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Kadoka Press, November 1, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 16
November 1, 2012
News Briefs …
NOTICE: Region VII High
School Vocal Festival in
Kadoka Friday, Nov. 3. Re-
hearsals from 9:00 – 4:30 and
the concert will be at 6:00.
TRICK-OR-TREATING: is
fun for all and the treats are a
joy to receive. But there always
seems to be treats left over
after enjoying the favorites.
Lets extend the sharing with
our troops. Send properly
wrapped candy to Operation
Shoebox at 8360 E Highway 25,
Belleview, FL 34420. For more
information go to: opera-
tionshoebox.com
KCBA: will be meeting Thurs-
day, November 1, 12:00 noon at
Jigger’s Restaurant. Everyone
is invited.
PUBLIC MEETING: Lack of
Adequate Housing In Your
Community? November, 5,
2012 7:00 p.m. (CT), Turner
Community Center, 121 Main
Street, Murdo, SD. Speakers
include: Mark Lauseng: Execu-
tive Director for the South
Dakota Housing Development
Authority; Roger Jacobs: Field
Office Director for Housing and
Urban Development (HUD);
Greg Henderson: Executive Di-
rector for Planning & Develop-
ment District III; Marlene
Knutson: Executive Director
for Central South Dakota En-
hancement District; Paula Cor-
coran: Loan Specialist from
Rural Development; Bill Han-
son: Rural Housing Collabora-
tive; Joy McCracken:
NeighborWorks Dakota Home
Resources & Dakota Land
Trust.
~ by Ronda Dennis ~
Election
Ballots
Pages 7 & 8
Sports
Athlete of the Week
Page 5
Public
Notices
Pages 6,7 & 8
Classified Ads
Statewide Ads
Page 9
Belvidere
& Norris News
Page 3
Obits:
Barb Stone • Linda Wilkie
Harold Finck • Wendell Hagan
Page 2
Princess
Jryzee Coller
Princess
Aybree Pi tman
Pumpkin
Laney Eisenbraun
Bride
Andi Stone
Dorothy & Puss in Boots
Kaylee Kusick & Ella Lamont
NHS Halloween Carni val
Strawberry
Shortcake
Peyton Porch
Mary Bull Bear was born March
15, 1942 in Rosebud, SD, to Mose
and Sophie (Grey Eagle Tail) Bull
Bear. Mary has one sister,
Donna.
Mary attended the Little
Wound grade school before
her parents relocated to
Chicago, IL, were her father
worked for Hunts Ketchup
for many years. Mary fin-
ished school in Chicago.
On February 28, 1957 she
married and had six chil-
dren: Mary, Richard, Debbie,
Sonia and Brian. In 1970 the
family moved to Lawrence,
KS, and Marlin was born a year
later.
In 1972 Mary and family made
the move back to Kyle, the place she
will always call home.
She recalled that her home was always full of children -- her own, and
her children’s friends. They all still call her “mom.”
In addition to raising her family she kept busy working, first as a sub-
stitute teacher then spending 15 plus years working for the police depart-
ment as a radio dispatcher for the BIA. In fact she was working dispatch
with officers during the takeover at Wounded Knee. After that she
worked for Social Services for five years.
Due to health reasons, rheumatory arthritis, Mary Bull Bear retired.
She enjoyed spending time with her children and their families. She trav-
eled all over the U.S. spending winter months in Florida or Arizona, but
as soon as it warmed up in South Dakota, she was back to Kyle.
Her children will be the first to say that she taught her children to treat
people the way they wanted to be treated.
Mary has 30 grandchildren, 42 great-grandchildren (two more on the
way) and two great-great-granddaughters.
It was in 2010 that she moved into the Gateway Apartments in Kadoka
and on June 24, 2011, she became part of a new family at the Kadoka
Nursing Home.
Mary loves to joke and laugh and can find humor in about everything.
Family remains close to her with two daughters and 11 grandchildren
living in Kadoka. In addition, granddaughter Tammy works at the nurs-
ing home, along with great-granddaughter Mariah.
The family said, “Mom has a great sense of humor and she will always
tell it the way it is.”
Congratulations for being the November Resident of the Month.
Kadoka Nursing Home
Resident of the Month
the insurance?” He also had con-
cerns that the trail would be very
close to his house.
Cole said they (Future Focus
Consulting) would try to answer
the study questions over the winter
months. Cole said they expect to
have another public meeting in
May or June of next year.
The cost, he noted, would be
more than anyone could afford and
he didn’t know where the money
would come from. “There is no
money,” Cole said more than once
throughout the meeting.
Cole showed a map of the physi-
cal assessment already done of the
trail from Rapid City to Interior. It
includes washouts, culverts,
bridges, etc., that will need to be
worked on.
Some of the questions addressed
were … who will be responsible if
someone is hurt, does the private
landowner need to give access for
an emergency route and will camp-
fires be an issue?
Meanwhile, others voiced con-
cerns saying they do not lock their
doors and questioned safety of their
children.
The group questioned fencing for
livestock and crossings such as cul-
verts for livestock to cross over the
trail.
They also had concerns regard-
ing trail users closing gates, trash
issues and more.
Cole said the State of South
Dakota does not want to run the
trail and they don’t have money for
the trail.
For more information or to re-
quest a questionnaire/comment
sheet you may contact Future
Focus Consulting at 605‐631‐0117
or email them at:
FutureFocusConsulting@midco.net
The West River Trails Coalition,
along with Future Focus Consult-
ing, recently held a public meeting
at Caputa to hear comments on the
proposed Mako Sica Trail.
Last week, Jerry Cole with Fu-
ture Focus Consulting, held a pub-
lic meeting in Kadoka.
Cole gave a short overview of the
rail road history, saying it was built
in 1906-1907 and it went bankrupt
in the 1980s.
West River Trails started in
2009, two years later they held
public meetings and now Future
Focus Consulting has been hired by
West River Trails to work on a fea-
sibility study for a proposed trail.
The proposed trail would follow
the old Chicago, Milwaukee, St.
Paul Railroad corridor from Rapid
City to Kadoka. This corridor was
purchased by the State of South
Dakota in the 1980s and has been
rail‐banked to keep the line in tack
for future purposes.
If built, this rails to trail will be
approximately 100 miles long and
would run along Hwy. 44 east of
Rapid City through parts of the
Badlands and on to Kadoka.
Landowners along the proposed
trail from New Underwood to
Kadoka were on hand at the meet-
ing.
Cole told the group that he could
not answer the citizen’s questions,
but was only there to get their com-
ments.
One of the first questions asked
from a landowner was, “What hap-
pens with deeded property? Will it
be fenced off and who will provide
Landowners not happy with
proposed Mako Sica Trail
While most people in the U.S.
are preparing for holiday activities,
Kadoka volunteers with Operation
Christmas Child, the world’s
largest Christmas project of its
kind, are filling shoe box gifts with
toys, school supplies and hygiene
items for needy children overseas.
This year-round project of interna-
tional Christian relief and evangel-
ism organization Samaritan's
Purse, headed by Franklin Gra-
ham, is ramping up as local busi-
nesses, churches and community
groups prepare to collect 150 gift-
filled shoe boxes during National
Collection Week (Nov. 12 – 19).
Anyone can drop off a packed
shoe box at Kadoka Presbyterian
Church. Then, using whatever
means necessary—trucks, trains,
boats, bikes and even elephants—
the shoe box gifts will be hand-de-
livered to hurting children in 100
countries around the world.
Kadoka Collection Site:
Kadoka Presbyterian Church,
925 6th Avenue, Kadoka, SD
Mon., Nov 12: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Tues., Nov 13: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Wed., Nov 14: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Thur., Nov 15: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Fri., Nov 16: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat., Nov 17: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Sun., Nov 18: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Mon., Nov 19: Not Collecting
Jean Weller is the collection site
coordinator for Kadoka. Please con-
tact her with any questions at (605)
837-2233.
Additional local collection sites
can be found using the online zip
code locator at www.samari-
tanspurse.org.
In 2012, Operation Christmas
Child expects to reach a milestone,
collecting and delivering shoe
boxes to more than 100 million
children since 1993. During that
time, Operation Christmas Child
has collected more than 94 million
shoe box gifts and hand-delivered
them to suffering children in more
than 130 countries. This year, Op-
eration Christmas Child hopes to
collect another nine million gift-
filled shoe boxes. Through the
power of a simple gift and the mes-
sage of hope through Jesus Christ,
children learn they are loved and
not forgotten. For many children,
the shoe box gift will be the first
gift they have ever received.
Operation Christmas Child uses
tracking technology to allow partic-
ipants to “follow” their box to the
destination country where it will be
given to a child in need. To register
shoe box gifts and find out the des-
tination country, use the “Follow
Your Box” donation form found at
www.samaritanspurse.org/occ.
For more information on how to
participate in Operation Christmas
Child, call (612) 359-7025 or visit
www.samaritanspurse.org/occ. Na-
tional Collection Week for gift-filled
shoe boxes is Nov. 12-19; however,
shoe box gifts are collected all year
at the Samaritan’s Purse head-
quarters in Boone, N.C.
Kadoka collection site to
receive gift-filled shoe boxes
Secretary of State Jason Gant
released a fact sheet to address
questions and eliminate any confu-
sion about voting in the November
6th general election. The South
Dakota Voter Information Portal
(VIP) is available at www.sdsos.gov
website giving voters the opportu-
nity to look up pertinent informa-
tion pertaining to voting.
1. How do I find my polling
place?
•Access the Secretary of State’s
website at www.sdsos.gov. Go to
“Where Do I Vote?” and enter your
first and last name and your date
of birth. Click “Search.”
2. If I don’t vote on a candidate
or question, will my other votes
still get counted?
•Yes, you are not required to
cast a vote in every race or on every
question. If you choose to leave a
race or questions blank, the rest of
the votes on your ballot will still be
counted
3. What are the rules about cam-
paigning in or near polling places?
•State law prohibits electioneer-
ing within 100 feet of the entrance
to a polling place. This means any-
one who is advocating for the elec-
tion or defeat of a candidate or a
ballot issue must be at least 100
feet away from the entrance to the
polling place.
4. What forms of ID can I use to
vote?
•Acceptable forms of ID include:
South Dakota driver’s license or
nondriver ID card
U.S. government photo ID
Current student photo ID from a
South Dakota high school or South
Dakota accredited institution of
higher education
Tribal photo ID
If you do not have a photo ID,
you can sign a personal identifica-
tion affidavit.
5. What times do the polls open
and close?
•The polls will be open on elec-
tion day from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
standard time.
6. How can I access a sample
ballot prior to November 6?
•Go to www.sdsos.gov. Find the
space entitled “See Your Sample
Ballot.” Click on “View Your Bal-
lot.” Ballots can also be found at
your county auditor’s office and
will be published in local newspa-
pers the week before the election.
7. How can I review the ballot
measures before I vote?
•The 2012 Ballot Questions can
be viewed at www.sdsos.gov. Copies
have also been distributed to
county auditor offices and libraries
across the state.
8. Has my district changed due
to the 2010 census?
•Maps of all South Dakota leg-
islative districts can be accessed at
www.sdsos.gov. These maps were
approved at the 2011 Special SD
Legislative Session. Information
can also be obtained from your
local county auditor’s office.
9. How can I follow the election
results on November 6?
•Election results for all races
and ballot measures will be posted
beginning at 8:00 pm CST on Elec-
tionresults.sd.gov.
10. What is the deadline for ab-
sentee voting?
•The county auditor must re-
ceive your application for an absen-
tee ballot no later than 3 p.m. on
Election Day.
11. When is the voter registra-
tion deadline?
•Registration for the November
6th election closed on Monday, Oc-
tober 22nd.
12. I am registered to vote, but
I’ve moved, and I didn’t get my
voter registration updated by the
deadline. Can I still vote?
•Yes, you will still be able to
vote at your old polling place.
13. How do I absentee vote?
•Go to www.sdsos.gov. In the
“Absentee Voting” section, you can
complete and print out an absentee
application. Sign it and mail to
your county auditor. Either have
the form notarized or include a
copy of your photo ID with your ap-
plication. You may also go to your
county auditor’s office during busi-
ness hours to vote.
Gant announces election fact sheet
Daylight Saving Time Ends
Sunday, November 4
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
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Church Page …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
For
Sale:
Newsprint
End Rolls
$5.00 each
Great for craft
projects, painting,
drawing & more.
Kadoka Press
Email us at:
press@kadokatelco.com
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . . . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . . . . . .344-2500
All others call . . . . . . . . . .911
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Pastor Art Weitschat
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
Hebrews 5:12-14
Believers are on a continual growth track that as-
cends higher and higher. This side of heaven none of us
ever "arrive," but we each have a responsibility to press
on to maturity. Though many people think those who
know a lot about the Bible are the spiritually mature ones, Hebrews 5:14 adds the element of practice to
the growth equation. This word means a custom or habit. Christian growth requires the discipline of
godly habits carried out daily.
