Lounge) and City of
Kadoka (Liquor Store).
Mayor Weller opened bids for
dyed #1 diesel and dyed #2 diesel
fuel, propane heating fuel, un-
leaded gasoline for city vehicles de-
livered to the city owned tanks at
the city shop.
Bids were received from CHS
and Kadoka Oil LLC.
After review, a motion carried to
award all bids to Kadoka Oil, LLC.
The council reviewed the Dakota
Care Health Insurance premium
and the Delta Dental Insurance
premiums for 2013.
The amounts showed a four per-
cent increase ($230.56) over last
year, with coverage remaining the
same as last year.
City council approves bids,
liquor licenses, audit report
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
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South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
Monday, November 19
Spaghetti with meatsauce,
green beans, tossed salad, french
bread, and mandarin oranges.
Tuesday, November 20
Oven crisp chicken, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, seasoned carrots,
dinner roll, and tropical fruit.
Wednesday, November 21
Ham and beans or alternate,
tomato spoon salad, corn bread,
and pears.
Thursday, November 22
Closed For Thanksgiving
Friday, November 23
Closed For Thanksgiving
Meals for
the Elderly
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HWY:
August 2012
Brian Belandres, Chicago, IL $105
Darien Scott, Dumfries, VA $145
Michelle Martinez, Detriot, MI $125
James Matthai, Council Bluffs, IA $125
Brock Bellegante, Clinton, IN $125
Debora Gruhn, Vermillion $125
Rachel Buiter, Randolf, WI $105
Laurel Koerner, Los Angeles, CA $105
Debra Brost, Sioux Falls $125
Donald Fraser, Blacksburg, VA $125
Brian Lorenz, Orlando, FL $125
Heater Timothy, Rapid City $220
Chandra Green, Brighton, CO $105
SPEEDING OTHER ROADWAYS:
August 2012
Gilbert Heth, Winner $125
Vickie VanderMay, Long Valley $145
Judy Brink, Midland $145
Lisa Zeilinger, Milwaukee, WI $145
William Warren, Dromana Victoria, AS $105
FAIL TO USE CHILD
PASSENGER RESTRAINT SYSTEM:
August 2012
Ester Rosas, Appleton, WI $25
VIOLATE STOPPED VEHICLE
RED/AMBER/YELLOW LIGHTS:
August 2012
Cheryl Pochak, Harrisburg, PA $120
Anna Selchert, New Underwood $120
NO DRIVERS LICENSE:
August 201
Connie Conquering Bear, Wanblee $120
Melford Witt, Norris $66
Esther Antelope, Interior $120
FAILURE TO MAKE PROPER STOP AT
STOP INTERSECTION:
August 2012
Jordan Stout, Kadoka $120
ILLEGAL LANE CHANGE:
August 2012
Richard Besler, Bartley, NE $120
ILLEGAL BARRIER/MEDIAN
CROSSING:
August 2012
Michael Gettelfinger, New Albany, IN $120
LOG BOOK/OTHER VIOLATION:
August 2012
Francis Miller, Bismark, ND $170
Ingest Intoxicant other than Alcoholic Beverage:
No date listed: Larry Franklin, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-
12; Fine and costs $84; 30 days jail with 12 days suspended based on
the following conditions: obey all laws for one year; random UAs at law
request.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
03-30-12: Connie Conquering Bear, Wanblee: Plea: Guilty; Plea date:
08-29-12; Fine and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the fol-
lowing conditions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, includ-
ing any blood test costs if applicable.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
06-23-12: Milford Witt, Norris: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12; Fine
and costs $66; 10 days jail suspended based on the following conditions:
obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any blood test
costs if applicable.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
07-05-12: Esther Antelope, Interior: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12;
Fine and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the following con-
ditions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any
blood test costs if applicable.
Failure to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
07-18-12: Kadem Fisher, Kyle: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 08-29-12; Fine
and costs $150; 10 days jail suspended based on the following condi-
tions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including any blood
test costs if applicable.
James 4:8
I have a friend who, at one point, was a self-con-
fessed shopping addict. Recently, his family realized
that this activity had stopped, though he hadn't inten-
tionally curtailed it. Why, they wondered, did his long-
ing to acquire more goods seem to dissolve?
The reason was that my friend had become more satisfied with the Lord. He no longer needed fulfill-
ment from what the world had to offer. What a terrific illustration of growth in Christ.
In addition to finding fulfillment in God, there are many other growth indicators that are noticeable
to the believer. For instance, offering forgiveness becomes easier over time. Consider our Savior, who
asked God to forgive even those who crucified Him on the cross.
Also, as we mature, our faith will increase. God loves us, and He gracefully and gently builds our con-
fidence in Him. Then, as our trust grows, we realize how faithful He truly is--which grows our assurance
even more.
Another mark of a closer walk with Christ is an expanding concern for others' spiritual condition. And
finally, as our relationship with the Lord deepens, we will increasingly desire to obey Him. This desire is
born not out of fear but out of love for our heavenly Father. Similarly, when we do sin, our hearts will be-
come saddened and repentant.
Are you satisfied spiritually? Or do you have a growing, insatiable hunger for more of Jesus? Friend,
if you think that you've come far enough in your journey with Christ, you have made a terrible mistake.
You are missing great fulfillment and the excitement that comes from getting closer to Him.
Evidence of a Growing Believer
Inspiration Point
I think it is pertinent to the topic
of the week, “ask anything” to pose
the question, “What does it mean
to be a doctor”? This is especially
apropos as a new crop of doctors
are graduating from med school.
Did you know that in order to
enter into the profession of medi-
cine, each new doctor must make a
serious promise? It is to profess or
to give one’s solemn word to do the
right thing in the name of all that
is sacred, and this pledge is given
in public for all to see and hear. By
the way, it is this professing or
promising that is the basis for the
word “profession”.
In a recent issue of the medical
journal Pharos, Edward Harris,
the editor, writes about three parts
to the promise. First it has to do
with valuing service to others over
personal reward. That means med-
icine is a profession that should
not be undertaken with profit in
mind. I would state here that
clearly most premed students do
not go into medicine for profit, al-
though there are be a few that do,
and I see them as the least blessed
of the profession.
Next, Harris points out that as
a medical profession, we should be
responsible for monitoring who are
ethical and competent enough to
graduate from med school, to be li-
censed to practice, and to continue
to practice. It is important to pro-
tect the public from unethical or
incompetent physicians, and that
is why we have a State Board of
Medical Examiners.
Finally, we profess to keep the
sacred trust of a valuable body of
knowledge, to continuously cri-
tique, question, and challenge that
knowledge, and to pass it on in
order to benefit every individual
patient.
And passing on knowledge is
what we are trying to do with our
television show “On Call”®. That’s
a promise.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Ask Anything
and neighbors.
South Dakotans not only speak
words of gratitude, but also express
gratitude through their acts of
goodwill and charity. In communi-
ties across the state, fundraisers
are held for families experiencing
tough times, neighbors offer a help-
ful hand with errands, and food
drives and Thanksgiving dinners
are provided for those who are in
need of a warm meal and friend-
ship. The selfless acts of those
around us make each of us thank-
ful that South Dakota is the place
we call home.
As the year draws to a close, I
am thankful for my wonderful fam-
ily and the opportunity to continue
to serve our state in the U.S. Sen-
ate. The new year will be filled
with challenges, but it will also be
filled with the promise for many
great blessings. Kimberley and I
wish all South Dakotans and their
families safe travels and a very
blessed Thanksgiving.
The passing months have high-
lighted some of the country’s deep
divides and overwhelming chal-
lenges. As the end of the year ap-
proaches, it is important to pause
and give thanks for the many bless-
ings that come with living in this
great country.
The national celebration of
Thanksgiving reminds each of us to
set aside our frustrations, worries,
and problems, and instead take
time to express gratitude for the
good fortune in our lives. We are
thankful for the exceptional service
of our brave troops around the
world, who protect our nation from
foreign and domestic threats. We
are thankful to live in a country
where we can freely worship our
Creator, speak our minds without
fear, and enjoy the freedom that is
the cornerstone of our society. And
perhaps most of all, we are thank-
ful for the blessings of family, for
the support of our communities,
and for the fellowship of our friends
Counting our blessings
by Senator John Thune
One of the greatest honors I
have had as South Dakota’s lone
representative is to help send off
and welcome home the brave men
and women of our military. Every
time I participate in an activation
or a welcome home ceremony, I am
reminded just how blessed we are
to have so many individuals volun-
tarily put themselves in danger to
protect the freedoms we hold so
dear.
Over 72,000 veterans call South
Dakota home, and this Veterans
Day is an opportunity to say “thank
you.” Because of these men and
women and the countless coura-
geous patriots that came before
them, South Dakotans can con-
tinue to wake up in the greatest,
most free nation in the world.
That’s why it is so important to
treat our veterans with the honor
and respect they deserve. I have
supported legislation that assists
veterans in transitioning back to
civilian life by providing them with
quality health care, education as-
sistance and job development
skills. We must keep veterans a top
priority, and I intend to continue
doing just that in Congress.
I hope every South Dakotan
from Sioux Falls to Rapid City will
take time to thank a veteran this
Veterans Day for the sacrifices they
made for us. In addition, there are
a number of events occurring
across the state to honor our veter-
ans. I plan to attend a Veterans
Day program in Watertown, and I
encourage South Dakotans to at-
tend a local event in their commu-
nity or go to a nearby VA facility to
visit with a veteran.
Our veterans are heroes, and I
want to thank each and every one
who has answered the call to serve.
My office stands ready to assist vet-
erans with any problems they are
having with the federal govern-
ment. Whether they need assis-
tance with benefit claims or need a
replacement set of military medals,
I encourage veterans to contact one
of my offices so we can help. Those
needing assistance should visit my
website at http://noem.house.gov
for more information.
Honoring Our Nation’s Heroes
by Rep. Kristi Noem
November 16, 2012 - EQIP
and CSP Sign Up Batching
Deadline for 2013 Funding
Consideration.
EQIP (Environmental Qual-
ity Incentives Program) is a vol-
untary program that provides
technical and financial assistance
to producers, needing to improve
their lands through practices such
as livestock water development
(well, pipeline, tank, springs,
pond), seedings (hayland, pasture,
range), living shelterbelts (wind-
breaks), and cross fence.
The sign up deadline for
anyone interested in
applying for these programs
Nov. 16, 2012.
Late Fall Dormant Seedings
(11/1 to Spring Thaw) This is a
good time for completing cool sea-
son grass seedings. Stubble fields
may need chemical weed control
prior to drilling, and it is always a
good idea to check and make sure
the chemicals used do not have
residual carryover which could im-
pact the planned seeding. Drilling
into cover crop stubble helps re-
duce potential erosion prior to
seeding germination and estab-
lishment.
