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Kadoka Press, June 6, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 47
June 6, 2013
--by Robyn Jones
When not feeling well for several
days, Dan Van Gorp had no idea
the struggle that his body was deal-
ing with. For a few days he had
been dealing with a discomfort in
his chest, which he believed to be
the onset of a chest cold or early
stages of pneumonia.
But waking up on the morning
of December 10, 2012, Van Gorp re-
alized the discomfort was now
more of a pain and worse than be-
fore. He contacted his office and
told them he would not be in that
day and was debating whether or
not he should go to the doctor. After
the pain continued to increase, Van
Gorp drove to the Philip hospital.
He visited with the receptionist,
telling her of his symptoms and in-
quired whether he should go to the
clinic or the emergency room. After
hearing of his discomfort, the re-
ceptionist directed him to go the
emergency room.
Once the doctor arrived, he or-
dered an electrocardiogram, EKG,
to be done.
“Immediately the doctor re-
turned and stated that I was hav-
ing a massive heart attack,” said
Van Gorp, “and that he was going
to administer some medicine to
help me relax, but instead it com-
pletely knocked me out and my
next memory is waking up at the
Mayo Clinic on January 7, 2013.”
During the days between De-
cember 10 to January 7, even
though Van Gorp has no recollec-
tion of the days, he was in a battle
for his life.
Van Gorp was transferred from
Philip to the Rapid City Regional
Hospital and his family in Pella,
IA, was contacted and told that he
had been admitted. His dad imme-
diately left for Rapid City, driving
10 hours knowing his son’s condi-
tion was not good and that the odds
were better for him to die rather
than to live.
Right away he went through the
procedure to have a stent put in his
heart. The stent was unable to re-
lieve the pressure in his heart and
a second procedure was done and
the tandemheart system was con-
nected to his heart.
A tandemheart system is a tem-
porary, external, continuous flow,
centrifugal pump that is placed
through the femoral vein. The
pump is used to stabilize critically
ill patients who require short term
left heart support that cannot be
adequately achieved with other
procedures.
Once Van Gorp’s heart was re-
ceiving the support from the
tandemheart system, he was flown
to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,
MN, on December 19. Once arriv-
ing at the Mayo Clinic, he under-
went triple-bypass open heart
surgery.
“Originally my family was told
that the open heart surgery was
successful,” said Van Gorp, “but
they had left my chest open for two
days to watch the healing, and
prior to closing it, they informed
my family that my heart was still
not functioning properly.”
So on December 27, a Left Ven-
tricular Assist Device, LVAD, was
surgically placed in Van Gorp’s
chest. It is similar to a type of me-
chanical heart, where it helps the
heart pump oxygen-rich blood
throughout the body. Unlike an ar-
tificial heart though, the LVAD
does not replace the heart, it just
helps it do its job, which meant the
difference between life and death
for Van Gorp.
For days following the LVAD
surgery, his family was by his side
and on January 7 it was another
answer to prayers when he re-
gained consciousness.
“During those few days when I
was supposed to be waking up, my
dad and my sister would ask me to
squeeze their hand or move my fin-
gers, and I was able to respond to
their commands,” said Van Gorp,
“but when the nurses would ask me
to do the same thing, I wouldn’t re-
spond. So, even being in a coma, I
could recognize my family and the
connection was there.”
Being so ill and in a coma, Van
Gorp’s family was faced with mak-
ing some major decisions.
“Making the decisions were re-
ally hard on my family, since there
were major risks attached to each
of those decisions,” Van Gorp said,
“but what helped them was all the
calls, cards, letters, and Facebook
messages of support and the
prayers that we received.
Not only did the support help
my family, but they also helped me.
They read all the messages to me
while I was in the coma and after
waking up, I didn’t remember the
entire messages but I could remem-
ber parts of the messages.”
Not only could he remember por-
tions of what his family said, he
also remembered the dreams he
had.
“The most vivid dream I had was
of my funeral. The dream appeared
to be exactly like my uncle’s funeral
that I attended a few months back,
expect this time I was in the cas-
ket,” he said, “I remember being
pushed down the aisle of the
church in the casket and I could see
everyone was looking at me.”