The most important practice to cultivate is a personal devotional time. Since God is the source of all
spiritual development, you can't neglect Him and expect to become mature. Transformation begins with
time in His Word and prayer.
Obedience is another essential element for advancement. When our desire to obey the Lord is stronger
than our attraction to sin, we'll know we are making progress in our spiritual life.
In terms of physical development, the goal is to become more independent and self-sufficient as we
age. But in the spiritual realm, the opposite is true. Those who are mature in Christ recognize their own
inadequacy and rely on the Holy Spirit within them. It's His job to transform our character and empower
us to accomplish everything the Lord calls us to do.
Getting older doesn't mean maturity in God's eyes. By digging into Scripture and developing righteous
habits, we can use our years to grow stronger in the Lord instead of wasting time with passivity. No one
accidentally becomes mature. Spiritual growth requires a diligent pursuit of God.
The Practices of Maturity
Inspiration Point
This discussion is about risky
behavior, which can be very harm-
ful, such as smoking, drinking too
much, driving and texting, driving
under the influence of alcohol, rid-
ing a bike or cycle without a hel-
met, not using seat belts, eating
too much, and not getting up off
that couch, to name a few. No ar-
gument, these are life choice type
of activities that put an individual
or individuals at serious risk of
harm. Chances are good that
within the last month your doctor,
spouse, or parent has been harping
at you about at least one of these.
But there’s another way of look-
ing at it. Why are any of us drawn
to take risks? Many say that risk
taking is an important part of our
creative character; the heart of in-
novation, and without taking some
risk our lives would be flat, stale,
without spice. Google “risk taking”
and you will find quotes of famous
people advising us to take risks.
These suggest that true executive
leadership has to have a compo-
nent of risk taking, in order to
bring businesses to change and im-
prove.
For example 19th century
French writer Andre Gide said,
"One does not discover new lands
without consenting to lose sight of
the shore for a very long time."
Jimmy Carter advises to "Go out
on a limb. That's where the fruit
is." Helen Keller encouraged us
with these words, "Security is
mostly a superstition. Life is either
a daring adventure or nothing."
And I especially like this one by
Mark Twain, “Twenty years from
now you will be more disappointed
by the things you didn’t do than by
the ones you did. So throw off the
bowlines, sail away from the safe
harbor, catch the trade winds in
your sails. Explore. Dream. Dis-
cover.”
But wait. These quotes about
taking risk are really all about
make a change; about bringing
oneself out of old routines and
habits that are not advancing the
cause; about seeing ways to get
better and getting there. That’s a
big difference from risky and dan-
gerous habits and behavior.
If you are caught in the grips of a
risky habit that could be harmful
to you or to someone you love,
please take the risk to change, dis-
cover new lands, go out on a limb,
dare to an adventure, and catch
the trade winds to get out of a bad
habit and change for the better.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Two views on taking risks
Monday, November 5
Meatballs in gravy, wild rice
blend, peas, coleslaw, french bread,
and mandarin oranges.
Tuesday, November 6
Oven fried chicken, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, harvard beets,
dinner roll, and apricots.
Wednesday, November 7
Ham and scalloped potatoes,
baked squash, broccoli-cauliflower
salad, bread, and pineapple tid-
bits.
Thursday, November 8
French dip with au jus, baked
potato, corn o’brien, angel food
cake with strawberries and top-
ping.
Friday, November 9
Chili or alternate, sunshine
salad, bread, pears, and cookie.
Meals for
the Elderly
Linda Wilkie ___________________
Linda Lee Wilkie, 59, of Rapid
City, died on Monday, October 22,
2012 at Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal.
Linda was born in Rapid City,
SD, on June 17, 1953 to Ed and
Opal (Anderson) Bodkin. She grew
up in the Billsburg/Milesville area
and then the family moved to
Philip, SD, where she graduated
from high school in 1971 and from
Karl John’s Beauty College in
1973.
Linda married William “Bill”
Wilkie on Dec. 26, 1973. Bill and
Linda had four children, Tanya,
Tracy, Travis and Sherri.
Linda worked as a hair stylist
and she has worked off and on at
McDonalds for the past 16 years
where Rob referred to her as his
“Egg McMuffin of employees.”
Linda loved her kids and espe-
cially her grandkids, working at
McDonalds, making beautiful
scrapbooking pages of her kids,
grandkids, nieces and nephews,
and friends children, and rummage
saling on Saturdays.
You never had to wonder what
Linda was thinking, because she
just said it, even if you didn’t want
to hear it.
Linda is survived by her hus-
band, Bill Wilkie of Rapid City; her
children, Tanya Sybert of Rapid
City, Tracy (Lenn) Vessell of Pensi-
cola, Florida, Travis (Michele)
Wilkie of Huron, Sherri (Curtis
Colvin) Wilkie of Box Elder, Scott
Arguello of Rapid City; nine grand-
children, Katelyn, Samantha,
Kasey, Briana, Jared, Brady, Zach-
ery, Brennen, and Hailey; and
three sisters, Betty (Jack) Sag-
dalen of Keystone, Karen (Ed) Sny-
der of Philip, and Donna Craven of
Rapid City, and numerous nieces
and nephews.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, Ed and Opal Bodkin;
nephew, Doug Shields; mother and
father-in-law, Roy and Jo-Ann
Wilkie.
Visitation was held at Kirk Fu-
neral Home in Rapid City on
Thursday, October 25 from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m., and for one hour prior to
services on Friday.
Services were held at 2:00 p.m.
Friday, October 26 at the funeral
home with the Rev. Jack Jewett of-
ficiating. Casual attire would be
appreciated. Interment followed at
Mountain View Cemetery in Rapid
City.
A memorial has been estab-
lished. Friends may sign Linda’s
online guestbook at www.kirkfu-
neralhome.com.
South Dakotan to ever receive his
party’s presidential nominee.
Throughout his post-political
life, McGovern dedicated himself to
the service of his fellow man in his
crusade against hunger, both at
home and abroad. McGovern also
remained a committed historian,
dedicated to penning books which
reached deep into our republic’s
history and speaking to audiences
around the world.
His legacy will live on through
the leadership program created in
his name at Dakota Wesleyan,
through those who continue his
crusade against hunger, and
through the students of his writ-
ings. Kimberley and my thoughts
are with his friends and family as
they celebrate the life of a man who
touched so many.
When I walked into the New-
seum in Washington, D.C. in July,
I was not surprised to see the large
gathering of South Dakotans who
had come out for a 90th birthday
party – although they may have
been surprised to see me. The room
was filled with a lifetime of friends,
family, and admirers of former Sen-
ator George McGovern. McGovern
carried on throughout the evening,
telling stories and sharing wisdom
with those of us who were fortu-
nate enough to be a part of the
event. That’s why the news that
Senator McGovern was entering
hospice care came as such a shock
after seeing him so recently and
knowing firsthand how well he
looked at his birthday party just a
few short months ago. Despite our
political differences, George was a
statesman and I was proud to call
him my friend.
During World War II, McGovern
led his countrymen with his brave
service in the flak-filled skies of
Europe. After the war, McGovern
served as a guide to the young
souls of South Dakota, teaching
history at Dakota Wesleyan Uni-
versity. In the 1950s, a young Mc-
Govern entered the rancorous
arena of electoral politics, serving
his state in Congress for over two
decades, and becoming the only
A Life of Service
by Senator John Thune
Barbara Stone__________________
Barbara Stone, 79, of Kadoka,
S.D., died Sunday, October 28,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Barbara Ann Hedeen was born
August 2, 1933, in Kadoka, the
daughter of Roy M. and Margaret
(Nielsen) Hedeen. She grew up in
Kadoka, graduating from Kadoka
High School in 1951.
Barbara was united in marriage
to Eldon “Gene” Stone on June 8,
1953, in Rapid City, and they were
happily married for 58 years.
She lived most of her life in
Kadoka, except for about 20 years,
when she moved with Gene as he
found more exciting teaching and
coaching positions.
She was always a hardworking
woman, holding down many jobs
while raising a loving family. Her
family was her first love, but the
children in the community were al-
ways her second. Many children
and young adults own blankets and
quilts, that have been crocheted or
embroidered by her loving hands.
Her greatest enjoyment was her
reading. She looked forward to the
new books she found at the library.
She was a lifelong member of the
American Legion Auxiliary, and a
member of the Presbyterian
Church in Penrose, Colo.
Survivors include five sons, Bill
Stone of Kadoka, Cliff Stone of
Kadoka, Jody Stone and his wife,
Sunday, of Hot Springs, Jerome
“Zeke” Stone of Kadoka, and Brad
Stone and his wife, Kristie, of
Kadoka; three daughters, Chris
Cope and her husband, Drew, of
Evanston, Wyo., Cathy Stone of
Kadoka, and Laurie Prichard and
her husband, Cleve, of Kadoka; 23
grandchildren; seven great-grand-
children; one sister, Viola Olney
and her husband, Russ, of Kadoka;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Barbara was preceded in death
by her husband, Gene Stone, on
February 19, 2012; her daughter,
Peggy Stone; a grandson, Todd
Prichard; and two sisters, Ethel
Anderson and Delores Smith.
Memorial services will be held at
10:00 a.m. Thursday, November 1,
at the Presbyterian Church in
Kadoka with Pastor Gary McCub-
bin officiating.
Interment will be at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhom.com
Wendell R. Hagan_______________
Wendell R. Hagan, 85, of Rapid
City and formerly of Midland, S.D.,
reunited with the Lord on October
25, 2012, at the Ft. Meade VA Med-
ical Center Hospice with his family
at his side.
Wendell Rex Hagan was born on
October 19, 1927, the son of Pat
and Ethyl (Dennis) Hagan at
Bunker.
Wendell served in the U.S. Ma-
rine Corps during WWII. He was
united in marriage to Grace
(Stotts) on September 4, 1948.
They farmed and ranched in the
Midland area for many years.
He is survived by one son, Larry
(Rose) Hagan, St. Cloud, Minn.,
two daughters, Mary (Ducie) Hulce
of Rapid City and Peggy (Mike)
Martin of North Pole, Alaska; 10
grandchildren, Patrick (Brenda)
Hagan, Nick (Malay) Hagan, Terra
(Tim) Duda, Kyleen (Shane) Liebig,
Britney and Brianna Hulce,
Nathan (Kristin) Martin, Heath
(Billie Jo) Martin, Ashley and
Grace Martin; eight great-grand-
children, Kaycee Darrow, Tianna
Duda, Tyler Liebig, Tanya, Telissa,
Branden, Macy Bell, and Ashton
Martin; one brother, Dick (Darlene)
Hagan; and four sisters, Mary Lou
Torres, Patty (Ulane) Finn, Phyllis
(Robert) Gural, and Shirley (Don)
Reed.
Wendell was preceded in death
by his parents; his wife, Grace; a
son-in-law, Terry Hulce; a brother,
Verlyn; and a sister, Diane Madsen.
Wendell’s request was to not
have a funeral service, just to re-
member our time together, the love
laughter, and sharing. If you
choose to do something in my mem-
ory, show someone, preferably a
child, some extra kindness.
Graveside services were held Oc-
tober 29, 2012, at the Midland
Cemetery with Lyle Dennis offici-
ating.
Military honors were provided
by the Midland American Legion.
An online guestbook is available
at www.kirkfuneralhome.com
Harold C. Finck_________________
Harold Clifford Finck, 82, died
peacefully at Rapid City Regional
Hospital Auxiliary Hospice House
on Saturday, October 27, 2012, sur-
rounded by his family.
Harold was born August 30,
1930, in Murdo, S.D., to Harry and
Marie (Schellenberger) Finck. He
was the youngest of nine children,
and was raised and attended
schools in Jones County. After
graduation, he joined the U.S.
Navy and served on the USS Des
Moines from 1950-1954.
On July 10, 1960, he was united
in marriage to Karen Peters. To
this union two children were born,
Lynette and Steve, who were his
pride and joy. He was employed at
the Okaton State Bank and West-
ern States Wholesale before mov-
ing to Rapid City in 1964. He
worked for Brown Swiss and
Harold's Home Delivery in retail
route sales until he retired in De-
cember of 1992. He was known by
many as their milkman, or simply
as “Pepsi.” Others will remember
him as always having a smile and
a unique sense of humor. He
touched many lives and will be
missed by all who knew him.