For more information on the
CSP and/or EQIP programs/appli-
cation process, and grass/hay seed-
ings, please call 605-837-2242 Ext.
3 or stop in at the office located at
805 Main Street at the USDA
Service Center, for further assis-
tance.
SD NRCS Website
www.sd.nrcs.usda.gov
Jackson County NRCS
Kelly J. O’Connell, District Conservationist
Brett Amiotte, a senior and ma-
joring in business
administration/finance and eco-
nomics, is a member of Northwest-
ern College’s Honors Program.
The Honors Program seeks to
create an intellectual environment
in which superior students flour-
ish. The program offers gifted stu-
dents opportunities such as
interdisciplinary seminars on top-
ics of current interest, honors re-
search projects, annual trips to
graduate schools, panel discus-
sions about graduate education
and funding for graduate school
applications.
College News
Kadoka Police
Department
Forrest L. Davis,
Chief of Police
Monthly Report
9/11/12 ~ 11/12/12
Accidents: 1
Parking Violations: 0
Calls for Service: 48
Warnings:
Verbal: 2 ~ Written: 0
Investigations: 3
Complaints: 5
Arrests: 1 ~ Court: 2
Calls for Service: 34
Skunks: 9
Kadoka Area News Briefs …
Coat Drive, sponsored by the Catholic Youth Group classes, runs
through Wednesday, November 21. Drop off spots: Jackson County Li-
brary, Our Lady of Victory Church and the Kadoka Presbyterian
Church. We would appreciate any coats anybody is willing to donate.
School Board meeting will be Wednesday, November 14, at the Mid-
land School beginning with a walk through of the school at 3:00 p.m.
and the meeting to follow.
Operation Christmas Child Drop off a packed shoe box at the
Kadoka Presbyterian Church: Mon., Nov 12 through Sat., Nov 17 from
1 - 5 p.m.; Sun., Nov 18: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Contact Jean Weller for more
information at (605) 837-2233.
Bel videre News …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
To Place a
Classified Ad
or Thank You
in the Press
Call 837-2259
Norris News
June Ring • 462-6328
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
Stop by the Kadoka Press
for your office supplies.
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Fall Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
vehicle maintenance!
Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
Mechanic
Shop!
J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
“It makes you wonder,” is a com-
mon phrase of friend Leo. In truth,
there are lots of things out there
that do make you wonder from
why people do the things they do,
to election results, to imponder-
able matters of time and the uni-
verse.
Take Indian tacos for instance.
I can never quite believe that eat-
ing them doesn’t result in major
indigestion. They start with some
bread fried in oil or grease and
topped with very spicy hamburger
probably involving hot peppers
and their ilk. Add some innocuous
tomatoes, lettuce and cheese, and
finish it off with lots of raw onion
and green pepper. Salsa and sour
cream go on top making it seem
like stomach upset should be the
natural result. I’m always sur-
prised when, after eating this tasty
concoction, I suffer no ill effects.
Tums aren’t even required before
settling down for a nap afterwards.
As Leo says, “It makes you won-
der.”
The size of the universe is an-
other subject that is hard to wrap
your mind around. Consider
Deneb, for example, which is one
of the fifteen brightest stars visible
in this hemisphere. It is roughly
1,600 light years away which
means the light you see from
Deneb tonight started traveling
here 1,600 years ago at the speed
of light or 186,000 miles per second
(700 million miles per hour,) and it
is just now arriving. Oof! Secondly,
since it is so very far away and still
so bright, that means it is huge—
probably 100 to 200 times larger
than our sun. Deneb has always
been a favorite of mine for its
brightness despite its distance,
and also because it is one star of
the Summer Triangle which graces
the summer sky. Then too, it is in
the constellation, Cygnus, also
known as the Northern Cross, and
which our Lord obviously put
prominently in the night sky to re-
mind us of himself. There’s an-
other cross in the southern
hemisphere in case you go there.
Interesting.
By the way, how well do you
deal with the concept that time
and space both have no beginning
and no end? How can that be? On
the other hand, if space ends at a
wall or something, isn’t there
going to be something on the other
side of the wall? These are matters
so far beyond our experience that
they boggle the mind. We might
accept them as true, but we can’t
really understand them.
That goes for God too. He is so
far outside our human experience
that we might be inclined to doubt
his existence. Can he really control
everything about the world and
still be personally concerned about
us? The short answer to that is,
“Yes.” It’s hard to look at the sym-
metry and complexity of this world
and not see the work of a skillful
creator. We, however, can no more
completely understand God than
can we grasp the idea of time and
space having no beginning or end.
That, of course, doesn’t mean God
isn’t there. It just means he’s be-
yond what we can comfortably
take in all at one time. He did
make it somewhat easier for us by
sending his son in human form to
earth so we could see many char-
acteristics of God and identify with
him without being overwhelmed
by his ultimate glory.
Well, have I made you uncom-
fortable by suggesting you con-
sider matters that you can’t begin
to fathom? It is unsettling, to be
sure. I don’t drag these subjects
out and consider them very often
just because they tend to put my
mind in a fuss. There is an anti-
dote, however. Just lay them aside
for the present and go deal with
things you can comprehend—read
a book, play a computer game, eat
a hamburger, take a drive. In
short, get on with life.
Still, occasionally we need to get
beyond ourselves and our little
world. We have to consider that
time goes on forever and that per-
sonal preparations may need to be
made for that eventuality.
Now that I’ve given due thought
to all these hard subjects, though,
I need a break. I need to come back
to earth. Perhaps I’ll go for a drive
and get the mail. When I get back,
I could have a bite to eat and
maybe take a short nap. These are
nice manageable endeavors and
things that don’t jangle my nerves.
Those subjects that are beyond me
can safely be put on hold until to-
morrow when I might be more in-
clined to wonder some more.
Maybe tomorrow I’ll consider sub-
atomic particles or things that are
way too small to see, or not. It de-
pends on how I feel. That probably
applies to you as well, but there’s
plenty out there to wonder about.
Happy wondering.
In Wonder
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Mike and Marlene Perault have
been busy celebrating birthdays
with grandkids this week. On
Thursday, they went to Long Valley
to help Dylan VanderMay celebrate
his 11th birthday. Besides Dylan’s
folks, Matt and Melissa, and his
sister, Lindsey, his aunt, Laney
Waln, and family were there from
Martin. The Waln’s included
Laney’s husband, Joe, and their
four kids, Bodey, Billy, Madi and
Rei. Then on Saturday, the Walns
came to Mike and Marlene’s so
they could help celebrate Rei’s first
birthday. They stayed overnight
and left on Sunday. They couldn’t
leave, however, until, despite the
cold temperatures, they’d helped
with chores since doing those is a
highlight of their visits—feeding
cattle, pigs and other livestock.
After a busy weekend, Marlene
was glad to have Monday off from
the bank in Kadoka although she
said Mike had plans for things they
could accomplish together that day.
Lee Addison and Rhonda stayed
home this weekend, but the last
four weekends have seen them
traveling to Gettysburg and High-
more. They’ve been helping friends
with some building projects and
also helping them take care of
hunters who stay at their motel.
Rhonda got to make quite a bit of
fry bread, construct Indian tacos,
etc. Pheasant hunting has been the
main activity there, but deer sea-
son opens next week.
Mark and Nicci DeVries are
bracing themselves for the
wrestling season which starts this
week. With all three boys in school,
Nicci helping Amy Smiley with
teaching, and Mark coaching this
and that, they keep the roads fairly
hot between home and Kadoka.
Two cars coming and going are not
unusual, and sometimes there are
three. Nicci also helps coach the
cheerleaders. This year, Gavin is a
junior, Geoffrey is in the eighth
grade, and Greyson is in the fifth.
Mark says that, with the boys
spaced about three years apart,
they get to attend practically every
sports and music event, which
keeps things fairly busy. Attending
parent-teacher conferences almost
requires packing a lunch since they
get to visit with just about every
teacher in the school.
Delores Bonenberger said her
grandson, Kade, and the other guys
were around the place this week-
end hunting some deer. They didn’t
have much luck but will continue
trying. Kade was headed back to
Dickenson, ND, however, to con-
tinue helping Collers dig water
lines. There is a lot of new housing
going on thanks to the oil boom,
and water lines are required. This
has been going on for a month or so
and will continue. Kade said he
thought they got four to five inches
of snow this weekend. Delores said
that Nikki Bonenberger and son,
McCoy, went to Philip on Monday
to attend Terry Karrel’s funeral.
Nikki is related since Terry is a sis-
ter to Tom Trask who is married to
Nicci’s dad’s sister, Sheila. After the
funeral, Nikki visited with her
folks, Bill and Diane McDaniel,
and ate with them at The Steak-
house.
Colter Carlson said that the fall
work should be mostly finished this
week with the sale of cull cows at
Ft. Pierre. This follows pregnancy
checking that was done last week.
The calves were sold in Philip in
late October. Colter and Abby and
kids traveled to Ft. Pierre last Sat-
urday to attend the cattle sale and
see Badure’s calves sell.
Nancy Schofield and her daugh-
ter, Danielle, of Philip went to
Sioux Falls on Friday. They visited
Nancy’s oldest son, Richard, and
family which includes three kids.
Nancy said grandkids are great
and so much easier than raising
kids. You can just enjoy them with-
out having to train them. The roads
were a little tricky coming home
since some snow and ice were cov-
ering them from about Vivian this
way. Since the 1880 Town closed for
the season last week, Nancy has
more time to travel and do other
things like visiting grandkids, and
there are a lot of them to visit.
Larry Grimme went to Yankton
this weekend to visit sons, grand-
kids, etc. There wasn’t much snow
or bad weather there, but the roads
between here and there are not so
clear.
Les Huber continues to split his
time between here and Rapid City.
He was in Belvidere this weekend
since he needed to check on things,
do his laundry, collect the mail and
so on. He returned to Rapid City on
Sunday where he will continue
with his current painting job in-
volving the Pennington County
Courthouse. The trip back to Rapid
on Sunday was no joy from Wall on
west due to slippery stuff on the
road and sometimes poor visibility.
Chris and Diana Elwood have
moved to a new location, which is
about 15 miles north of where they
were before. They are on a ranch
and Chris will be more on his own
there. Their new address is: 102
Stacey Rd, Volborg, MT 59351.
Diana said they got about six
inches of snow there on Friday and
it’s been pretty chilly.
“Sometimes one smile means
more than a dozen roses.”