Another dream I had was a
mother cat was sitting in the cor-
ner of the room and her kitten was
very cold, and she was doing every-
thing she could to keep the kitten
warm. The doctors believe that this
dream may have been related to
when they had packed my body
with ice packs to reduce a fever, but
one doesn’t know for sure,” said
Van Gorp, “I had several dreams
that I can remember and some of
them make sense and others do
not.”
The fever was one of the health
obstacles and complications that he
faced during the time he was in the
coma. He spiked a fever of 104º and
the doctors could not determine the
cause.
“The doctors took every precau-
tion they could and at one time
they were actually too cautious,”
said Van Gorp. “I was connected to
eleven machines at one time. They
were doing all the work for my
heart, breathing, bowels, liver, kid-
neys and that’s when the fever
came on. They finally started to
slowly disconnect the machines
and my fever went down. My body
was rejecting the extra help and
was sending the message that the
only organ that needed help was
my heart, the others were healthy.”
At another point Van Gorp suf-
fered a minor stroke, which af-
fected the visual area of the brain.
As a result, he has a blind spot in
the upper left quadrant of each eye.
There is a small chance that his vi-
sion may return, but the doctors
were very concerned that there
may be brain damage.
“Constantly I was doing mental
chores of answering questions,
spelling my name, stating the date,
and counting,” said Van Gorp, “but
thankfully I showed no signs of any
damage.”
Even though regaining con-
sciousness was a milestone, the re-
covery process was just beginning.
“When I woke up I was so
thirsty that the first words out of
my mouth to my dad was, ‘I want
copious amounts of water’,”
laughed Van Gorp, “my Dad knew
that if I used a word like ‘copious’ I
must have some good brain func-
tions.”
But recovery was going to take
time and even the simple task of
swallowing was a chore. Since it
had been nearly a month since he
had swallowed, his tongue had
shriveled up and his vocal cords
were diminished, there was a con-
cern with fluids going down the
esophagus to the stomach and not
into the lungs.
“For days I was only allowed ice
chips and in very small amounts
and I was so thirsty,” said Van
Gorp, “but once I graduated to
water, I would have to drink with
my head bent forward to make sure
I was swallowing right.”
It also took time to gain strength
and learn how to live the LVAD.
The cable for the LVAD enters
into his chest cavity right below the
rib cage. Beneath his heart is small
pump and tubes are connected to
heart. There is a small computer-
ized ‘brain’ that regulates the inter-
nal pump and the brain is powered
by two batteries. The batteries give
approximately ten to twelve hours
of life and are carried in vest. At
night the chest cable is connected
to a larger machine at his house
and plugged into a wall outlet.
“I don’t even notice carrying the
extra hardware around anymore,
it’s been a very easy adjustment.”
he said, “and if I didn’t have the
power supply, my heart stops.”
The pump produces 10,000 rev-
olutions a minute to circulate the
blood at a steady stream. Since the
blood flows at a constant rate
through his system, he no longer
has a blood pressure or a pulse.
Listening to his heart with a
stethoscope, the beating sound is
now replaced by a the soft purr of a
motor.
“I do get tired a lot easier now,”
he said, “a normal heart will in-
crease its’ rate to match the
amount of activity being done, but
mine continues at the same rate no
matter if I’m walking or sitting. So,
I’ve had to adjust my pace some.”
Other lifestyle changes have
been minimal. The main change in-
cludes putting the brain and bat-
teries in a waterproof bag to
shower. He can longer be in any
body of water including a tub of
water, hot tub, or swimming. His
diet consists of high fiber and low
sodium, and no alcohol or tobacco.
Along with that, he also takes 20
pills everyday.
Even though the LVAD is doing
the work for his heart, he is able to
maintain a routine schedule, the
life expectancy of living with an
LVAD is only 10 years.
“There is a three percent chance
that my heart will heal itself, so
even though it’s small, there’s al-
ways that hope,” he said, “since the
time I became sick the doctors told
me that there were three times I
should have died, so I’ve used up a
few miracles already.”
Every three months Van Gorp
returns to Mayo Clinic for tests and
to monitor his heart. After a certain
amount of criteria is met, he can
become eligible for a heart trans-
plant.