Survivors include his wife of 52
years, Karen Finck; his sister,
Edna Mae Hensley, Belgrade,
Mont.; his son, Steve (Kris) Finck,
Black Hawk; his daughter, Lynette
(Renzo) Bianchi, Colorado Springs,
Colo., and his "Grands," Joshua,
his "main sqeeze," Kaitlyn, his "fa-
vorite granddaughter," and Logan,
his "PeeWee," Fort Collins, Colo.
Some of his favorite times were
those spent with his grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and seven siblings.
Services were held Wednesday,
October 31, at Osheim & Schmidt
Funeral Home with Rev. Doug
Diehl officiating.
Burial was in Pine Lawn Memo-
rial Park with military honors by
Rushmore VFW Post 1273 at the
South Dakota National Guard.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
His online guestbook is available
at www.osheimschmidt.com.
Bel videre News …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
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Perspective is sometimes hard
to get right. In drawing and paint-
ing, for example, there tends to be
a battle between what we know is
there and what our eyes actually
see. Consider a straight highway
through the desert, if you will.
Your mind knows that the sides or
shoulders of the road basically stay
parallel, but your eyes say the
sides get closer and closer as the
road gets more distant until, way
in the distance, they seem to join
together into a straight line.
This difference between the
mind view and the eye view is
often completely ignored by young
kids when they draw. They go by
what is in their minds instead of
what they see. The sides of their
roads in drawings stay parallel.
Houses are completely square.
Cows are shown broadside.
Proportion is tricky as well.
Budding artists in this area often
try to draw horses, but only the
gifted ever get it right. I’ve seen a
lot of horse pictures where you
look at them and say, “That isn’t
quite right.” Somehow the head is
too big for the body, or the shoul-
ders or rump are not the correct
size for the rest of the animal. You
may not know exactly what is
wrong, but something obviously is.
You wouldn’t go out and buy a
horse that looks that way. That’s
for sure.
Then we come to perception. As
a Christian, rancher, husband and
father from the middle of the coun-
try, I might see things differently
than does a single Jewish banker
who lives with his medium-sized
dog in a New York high-rise. Who
we are and what we value are
bound to color our perception of
events, trends, and many other
things. That’s just the way it is.
With an election coming up this
week, we will easily be able to tell
that there is a wide variety of how
citizens view what has been hap-
pening in our country and what
should happen in the future. There
is even some possibility that, if you
vote differently than I do, I might
think you are certifiable and
should be confined to a loony bin.
That was certainly the opinion of
an uncle or two of mine if I dis-
agreed with them in any way con-
cerning politics. They were not at
all open to opposing views. Never-
theless, it is important to see
things honestly in order to do a
good job of voting.
First off, we have to have an ac-
curate view of how things really
are, what things are truly impor-
tant, and who can do the best job
of filling the office for which they
are running. In other words, we
have to keep things in proportion.
We have to balance the values of
lots of things such as the economy,
national security, and freedoms.
We also need to keep in mind what
is best, not only for ourselves, but
also for our community, state,
country and world. That’s a lot of
responsibility and not to be taken
lightly.
As you know, our system of gov-
ernment is not perfect by any
means, and sometimes we get
things wrong. Luckily, we don’t
elect most people for life so we
have an opportunity to make cor-
rections every two, four, or six
years. This is a good thing. When
you consider many of the countries
around the world, their govern-
ments are not nearly as flexible
and useful as ours. Many have dic-
tators and little freedom. Others
have leaders who are corrupt and
much more interested in getting
rich than leading a country as they
should. In comparison to all that,
our country is just grand. I have no
plans of emigrating anytime soon,
and I’ve been to enough different
countries to realize that I’m really
very well off living right here.
So, what to do? As usual, we can
only do our best and hope it’s right.
The definition of “perspective” in-
cidentally is as follows: “The as-
pect in which a subject or its parts
are mentally viewed, especially a
view of things (as objects or
events) in their true relationship
or relative importance.” That part
about true relationship and rela-
tive importance seem to be the key
to the whole business. We’ll try to
attain that.
By the way, if you aren’t sure
how to vote, I’ll be glad to give you
some advice. I’m pretty sure that if
everyone votes the way I do, we’ll
be fine. We just have to have good
perception and keep everything in
proportion. What’s so hard about
that?
Perspective
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Chuck Willard got another year
older on Wednesday, but that was
mid-week and inconvenient for
gatherings. As a result, he cele-
brated it on both the weekend be-
fore and the one after. Last
weekend, Chuck and Merry were in
Hot Springs visiting their daugh-
ter, Niki, and boys and attending
grandson Joshua’s last soccer game
for this season. Niki made him a
birthday cake then to get things
started. This weekend, Niki and
boys came to the ranch and cele-
brated some more only with Rice-
Krispie bars instead of cake. Also
there were Chuck’s mom, Pat
Willard, of Philip and his sister,
Jackie Fortin, of Haiti. Putting it
all together, Chuck’s birthday was
duly celebrated.
Mike Livermont had knee-re-
placement surgery on Tuesday at
the surgical clinic in Rapid City. He
got home on Friday and is doing
okay. Amelia went with him and
stayed for the duration. Physical
therapy in Philip is scheduled to
start this week. While Mike was
gone, his daughter and son-in-law,
Jo and Tim Jandreau, looked after
the cattle and took care of things at
the ranch. Jandreaus have been
living at Lower Brule for several
years but moved back to this area
over by Jerry Grimes’ a month and
a half ago.
Jodie O’Bryan was in Huron this
weekend for the Heartland Barrel-
Racing Futurity. She took three
horses along and used them all.
Her comment about the event was,
“Good friends, good horses, lotsa
fellowship. Funnest weekend ever.”
Scot, meanwhile, stayed home to
feed the ponies and take care of
things here. This week, Jodie is
considering finishing up some
painting over at 1880 Town if the
weather cooperates.
Russ and Gay Spinsby have
been hauling hay this last week.
They would usually do that a bit
earlier in the fall, but they thought
they’d wait a little longer this year
due to dry conditions and possible
fire danger. Almost a half-inch of
rain fell there this last week. They
are expecting sons and others to
come for the deer-hunting season
which will open in early November.
Their son, Casey, right now is tak-
ing courses on line in order to get
his college degree which he is close
to getting. That would be needed
for him to advance to captain rank
in the Huron police force where he
now works, and he is working to-
wards that goal. Son Marty contin-
ues to work at a computer place in
Sioux Falls and is foreman of one
part of that operation. All three of
Russ and Gay’s grandchildren are
doing fine and are all in school with
the youngest now in kindergarten.
At the ranch, the second house on
the place became inhabited again
this week when their nephew,
Matthew Bork, moved in. This was
the house previously occupied by
Russ’s folks and also for a while by
son Casey. Matthew continues to
work with his folks, Bob and Diane,
but thought it was time to have a
place of his own. He recently grad-
uated from the School of Mines in
Rapid City but decided to continue
in the ranching game instead of
looking for employment elsewhere.
Larry Johnston flew to New
York on the 26th to visit his son,
Laramie, and family, and then to
help Laramie and some friends
drive back here for hunting season.
They plan to leave there on Nov. 1
although the nasty storm forecast
for that area may put a crimp in
things. Laramie lives near the St.
Lawrence Seaway, but how the
storm might affect that is hard to
tell at this point. Laramie’s kids
were excited that Grandpa Larry
would be there for Halloween and
were making plans to include him
in trick-or-treating and so on.
Larry Grimme constructed a
small shelter for the neighborhood
cats this week. There are at least
25 of them living in the area and
fed and supported by various
neighbors such as Bunny Green
and Larry. There have always been
a lot of cats in that part of town
even dating back to Gladys
Bearheels who had quite a few her-
self. The cats seem to think it’s a
fine place to hang out and were
even joined there one night last
week by a skunk. The cats just ac-
cepted the skunk as one of their
own although Larry wasn’t too
keen on the visitor.
Chad and Francie Davis and
boys were also visited by a skunk
this week. The boys went to the
barn to do chores and found a
striped critter in residence. Francie
took a BB gun out to try to drive
the fellow away, but wasn’t terribly
successful. The skunk was sam-
pling all the different foods there
and apparently liking them all. He
tried the cat food first and went
from there to dog, goat and horse
food. He never tried to spray, but
just looked inquiringly at Francie
as if to say. “What’s your problem?
Everyone else here accepts me.
Why not you?” Eventually the fel-
low wandered back off into the
prairie after apparently getting his
stomach full. Son Grady, mean-
while, got his first deer this last
week. He had a youth tag which al-
lowed him to hunt before the main
season as long as he went with his
mentor who was his grandfather,
Larry (Chad’s dad), from Pierre.
Betty Kusick was visited one
day last week by Joe Livermont of
Wanblee. They played some crib-
bage with each winning a game
and then quitting before they had
to crown one or the other as cham-
pion. Betty said none of her kids
visited this week, but they keep in
touch frequently by phone.
Jim, Georgann and Jami Addi-
son spent Saturday in Philip since
Jami was playing in a 7th and 8th-
grade basketball tournament there
with her Murdo team. This is an
annual event at Philip, and Jami
and her team came in third. On
Thursday, Jim helped Colter Carl-
son preg check some cows. On Mon-
day, he was busy with Ted Vobr and
Syd Iwan rounding up and ship-
ping out calves and cull cows to
Philip for sale on Tuesday and
Wednesday. Then he attended the
sales and did some sorting over at
Philip.
“If you want children to keep their
feet on the ground, put some
responsibility on their shoulders.”
Abigail Van Buren
Bow hunters, Ken and Kelly
Koistenen, were out this past
weekend at Maxine Allard’s place.
Christine Dunham visited Maxine
Saturday afternoon.
Alberta Allard of Yankton is out
visiting Cliff and Pam Allard.
Dorothy Bligh stopped in to visit on
Friday.
After Dorothy Bligh’s mishap
with the horse last Sunday she was
taken to Philip; from there she was
taken to Rapid City by ambulance.
The diagnosis was a fractured ver-
tebrae in her neck and she was fit-
ted with a brace. She is home now
and recovering. Cattle work had
been scheduled for Monday, and
since she had all the food prepared
ahead of time, it was brought to
Maxine to serve to all the neigh-
bors who came to help Evan. Mar-
jorie Anne Letellier also came out
to help serve the food to the work-
ers.
Repairs, snow and flu slowed
down harvest at the Hubers.
Nearly all the men came down with
the flu, including young Braeden,
who missed a week of school.
Howard and Nette Heinert were
in Rapid City on business Monday,
October 22. Chris and Beau were
among the neighbors helping work
cattle at the Bligh’s that day.
Nette has been busy harvesting
the fall crops from the gardens.
Ace and Brant Kary also helped
at Bligh’s last Monday. This past
Friday they worked cattle at their
place.
Wednesday, October 24, James,
Marjorie and Julie Letellier and
Andrea Beckwith traveled to Sun-
shine Bible Acedemy, as DJ Beck-
had Senior Chapel that day. All of
his family made it there, including
Erica who came from Omaha.
Other friends and relatives were
also there. The weather had been
okay when they drove to Sunshine,
but coming home was another
story. They drove all the way in
treacherous snow, making it a slow
and cautious journey.
Congratulations to Bob and
Ellen Totton, who celebrated their
60th wedding anniversary Friday,
October 26.
Friday Jan Rasmussen and Amy
Lehman ran some errands in Mis-
sion and then headed on to Valen-
tine. From there they toured the
Ft. Niobrara National Refuge.
Sunday Kevin and Kris
Hachmeister came for a visit with
Jan before they head on out west to
their new home in Vancouver,
British Columbia.
Norris School news: Miss
Hermsen came Tuesday for pump-
kin painting and carving with the
students. The Halloween party is
Wednesday afternoon.
Jessie Ring and Risa picked up
June Ring Monday, October 15,
and took her to the airport to catch
her flight to Dallas, TX, where she
took care of Michael and Matthew
Ring while Rachel flew to Portland,
OR, for the annual ophthalmologist
convention. Marcus, Kristy,
Charissa and Robb Ring came from
Shreveport, LA, for a visit Wednes-
day and Thursday. The twins got
out of school Thursday at noon, so
in the afternoon they all went to
visit Gert Ring in her new home in
McKinney, TX.
The Shreveport Rings returned
home Thursday evening. Rachel
flew back Sunday, but Saturday
she had a visit from her brother,
Daniel, and sons, Jake and Gabe.
They drove down to Portland from
Seattle for the afternoon. It was
Gabe’s 8th birthday that day, so
they went to the zoo as a special
treat for him.
Bruce Ring picked up June from
the airport in Rapid City on Mon-
day, October 22.