Dove Chocolates
There was lots of activity around
Maxine Allard’s place this past
weekend. Grandson Daniel Allard
and friends were down hunting, as
were Ken, Kelly and Cody Koiste-
nen. They got an early start and
Cody’s sharp shooting netted him a
deer. That was his first deer, so he
was really elated about it all. Bob,
Danny, Gene and Cliff also came
out to hunt later in the day. They
are from Pennsylvania.
Orlana Schmidt recently re-
turned from a trip to Alaska with
some of her co-workers. She gave a
presentation connected with her
work, and it went over well. She
also was happy to have her Aunt
LeeAnn have time to show her
around when she had some time on
her own.
Cliff and Pam Allard’s friends,
Todd and Brock Haberman, were
out visiting and hunting, along
with their friends, Don and Pete.
They had some success by early af-
ternoon Saturday.
Rev. Glenn Denke kept an ap-
pointment in Philip on Friday, and
by the time he came home toward
evening, the thick fog made for
challenging travel.
All three of Gary and Anne
Heinert’s offspring have been mak-
ing extra television appearances
lately. Alex has been doing the
play-by-play for the USF football
games on Saturdays on KDLT TV,
while Paul does the announcing at
the game. Friday Alex did the play-
by-plays for the high school cham-
pionship games on KSFY Radio,
where Winner was triumphant
over Tri-Valley and Dell Rapids de-
feated Harrisburg. Saturday
evening he was the announcer for
the basketball game. Now on to
Erin, who does her work mostly be-
hind the scenes on KSFY early
morning TV show, but lately she
has been appearing on television
doing short specials about flu
shots, Halloween treats and
Thanksgiving meal shopping.
Jean Kary is hard at work on
her November “National Novel
Writing Month.” This program’s
aim is to get people to write a
50,000 word novel in the month of
November. Granddaughter Eliza-
beth got her involved in this chal-
lenge and this is her third year to
participate. At newsgathering time
Saturday afternoon, she was al-
ready past the 12,000 word mark
on this year’s novel.
Patrick Lehman was home from
college in Chadron, NE, for the
weekend.
The Burma family was in Norris
for the weekend, preparing for tak-
ing the seniors at Sunshine Bible
Academy for their senior trip to
Missouri this week.
The deer hunters from Pennsyl-
vania have checked in with Jim
and Marjorie Letellier. Wednesday
Jim and Marjorie stopped in briefly
at Bill and Marjorie Letellier’s and
found that their grandson, Cason
Brown, was having a meal with
them that day.
Norris School news is that the
governor’s wife is continuing with
her project of reading to every ele-
mentary school in the state. On
Thursday, November 15, Mrs.
Linda Daugaard will be in Norris
reading to the 3rd, 4th and 5th
graders.
Bruce Ring was among those
helping work cattle at Rueben
Ring’s on Tuesday last week.
Thursday Jake Ring and Sons
shipped fat cattle off to market.
Saturday morning Jessie took the
children down to visit their grand-
mother, Loretta, in St. Francis.
They were happy to be back home
when the snowstorm hit that after-
noon.
Jace Totton and friends are out
from Pennsylvania and staying at
Janice Ring’s guest house when
they are not hunting.
Mr. Donovan and his son and
grandson are out from Sioux Falls
for deer hunting and stayed at the
Robert Ring home.
The Long Valley School students
rode the bus to Kadoka Thursday
morning to take part in the Vet-
eran’s Day program there. The chil-
dren helped with the singing, and
some of them played in the band.
They played The Star Spangled
Banner and God Bless America.
Susan Taft was on the election
board Tuesday. Wednesday after
work, Susan, Dan and Heather
headed for Rapid City to pick out a
new kitchen stove. Since then it
has been a challenge finding the
right fittings to connect it up and
getting it working for them. Mor-
gan and Heather have been busy
getting orders for the 4-H fruit and
all.
Francis Taft and son, Casey,
were out this past weekend deer
hunting, along with Jack and Al.
Noreen Krogman headed for
Omaha last Thursday to do some
grandmother babysitting with
Mike and Kay’s twins.
Elaine Krogman was among
those attending a baby shower for
Evan and Hilary Saturday morn-
ing at the Senior Citizen Center in
White River.
Jeannine Woodward and Rose
West were among those working
Saturday afternoon at the
Methodist Church getting ready for
the supper and bazaar that
evening.
Vic and Myrna Stenson of Geor-
gia arrived Saturday for their an-
nual visit in the area, and as has
happened quite often, snow came
with them! Besides visiting their
many friends, they also hope to get
in some pheasant hunting.
Bill and Kenda Huber were in
Grand Island, NE, last week to
pick up an all-crop head for their
combine.
October 30 and 31, Nette and
Howard Heinert were in Oelrichs
visiting Nette’s family there. This
past Saturday they were in Valen-
tine for the funeral of Millie Stoner,
and afterward visited Howard’s
mother, Erna Heinert. They drove
home in the snowstorm and it took
them over twice as long to get
home.
Informational Kick-Off Event
West Region
Stronger Economies Together
Wed., Nov. 14 • Club 27, Kadoka
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. meeting
Join us to...
•Learn about the SET program.
•Understand how you can be involved.
•Network with other communities in your region.
•Build enthusiasm for a stronger, successful region.
Contact Jackie Stilwell at
488-0334 for more
information.
The South Dakota Department
of Revenue, Division of Motor Vehi-
cles, has awarded six new site loca-
tions in South Dakota to place
motor vehicle registration self-ser-
vice terminals (SST).
The 24-hour SST is a fully auto-
mated vehicle registration renewal
station and dispenses license plate
renewal tags on the spot.
“The real convenience is that ve-
hicle owners from any county can
use the terminal with the proper
identification,” said Division of
Motor Vehicles Director Deb
Hillmer. “We are excited for the op-
portunity to install self-service ter-
minals in other areas of South
Dakota. The terminals already op-
erating have been well received. I
believe the additional locations will
experience the same success.”
The six new site locations are the
Rushmore Mall in Rapid City,
Kessler’s in Aberdeen, County Fair
Food Store in Mitchell, and at the
Hy-Vee Food Stores in Watertown,
Brookings and Yankton. The ma-
chines are expected to be installed
and operational in early 2013.
There are four self-service termi-
nals currently operating in South
Dakota. The SSTs are available in
Sioux Falls at the Get-N-Go and
the Hy-Vee Food Store, in Rapid
City at the Public Safety Building,
and at the Department of Revenue,
Pierre Office.
A vehicle owner can navigate
through the easy touch screen
(voice assistance available) with a
valid South Dakota driver’s license;
South Dakota identification card;
or if a company, the information
provided on its renewal notice.
Once the payment has been sub-
mitted and the transaction is com-
plete, the license renewal tags and
vehicle registration are dispensed
directly from the machine.
The SST allows vehicle owners to
register up to 90 days prior and 30
days after the expiration of their
current license tags. A two dollar
convenience fee per vehicle is as-
sessed. Acceptable forms of pay-
ment include electronic check,
credit cards (MasterCard or Dis-
cover only), or ATM/debit cards
supported by Pulse, Star, NYCE
and Accel.
Motor vehicle registration
self-service terminal sites
Club 27
Kadoka, SD • 837-2241
Enjoy the
entertainment of
Brock Finn
Saturday, Nov. 17
Friday & Saturday Special
Prime Rib & Salad Bar
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Locals …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
Hosted by Save the Pearl
Sat., Nov. 17 • 6 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
Everyone Welcome!
Lunch & refreshments will be available.
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You’re invited to an
Open House on Sunday, November 18th
from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Rush Funeral Home’s new location:
165 E. Hwy. 14 in Philip (east of the bowling alley)
Come see an exact replica of Abraham Lincoln`s casket on display during the open house!
R
efreshm
ents
w
ill be served!
Rush Funeral Home
859-2400
Chapels in Philip ~ Wall ~ Kadoka
The annual Community
Thanksgiving Service will be at the
Concordia Lutheran Church on
Sunday, November 18 at 6 p.m.
with a free soup and sandwich sup-
per at 5 p.m.
Each year the churches of our
community get together for a
Thanksgiving Service at one of our
three area churches. The ladies
from the Presbyterian, Lutheran
and Roman Catholic Churches will
be serving a free soup and sand-
wich supper before the service at 5
p.m.
This year they are very happy to
have the men’s singing group, the
Haakon County Crooners, from the
Philip area with them. There will
also be a childrens message. At con-
clusion of the this worship service,
they will be taking an offering for
the needs of stranded travelers and
the needy in our community.
The churches cordially invite
everyone to come to the worship
service at the Concordia Lutheran
Church, join them for supper, and
to hear the Crooners perform.
There is no charge for the sup-
per and you are invited to bring
someone with you; you will not be
disappointed.
For more details please call
Gary McCubbin at 837-2233.
Churches come together, plan
Community Thanksgiving Service
Christmas trees will begin to fill
South Dakota Capitol hallways
later this month for the annual
Christmas at the Capitol holiday
display.
The 2012 theme is “Joyous
Sounds of Christmas.”
More than 90 Christmas trees
will be decorated Nov. 17-18 by
members of schools, churches, com-
munities, and civic groups from
across the state.
Thousands of guests visit the
South Dakota State Capitol each
year to view the decorated trees.
The display will officially begin
with a grand lighting ceremony on
Tuesday evening, Nov. 20, and con-
tinue through Wednesday, Dec. 26.
Display hours for the public will be
8 a.m. to 10 p.m. CST each day.
The two-story South Dakota tree
specially featured this year in the
Capitol rotunda was donated by
Josh and Mary Arntz of Pierre. It
is a blue spruce that is about 35-
feet tall. The tree will be decorated
by Girls Scouts – Dakota Horizons,
who are celebrating their 100th an-
niversary.
In addition to the trees, many
other parts of the Capitol will be
decorated for the holiday season,
including the Grand Marble Stair-
case and the Capitol grounds.
Christmas trees soon to
adorn SD Capitol hallways
chaperone, Kate Thoennes
Latham, on Thursday evening to
ensure a good night’s rest before
the intense two-day band festival.
Registration started at 8:30 a.m. on
Friday, followed by a seven and a
half hour intense rehearsal day,
broken up with an hour for lunch
and a couple hours for supper.
Along with the four Kadoka stu-
dent musicians, students from all
over South Dakota, North Dakota,
Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska
participated in the festival. The
student musicians had no problem
getting to sleep after the intense
mental and physical rehearsals of
the day.
Saturday morning brought an-
other hour and a half of rehearsing
for each of the bands. After morn-
ing rehearsals, the student musi-
cians were treated to a recital hour
before lunch featuring several of
the Augustana Music Department’s
top ensembles, including the Au-
gustana Keyboard Percussion En-
semble, the Augustana Flute Choir,
the Clarinet Chamber Ensemble,
The Augustana College Trombone
Quartet and Trombone Choir and
the Northlands Jazz Band. Each of
the ensembles offered stellar per-
formances and were discussed en-
thusiastically by the student
musicians afterward.