Jessie Ring took the noon meal
for the school at Long Valley Tues-
day the 23rd in honor of
Stephanie’s 11th birthday. It was
also in honor of Ryan’s birthday,
which was in July. Bruce, Riley and
Risa were luncheon guests at June
Ring’s that day. Then there was a
birthday supper that night at
Bruce and Jessie’s. Saturday June
took care of the children while
Bruce and Jessie went to the work-
shop in Rapid City at Ramkota Inn.
Robert and Sharon Ring drove to
Chadron for parts last Monday.
Thursday Janice M. Ring stopped
in for a visit. Friday Robert and
Sharon were in Winner for appoint-
ments.
A week ago Saturday Susan and
Morgan went to an auction and did
some shopping for Morgan’s birth-
day. Sunday they went to Rapid
City and brought home pizza for
Morgan’s birthday. Heather had a
cake all ready for them when they
got home.
Last Monday the Tafts went in
for the final volleyball game and
parents night at White River. Tues-
day Morgan stayed in and played
in the pep band for the football
playoff game in White River. This
past Saturday Dan, Susan and
Morgan went to Philip to pick up a
vehicle that had been there for re-
pairs. Friday they helped work cat-
tle at Kary’s.
Noreen Krogman went to Mis-
sion Sunday afternoon, Oct. 14, for
the DNP quilting session. Tuesday
Richard and Noreen took in the
football playoff game in White
River between White River and
Newell.
Richard has been busy helping
neighbors with cattle work, but
Friday he was in White River for
jury duty.
Rose West and Jeannine Wood-
ward were in White River for the
rodeo club meal Saturday, and
again Sunday for the fireman and
EMT meal at noon.
Marilyn Heinert celebrated
birthday #82 on October 15. Her
sisters, Judy Bristow and Eunice
Jones, and Eunice’s daughter, Deb
Valandra, came to visit and
brought lunch with them that day.
That evening Gary and Anne had a
birthday supper for her at their
home. Stanley and Maureece and
Ruth and family were also guests,
as well as Troy and Harold Hein-
ert.
The weekend of the 20th, Gary
and Anne drove to Sioux Falls to
help Erin celebrate her birthday a
few days late. Gary, Paul and Alex
went to the USF game with Augus-
tana, while Anne and Erin were
free to shop.
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USED VEHICLES!
Locals …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Please,
return the
ENTIRE
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when
renewing your
subscription
to the
Kadoka Press
Thank You!
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
To Report
A Fire Call:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
November Specials
Prices good from Nov. 1 to Nov. 30
Bud & Bud Light, 16 oz. 18 pk cans.............$18.50
Busch Light, 16 oz. 18 pk. cans...................$13.50
Crown 1.75...................................................$48.00
Windsor 1.75................................................$19.00
José Cuervo 750..........................................$19.00
Crown 750....................................................$19.00
Cowgirl Red or White 750............................$13.00
Seven Deadly Zins 750................................$15.00
All prices include tax and FREE ICE!
Kadoka City Bar
Main Street • Kadoka • 605-837-9102
Thanksgiving Special
Get your wine here!
Tues. & Wed., Novemeber 21 & 22
$1
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OFF any bottle of wine
Come check out our new wine in stock!
Limit 5 per person.
Carmen and Tim Huffman went
to Madison on Friday, Sept. 19,
where they visited their son, Keith.
On Saturday they all went to Wess-
ington Springs to the home of Cur-
tis and Casey Huffman and went
pheasant hunting in the area. Sun-
day evening on their way home to
Kadoka, Carmen and Tim had sup-
per with her mom, Dorothy
Houska, near Pukwana.
Amy Stilwell, Jackie Stilwell,
Kathleen Carlson and Ellie Bette-
lyoun went to Watertown on Thurs-
day where they attended the EMT
Conference. Ellie was here from
her home in Wyoming. The ladies
returned to Kadoka on Sunday af-
ternoon.
Sympathy is extended to the
family and friends of Barbara
(Hedeen) Stone who passed away
Sunday afternoon at the Hans Pe-
terson Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Memorial services will be held at
10 a.m. Thursday morning at the
Kadoka Presbyterian Church.
Kenny and Cindy Wilmarth at-
tended a meeting of the Black
Hills, Badlands and Lake Associa-
tion in Rapid City on Thursday.
Saturday they went back to Rapid
City to attend the Annual All State
Chorus and Orchestra concerts at
the civic center. Their granddaugh-
ter, Taylor Merchen, was one of the
members of the All State Chorus.
Cindy’s parents, Esther and Abe
Ritchhart, of Sioux Falls arrived in
Kadoka on Friday and spent the
weekend in the area.
Tuesday of last week Sydne
Lenox delivered over $1,000 worth
of Christmas gifts to the Legion
Auxiliary Gift Shop at the Veterans
Administration Complex in Hot
Springs. The gifts were donated by
auxiliary members and friends in
the Kadoka area and will be avail-
able to the veterans at the hospital
complex so that their families can
have a great Christmas, at no
charge to them. Kadoka has always
been very generous when giving to
this cause. The thought that the VA
hospital and buildings on these
grounds may be closed, is unbear-
able. What a beautiful place this is,
where veterans have been taken
care of for over one hundred years.
The Quilts of Love organization
recently sent 16 quilts to the hospi-
tal in the local auxiliary’s name.
This coming week there will be
trick-or-treaters out and about, so
be especially careful of them as
they will be on the streets. Also
don’t forget to change your time as
Daylight Saving Time ends early
Sunday morning.
Databases are available through
the Jackson County Library cour-
tesy of the SD State Library. Over
50 databases include authoritative
resources; journal, magazine, and
newspaper articles. Current infor-
mation is available for medical,
technical, business, agriculture,
historical, and student needs -- in-
cluding databases with maps, ency-
clopedias and more. If needed,
these databases can also assist
with citations -- making easy refer-
encing and reduce copyright wor-
ries. These fantastic resources are
available through your local li-
brary. Stop in and inquire!!
Library “Friends”:
Check-out our Gift-Wrap/Silent
Auction at the Kadoka Nursing
Home Craft Fair On Sunday, Nov.
4 at the Kadoka Auditorium.
Please Remember to vote on
Nov. 6, Election Day. Free pam-
phlets from the Secretary of State
office explaining the ballot ques-
tions can be found at the library.
Take one home to read explana-
tions, pros and cons of issues which
will be on the ballot.
“Life from the Seat of a Trac-
tor—an old farmer’s words of wis-
dom”
Your fences need to be horse-
high, pig-tight and bull-strong
Keep your distance from skunks
and quicksand
Life is simpler when you plow
around the stump
Questions, call the Jackson
County Library at 837-2689, e-mail
jclibrary2000@gmail.com or stop in
for a visit.
New Books In:
Adult fiction: John Grisham,
Calico; Joe JeffreyArcher, Only
Time Will Tell, The Eleventh Com-
mandment; Beth Hoffman, Saving
Cee Cee Honeycutt; Shirley McCoy,
Navy Seal Rescuer
Current & Upcoming
Programs:
Story Time is held on Thursday
mornings at 10:15 for pre-school
age children. There will be no Story
Time on Thanksgiving Day, No-
vember22.
If you are interested in computer
classes, please contact Deb Moor to
arrange these sessions. A variety of
sessions continue to be offered.
Did You Know?
Check-out the Jackson County
Library website--Links, informa-
tion, homework help, library hours,
programming and more! Changes
and updates will periodically be in-
cluded. Find us @
https://sites.google.com/site/jack-
soncountylibrary/
Do you have a credit or debit
card with RFID (Radio Frequency
Identification)? Waving your card
over the scanner makes checking-
out quick, but it also makes credit
card fraud and identity theft easier.
Your card can be scanned through
your pocket, purse, or wallet by a
passer-by, which can be transferred
and used to steal your identity. For
tips on how to prevent this new ID
theft, check out this website (also
found on the Jackson County Li-
brary website) for more details:
http://youtube.googleapis.com/v/lL
AFhTjsQHw%26sns=em
3 Check It Out at the Library 3
and Ace Hardware (The General
Store) in Martin chose the Kadoka
FFA chapter to receive donations
from the Performance Pays pro-
gram.
The Kadoka FFA chapter said
they were so appreciative to the
two businesses and Pfizer Animal
Health for their support and said
that these donations will be used to
help fund the trips to the national
competition.
Pfizer Animal Health, in partner
with veterinarians, animal health
suppliers and local deals, continues
to support local FFA chapters
through its Performance Pays pro-
gram. This program set aside one
percent of the money from Pfizer
products purchased between Feb-
ruary 1 and April 30, 2012 by local
Pfizer dealers. This percentage is
then donated to a local FFA chapter
or chapters of their choice.
This year Headlee Enterprises
FFA receives Pfizer donation
Austin Thayer (R) and Racheal Hajny, representing Headlee Enterprises,
received the Phizer donation the Kadoka Vet Clinic and Ace Hardware of
Martin gave the Kadoka FFA chapter. --courtesy photo
Hosted by Save the Pearl
Sat., Nov. 17 • 6 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
Everyone Welcome!
Lunch & refreshments will be available.
First Lady Linda Daugaard has
announced that public tours to
view Christmas finery at the Gov-
ernor’s Mansion will be offered on
two Mondays in December.
“The Governor’s Mansion is
beautiful during the holiday sea-
son, and Dennis and I would like to
share that with all South
Dakotans,” the First Lady said.
“We are so very fortunate to live in
this home, but it really belongs to
all of us.”
The holiday tours are scheduled
for Dec. 10 and Dec. 17. Six tours
will be conducted each day (9 a.m.;
10 a.m.; 11 a.m.; 1 p.m.; 2 p.m.; 3
p.m.).
Those wishing to take the Gov-
ernor’s Mansion tours must obtain
tickets (free) in advance from the
Pierre Chamber of Commerce.
There is a limit of 40 people per
tour. The Chamber of Commerce
can be reached at 605-224-7361.
Holiday tours
scheduled at
the Governor’s
Mansion
State Fire Marshal Paul Merri-
man plans to use part of the hour
he’ll gain when Daylight Saving
Time ends this weekend to check
the smoke-alarm batteries at his
home. He encourages everyone else
to do the same thing.
Daylight Saving Time ends on
Sunday, Nov. 4. That’s when clocks
are set back an hour. Merriman
suggests state residents mark the
change by not only moving their
clocks back but also checking the
batteries in their smoke alarms
and carbon monoxide detectors.
“This clock-change weekend is a
good reminder to make sure your
detectors are in working order,’’
Merriman said. “A majority of
home fire deaths could be pre-
vented if all homes had working
smoke detectors. Some statistics
say up to 80 percent of child deaths
in fires occur in homes without
working smoke alarms. Please
make sure your family doesn’t be-
come part of that statistic.’’
If you don’t have smoke detec-
tors in your home, Merriman rec-
ommends you install them. Smoke
detectors have a test button. When
the button is pressed, the detector
should make a sound. If it doesn’t,
the batteries need to be changed. If
that doesn’t work, it’s time to re-
place the detector.
Merriman offers these addi-
tional guidelines for keeping you
and your family safe from fire.
•At least once a month, press
the test button to check your detec-
tor.
•For maximum protection, in-
stall smoke detectors on every level
of your home.
•Smoke detectors lose sensitiv-
ity over time and should be re-
placed periodically. Smoke
detectors are usually good for about
10 years.
•Periodically clean smoke detec-
tors using a vacuum attachment.
This removes particles that could
interfere with the detector’s proper
operation.
•Finally, brush up on your fam-
ily’s emergency exit plan. If your
family doesn’t have a plan, this is
an ideal time to develop one.
Change your
clock, check
your batteries
this weekend
U.S. Senator John Thune (R-
S.D.) is currently seeking hard-
working college students to serve
as interns in his office in Washing-
ton, D.C., as well as in his offices in
Aberdeen, Rapid City, and Sioux
Falls.
Interns in Thune’s state offices
will participate in constituent serv-
ice and state outreach activities,
while students in the Washington,
D.C. office will have the opportu-
nity to witness the legislative
process, give Capitol tours, and at-
tend Senate votes and hearings.
Both in-state and Washington,
D.C. internships will allow stu-
dents to work closely with con-
stituents, hone their research and
writing skills, and learn a multi-
tude of valuable office skills.
“Interning in a Senate office pro-
vides students with a front row
view of democracy in action and
can serve for many as an excellent
introduction to public service,” said
Thune. “I encourage all interested
college students to apply for this re-
warding experience.”
Thune is a member of the Sen-
ate Committees on Agriculture,
Nutrition, and Forestry; Budget;
Commerce, Science, and Trans-
portation; and Finance.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in Thune’s
Washington, D.C. office should sub-
mit a resume and cover letter, by
November 30 to: Senator John
Thune, Attn: Jen Kelly, 511 Dirk-
sen Senate Office Building, Wash-
ington, D.C. 20510, By Fax to:
202-228-5429
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in Thune’s Sioux
Falls, Rapid City, or Aberdeen of-
fices should submit a resume and
cover letter, by November 30 to:
Senator John Thune, Attn: Robin
Long, 320 North Main Avenue,
Suite B, Sioux Falls, S.D. 57104
For more information, please
call 202-224-2321.