After lunch, each of the three
festival bands had their dress re-
hearsal at the Washington Pavilion
of Arts & Science in the Mary V.
Sommervold Hall. The hall is visu-
ally stunning and acoustically
beautiful. It is a wonderful hall in
which to hear outstanding band lit-
erature played by top-notch stu-
dent musicians from South Dakota
and surrounding states.
The evening concert featured
the three high school Festival
bands, as well as the Augustana
Band, under the direction of Dr.
Schilf. Each of the bands per-
formed a variety of literature, from
classic band compositions to con-
temporary selections. As a special
treat, each of the bands performed
a piece that was either composed or
arranged by the guest conductor,
Mr. Ford.
After the concert, the Kadoka
student musicians had the oppor-
tunity to talk to and have their pic-
ture taken with their conductors
and Mr. Ford. The students com-
mented that this year was unusual
and exciting, since all four Kadoka
student musicians had been nomi-
nated and accepted to all three
honor bands that Kadoka Area
High School attends, namely Re-
gion VII Honor Band, Augustana
Band Festival, and the Northern
Hills Honor Band in Spearfish
later in November.
Latham had nothing but praise
for his students, saying, “I am ex-
tremely pleased and proud of the
way our students conducted them-
selves this weekend. They were fo-
cused, well-behaved and courteous
during the entire endeavor. I hope
that they bring the energy and ex-
citement of this festival home with
them and inspire their fellow stu-
dent musicians in Kadoka.”
The next outing for members of
the band will be the Northern Hills
Honor Band in Spearfish. Several
of the middle school and high
school band members have been ac-
cepted this prestigious event, in-
cluding Berry, Shuck, Perkins and
Kary.
The 55th Annual Augustana
College Band Festival was held
Friday and Saturday, November 9
and 10, 2012, in Sioux Falls, SD.
Foster Berry, Rebekkah Kary, April
Perkins and Racheal Shuck, four
Kadoka Area High School students,
represented their school and com-
munity at the annual Festival.
Each of the students was nomi-
nated by their band director, Ben-
jamin E. Latham, to participate in
one of three bands at the Festival.
Berry and Kary participated in the
Festival Gold Band, conducted by
Dr. Paul Schilf of Augustana Col-
lege. Perkins and Shuck played
with the Festival Blue Band, con-
ducted by Dr. Bruce T. Ammann,
also of Augustana College. The Fes-
tival’s Honor Band was conducted
by noted composer and arranger,
Mr. Ralph Ford.
The students arrived with their
director, Benjamin E. Latham and
Four student musicians attend 55th
Augustana Band Festival
Food for the CAP pantry
You “can” be drug free! …For part of the drug and alcohol
awareness and prevention week, the Kadoka Area School District partic-
ipated in theme dress up days to reinforce the concepts. One day was: You
“can” be drug-free! The students were supposed to bring in a can of food
to donate. Many students brought more than one can and a few brought
a box full! As the cans came in they were stacked in pyramids in the Great
Hall. Students from Kadoka Elementary, Kadoka Middle School, Long Val-
ley, Interior, and Midland participated, along with some staff that donated
cans. The grand total was 282 cans of food! The CAP office was so happy
to hear of the drive since the food pantry was almost empty. The food col-
lected will go to families in the area who are in need of a little extra help.
--courtesy photo
Racheal Shuck, April Perkins, Rebekkah Kary and Foster Berry
Cindy and Kenny Wilmarth at-
tended the Youth Football Super
Bowl game in Rapid City on Sun-
day, Nov. 4. Their grandson, Cedar
Amiotte, was on one of the teams.
His team lost by only two points in
a very exciting game. He is the son
of Tricia and Kyle Amiotte of Wall.
This past week they have been
busy helping Tammy and Tim
Merchen pack household goods as
they are moving to the former
Harry Merchen home near Norris.
The move should be completed by
the end of the week.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Rance Blue Legs, 33, who
passed away in Pierre on Tuesday,
Nov. 6. His daughter, Tyra Fugate,
lives in Kadoka where she goes to
school. Funeral services were held
on Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Crazy
Horse School in Wanblee.
Curtis Huffman of Wessington
Springs spent the weekend in
Kadoka at the home of his parents,
Tim and Carmen Huffman. He
came to hunt deer with his dad,
and went home with a deer on Sun-
day afternoon. The weekend saw
many hunters in the area, but
weather was foggy, snowy and very
cold.
Jim and Venessa Plaggemeyer
went to Sturgis on Tuesday of last
week to see his brother, who is
fighting cancer. They have gone up
about once a week for awhile, since
his brother returned home from
hospitalization in both Rochester
and Sioux Falls.
Residents of the area enjoyed
the Veterans Day Program held at
the Kadoka City Auditorium on
Thursday, Nov. 8. The program was
put on by the Kadoka Area Schools
and all the students took part in
presenting the program and in the
musical patriotic songs by the cho-
rus and band. It was a wonderful
tribute to the veterans.
Paul Embree of Rapid City was
a Kadoka visitor on Friday. He had
lunch at Jigger’s with Russ and
Viola Olney and was then going on
to Norris and Long Valley to visit
other friends and relatives.
Members of Jackson County
Unit 27, American Legion Auxil-
iary met on Thursday evening, No-
vember 8. Education Week begins
on Nov. 11 and the unit will send a
$50 donation to the American Le-
gion Auxiliary Scholarship Fund in
honor of the teachers in Kadoka
Area Schools. It was reported that
the bake sale held on the 4th of No-
vember was successful. Dictionar-
ies for the third graders will be
ordered and given to those stu-
dents at Long Valley, Interior and
Kadoka schools. Ninety-eight
members have paid their 2013
membership so far this year. Cour-
tesy cards were sent to the family
of Barbara Stone, JoAnne Stilwell
and Ruby Cadman. Thank yous
were read from Hot Springs VA
Hospital for the Christmas gifts
taken to the facility and for 16
quilts given to the hospital, made
by the Quilts of Love organization.
The December meeting will be held
on the 13th and there will be a gift
exchange.
The Catholic Youth Group
classes are hosting a coat drive.
Coats are being collected and will
be distributed to those in need of a
winter coat.
Collection of coats will be held
until Wednesday, November 21.
If you would like to donate a
coat, they may be dropped off at the
Jackson County Library, Our Lady
of Victory Church or the Kadoka
Presbyterian Church.
Any coats that are donated will
be greatly appreciated.
Please help by donating coats.
Give those in need a little more to
be thankful about.
Coats being
collected for
those in need
U.S. Senator John Thune (R-
S.D.) has announced that he will
seek re-election for Chairman of
the Senate Republican Conference,
the third highest ranking Republi-
can position. Thune has served as
Conference Chairman since Janu-
ary of this year.
“America continues to face enor-
mous challenges and the conse-
quences have never been greater,”
said Thune. “Our country is at a
crossroads and communicating our
positive Republican vision to grow
the economy, create jobs, and re-
store our nation’s fiscal health
couldn’t be more important. Senate
Republicans have solutions and we
will work hard to aggressively take
our message directly to the Ameri-
can people.”
Thune previously served as
Chairman of the Senate Republi-
can Policy Committee and as Vice
Chairman of the Senate Republi-
can Conference.
Thune to seek re-election
as Senate Republican
Conference Chairman
This & That …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Send News, Classifieds, Thank Yous & Photos
e-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
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FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
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Rush Funeral Home’s main
chapel is moving from 203 W. Pine
Street to its new site at 165 East
Highway 14, in Philip. An open
house will be held Sunday, Novem-
ber 18, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
The new location was once the
Park-Inn Cafe and gas station, be-
fore it became a Kingdom Hall for
the Jehovah Witnesses. The new
building is 4,917 square feet, with
a 36x36 garage. It is Occupational
Safety and Health Administration
compliant; including the air ex-
change unit in the embalming
room set to exchange the air 14
times per hour. The layout of the
viewing room is for easier visiting
of the attendees. Actual funeral
services will still be held in
churches or other family chosen
places.
As part of the open house, there
will be on display a replica of the
coffin used to show President Abra-
ham Lincoln during his lying in
state. It is one of five replicas made
10 years ago by the Batesville Cas-
ket Company of Indiana. The coffin
was designed using the only known
surviving 1865 photograph of the
coffin. The distinction between a
coffin and a casket is that a coffin
has six sides (diamond shaped) and
a casket has four sides.
Four of the five coffin replicas
travel the nation for display at fu-
neral homes, and the fifth remains
as part of the permanent collection
at the Abraham Lincoln Presiden-
tial Library and Museum in
Springfield, Ill.
Lincoln’s coffin was the most
elaborate of that time. It was con-
structed of solid walnut, lined with
lead and completely covered in ex-
pensive black cloth. It was six feet,
six inches long and decorated with
sterling silver handles and studs
extending the entire length of its
sides. Though it appears austere
compared to modern caskets, the
original was custom made for the
president and featured a remov-
able two-part top. The replica does
not contain a lead lining.
Historically, the coffin played
prominently in a plot by thieves to
steal the president’s body. In 1876,
when a counterfeiting ring’s top en-
graver was imprisoned, his gang
decided to break into the tomb and
steal the body, planning to hold it
for a ransom of $200,000 in gold
and the freedom of the engraver.
The plot was foiled when lawmen
made their move as the coffin was
being removed from the tomb.
In 1900, Lincoln’s son, Robert,
was afraid that more attempts to
steal the body would be made. A se-
lect few viewed the body one last
time, to ensure that previous at-
tempts to steal the body had not
been successful. Lincoln’s appear-
ance had not changed much since
that of his original burial in 1865.
Lincoln was then permanently
buried, with the coffin placed in a
cage 10 feet deep and encased in
4,000 pounds of concrete.
It is estimated that one million
people viewed Lincoln’s body from
the time of his death until his bur-
ial. The funeral was the largest in
the world, until President John F.
Kennedy’s death in 1963.
It could be said that Lincoln’s
death triggered the beginning of
the modern day funeral service. He
was the first public figure to be em-
balmed and put on view – for al-
most three weeks. The embalming
technique used was primarily used
on soldiers who died during the
Civil War and needed to be trans-
ported home for burial. People at
the time thought embalming was a
barbaric violation of the body, but
Lincoln’s funeral changed that per-
ception. His public viewing intro-
duced the population to the
benefits of embalming. Mourners
were able to see the late president
for 20 days and embalming made it
possible.