Senator Thune's office accepting
Spring internship applications
Sports …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
The Annual Community Veteran’s Day Program
Thursday, Nov. 8 • 9:00 a.m. • Kadoka City Auditorium
We extend a special invitation to all service veterans and service members.
Featuring music from the Kadoka area band, chorus and elementary music programs.
All community members welcome to attend.
If any questions, contact Mr. Latham or Mr. Ohrtman at (837-2171)
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
On Monday, October 22 the
Kadoka Lady Kougars hosted the
Rapid City Christain Lady Comets
in the final game of the season.
Kadoka defeated Rapid City
Christian 25-21, 25-20, 25-12.
Well, we ended our regular sea-
son on a good note. The girls played
well and took care of business
against a team that can be very
good at times.
Taylor Merchen served 16/17
with 13 points and 4 aces and Tessa
Stout served 15/16 with 11 points
and 4 aces. Kwincy Ferguson
spiked 17/17 with 10 kills and
Raven Jorgensen spiked 17/17 with
9 kills and 2 blocks. Tessa Stout
had 9 set assists and Taylor
Merchen had 5. Marti Herber and
Mariah Pierce each had 3 digs. We
ended the regular season 15-13.
We will play Jones County in the
first round of districts on Tuesday,
October 30, at 6:30 p.m. CT, in
Murdo.
--by Coach Barry Hutchinson
Volleyball team ends regular season
with win against RC Christian Comets
Taking care of business…Kwincy Ferguson #10 gets the kill
against Rapid City Christain Comets. --photo by Robyn Jones
Rejected …Raven Jorgensen #2 blocks the spike attempt from the
Lady Comets.
--photo by Robyn Jones
192 yards. We were able to put
Faith deep in their own territory a
number of different times since our
punt team executed well.
Defensively we were led by Clint
Stout this week with 18 total tack-
les and he also had an interception.
Klay O’Daniel had 10 tackles, Lane
Patterson 8, Chance Knutson had
7 tackles and 1 fumble recovery,
Chandlier Sudbeck had 6 tackles, 1
fumble recovery and 1 interception,
Dylan Riggins had 5 tackles and 1
fumble recovery, Logan Ammons
had 3 tackles and 1 sack, Logan
Christensen had 3 tackles, Sam
Pretty Bear and True Buchholz
each had 2 tackles, and Ashton
Standing Bear and Ty Merchen
each had 1 tackle apiece.
The boys fought hard in this
game as they did all season. We
had a very tough schedule this sea-
son and there were a lot of close,
hard-fought games. But, despite
that our kids battled every game,
ultimately qualifying for the play-
offs, earning a tie for runners-up in
the conference and finishing the
season with a 5-4 record. I’m really
proud of how hard this team
worked this year, and the integrity
that these kids showed all season.
A lot of these guys hit the weight
room in the off season and during
the season we even had some lift-
ing in the mornings before school.
It was a very dedicated bunch of
boys. We had great leadership this
year, and that’s what really made
this year successful. Congratula-
tions to the kids on a very success-
ful season and thanks to the
community for all of your support!
--by Coach Chad Eisenbraun
Kadoka Area – 44
Faith – 52
The Kougars traveled to Faith to
take on the Longhorns in the first
round of the 9A playoffs last Tues-
day night. The kids fought hard,
but in the end we came up short
losing 52-44.
The first half was all Faith.
Faith’s offense took it to us, racking
up 46 points and 300 total yards.
They had a good mix of the run and
the pass, and we struggled, espe-
cially against the pass. The Long-
horn defense was especially tough.
We could not get anything going of-
fensively at all. One bright spot for
us was on a kick return. Chandlier
Sudbeck returned two, 79-yard
kick offs for touchdowns and one
more that went 50 yards as he was
tripped up right before breaking
loose for a possible third touch-
down.
The second half our kids did not
quit. We took advantage of some
opportunities as Faith turned the
ball over five times in the game, as
we mounted a comeback. We had a
lot of kids contribute.
Chandlier Sudbeck had another
huge game as he ended up having
391 total yards, to go along with 4
touchdowns (2 rushing and 2 kick
returns). Sam Pretty Bear and
Chance Knutson each had a rush-
ing touchdown and Chance also
contributed two, two-point conver-
sions. Clint Stout also had one two-
point conversion as well. We did
punt the ball well this week. It’s
something we worked on in prac-
tice a lot last week because it
seemed to be a trouble spot for us
toward the end of the year this
year. Klay O’Daniel had 6 punts for
Kougars drop to Faith in
first round of playoffs
Athlete of the Week
Lane Patterson
Football
Lane Patterson stepped in to play Quarterback for
us when we lost Kenar VanderMay to a broken col-
larbone. Before that Lane played a little bit of every-
thing on offense, but primarily played wide receiver.
Lane did a nice job of taking care of the ball and
managing the game at quarterback. He got a lot of
valuable experience. He also plays linebacker for
us and this week he was third in tackles on the team
with 8. Great job this season Lane!
Sponsored by
Jackson County Title Company
and Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2286
News …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
SPECIAL MEETING
Board of Jackson
County
Commissioners
October 15, 2012
TThe Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in special session at 3:12
p.m., Monday, October 15, 2012 in the
Commissioner’s Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Jim Stil-
well called the meeting to order with
members Glen Bennett, Delores Bonen-
berger, Larry Denke and Ron Twiss pres-
ent.
Aaron Richardson, Acting Hwy. Supt.
was present. Veryl and Charlie Prokop
were also present.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
As was advertised, fuel bids were
opened. The following bids were re-
ceived for the period of October 15, 20l2
through April 15, 2013:
Midwest Cooperatives, Pierre, Fixed
Price Bid, # 1 Diesel $3.99 per gallon; #
2 Diesel $3.81 per gallon; No Lead Gas
$3.75 per gallon; Propane $1.29 per gal-
lon.
Kadoka Oil, Kadoka, Competitive Quote,
# 1 Diesel $0.06 under daily charge de-
livery price; # 2 Diesel $0.06 under daily
charge delivery price; No Lead Gas
$0.06 under daily charge delivery price;
Propane $0.06 under daily charge deliv-
ery price.
Discount Fuel, Kadoka, Competitive
Quote, No Lead and Ethanol Gas at
Pumps, Pump Charge Price; # 2 High-
way Diesel, Pump Charge Price; # 1
Highway Diesel (not available at this
time) Pump Charge Price.
Denke moved that Jackson County ac-
cept the fixed price bid of Midwest Coop-
erative for gas, diesel and propane, as
this bid is in the best interest of the
county. Bennett seconded the motion.
Discussion was held on having gasoline
available at the pumps for emergency
purposes. Report was made that al-
though request for bids on diesel fuel at
the pumps was not advertised a compet-
itive quote was presented. Twiss moved,
Bonenberger seconded, that Jackson
County accept the competitive quote of
Discount Fuel for gasoline at the pumps.
Sheriff Clements met with the board and
reported that a representative of the Fall
River Sheriff’s Department is willing to
come to Jackson County to train Deputy
Kendrick on civil processes, executions,
etc. Twiss moved, Bonenberger sec-
onded, that a Fall River Sheriff’s Depart-
ment representative be authorized to
come to Jackson County for one day to
train Deputy Kendrick.
Twiss moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that Terry Deuter, Veteran Service Offi-
cer, be authorized to attend the SDDVA
fall mini-conference in November.
A FY 2013 extension to the Joint Coop-
erative Agreement with Central S.D. En-
hancement District was presented to the
board. Jackson County’s annual financial
support to CSDED would remain at
$6,104.88. Bonenberger moved, Bennett
seconded, that the agreement with
CSDED be approved and signed.
Bennett moved, Denke seconded, that
Central S.D. Enhancement District be
notified that Jackson County has delayed
application for CDBG grant funding for
the proposed library building until the ap-
plication date in April 2013.
Report was made that a signed agree-
ment between Jackson County and Tom
and Lori O’Rourke has been received.
The O’Rourke’s have granted access to
Jackson County to complete the pro-
posed project to relocate the channel of
Lost Dog Creek across their property.
Report was made that a signed contract
for Jackson County to purchase gravel
from Dustin Harvey has been received.
Report was made that Notice of Intent to
Mine at the Dustin Harvey pit has been
advertised, and all agencies notified.
A plat was presented to the board for ap-
proval. Bonenberger moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the following resolution be
adopted approving the plat of Lot 1, Jef-
fords Addition, in the S2 of the SE4, Sec-
tion 30, T 2 S, R 22 E, BHM, Kadoka,
SD:
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2012 – 21
Be it resolved that the Jackson
County Board of County Com-
missioners having examined
the within plat do hereby, by
resolution, approve the same
for recording in the office of the
Register of Deeds.
Dated this 15th day of Octo-
ber, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
Liz May, Kyle, met with the board. Liz
May is the Republican candidate for
State Representative, District 27. Discus-
sion was held on federal, state, and local
government issues.
Grant Patterson met with the board to re-
port a problem at Willow Creek on CH 5
since the bridge was replaced and cul-
verts installed. He informed the board
that when they leave their property with
trucks they get hung up getting on to the
road going up the hill to the north. There
is no site distance for vehicles coming
south over the hills. He stated there have
been a lot of trucks using the road to haul
hay as an alternate route as they are not
able to go under the bridge at I-90 Exit
143, and there have been several occa-
sions when they just got their truck dis-
lodged when a truck has come over the
hill from the north. He suggested the
county lower the road at the first hill north
of Willow Creek. Discussion was held on
having to redo the back slope if the road
was lowered. Discussion was held on the
need for a culvert and approach at the
site.
Grant Patterson inquired as to whether
the county plans to work on or replace
the bridge leading to their place north of
Kadoka on CS 34 as planks are loose.
The board informed him it is one of sev-
eral bridges on bridge inspection reports
needing repaired or replaced. Aaron
Richardson, Acting Hwy. Supt. reported
the deck is solid, but planks are loose.
Rita O’Connell and Steve Clements,
Haakon County Commissioners, met
with the board concerning the four
county group established in 2011 through
SDSU for the 4-H program. Bennett re-
ported an attempt was made to set up an
appointment with Dean Dunn, but has
been repeatedly put off. Haakon County
representatives reported there is some
negative feedback from 4-H leaders in
their county, and also reports that there
is less programming in Haakon County,
and one instance of a program sched-
uled for Haakon County which was
moved to Jackson County. Stilwell re-
ported he had received positive feed-
back, and observed more activities in
Jackson County.
At 4:42 p.m., Denke moved, Bennett sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Rita O’Connell and Steve Clements were
present.
At 5:10 p.m., Bonenberger moved,
Denke seconded, that the board come
out of executive session. No action was
taken at this time.
Discussion was held on the project to
reroute a section of CS 29 leading to the
Prokop place on the White River due to
erosion created by the river. West Cen-
tral Electric provided a cost of $3,500 to
adjust the coop’s electric line to accom-
modate the road changes. This is a “do
not exceed amount.” Veryl Prokop in-
formed the board that his attorney ad-
vised him that the county is responsible
for costs in moving the line, and that he
is responsible for relocating the cattle
guard. Veryl Prokop reported that about
a year ago a representative of West Cen-
tral Electric was at the site where the
White River is changing channel and had
made comment that “We are going to
have to move the power line.” Denke re-
ported that Jackson County paid right at
$11,000 to have the electric lines moved
at the Willow Creek bridge replacement
project. Twiss commented that he is not
in favor of the county paying to move the
electric line, as the REA should not have
placed the line there. Bonenberger com-
mented she felt the REA is supposed to
be responsible for maintenance of the
lines. Stilwell reported that Merle Stilwell
had paid a portion of the cost to repair
CS 12 B, and asked Veryl Prokop if he
would be willing to provide funding for a
portion of this project.
Chairman Stilwell tabled discussion of
the CS 29 project to attend to other
agenda items.
Debra Moor, Librarian met with the board
to discuss her attending the South
Dakota Library Association conference.
Discussion was held on obtaining prior
approval from the County Commission to
attend meetings, trainings or workshops
outside the county. Debra Moor pre-
sented information that she had obtained
approval from the Library board, and also
presented a voucher to the county for all
expenditures in her attending the SDLA
conference. Following discussion, Twiss
moved, Bonenberger seconded, that
Debra Moor be paid two days wages for
attending the SDLA conference, and that
she be reimbursed for expenses to at-
tend the conference at county estab-
lished rates.