Rush Funeral Home open house to
display replica of Lincoln’s coffin
Participating flower shops, in-
cluding Pocetful of Posies in
Kadoka, will gather canned goods
for distribution by their local food
pantries during National Hunger
and Homelessness Awareness
Week. During Caring Rose Week,
November 12-17, donors who bring
2 cans of food can buy 1 dozen long-
stemmed roses to grace their tables
over Thanksgiving for only $10.
Demand for food from charity
providers is up by as much as 40%
due in part to America recovering
from the greatest economic down-
turn since the Great Depression. To
help, florists across the central
United States will gather over 32
tons of food for those in need during
Caring Rose Week November 12-17.
Now in its 14th year, the program
will likely surpass three quarters of
a million pounds of donated food
over the life of the event.
Florists in each community choose
a local food-distribution charity.
Collected canned goods are then
distributed through the charity to
feed those within the community
who cannot otherwise meet their
nutritional needs. Coming at the
onset of seasonally cold weather,
the program helps food-distribution
programs when families begin to
experience the greatest financial
pressure.
According to Brian Barks,
spokesperson for Foodbank for the
Heartland in Omaha, Nebraska,
their member agencies such as
emergency shelters and church
pantries are reporting new faces at
their locations, often seeking help
for the first time due to the sour
economy.
Caring Rose Week’s timing – and
that of National Hunger and Home-
lessness Awareness Week – is ap-
propriate.
“I think people at this time of
year are in a reflective mood,” said
Matt Gasson, Executive Director of
Feeding South Dakota, with offices
in Sioux Falls, Pierre and Rapid
City, and about 450 non-profit affil-
iates in every county across the
state. “People reflect on all that we
have and are thankful for. This is a
time of great connection.”
Jill Henessy of Flower Box in
Graceville, MN, reports that cus-
tomers bring in bags of food rather
than just the 2 cans needed. “Their
generosity is overwhelming. The
food stays local, where we need it.”
“The fact that we are doing
something to help so many unfortu-
nate people is reason enough to par-
ticipate, especially now,” said Irene
Arnold of Chariton Floral in Chari-
ton, IA.
Tammy Holen at Artistic Am-
biance in Minot, North Dakota
noted that Caring Rose Week was
responsible for the largest amount
of food ever picked up by the food
pantry in the Minot area.
Conceived in 1998, Caring Rose
Week was created by Harry
Whelden, General Manager of
North American Wholesale Florist
in Sioux Falls, SD, and now in Ro-
seville, MN. Former food-industry
businessman, Whelden took an in-
terest in “National Hunger and
Homelessness Awareness Week”
sponsored by the National Coalition
for the Homeless and the National
Student Campaign Against Hunger
& Homelessness which takes place
each year one week before Thanks-
giving.
“I am deeply grateful for the par-
ticipation of the literally hundreds
of flower shops across the Great
Plains for taking the time and en-
ergy to help meet this need,” says
Whelden. “It’s a time of year when
food is needed and appreciated.
While many people are buying toys
and other Christmas gifts, many
others across America are without
food.”
Flower shops to deliver over 32 tons of food to those in need
by Norris Preston
Past national vice-commander
the American Legion
The National Education Associa-
tion’s 91st American Education
Week is November 11-17.
American Legion posts and fam-
ily members are encouraged to par-
ticipate in the weeklong cele-
bration to support America’s youth
and the NEA’s annual tagline,
“Great public schools: a basic right
and our responsibility.”
The American Legion has played
a significant rule in the history of
American Education Week, being a
co-sponsor of the initial event, De-
cember 4-10, 1921. Distressed that
25 percent of the country’s World
War I draftees were illiterate and
nine percent were physically unfit,
representatives of the NEA and the
American Legion met in 1919 to
seek ways to generate public sup-
port for education.
American Education Week is now
organized a week before Thanksgiv-
ing. It is celebrated in order to af-
firm the importance of schools and
education in nation building. It sig-
nals a commitment to developing
the necessary tools that American
students require in order to be suc-
cessful in practical life and help
build the nation.
American Education Week is a
perfect occasion to let the media in-
side the institutes and increase the
exposure of students. Ultimately It
can only be a success if schools take
the initiative to involve quests from
many walks of life. If schools choose
to adopt this exercise, they will en-
hance the sense of responsibility
among both teachers and students
and they can thus work together to
improve standards in the school.
American Educational Week
helps schools to let the students
and parents know of the plans and
initiatives that the school has taken
to boost educational standards.
Some schools often organize parent-
teacher meetings during American
Educational Week in order to keep
the parents informed of their child’s
progress. It is observed nationwide
in many different ways and it is re-
ally up to individual schools as to
how seriously it takes the occasion.
Of Interest to Veterans
– American Education Week –
Public Notices …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
Public Notice Publication Deadline
Friday at Noon
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
COMMUNITY BANK,
AVON, SOUTH DAKOTA,
a South Dakota
Banking Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRADLEY PORCH, JACKSON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA,
SOUTHSIDE REBUILDERS,
KELLIE M. PORCH, CREDIT
COLLECTIONS SERVICES, INC.,
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA (DEPART-
MENT OF REVENUE
& REGULATION),
and BENNETT COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA,
Defendants.
CIV. NO. 10-42
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on
June 25, 2012, the Honorable John L.
Brown, Circuit Court Judge acting in and
for the Sixth Judicial Circuit, entered an
Order Granting Plaintiff’s Motion for
Summary Judgment, stating that the
Mortgage held by Plaintiff, dated July 14,
2006, and filed for record in the office of
the Jackson County, South Dakota, Reg-
ister of Deeds on July 19, 2006, in Book
36 of Mortgages, on pages 157-165,
upon the following described real prop-
erty, is a valid lien upon the premises and
which Mortgage was thereby foreclosed
and that the said real estate as here-
inafter described is to be sold at public
auction by the Sheriff of Jackson County,
South Dakota, or his authorized deputy,
retaining his fees, disbursements, and
commissions, and payment shall be
made to Plaintiff for Plaintiff’s judgment
amount.
The real estate upon which the
Mortgage is herein foreclosed and
upon which the Order of Sale is di-
rected is described as follows:
The Northwest Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter (NW¼NW¼)
and the East Half of the Northwest
Quarter (E½NW¼) of Section
Twenty-Four (24), in Township Forty
(40) North, Range Thirty-Eight (38),
West of the 6th P.M., Jackson
County, South Dakota.
The amount claimed to be due on this
Mortgage is the sum of $85,717.06, plus
interest accrued through the date of sale
and any redemption period, plus costs of
sale.
Said real estate shall be sold to the high-
est bidder, for cash, at the hour of 9:00
a.m. (mountain) on the 20th day of No-
vember, 2012, at the front door of the
Jackson County Courthouse, Kadoka,
Jackson County, South Dakota.
In accordance with the terms of the
Order, Defendant, Bradley Porch, and all
persons claiming under him to be and
they are forever barred and foreclosed of
all equity of redemption and claim to the
mortgaged property and all parts thereof,
except for statutory right of redemption
within 180 days from the date of record-
ing the certificate of sale. Further, any
lien held by any other Defendant and any
person in possession of the above-de-
scribed real estate are inferior to the lien
of Plaintiff.
Dated this 19th day of October, 2012.
/s/ Daniel G. Van Gorp
Attorney for Plaintiff
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605/859-2540
[Published October 25, November 1, 8 &
15, 2012]
Public Notice
Deadline
Friday at Noon
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Pro Cellular, AT&T authorized retailer
of Pierre will be in Kadoka
Thursday November 15 - 10am-6pm
& Friday November 16 - 10am-6pm
Visit them at Peters Excavation Office at
700 Hickory St. (1/2 block off Main St)
605-945-0563 - Pierre (store)
9/5,,"%!",%4/
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We look forward to seeing you!
For directions call 605-220-3987.
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NOTICE TO
BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Commissioners are accepting
sealed bids to crush and stockpile gravel
at the following site:
20,000 ton (+ or – 1%) of
gravel at the Harvey pit: NW4,
Section 29, T 43 N, R 38 W,
Jackson County, South
Dakota
Gravel to be crushed to one inch (1")
maximum.
Gravel stockpile to be neatly piled within
the pit site.
Gravel to be weighed on either a belt
scale or on a truck scale before being put
in stockpile. A comparison shall be made
against a scale reading from a certified
scale by measuring a minimum of Ten
(10) tons with the scale used and loading
it into a truck. The truck shall be weighed
loaded and empty. A conversion factor
from belt scale weight to truck scale
weight will be calculated by the County
and applied to the payments. Contractor
must perform this comparison during the
first One Thousand (1,000) tons of pro-
duction and during the final One Thou-
sand (1,000) tons of production. County
will calculate the average conversion fac-
tor and the final payment will be deter-
mined.
County is to pay all royalties to the pit
owner.
Contractor may be required to do such
other incidental work including, but not
limited to, minimal stripping, at the pit.
County will backfill pit at the landowner
and County’s discretion upon completion
of the project.
Contractor is to be responsible for any
damage to land, fences or cattle guards.
Contractor shall clean the pit site of all
garbage, oil filters, metal or plastic con-
tainers, equipment, equipment parts, etc.
to the satisfaction of the landowner and
county.
Contractor is to complete work within
Sixty (60) calendar days after the notice
to proceed has been issued by the
County Highway Superintendent. No
work shall begin until such notice has
been presented to Contractor. Any exten-
sion of time to complete work must be
agreed to by County, in writing, in ad-
vance of the expiration of the Sixty (60)
calendar days.
Certified Check or Bid Bond: A certified
check or a cashiers check drawn on a
South Dakota bank in the amount of five
percent (5%) of the amount of the bid,
made payable to Jackson County, shall
accompany the bid. In lieu of a bid check
the bidder may submit a surety bond for
ten percent (10%) of the amount bid. The
surety is to be payable to Jackson
County as a guarantee that such bidder
will enter into a contract with Jackson
County. Bid bond is waived as per SDCL
5-18B-3 if the bid does not exceed Fifty
Thousand Dollars ($50,000.00).
Performance Bond: The successful bid-
der must provide either a performance
bond with property surety or a certified
check in the amount of the contract price,
delivered and accepted by Jackson
County prior to signing of a contract
guaranteeing the faithful performance
and the payment for labor and materials
by the successful bidder. Successful bid-
der is to enter into a contract with Jack-
son County within ten (10) days after the
date of bid letting. Performance Bond is
waived as per SDCL 5-21-1.1 if the bid
does not exceed Twenty-Five Thousand
Dollars ($25,000.00).
The successful bidder will be required to
provide a certificate of insurance in the
amount of Two Million Dollars
($2,000,000.00) to Jackson County,
South Dakota.