Debra Moor reported that the Library has
an old desk that is no longer being used,
and requested the desk be declared sur-
plus. Bonenberger moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the desk at the Library be
declared surplus and be disposed of at
the landfill.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor reported there is a
magazine rack in the basement of the
courthouse that is no longer being used,
and the Library has use for it.
Aaron Richardson, Acting Hwy. Supt., in-
formed the board that the Highway Crew
will haul the magazine rack to the Library
and haul the Library desk to the landfill.
Discussion resumed on the project to re-
locate a section of CS 29 leading to the
Prokop place on the White River. A draft
agreement between Jackson County and
West River Excavation to have West
River Excavation relocate the section of
CS 29 at a cost of $24,999.00 was re-
viewed. Discussion was held on funding
for the project. Discussion resumed on
cost of moving the West River Electric
power line. Veryl Prokop agreed to pay
one-half of the cost to move the electric
power line, not to exceed total cost of
$3,500.00. Denke moved that Jackson
County approve the relocation of the sec-
tion of CS 29 being eroded by the White
River, and that Jackson County pay one-
half the cost to move the electric power
line, not to exceed total cost of
$3,500.00. Motion carried with the follow-
ing vote: Bennett, yea; Bonenberger,
yea; Denke, yea; Twiss, nay as he does
not feel the county should pay for moving
the electric power line.
Veryl Prokop provided an easement to
Jackson County in the N2, Section 33, T
3 S, R 22 E for relocation, construction
and maintenance of the proposed proj-
ect. The easement includes the agree-
ment that he will pay one-half the cost of
moving the electric line, not to exceed
total cost of $3,500.00, and that he will
relocate the cattle guard.
Discussion resumed on the agreement
with West River Excavation to relocate
the section of CS 29. Items were added
to and deleted from the draft agreement.
Bonenberger moved, Twiss seconded,
that the agreement to hire West River
Excavation to relocate the section of CS
29 at a cost of $24,999.00 be approved
and signed.
Pit releases for the Kennedy Pit and May
Pit were prepared by States Attorney Van
Gorp and presented to the board. The pit
releases were requested by T. F. Luke
and Sons. The landowners are to also
approve and sign the releases. Bennett
moved, Denke seconded, that Jackson
County approve and sign the releases.
Motion carried with the following vote:
Bennett, yea; Bonenberger, yea; Denke,
yea; Twiss, nay.
Discussion resumed on the four county
4-H program agreement with SDSU. The
board directed that a letter of concern be
drawn up about the four county 4-H pro-
gram agreement and sent to SDSU.
Brad Stone, Director of Equalization, pre-
sented information on progress in adding
new property to the assessment roles
and reassessment of other property.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor, reported that tables
that were in the courthouse basement
lobby and used on election day are now
being used in other offices. She pre-
sented a price quote from Dakota Busi-
ness Center for folding tables, and
requested authorization to purchase four
tables. Bonenberger moved, Bennett
seconded, that four tables be purchased
at $213.74 each from Dakota Business
Center.
The General Fund cash analysis for Sep-
tember 30, 2012 showed an undesig-
nated, unassigned fund balance of
$58,901.64, which is 4.32% of the 2013
General Fund budget.
A resume for the Highway Superintend-
ent position was reviewed.
At 6:54 p.m., Bennett moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
At 7:04 p.m., Bennett moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the board come out of exec-
utive session. No action was taken.
Bonenberger moved, Bennett seconded,
that the November meeting be held on
November 9, 2012.
There being no further business to come
before the board, Bonenberger moved,
Denke seconded, that the meeting be
adjourned, that the board meet to can-
vass the votes of the November 6, 2012
General election at 9:00 a.m., Friday, No-
vember 9, 2012 and continue in regular
session following the canvass of votes
on Friday, November 9, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
[Published November 1, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $135.17]
STATE BIRTH RECORDS
ACCESSIBLE THROUGH COUNTY
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Certified copies of birth records from across the state are avail-
able in Jackson County, according to Mitzi Mitchell, Register of
Deeds. The office has access to computerized birth records
statewide and can issue a certified copy of any South Dakota
birth. In the past, birth records were only available from the county
where the birth occurred or from the South Dakota Department of
Health, Vital Records Program.
Birth records are available from 1905 on.
As earlier years are entered in the computerized system,
records from those years will also become available.
The cost for a certified copy of a birth record is $15.00 as of
July 1, 2012.
The playoffs for the Black Hills
Youth Football League are com-
pleted.
In the Mighty Mite age division,
the Wall Eagles – made up of area
youth from Philip, Wall and
Kadoka – defeated the Broncos 7-6.
In the Junior Pee Wee age divi-
sion, the Eagles defeated the Steel-
ers 19-6. The playoffs for both these
divisions were held at the Rapid
City Christian High School, south
of Rapid City, Saturday, October
27.
In the Pee Wee age division, the
Eagles lost to the Rams 8-29. That
playoff game was held at Sturgis
High School’s Woodle Field, Tues-
day, October 23. The team had a
very successful winning season,
but had a tough division in the
playoffs.
Both of the winning age divisions
of the Eagles will play their super-
bowl finals Sunday, November 4, in
Rapid City on the South Dakota
School of Mines and Technology
football field. The younger group
will play at 3:00 p.m. against the
Vikings. The older group will play
at 4:30 p.m. against the Rams
Blue.
Area Pee Wee team members in-
clude Richard Lamont, Bridger
Amiotte and Trenton Cuny, Junior
Pee Wee members Jadyn Coller,
Cedar Amiotte and Tack Tines, and
Mighty Mite members Jyntre
Coller and Tyus Williams.
Black Hills Youth Football is an
organization for children between
the age of 6 to 14 and is a full
tackle program. Practices began in
August and games are played on
Saturdays. Each team mimics an
NFL team and mascot.
Youth football in superbowl finals
Tough on defense …
Richard Lamont #33 moves in on de-
fense to assist with the tackle and
prevent a gain in yards.
Watching the play …
Tack Tines #32 gets a break and
watches the play develop. Tines
plays on the junior pee wee team.
Moving the ball …Jadyn Coller #11 carries the ball behind his
lead blocker Cedar Amiotte #36.
Preparing the offense …Coach Randy Griebal instructs Jyntre
Coller #55 and Tyus Williams #22 on the upcoming play.
--courtesy photos
Public Notices …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
For
Sale:
Newsprint
End
Rolls
$5.00 each
Great for craft
projects, painting,
drawing & more.
Kadoka Press
INSTRUCTION
TO THE VOTERS
VOTING RIGHTS
Any voter who can't mark a ballot be-
cause the voter has a physical disability
or can't read, may ask any person they
choose to help them vote.
Any voter may ask for instruction in the
proper procedure for voting.
Any voter at the polling place prior to
7:00 p.m. is allowed to cast a ballot.
If your voting rights have been violated,
you may call the person in charge of the
election at 605-837-2422, the Secretary
of State at 888-703-5328, or your state's
attorney.
Any person who is convicted of a felony
on or after July 1, 2012, loses the right to
vote. However, any such person may
register to vote following the completion
of their felony sentence.
Any person who is convicted of a felony
on or before June 30, 2012, and who re-
ceives a sentence of imprisonment to the
adult penitentiary system, including a
suspended execution of sentence, loses
the right to vote. Any such person so sen-
tenced may register to vote following
completion of their sentence. Further in-
formation is available at HYPERLINK
"http://www.sdsos.gov" www.sdsos.gov.
ELECTION CRIMES
Anyone who makes a false statement
when they vote, tries to vote knowing
they are not a qualified voter, or tries to
vote more than once has committed an
election crime.
[Published November 1, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $16.91]
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
COMMUNITY BANK,
AVON, SOUTH DAKOTA,
a South Dakota
Banking Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRADLEY PORCH, JACKSON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA,
SOUTHSIDE REBUILDERS,
KELLIE M. PORCH, CREDIT
COLLECTIONS SERVICES, INC.,
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA (DEPART-
MENT OF REVENUE
& REGULATION),
and BENNETT COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA,
Defendants.
CIV. NO. 10-42
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on
June 25, 2012, the Honorable John L.
Brown, Circuit Court Judge acting in and
for the Sixth Judicial Circuit, entered an
Order Granting Plaintiff’s Motion for
Summary Judgment, stating that the
Mortgage held by Plaintiff, dated July 14,
2006, and filed for record in the office of
the Jackson County, South Dakota, Reg-
ister of Deeds on July 19, 2006, in Book
36 of Mortgages, on pages 157-165,
upon the following described real prop-
erty, is a valid lien upon the premises and
which Mortgage was thereby foreclosed
and that the said real estate as here-
inafter described is to be sold at public
auction by the Sheriff of Jackson County,
South Dakota, or his authorized deputy,
retaining his fees, disbursements, and
commissions, and payment shall be
made to Plaintiff for Plaintiff’s judgment
amount.
The real estate upon which the
Mortgage is herein foreclosed and
upon which the Order of Sale is di-
rected is described as follows:
The Northwest Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter (NW¼NW¼)
and the East Half of the Northwest
Quarter (E½NW¼) of Section
Twenty-Four (24), in Township Forty
(40) North, Range Thirty-Eight (38),
West of the 6th P.M., Jackson
County, South Dakota.
The amount claimed to be due on this
Mortgage is the sum of $85,717.06, plus
interest accrued through the date of sale
and any redemption period, plus costs of
sale.
Said real estate shall be sold to the high-
est bidder, for cash, at the hour of 9:00
a.m. (mountain) on the 20th day of No-
vember, 2012, at the front door of the
Jackson County Courthouse, Kadoka,
Jackson County, South Dakota.
In accordance with the terms of the
Order, Defendant, Bradley Porch, and all
persons claiming under him to be and
they are forever barred and foreclosed of
all equity of redemption and claim to the
mortgaged property and all parts thereof,
except for statutory right of redemption
within 180 days from the date of record-
ing the certificate of sale. Further, any
lien held by any other Defendant and any
person in possession of the above-de-
scribed real estate are inferior to the lien
of Plaintiff.
Dated this 19th day of October, 2012.
/s/ Daniel G. Van Gorp
Attorney for Plaintiff
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605/859-2540
[Published October 25, November 1, 8 &
15, 2012]
)
)ss
)
NOTICE OF
PRIMARY ELECTION
A General Election will be held on Tues-
day, November 6, 2012 in all the voting
precincts in Jackson County.
The election polls will be open from seven
a.m. to seven p.m. (MDST) on the day of
the election.
The polling place in each precinct in this
county shall be as follows:
Precinct # 1: Town of Cottonwood and
rural area
Polling Place: Cottonwood
Rangefield Station
Precinct # 2: Town of Interior and rural
area
Polling Place: Interior School
Precinct # 3: [East] North portion of
the City of Kadoka and rural area
Polling Place: Courthouse Basement
Precinct # 3: [West] West and north of
the City of Kadoka (Rural area on the
east end of Commissioner Dist. 5 and
east end of Commissioner Dist. 2)
Polling Place: Courthouse Basement
Precinct # 4: South portion of the City of
Kadoka (portions of Wards 1 & 2)
Polling Place: Courthouse Basement
Precinct # 5: Town of Belvidere and rural
area
Polling Place: Belvidere Fellowship
Hall
Precinct # 6: Long Valley area
Polling Place: Long Valley School
Precinct # 7: [East] South portion of
the Village of Wanblee and rural area
(Rural area on the west end of
Commissioner Dist. 3 and south end
of Commissioner Dist. 2)
Polling Place: Crazy Horse School -
Commons Area
Precinct # 7: [West] North portion of
the Village of Wanblee and rural area
(Rural area on the east end of Commis-
sioner Dist. 4 and south end of
Commissioner Dist. 5)
Polling Place: Crazy Horse School -
Commons Area
Precinct # 8: Green Valley area
Polling Place: Green Valley Fire Hall
(Larry May residence)
Voters with disabilities may contact the
county auditor for information and special
assistance in absentee voting or polling
place accessibility. 605-837-2422
Vicki D. Wilson
Jackson County Auditor
[Published October 25 & November 1,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$52.72]
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
NOTICE FOR BIDS
Vehicle and Heating
Fuel Bids
City of Kadoka
The City of Kadoka will be accepting bids
for the calendar year of January 1, 2013
to December 31, 2013, until 4:00 p.m. on
Monday, November 12, 2012 for the fol-
lowing:
• Dyed #1 Diesel Fuel
• Dyed #2 Diesel Fuel
• Propane Heating Fuel
• Unleaded Gasoline for City Vehicles
Delivered to
• City Owned Tank Located at City
Shop
Bids will be opened at 7:00 p.m. at the
Kadoka City Council Meeting on Monday,
November 12, 2012 and award made as
soon as possible. The City reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all bids.
Please put bid for each item in a sepa-
rate envelope and denote contents on
outside of envelope.
[Published November 1 & 8, 2012 at the
total approximate cost of $23.40]
Public Notices …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Kadoka Press Deadline
Tuesday mornings at 10:00
Honorees from across the state
will be recognized at the Annual
Casey Tibbs Foundation Tribute
Dinner to be held on Saturday, No-
vember 3 at the Casey Tibbs South
Dakota Rodeo Center in Fort
Pierre.
This years honorees include,
Troy Brown of Harrold, as “Rodeo
Cowboy Great” who won the Bad-
lands Steer Wrestling Champi-
onship three times; Lisa Lockhart,
of Oelrichs, as “Rodeo Cowgirl
Great” who is a six-time Wrangler
National Finals Rodeo qualifier in
barrel racing; Ralph Maynard orig-
inally from Dupree, as “Past Rodeo
Great” who competed at the Rodeo
Cowboys Association National Fi-
nals Rodeo four times in bronc rid-
ing; Singer Kyle Evans, formerly of
Wessington Springs, as “Rodeo Pro-
moter”, who performed for more
than 40 years at rodeos all over the
country; John “Jack” Carr Family
Ranch of White River, as “Ranch
Cowboy Family”, who has ranched
for nearly 70 years; and Stallion
“Walter Mitty”, as “Rodeo Animal
Athlete.” Mitty is owned by Delbert
and Lois Stinson of New Under-
wood. The Stallion won Barrel
Racing, Pole Bending, and numer-
ous other titles.
Now in its 23rd year, the tribute
dinner is an opportunity for friends
and families in the ranching and
rodeo communities to celebrate and
honor the accomplishments of
South Dakota cowboys, cowgirls,
families and animals. Their photos
and biographies are added to the
“Wall of Fame” each year, located in
the Rodeo Center.
Casey Tibbs Foundation to
host 23rd tribute dinner
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
EMPLOYMENT
JOIN OUR TEAM ~ looking for re-
sponsible, outgoing and energetic
advertising sales representative.
Apply at Mobridge Tribune, PO Box
250, Mobridge, SD 57601 or email
linda@mobridgetribune.com.
PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR – City
of Hill City, SD seeks professional
candidate for city operations. Open
until filled. Salary DOE. Info at hillci-
tysd.org or 605-574-2300. EOE.
CITY OF DE SMET: Full-time water,
wastewater, buildings, parks, swim-
ming pool maintenance assistant.
Possession of or ability to obtain
Commercial Driver’s License, Chem-
ical Applicator’s License, Water-
Wastewater Operator Certifications
required. Salary DOE/Benefits. For
application contact 605-854-3731 or
desmetcity@mchsi.com. EOE.
SALES AGRONOMIST/PRECISION
AG position at Howard Farmers
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Coop, Howard SD. Sales experi-
ence, knowledge of Ag chemicals
and precision Ag/VRT is preferred.
Call Colby 605-772-5543.
FOR SALE
2010 GMC YUKON XL 4x4, 65,000
miles, rear DVD, heated leather
seats, remote start, many more ex-
tras. $32,500. Call 605-853-3687 or
605-871-9996.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
NOTICE
The advertising signs for Main
Street are provided by KCBA.
Please, remember to
remove them from the street
and take the posters off the
boards after use.
Buy • Rent • Sell
Trade • Giveaway
In the
Kadoka Press
Classifieds
605-837-2259
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Great Gobbler Give-away!
J& S
Restore
Jigger’s
Restaurant
Double H
Feed
Club 27
Kadoka
Press
BankWest
Insurance
Creative
Cuts
Discount
Fuel
Hogen’s
Hardware
BankWest
Kadoka
Gas & Go
People’s
Market
Midwest
Coop
Each of the businesses listed below will be giving away a turkey, so stop in and sign up to win!
Drawings will be Thursday, Nov. 15 at 4:00 p.m. Businesses will notify the winners.
Winners MUST pick up their turkeys at People’s Market by Tuesday., Nov 20.
Shopping at home supports local business!
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing ...........................21-11
Rockers................................18.5-13.5
Petersen’s ..................................18-14
Handrahan Const .....................16-16
Dakota Bar................................13-19
Badland’s Auto......................9.5-22.5
Highlights:
Jim Kujawa..................................210
Marlis Petersen.....2-7 split; 201/527
Kim Petersen ...............................176
Cory Boyd.....................................222
Trina Brown..........................190/537
Jason Petersen......................204/563
Matt Reckling .......................202/557
Vickie Petersen....5-10 split; 181/485
Ronnie Coyle...........8-9 & 3-10 splits
Maralynn Burns...................2-7 split
Carl Brown ...........................7-9 split
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................13-3
George’s Welding ........................10-6
Kadoka Tree Serv ...................9.5-6.5
Philip Motor..................................8-8
Philip Health Services..................7-9
Kennedy Imp.................................7-9
G&A Trenching...........................6-10
Bear Auto ..............................4.5-11.5
Highlights:
Ronnie Williams..215 clean, 220/629
Alvin Pearson........................204/568
Earl Park...............................258/562
Fred Foland...........................200/555
Johnny Wilson.............210 clean/551
Bill Bainbridge.............................550
Randy Boyd...........................200/544
Dakota Alfrey...............................533
Terry Wentz..................................531
Cory Boyd..............................209/527
Steve Varner........3-10 split; 209/520
Jerry Iron Moccasin..............200/516
Matt Schofield..............................513
James Mansfield ........3-10 split; 500
Wendell Buxcel.............................514
Les Struble .........................3-10 split
Tony Gould..........................5-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge...............................26-6
Invisibles ...................................21-11
Bowling Belles ..........................19-13
Jolly Ranchers ..........................14-18
State Farm Ins..........................14-18
Highlights:
Karen Foland 4-9 split; 174, 185, 214
.............................................clean/573
Dody Weller ...5-7 split; 152, 149/439
Deanna Fees..........................155/403
Joy Neville............6-7 split; 150, 148
Debbie Gartner .....................150/425
Joyce Hicks...........................144, 141
Shirley Parsons ....................5-7 split
Judy Papousek .....................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................21-11
Chiefie’s Chicks...................17.5-14.5
Morrison’s Haying ..............17.5-14.5
Wall Food Center ......................17-15
Dorothy’s Catering....................15-17
Hildebrand Concrete ..........14.5-17.5
First National Bank .................13-19
Just Tammy’s......................12.5-19.5
Highlights:
Beth Kennedy .......................167/409
Shar Moses ...................2-7 split; 176
Karen Iwan ..................................159
Jessica Wagner.............................128
Marlis Petersen.....................183/497
Kathy Arthur.........................171/474
Amy Morrison.............3-10 split; 471
Debbie Gartner....4-5-7 & 5-10 splits
Sandee Gittings.................4-5-7 split
Brittney Drury ...................3-10 split
Muriel Kjerstad..................3-10 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................13-3
McDonnell Farms .......................10-6
O’Connell Const ..........................10-6
Dakota Bar..................................10-6
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................6-10
WEE BADD.................................5-11
West River Pioneer Tanks ..........5-11
The Steakhouse...........................5-11
Highlights:
Alvin Pearson4-5 split; 245 clean/555
Jason Petersen......................234/542
Ronnie Williams...........................222
Greg Arthur ....3-8 & 3-10 splits; 212
Brian Pearson .....224, 188 clean/615
Matt Schofield.......................214/588
Cory Boyd 5-10 & 5-7 splits; 204/580
Rick Coyle .............................209/579
Bryan Buxcel ..............3-10 split; 567
Don Weller.............................220/565
John Heltzel .........................2-7 split
Jay McDonnell......................3-7 split
Jordan Kjerstad..................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................25-7
King Pins.............................19.5-12.5
Randy’s Spray Service..............16-12
Roy’s Repair ........................15.5-16.5
Lee and the Ladies ...................15-13
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Jerry Iron Moccasin..............208/565
Cristi Ferguson.....................192/507
Brian Pearson .......................194/534
Roy Miller .............................4-5 split
NOTICE: Library "Friends" will have
a Gift-Wrap/Silent Auction table at
the Nursing Home Craft Fair, Nov. 4.
Please bring gift-wrapping items:
paper, bags, bows, gift tags, small
boxes, etc., to the Library. Assis-
tance wrapping gifts would also be
appreciated! K16-1tc
FOR SALE: Two, purple stadium
seats, $25 each. Call 605-344-2504
or 605-441-7487. K16-1tc
FOR SALE: Hereford bull calves.
Will keep until December 1, 2012.
Hovland Herefords, Allen Hovland,
605-544-3236, or Miles Hovland,
544-3294. KP16-2tc
POSITION AVAILABLE: The
Kadoka Area School District is look-
ing for a bus monitor at an hourly
rate of $11. The hours for this posi-
tion would be approximately 6:15 to
8 a.m. and 3:30 to 5:15 p.m. on all
school days with the possibility of
additional days as assigned. An ap-
plication may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please
feel free to contact the school with
further questions about this position.
Completed application may be
dropped off at the school or sent it
to: Kadoka School, Attn: Supt. Jamie
Hermann, PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD
57543 or call 1-605-837-2175. EOE.
KP15-2tc
KADOKA LEGION AUXILIARY
MEMBERS: Please bring two baked
good items or a cash donation to the
Holiday Festival Bake Sale, Nov. 4.
Thanks.
KP15-2tc
POSITION AVAILABLE: The
Kadoka Area School District is look-
ing for a full-time Special Education
Teacher’s Assistant. The duties of
this position include; assisting in the
education of Special Education Stu-
dents K-8, possible recess/lunch-
room supervision, and other duties
as assigned. A non-certified applica-
tion may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please
feel free to contact the school with
further questions about this position.
This position will be a one-year po-
sition based on need. Completed
application may be dropped off at
the school or sent it to: Attn: Jeffery
M. Nemecek, Elementary Principal,
PO Box 99, 800 Bayberry Street,
Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 1-605-
837-2175. EOE. KP15-2tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
U.S. Senator Tim Johnson (D-
SD) today announced he is seeking
spring interns for his state and
Washington, DC offices.
Johnson’s internship program
matches interns' interests to South
Dakota and federal issues while
providing a first-hand opportunity
to experience a wide-range of office
duties. Interns may attend hear-
ings, help with casework, research
issues for projects and work with
the office administrative staff.
College sophomores, juniors and
seniors are encouraged to apply for
Johnson's upcoming spring intern-
ship program. College credits
and/or a stipend are available. To
apply for a state office internship,
please call toll-free at 1-800-537-
0025. To apply for a Washington,
DC legislative or press internship
during the spring term or beyond,
interested students should submit
a cover letter, resume, references,
and a writing sample to:
General Internship, Senator
Tim Johnson, Attn: Intern Coordi-
nator, 136 Hart SOB, Washington,
DC 20510, By Fax to: 202-228-7575
By Email to:
Intern_Coordinator@johnson.sen-
ate.gov
Press Internship: Senator Tim
Johnson, Attn: Kate Cichy, Press
Intern Coordinator, 136 Hart SOB,
Washington, DC 20510, By Fax to:
202-228-7575, By Email to:
Kate_Cichy@johnson.senate.gov2.7
29
Johnson seeks spring semester interns
Agricul ture …
November 1, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605i 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605i 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdman/AuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605i 985.5486
Ccll. (605i 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605i 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605i 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605i 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605i 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605i 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll. äê|Ik 01KêI1
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT - OCT. SD, 2DJ2
We Þod ono1Þer b1g run o] oo111e. Lorge
oroud o] bugers u11Þ o 1o1 o] 1ong s1r1ngs
1n 1Þe o]]er1ng. £×peo11ng SDDD oo111e
ne×1 ueeK.