All bids must be submitted in a sealed
envelope plainly marked as “Bid on
Gravel Crushing and Stockpile - Harvey
Pit”.
All bids must be filed in the Jackson
County Auditor’s Office, 700 Main Street,
Kadoka, SD or mailed to Jackson
County, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD 57543.
Bids must be received no later than 1:00
p.m., Wednesday, November 21, 2012.
Bids will be opened at 1:05 p.m. (Moun-
tain time), Wednesday, November 21,
2012.
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to accept or re-
ject any or all bids, to waive any
irregularities or technicalities therein, to
advertise for new proposals, and to ac-
cept the bid that is to the best advantage
of and is in the best interest of Jackson
County.
For further information you may contact
Aaron Richardson, Jackson County
Highway Department at 605-837-2410.
Vicki D. Wilson
Jackson County Auditor
[Published November 8 & 15, 2012, at an
estimated cost of $87.78]
Notice of Meeting
The annual meeting of the Tri-County
Predator District will be held Tuesday, De-
cember 4, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at The
Steakhouse in Philip, S.D.
[Published November 15, 22 & 29, 2012,
at the total approximate cost of $10.83]
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
October 17, 2012
The regular meeting of the Town of Cot-
tonwood was held at Town Hall on
Wednesday evening, October 17, 2012
at 7 p.m. Present were JC Heath, Dave
Griffee, and Doug Hovland. Absent was
Trenton Heath. The meeting was called
to order by JC Heath.
Old Business: None.
New Business: Discussed investment
letter that was received and chose to
leave funds as is. There was also discus-
sion about contracting snow removal. No
vote taken.
The following bills were approved:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.62
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101.00
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86.25
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,500.48
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,823.84
With there being no other business to
discuss, the meeting was adjourned.
The next regular meeting will be held on
November 21, 2012 – 7 p.m. at Town
Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published November 15, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $14.66]
To all of the friendly
faces we have had the
privilege to serve this
year, we wish you a
bountiful Thanksgiving
and a blessed New Year.
It’s been a
pleasure
West Central Electric
Cooperative, Inc.
A Touchstone Energy Cooperative
Cn thís duy oí thunks
\e're countíng our bíessíngs und
extendíng our grutítude to everyone
ve huve served thís yeur.
\e upprecíute your support.
Huppy 1hunksgívíng!
Mídvest
Cooperutíves
lhíííp & ludoku
The South Dakota Cattlemen’s
Association (SDCA) is proud to an-
nounce a great speaker lineup for
their 64th Annual Convention and
Trade Show scheduled for November
28-29, 2012 at the Crossroads Hotel
& Convention Center in Huron.
Wednesday morning’s opening
session will feature Ryan Eichler
from Elanco Animal Health present-
ing an overview of the role technol-
ogy will play in feeding a growing
world population. Attendees will
then choose two of three breakout
sessions focusing on estate planning,
social networking, and an update on
Northern Beef Packers and the
South Dakota Certified program.
Wednesday’s lunch crowd will
hear from National Cattlemen’s Beef
Association President JD Alexander
from Nebraska. He will share in-
sights about the current political
landscape in Washington, D.C.
Wednesday evening kicks off with
the popular president’s auction, fol-
lowed by the SDCA awards for Cat-
tleman and Agribusinessman of the
Year and media winners, along with
the much anticipated Leopold Con-
servation Award presentation.
“South Dakota Cattlemen’s Asso-
ciation is proud to present the Ko-
priva Ranch the 2012 Leopold
Conservation Award,” said Cory
Eich, SDCA 1st Vice President.
“Their commitment to the land by
utilizing techniques in no till crops
and cover crops, along with rota-
tional grazing efforts, earned the Ko-
privas this award.”
After the banquet convention at-
tendees will plan to attend a per-
formance by Baxter Black. “We are
very excited to have a cowboy icon
performing at our convention this
year,” said Jeff Smeenk, “We are
grateful to Priefert Ranch Equip-
ment for sponsoring the cowboy
poet’s witty storytelling and we hope
to see our members and the commu-
nity take advantage of this opportu-
nity.” Tickets can be purchased at
www.sdcattlemen.org or by calling
the SDCA office at 605-945-2333.
At Thursday’s lunch, attendees
will hear from South Dakota Secre-
tary of Agriculture, Walt Bones, to
provide them an update on the ag de-
partment’s livestock development
initiative. Attendees will also hear
insight on agriculture in China, Tai-
wan and Russia. Following lunch at-
tendees will wrap up their
convention experience with the al-
ways popular Cattlemen’s College,
sponsored by Pfizer Animal Health.
Duane Lenz from CattleFax will pro-
vide a market outlook for 2014 fol-
lowed by Dr. Gary Sides of Pfizer
Animal Health sharing information
regarding new technologies that will
assist in feeding growing world pop-
ulation.
SDCA Convention speakers will provide
information, education and insight for cattlemen
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
ADOPTION
ADOPT - WE WILL PROVIDE a
happy, loving home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn baby. Ex-
penses paid. Married couple
Walt/Gina. Call for info: 1-800-315-
6957.
BASKETBALL
The Cougar Classic Basketball Tour-
nament in Rapid City is December 1
& 2. Open to girls and boys teams
grades 4-8. Registration is
$135/team, three game guarantee.
Rosters due November 21. For in-
formation: www.rapidcitycourgar-
classic.com.
CELEBRATIONS
WANTED FOOD VENDERS for the
Rosholt, Centennial, August 16-18th
2013. For more information call 605-
537-4426 ask for Mary.
EMPLOYMENT
DENTAL ASSISTANT Delta Dental is
looking for a Dental Assistant to join
a dedicated team of professionals
aimed at improving oral health and
keeping kids across the state of
South Dakota smiling. The position
will work directly out of a 40-foot-
long, state-of-the-art mobile dental
unit. Responsibilities will include:
providing chair side assistance, tak-
ing x-rays, patient charting, and
equipment sterilization. Position is
based out of Pierre. Extensive travel
is required (75% of the time M-F).
Person must have graduated from
an accredited dental assisting edu-
cation program or have at least one
year of experience working in the
dental assisting field. Current CPR &
x-ray certifications are required. Ex-
cellent salary and benefits package.
Email cover letter, resume and pro-
fessional references to
summer.sporrer@deltadentalsd.com
or for more information please con-
tact Summer Sporrer at 605-494-
2569.LICENSED INSURANCE
AGENTS - A+ Rating, Great Pay,
Lifetime Renewals. Offer great train-
ing! Call today. Tucker Tonkel 605-
645-7502.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for mechanic
and equipment operators. Good ben-
efits. Applications are available at
courthouse in Bison, SD or call 605-
244-5629.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competi-
tive wages, benefits, training, profit
sharing, opportunities for growth,
great culture and innovation. $1,500
Sign on Bonus available for service
technicians. To browse opportunities
go to www.rdoequipment.com. Must
apply online. EEO.
FOR SALE
2009 POLARIS 850XP 4x4. 50K
miles, Green. $5500.00 or OBO. Call
evenings: 605-466-2650.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LIVESTOCK
FOR SALE: PURE BRED Rambouil-
let Rams. Yearling or Lambs. Big,
Hardy, Fine Fleeces. Call evenings:
605-466-2370.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
DRIVERS: $1,000 SIGN-ON
BONUS. New Pay Program! *Earn
up to 50 cpm *Home Weekly *2500+
miles, 95% no-tarp. Must be Cana-
dian eligible (888) 691-5705.
REAL ESTATE
INCOME PROPERTIES. Stable,
fully managed properties in the Black
Hills, great condition and locations.
Would make good exchange proper-
ties. Call Todd Young, SDRE broker,
605-645-4917.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
November 16-17-18-19:
Taken 2(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
November 23-24-25-26:
Here Comes the Boom (PG)
November 30-December 1-2-3:
Wreck It Ralph (PG)
December 7-8-9-10: The Twilight
Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2
(PG-13)
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
Thank You .
Thank you to the Jackson County
voters who supported me in the
state's attorney eIection.
CongratuIations to Dan Van Gorp
on his re-eIection.
0s, kl|ss !clleIsce
Thank you, voters of Jackson County!
I look forward to continue serving
as your state’s attorney.
– Dan Van Gorp
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing ...........................27-13
Rockers................................23.5-16.5
Petersen’s ..................................20-20
Handrahan Const .....................20-20
Dakota Bar................................16-24
Badland’s Auto....................13.5-26.5
Highlights:
Wendell Buxcel......................257/596
Bryan Buxcel ....6-7-10 & 3-10 splits;
.....................................236 clean/558
Marlis Petersen.....................207/521
Gail Reutter ..........................192/504
Jim Kujawa...........................201/553
Jason Petersen ....................5-7 split;
.....................................212 clean/581
Andrew Reckling...................208/583
Ronnie Coyle................205 clean/545
Trina Brown .......................202 clean
Vickie Petersen.2-7 & 3-6-7-10 splits
.....................................193 clean/490
Maralynn Burns....................197/476
Carl Brown ..................193 clean/540
Arlene Kujawa ......................184/476
Tena Slovek .........4-7-10 & 2-7 splits
Shirley Parsons ....................2-7 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................20-4
Kennedy Imp...............................15-9
Philip Motor ..............................13-11
George’s Welding ......................12-12
G&A Trenching.........................10-14
Kadoka Tree Service.............9.5-14.5
Bear Auto ....................................9-15
Philip Health Service ...........8.5-15.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd ............248, 245 clean/684
Earl Park ...8-10 split; 255 clean/598
Bill Bainbridge ....8-10 & 3-10 splits;
.............................225 clean, 206/583
Steve Varner..........................236/580
Tony Gould...........3-10 split; 215/559
Jim Larson ............................201/548
Fred Foland..................................543
Ronnie Williams...........................538
Matt Schofield ...................3-10 split;
.....................................202 clean/535
Pat Birkimer ....6-7-10 split; 210/508
Bill Stone......................................502
Alvin Pearson .......................5-7 split
Norm Buxcel .............5-7 & 4-5 splits
Johnny Wilson...................2-5-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................34-6
Invisibles...................................24-16
Bowling Belles ..........................21-19
Jolly Ranchers ..........................19-21
State Farm Ins..........................19-21
Highlights:
Christy Park..........................193/474
Sandra O’Connor ..181, 149, 148/478
Charlene Kjerstad........................181
Jen Schriever..............3-10 split; 152
Joy Neville............................4-5 split
Judy Papousek .............3-10 split x 2
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.....................6-5 split
Shirley Parsons ....................7-8 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................23-13
Chiefie’s Chicks...................21.5-14.5
Wall Food Center ......................19-17
Morrison’s Haying ..............17.5-18.5
Hildebrand Concrete ..........16.5-19.5
First National Bank .................16-20
Dorothy’s Catering....................16-20
Just Tammy’s......................14.5-21.5
Highlights:
Shar Moses............................175/492
Kalie Kjerstad..............................316
Alicia Heathershaw.....................155
Marlis Petersen............................181
Amy Morrison ..............................472
Sandee Gittings ......3-10 & 4-5 splits
Debbie Gartner.....................5-6 split
Kathy Gittings......................5-6 split
MaryLynn Crary .............2-5-10 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................20-4
Dakota Bar..................................15-9
O’Connell Const ........................13-11
McDonnell Farms .....................11-13
WEE BADD...............................11-13
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................10-14
West River Pioneer Tanks..........9-15
The Steakhouse ..........................7-17
Highlights:
Don Carley.............5-7 split; 219/523
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 253/636
Greg Arthur...........................233/586
Mark Foland.................................200
John Heltzel ..........................200/549
Andrew Reckling...............3-10 split;
.....................................224 clean/580
Cory Boyd ....................221 clean/585
Rick Coyle .............................204/577
Jack Heinz.............................205/565
Bryan Buxcel ..............5-10 split; 206
Nathan Kjerstad..........3-10 split x 2;
.....................................195 clean/543
Wendell Buxcel...................197 clean
Haven Hildedbrand....3-10 split; 202
Ronnie Coyle.......................5-10 split
Jason Petersen .............3-10 split x 2
Conrad Kjerstad.................3-10 split
Matt Reckling.....................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................33-7
King Pins.............................23.5-16.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............22-14
Roy’s Repair ........................19.5-20.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................16-20
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Ed Morrison...........................211/552
Cristi Ferguson.....................183/518
Cory Boyd..............................203/525
Duane Hand.................................533
Bart Guptill ........................192 clean
Jerry Iron Moccasin .............5-6 split
Randy Boyd ........................3-10 split
Angel Nemec.........................2-7 split
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Kadoka Clinic
Holiday Schedule
Chestnut Street • 837-2257
Kadoka Clinic
will be CLOSED
on the following dates:
Closed Nov. 22 and 23 for Thanksgiving
Closed on Dec. 24 and 25 for Christmas
Closed on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 for New Years
We will have the Digital Mammography
Unit here on December 13, 2012.
Unfortunately, this will be the last time they can
come here or to Philip due to the fact that they
will be discontinuing the traveling unit.
Please call Kadoka Clinic if you would like to be
put on the schedule in December.
Agricul ture …
November 15, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Notice
to our
Subscribers:
When sending
subscription
payments
PLEASE return
the entire pink
postcard
with the payment.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14: WEICH-UP COW,
DULL & HFFT. SALE. SALE TIME: WEIGH-UPS:
10:00 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12:00 P.M. (MT).
EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. 1?00 HD
DISPERSIONS:
KUDRNA RANCH: ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 280 DLK & A
FEW FED 2 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK &
HEFF; CLV. 3-1
JEFF MADSEN: ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION OF 240 HD" - 110
DLK 4 TO 9 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45 DAYS;
50 DLK COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45
DAYS; 40 FED ANC COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK & FED;
CLV. 3-20 FOF 45 DAYS; 40 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW FINAL AN-
SWEF; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45 DAYS
BRED HEIFERS:
CLEVE PRICHARD - 180 DLK HFFS (CAKE DFOKE & CENTLE};
DFED.LOW DIFTH WEICHT DLK ANCUS; CLV.2-20 (SOFTED INTO
2, 15 DAY CALVINC CFOUPS}
HOWARD INGALLS & SONS - 84 HOME FAISED DLK ANCUS
HFFS; DFED; LOW DIFTH WT. ANCUS; CLV. 3-10 FOF 30 DAYS
DALLIS BASEL - 40 FED ANCUS HFFS; DFED. LOW DIFTH
WEICHT FED ANCUS; CLV. 3-1 FOF 50 DAYS
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
BLAINE KROGMAN - 150 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
TODD MORTENSON - 100 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLKS DFED HEFF, DWF DFED DLK; CLV.
3-10
JOE HARMON - 65 DLK 5 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-1; 10 DLK FALL CALVINC 5 YF OLD TO DFO-
KEN MOUTH PAIFS
MARK RADWAY - 55 DLK & DWF SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-15
A CONSIGNMENT - 30 DLK FUNNINC ACE COWS DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-20; 29 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
20
TROY RICHTER - 40 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
CHAF; CLV. 3-15 FOF 60
SCOTT PHILLIPS - 40 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK
BRAD STOUT - 40 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-1
STERLING RIGGINS - 40 DLK 8 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK & HEFF; CLV. 3-27
CHRIS & LEO GRUBL - 20 FANCY DLK & FED ULTFASOUND
HFFS (1050-100=}; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-10 FOF 30 DAYS; 18 DLK
& FED FUNNINC ACE COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV.3-10
MIKE HEATHERSHAW - 30 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-1
PAUL SCHNOSE - 29 DLK ANC COMINC 3 YF OLD COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 50 DAYS
RON HOWIE - 27 DLK & HEFF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-25
2EB HOFFMAN - 25 FED SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. FED; CLV. 4-1
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
MADSEN RANCH - 25 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK, FED & HEFF; CLV. 4-1
HELEN PFEIFER - 15 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-1
PHIL VANDERVOORT - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-1 FOF 60 DAYS
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-28 FOF 55 DAYS
BOB SCOTT - 6 HEFF & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
INCALLS ANC; CLV. 3-1 FOF 45 DAYS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE,
MUST DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITION-
INC SHOTS (FOUF-WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, &
HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11. SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S. NO SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£S., NOV. JS, 2DJ2
We Þod o b1g run o] oo111e ]or our speo1o1
Þere Tuesdog, Nov. JS1Þ, se111ng SDtJ
Þeod. B1g oroud o] bugers, morKe1 oo11ve,
bu1 so]1er on 1Þe ]1esÞg t ue1gÞ1 oo1ves
ond s1rong on 1Þe geor11ngs.
YEARLINGS:
LA2Y 3 LIVESTOCK - BILLINGS, MT
1558 .....................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 918= ......$139.40
735 .......................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 839= ......$141.10
346.......................FED & FWF SPAY HFFS 888= ......$141.50
180................................CHAF SPAY HFFS 893= ......$141.50
JACK SIMONS - ENNING
18............................................DLK STFS 805= ......$151.00
GLENDON SHEARER - WALL
24...................................DLK OPEN HFFS 731= ......$142.25
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
8.....................................DLK OPEN HFFS 897= ......$136.00
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
11..................................FED & DLK STFS 892= ......$140.25
12 .................................HEFF OPEN HFFS 813= ......$133.75
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
22...............................X DFED SPAY HFFS 705= ......$138.00
JOHN & PAT SOLON - KADOKA
22 .................................HEFF OPEN HFFS 732= ......$132.00
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
3.....................................FED OPEN HFFS 917= ......$133.50
A & B RANCH INC - HERMOSA
15.........................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 859= ......$130.50
MORTENSON CATTLE CO. - HAYES
5...........................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 1068= ....$119.50
CALVES:
ROBERTSON FAMILY - CAPUTA
96 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 506= ......$171.75
91 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 516= ......$171.00
24 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 413= ......$190.50
100 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 582= ......$164.25
175...............................DLK & DWF HFFS 523= ......$156.50
66.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 426= ......$158.00
RALPH & SHAYNE PORCH - WANBLEE
100................................FED & DLK STFS 521= ......$170.75
41..................................FED & DLK STFS 438= ......$187.50
112...............................DLK & DWF HFFS 514= ......$170.50
HERB & MIKE SIELER - WALL
52............................................DLK STFS 408= ......$190.00
10............................................DLK STFS 334= ......$209.00
18 ...........................................DLK HFFS 302= ......$186.00
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
86 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 510= ......$171.50
8..............................................DLK STFS 416= ......$184.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH INC - FAITH
100................................FED & DLK STFS 436= ......$187.00
10..................................FED & DLK STFS 342= ......$220.00
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
49............................................DLK STFS 521= ......$172.50
20............................................DLK STFS 436= ......$179.00
26 ...........................................DLK HFFS 460= ......$154.00
13 ...........................................DLK HFFS 401= ......$163.00
BRETT GUPTILL - INTERIOR
53 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 473= ......$180.25
109 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 578= ......$163.75
105...............................DLK & DWF HFFS 554= ......$157.00
50 ...............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 459= ......$153.00
HARLEY PRICE - OPAL
65 ...........................................DLK HFFS 574= ......$157.25
10 ...........................................DLK HFFS 467= ......$164.00
MICHAEL KNECHT - LODGEPOLE
60............................................DLK STFS 531= ......$168.50
30............................................DLK STFS 419= ......$189.00
61.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 448= ......$155.50
11 ...........................................DLK HFFS 348= ......$175.00
MARK LANTIS - BOX ELDER
40............................................DLK STFS 513= ......$171.25
23..................................FED & DLK STFS 370= ......$206.00
20.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 394= ......$162.00
24 ...........................................DLK HFFS 474= ......$151.00
SHANNON GARTNER - INTERIOR
36............................................DLK STFS 547= ......$169.75
SANDERS RANCH PARTNERSHIP - RAPID CITY
97..........................................CHAF STFS 590= ......$164.00
96 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 544= ......$163.00
48..........................................CHAF STFS 503= ......$169.50
39 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 434= ......$190.00
101 .......................................CHAF HFFS 576= ......$146.75
100..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 536= ......$153.25
118..............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 461= ......$156.50
DARRIN KLAPPERICH - RAPID CITY
37 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 559= ......$169.50
32.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 506= ......$149.00
JOHN NEUMANN - PHILIP
40............................................DLK STFS 526= ......$170.50
27 ...........................................DLK HFFS 538= ......$146.00
GLENDON SHEARER - WALL
80............................................DLK STFS 481= ......$179.00
38............................................DLK STFS 363= ......$209.00
CHRIS HOWIE - HERMOSA
48 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 518= ......$170.75
12 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 461= ......$167.00
28.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 484= ......$146.00
RON GARTNER - INTERIOR
45............................................DLK STFS 493= ......$173.00
25............................................DLK STFS 396= ......$186.00
13 ...........................................DLK HFFS 385= ......$173.50
MORRIS JONES & SONS - MIDLAND
105................................FED & DLK STFS 537= ......$163.50
116................................FED & DLK STFS 473= ......$171.00
29..................................FED & DLK STFS 375= ......$185.00
DENNIS SINKEY - MIDLAND
34............................................DLK STFS 548= ......$169.50
KENNY IRELAND - PHILIP
17............................................DLK STFS 509= ......$170.50
5...................................DLK & DWF HFFS 442= ......$153.00
ROBERT SMITH - BOX ELDER
20 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 595= ......$161.00
8 .............................................DLK HFFS 566= ......$147.00
CORY ELSHERE - QUINN
11............................................DLK STFS 515= ......$167.00
5..............................................DLK STFS 446= ......$185.00
JIM & KRISTI FARLEY - CODY, NE
28 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 698= ......$151.00