CALVES:
PERAULT RANCH - BELVIDERE
101.................................DWF STFS 503= ....$190.00
112.................................DWF STFS 440= ....$202.00
121 ................................DWF HFFS 482= ....$173.00
77 ..................................DWF HFFS 405= ....$173.00
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
63 ..................................FED HFFS 536= ....$200.00
368 ................................FED HFFS 458= ....$195.00
17 ..................................FWF HFFS 490= ....$170.00
142 ................................FED HFFS 394= ....$173.00
45 ..................................FED HFFS 402= ....$169.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
110.......................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ....$171.50
24.........................DLK & DWF STFS 467= ....$180.50
99 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 503= ....$160.00
BUCHHOL2 & RISLOV - PHILIP
300 ..........DLK & DWF WEANED STFS 549= ....$172.25
91.......................DLK WEANED STFS 613= ....$162.75
78.......................DLK WEANED STFS 480= ....$179.00
LYNN FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
94 .................................CHAF STFS 589= ....$166.25
72 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 500= ....$172.25
96.................................CHAF HFFS 548= ....$149.25
31.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 477= ....$147.25
JIGGS O'CONNELL - RAPID CITY
88.........................DLK & DWF STFS 545= ....$169.25
10 ...................................DLK STFS 436= ....$181.00
JONES RANCH - CAPUTA
107.......................DLK & DWF STFS 560= ....$166.25
111.......................DLK & DWF STFS 486= ....$180.25
39 ...................................DLK STFS 419= ....$190.50
102 ......................DLK & DWF HFFS 470= ....$162.25
33 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 386= ....$170.25
SCOTT BOOMER - INTERIOR
91.........................FED & DLK STFS 581= ....$165.00
65.........................FED & DLK STFS 480= ....$164.00
99 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 542= ....$169.00
TOM & LACEY CLEMENTS - PHILIP
33 ...................................DLK STFS 536= ....$169.25
CARLSON & ROMERO - BELVIDERE
48.........................DLK & DWF STFS 530= ....$169.75
30.........................DLK & DWF STFS 458= ....$184.50
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - PHILIP
95 .................................CHAF STFS 622= ....$161.25
85 ...................................DLK STFS 566= ....$164.25
67.......................CHAF & FED STFS 547= ....$167.50
38 ...................................DLK STFS 458= ....$186.00
106...............................CHAF HFFS 568= ....$148.50
WINK CATTLE CO,. - HOWES
87.........................FED & DLK STFS 520= ....$169.50
34 ...................................DLK STFS 419= ....$189.50
99...................................DLK HFFS 488= ....$159.75
28...................................DLK HFFS 383= ....$169.50
HARLAN & JUSTON EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
105 .................................DLK STFS 569= ....$168.25
42 ...................................DLK STFS 472= ....$176.00
95...................................DLK HFFS 519= ....$152.50
31...................................DLK HFFS 432= ....$160.00
LENDEN KJERSTAD - CREIGHTON
66 ...................................DLK STFS 545= ....$169.00
28 ...................................DLK STFS 456= ....$185.00
35 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 488= ....$153.00
11...................................DLK HFFS 387= ....$171.00
KETELSEN & BEUG - STURGIS
45 ...................................DLK STFS 543= ....$168.00
26 ...................................DLK STFS 454= ....$183.50
13 ...................................DLK STFS 336= ....$204.00
JACQUELINE CROWLEY - ST. ONGE
33 ...................................DLK STFS 414= ....$189.00
17 ...................................DLK STFS 335= ....$202.50
37...................................DLK HFFS 389= ....$170.00
14...................................DLK HFFS 318= ....$169.00
GLEN & JANET LONG - ENNING
46 ...................................DLK STFS 530= ....$168.00
24 ...................................DLK STFS 430= ....$186.50
45...................................DLK HFFS 461= ....$154.75
16...................................DLK HFFS 378= ....$169.00
JESSE MORELAND - RED OWL
17.........................DLK & DWF STFS 529= ....$167.50
26.........................DLK & DWF STFS 420= ....$192.00
9 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 421= ....$165.50
NORMAN & JOSH GEIGLE - WALL
53 ...................................DLK STFS 542= ....$168.25
9 .....................................DLK STFS 424= ....$186.50
KEFFELER RANCH - RED OWL
55.........................DLK & DWF STFS 522= ....$169.50
41 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 502= ....$147.50
KIEFFER & SHARKEY - STURGIS
60 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 552= ....$169.00
13 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 507= ....$172.50
32...............DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 533= ....$146.75
COLTON MCDANIEL - PHILIP
34 ...................................DLK STFS 553= ....$165.75
7 .....................................DLK STFS 466= ....$186.00
AARON & JIM MANSFIELD - KADOKA
118 .................................DLK STFS 488= ....$177.25
39 ...................................DLK STFS 575= ....$162.25
PAT TRASK FAMILY - WASTA
95.........................DLK & DWF STFS 567= ....$166.00
128.......................FED & DLK STFS 470= ....$180.00
44 ...................................DLK STFS 376= ....$190.25
DOUG & VICKY DAHL - WALL
46.........................DLK & DWF STFS 557= ....$168.00
26.........................FED & DLK STFS 466= ....$176.00
54 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 540= ....$144.75
16 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 437= ....$152.00
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
65 ...................................DLK STFS 630= ....$157.75
13 ...................................DLK STFS 531= ....$168.00
CHASE RANCH - MIDLAND
58 ...................................DLK STFS 616= ....$161.25
64...................................DLK HFFS 587= ....$150.50
DON & JUDY RAWHOUSER - NEWCASTLE, WY
51 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 567= ....$165.00
13 ...................................DLK STFS 468= ....$174.00
10.......................CHAF & DLK HFFS 469= ....$152.50
KILNESS RANCH - HOWES
47.........................DLK & DWF STFS 521= ....$168.50
27.........................DLK & DWF STFS 406= ....$192.50
11.........................DLK & DWF STFS 303= ....$207.50
22 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 408= ....$168.00
13 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 337= ....$171.00
JEFF MADSEN - QUINN
56.........................FED & DLK STFS 462= ....$182.50
27.........................DLK & DWF STFS 372= ....$198.50
58 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 441= ....$150.50
32 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 348= ....$172.75
MARTY & VICKI HEBB - CHERRY CREEK
32 ...................................DLK STFS 463= ....$176.00
14.........................FED & DLK STFS 361= ....$192.00
20...................................DLK HFFS 435= ....$164.50
18...................................DLK HFFS 363= ....$172.00
GENE CROSBIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
86.........................DLK & DWF STFS 473= ....$176.00
16.........................DLK & DWF STFS 374= ....$194.00
63 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 451= ....$159.25
18 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 383= ....$169.00
DEAN & MATT HEEB - MIDLAND
19.........................DLK & DWF STFS 564= ....$163.00
8 .....................................DLK STFS 435= ....$177.00
9.....................................DLK HFFS 418= ....$161.00
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
78 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 521= ....$165.25
19 ...................................DLK STFS 386= ....$190.50
DARRELL ENNEN - RAPID CITY
40 ...................................DLK STFS 617= ....$157.75
19 ...................................DLK STFS 533= ....$166.75
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
33.........................DLK & DWF STFS 678= ....$154.75
9...........................DLK & DWF STFS 535= ....$164.00
33 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 642= ....$140.00
GERRY ECKERT - RAPID CITY
39 ...................................DLK STFS 650= ....$153.00
ROBERT J. WHITE - FAIRBURN
64.........................DLK & DWF STFS 491= ....$170.50
24 .......................CHAF & DLK STFS 376= ....$192.50
52 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 475= ....$150.00
23 ...................................DLK STFS 394= ....$160.00
BURT DARTT - WALL
30.........................DLK & DWF STFS 617= ....$155.25
JAY & CONNIE PRICE - NEW UNDERWOOD
13.........................DLK & DWF STFS 596= ....$153.00
6.....................................DLK HFFS 543= ....$141.75
CHANCE & ROBERT DENNIS - RED OWL
29.........................FED & DLK STFS 512= ....$168.00
11.........................FED & DLK STFS 424= ....$185.00
18 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 458= ....$150.50
CODY & MANDI SKOGEN - OPAL
19.........................FED & DLK STFS 539= ....$166.75
25 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 509= ....$144.50
SANDY HANSON - STURGIS
18 ...................................DLK STFS 653= ....$150.50
KETELSEN FAMILY TRUST - UNION CENTER
48 ...................................DLK STFS 603= ....$158.50
29 ...................................DLK STFS 514= ....$172.00
37...................................DLK HFFS 537= ....$144.50
SHUCK BROTHERS - UNION CENTER
99.........................FED & DLK STFS 477= ....$171.50
82.........................FED & DLK STFS 411= ....$178.00
110 ......................FED & DLK HFFS 463= ....$160.50
93 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 373= ....$165.00
JJ ELSHERE - HEREFORD
15 ...................................DLK STFS 529= ....$166.50
10 ...................................DLK STFS 425= ....$190.00
WADE GEIGLE - CREIGHTON
16.........................DLK & DWF STFS 517= ....$162.25
20 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 501= ....$151.50
BAR OPEN A INC - KADOKA
36 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 545= ....$165.75
14 ...............DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 459= ....$172.50
41 ......................CHAF & FED HFFS 525= ....$147.50
CHANE COOMES - MANDERSON
70.........................FED & DLK STFS 550= ....$153.75
34.........................FED & DLK STFS 436= ....$170.00
50 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 473= ....$147.25
ERIC HENDRICKSEN - RAPID CITY
10.........................DLK & DWF STFS 575= ....$146.00
10........................FWF & DWF HFFS 592= ....$134.00
FLOYD VOGELGESANG - WANBLEE
12.........................FED & DLK STFS 598= ....$145.00
22 ........................FED & DLK HFFS 561= ....$139.00
BEN SMITH - QUINN
10.........................FED & DLK STFS 465= ....$173.00
IRWIN FERGUSON - KADOKA
47 .................................HEFF STFS 495= ....$161.75
17 .................................HEFF STFS 403= ....$173.25
15...................................DWF STFS 466= ....$181.00
16 ..................................DWF HFFS 415= ....$160.00
PAUL PARKS - OWANKA
9 ..........................DLK & DWF HFFS 537= ....$134.50
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
5...........................FED & DLK STFS 358= ....$178.00
8 ..........................FED & DLK HFFS 459= ....$145.50
MISTY HEBB - EAGLE BUTTE
18 ...................................DLK STFS 490= ....$162.50
16...................................DLK HFFS 456= ....$156.00
DELINDA SIMONS - ALLEN
36.........................DLK & DWF STFS 543= ....$158.75
23 ........................DLK & DWF HFFS 538= ....$141.00
Notice
to our
Subscribers:
When sending
subscription
payments
PLEASE return
the entire pink
postcard
with the payment.
Winner Regional
Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology
Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Using Soil Survey
Information
While many producers are fa-
miliar with the land they farm, the
drought of 2012 was very revealing
in how various soils hold water
compared to others. There were
areas that demonstrated excellent,
fair, and poor crop conditions in
the same field. Water holding ca-
pacities of different soil types
made a considerable difference in
the crops ability to survive the
drought stress.
There may be cases where a
field is predominantly made up of
a particular soil type that makes it
a poor candidate for certain crops.
Shallow soils with a low water
holding capacity for example,
might be poor candidates for full
season crops like corn, as they are
unable to store enough moisture to
produce a reasonable yield; and
rainfall during the latter part of
the growing season can be highly
unreliable.
There are some strategies a pro-
ducer could use to manage prob-
lem soils, like careful choice of
crops and crop rotations, planting
cover crops, etc. Progress would
likely be slow, and come in small
steps, but about all one could do to
improve production.
The first step is to find out more
about the soils you are dealing
with. All of South Dakota has been
surveyed for soil type and charac-
teristics. Many, if not all counties
have published soil survey books
that were provided to landowners,
and may be available at local li-
braries, Natural Resource Conser-
vation Service (NRCS) offices,
County Extension offices, etc. For
several years, the USDA-NRCS
has had the Web Soil Survey
(WSS) online: http://websoilsur-
vey. nrcs. usda. gov/ app/ Home-
Page.htm. The Web Soil Survey
contains more information than
the published soil surveys, and is
regularly updated with new op-
tions, features and data.
Chapter eighteen, “Online Web
Soil Survey (WSS) Information”, of
“iGrow Wheat: Best Management
Practices for Wheat Production”,
written by Doug Malo, Assistant
Department Head/Distinguished
Professor in the SDSU Plant Sci-
ence Department contains an ex-
tensive explanation of the WSS. In
addition to providing a comprehen-
sive guide to using the site, the
chapter contains a nice list of on-
line sources of soils and natural re-
sources information.
With the cost of land, fertilizer,
seed, machinery, fuel and other in-
puts in farming today, and the
prices of agricultural commodities,
farmers can enjoy significant re-
turns by using management to op-
timize their productivity. With
modern GPS technology, soil sur-
vey data yield monitoring data and
scouting reports, it may be possible
to increase profitability and reduce
the impact of agriculture on the
environment.
Chapter eighteen, “Online Web
Soil Survey (WSS) Information”, of
“iGrow Wheat: Best Management
Practices for Wheat Production”
should be posted in the “Resource
Library” of “iGrow Wheat”:
http://igrow.org/agronomy/wheat/
in the near future. You can also
purchase a printed copy of “iGrow
Wheat: Best Management Prac-
tices for Wheat Production” at the
iGrow Store:
http://igrow.org/store/.
Calendar
•11/27-28/2012: Ag Horizons
Conference, Pierre, SD
•12/11/2012: Soil Health Info
Day- Davison County Extension
Complex, Mitchell, SD

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