16 ...........................................DLK HFFS 669= ......$138.75
EDDIE TAYLOR - CAPUTA
54 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 618= ......$153.00
20 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 483= ......$169.00
24.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 531= ......$150.00
21.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 465= ......$152.00
RON RICHARDS - HERMOSA
25..................................FED & DLK STFS 613= ......$147.50
20 .................................FED & DLK HFFS 575= ......$138.75
STEVE MACLEAY - FAIRBURN
13 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 699= ......$141.00
9 ...................................DLK & DWF STFS 615= ......$150.00
25 ...........................................DLK HFFS 615= ......$138.50
JERRY PATTERSON - KADOKA
20............................................DLK STFS 591= ......$154.25
8....................................FED & DLK STFS 499= ......$162.00
CHARLIE CARLSON - KADOKA
30............................................DLK STFS 604= ......$153.25
28 ...........................................DLK HFFS 554= ......$144.00
ADDISON RANCH - BEVIDERE
26 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 560= ......$161.00
19.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 540= ......$145.00
SUE EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
35............................................DLK STFS 569= ......$148.00
19............................................DLK STFS 482= ......$161.00
27 ...........................................DLK HFFS 514= ......$142.00
JACK WIESER - OWANKA
33 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 586= ......$159.00
13 .................................DLK & DWF STFS 482= ......$166.00
JERRY SAMPSON - INTERIOR
19..................................FED & DLK STFS 406= ......$171.50
36.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 451= ......$146.00
14.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 376= ......$163.50
DAVE & TANYA BERRY - MILESVILLE
37..................................FED & DLK STFS 604= ......$151.50
11..................................FED & DLK STFS 523= ......$162.00
BRYCE BAKER - FT. PIERRE
30................................CHAF & DLK STFS 609= ......$155.00
7..................................CHAF & DLK STFS 496= ......$169.00
25 ...............................CHAF & DLK HFFS 577= ......$143.50
7 ...........................................CHAF HFFS 479= ......$155.00
DAN ANDERSON - MEADOW
15..................................FED & DLK STFS 620= ......$145.00
5..............................................DLK STFS 529= ......$161.00
7 .............................................DLK HFFS 494= ......$141.00
GARY & DEB MAILLOUX - VALE
34..................................FED & DLK STFS 638= ......$150.50
13..................................FED & DLK STFS 540= ......$151.00
17.................................DLK & DWF HFFS 583= ......$143.00
9...................................FED & DLK HFFS 483= ......$145.00
GARY WOODFORD - CUSTER
9....................................FED & DLK STFS 633= ......$147.50
8 .............................................DLK HFFS 603= ......$139.25
HALEY RANCH - STURGIS
23............................................DLK STFS 395= ......$194.00
17 ...........................................DLK HFFS 404= ......$167.00
RUSS SINKEY - MIDLAND
18 .................................FED & DLK HFFS 457= ......$154.00
6...................................FED & DLK HFFS 380= ......$164.50
JERRY ELLENS - PHILIP
10............................................DLK STFS 574= ......$153.00
RALPH MERCHEN - CUSTER
5..............................................DLK STFS 606= ......$156.00
DON HINSON - MIDLAND
18..................................FED & DLK STFS 480= ......$160.00
5....................................FED & DLK STFS 416= ......$173.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Healthy Beverage
Choices for Kids
Research shows that what chil-
dren drink plays an important role
in keeping children healthy and at
a proper weight. Over the last
thirty years, childhood obesity
rates have nearly tripled. It’s crit-
ical that we teach kids to eat
smart, but also drink smart.
There are many drink choices
available: Soda, sports drinks, iced
tea, iced coffee, energy drinks,
milk, juice blends, 100 percent
fruit juice and water, just to name
a few. Sugar-sweetened beverages
are the largest contributor of
added sugar in the American diet.
A typical 20-ounce sugar-sweet-
ened beverage contains 17 tea-
spoons of added sugar.
Refer to the Nutrition Facts
label on the container to know how
much sugar is in a beverage. Some
sugars occur naturally, such as 100
percent fruit juice. The amount of
sugar will be found under the car-
bohydrate section of the Nutrition
Facts label. Divide the total
amount of sugar in the container
by 4 (4 grams of sugar=1 tea-
spoon).
Soda is the soft drink that Amer-
icans drink the most of. We don’t
always realize how much extra
sugar and how many extra calories
we are getting when we drink a lot
of soft drinks. These are referred
to as “empty calories” because they
don’t have any nutrients (such as
protein, vitamins and minerals).
In addition, sugar in soda com-
bines with bacteria in the mouth to
form acid. Acid attacks teeth. To
prevent tooth decay, limit between-
meal snacking of sugary drinks
like soda.
Beware of buying fruit juice bev-
erages, fruit juice drinks and fruit
juice cocktails for children. You
may think these are good drinks
because “fruit” is in the name.
Many of these drinks are high in
sugar and only have a small
amount of fruit juice.
Drinking sugar-sweetened bev-
erages is associated with weight
gain, obesity, and type 2 Diabetes.
Research shows that children who
drink more than one glass a day of
beverages such as soda, juices and
juice drinks each day are more
likely to become obese.
Milk is a healthy beverage for
children. Milk has calcium which
is important for strong bones and
teeth. Whole milk is recommended
for children under two years of age
for proper brain development.
Growing children ages 2 and up
need two (8-ounce or 1 cup) glasses
of reduced fat (2 percent or 1 per-
cent) milk each day. Children over
4 years old and up to age 8 can
have 2-1/2 cups of nonfat or skim
milk daily. Youth ages 9 and up, as
well as adult individuals, should
consume 3 cups of dairy each day.
Instead of drinking pop at meals
or snacks, encourage children to
drink milk, water, or 100 percent
fruit juices. Parents can be posi-
tive role models for children by
drinking and purchasing healthy
beverages.
Download this simple recipe to
make a fruit smoothie that can be
modified according to your favorite
flavors and fruits:
http://bit.ly/Z8qE8t.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
2012 Ag Horizons Conference
It is time again for the 2012 Ag
Horizons Conference which is set
to take place November 27 and 28
in Pierre. The Ag Horizons Confer-
ence will focus this year on
“Weathering Change” in agricul-
ture.
Ag Horizons is an annual event
which is hosted by South Dakota
(SD) Wheat Inc., The SD Pulse
Growers, The SD Oilseeds Council,
The SD No-Till Association, The
SD Crop Improvement Association
and The SD Seed Trade Associa-
tion. The broad range of involve-
ment by different producer and
commodity groups makes the con-
ference appealing to producers and
industry members alike. Confer-
ence highlights will include pre-
sentations covering future trends
for wheat breeding, market strate-
gies, weather outlook, as well as
cover a range of crop production is-
sues. Certified crop advisor credits
will be available.
In addition, a number of the
above mentioned groups hold an-
nual meetings at the Ag Horizons
Conference. The SD Wheat Inc.,
the SD Seed Trade and the SD
Pulse Growers, Inc will each hold
annual business meetings on Tues-
day, November 27 at 4 p.m. A con-
ference agenda will soon be
available at www.iGrow.org.
The conference is being held at
the Ramkota River Convention
Center in Pierre, which is located
at 920 West Sioux Ave. Check-in is
set to start at 8 a.m. on November
27 with the program beginning at
9 a.m. The cost to attend the two
day conference is $75.00. This in-
cludes one breakfast, two lunches
and one supper. Attendees also
have the option to pay $45.00 to at-
tend a half day of the conference.
Registration is available at
iGrow.org: http://igrow.org/cata-
log/onlineregistration/.
Soil Health Information Day
The 2012 Soil Health Informa-
tion Day features some of the area
and Nation’s favorite “no-till”
speakers. The event will be held on
Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at the
Davison County Fairgrounds Com-
plex, 3200 West Havens Street,
Mitchell, SD. The day starts with
nationally recognized soil expert
Ray Archuleta, NRCS Conserva-
tion Agronomist, Greensboro,
North Carolina. Ray’s topic is
“Healthy Soils Make Healthy Prof-
its”.
Attendees will also hear presen-
tations covering the “Biology of
Soil Compaction”, “Residue, Soil
Structure and Cover Crops”, and
“Catch and Release Nutrients”.
Pre-registration is $25 post-
marked by 12/07/2012 and $35
after 12/7 and at the door. Regis-
tration includes a noon meal. Con-
tact your Regional Extension
Center, http://igrow.org/about/our-
experts/ for the meeting brochure
and registration form.
Certified Crop Advisor Credits
will be available. For more infor-
mation e-mail: ruth.beck@sd-
state.edu or
jason.miller@sd.usda.gov or call
(605) 773-8122. This contact infor-
mation is also available at
http://www.sdnotill.com/.
For information on soil health on-
line, visit the “Soil Health Infor-
mation Center”:
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/por-
tal / nrcs/ mai n/ nati onal / soi l s/
health.
Calendar
•11/27-28/2012: Ag Horizons
Conference, Pierre, SD
•12/11/2012: Soil Health Info
Day- Davison County Extension
Complex, Mitchell, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Cattle producers should mark
their calendars for the 2012 Ap-
plied Reproductive Strategies in
Beef Cattle Conference to be held
in Sioux Falls, S.D. Dec. 3 and 4.
The conference will focus on how
cattle producers can utilize advanc-
ing technologies to improve repro-
ductive efficiencies, profitability
and the product we all enjoy so well
beef.
"This is a tremendous opportu-
nity to hear 27 speakers from
across the U.S. and Canada discuss
topics including how to profit from
implementing these technologies,
and the latest research in the fields
of Reproduction, nutrition, and ge-
netics," said event coordinator,
George Perry, Associate Professor
and SDSU Extension Beef Repro-
duction Specialist.
This conference is geared to vet-
erinarians and producers. All
speakers will address how to imple-
ment what is discussed on your cat-
tle operation.
For more information, visist
http://igrow.org/events/category/liv
estock-beef/.
In addition to the outstanding
speakers, there will also be a large
tradeshow with booths from all
sponsors.
To register for the conference,
visit the conference website or con-
tact Perry at (605) 688-5456 or e-
mail George.Perry@sdstate.edu.
Save the date
for the 2012
Reproductive
Strategies in
Beef Cattle
Conference

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