“Just turning 35, the doctors are
not sure what caused me to have
heart problems,” he said, “They be-
lieve that most of it would have to
be genetics, although there is no
heart disease in my father’s family,
my mother was adopted, and we
have no knowledge of any of her
family’s health history so, we may
never be certain. But realistically,
I did myself no favors by smoking
or drinking.”
The goal of being discharged
from the hospital was met on Jan-
uary 29. After spending a month
with his family in Iowa, he re-
turned home to Kadoka on March
2.
“The type of heart attack I had
is often referred to as the “widow
maker” because people do no usu-
ally survive this type of heart at-
tack,” he said, “but it was an
amazing feeling to finally be home,
sleep in my own bed, reconnect
with my friends, see my dog, and
get back to work.
“If it wasn’t for the grace of God
and the skillful doctors, I know I
would not be here today, and even
though each day brings more chal-
lenges than before, I feel like every
day is gift, and that I’m thankful
for,” he concluded with a smile.
New lease on life thanks to high-tech heart pump
Dan Van Gorp shows shows his Left Ventricular Assist Device, which keeps his
heart function working while he waits for a heart transplant.
--photo by Robyn Jones
Left Ventricular Assist Device, LVAD, which Van Gorp uses.
ever taught was second grade.
“The different grades have kept
me young,” shared Sandy. “When
you have combination classrooms,
you have to be prepared and teach
ALL the grades. You have to be “on”
at all times while the students are
in the classroom.
“You have to come up with new
ideas every year because you have
those students two years at a time,
and they will remind you if they
have already done an activity,”
smiled Sandy.
Sandy, went on to say, “The
classroom needs to be a positive
place no matter what else is going
on in your life. When you walk into
that classroom, you leave behind
whatever is going on in your life. As
a teacher, you need to be there for
your students.”
That kind of dedication could be
seen anytime you walked into her
classroom. Sandy was either at the
table teaching a grade, in front of
the entire class instructing, or
preparing for the next lesson.
When I asked Sandy what kept
her going every day, she smiled and
said, “I loved going every morning
and seeing those faces. I loved my
job. I never tired of going to my
job.”
Sandy greeted her students at
the door every morning when they
walked up the stairs, and she was
there at the end of the day to say
goodbye.
She talked about a student who
gave her a hug when the student
entered the room, when the stu-
dent came back from lunch and
when the student left every day.
“That touches one’s heart,” shared
Sandy.
Reading has always been an im-
portant part of her classroom. Not
just reading during class, but read-
ing for enjoyment. The back shelf
along half the wall were tubs of
every kind of book in Sandy’s class-
room. Along with all these books
were two chairs and a bunch of pil-
lows. When the students were done
with their work or during free
reading time, they could use the
chairs or pillows to relax on and
just read.
This emphasis on reading cre-
ated a love for reading in many of
her students. In fact, during the
past few years, some of Sandy’s
students have been credited and
awarded with some outstanding
acheivements. These acheivements
being “reading a million or more
words” in a year.
Sandy shared a story of a stu-
dent who had struggled with read-
ing, and one day, it finally just
“clicked.” The student began to
read all the time. One day, when
she had dismissed the class for re-
cess, she looked over and found the
student still engrossed in the book.
“He hadn’t even heard me tell
the class it was time for recess,”
commented Sandy. “Those are the
moments that made teaching so re-
warding.”
Sandy talked about the changes
in education over the past 38 years.
She feels there is more emphasis
on testing now than in the begin-
ning of her career. Teacher account-
ability is better in today’s
education. Although, with the tech-
nology being such a large part of
teaching, she felt there is a lot
more responsibility placed on the
teachers now.
“Today, more of a teacher’s time
is spent working on things such as
websites and other requirements
and less time with the students,”
said Sandy. “I’m there to teach.”
Today’s schools have more re-
sponsibility than they used to.
Schools have to feed them not only
lunch but breakfast and some
snacks. She believes that’s a good
thing. The schools today, though,
have more social problems to deal
with than in the past.
I asked Sandy if she thought
there were benefits to teaching in a
rural school, and if teaching at In-
terior had some advantages as
well. “Oh, definitely,” she replied.
“Here at Interior School, we have
always felt more like a family. The
parents here as a general rule care
about what is happening with their
children.”
She went on to praise all that
the booster club does for the stu-
dents at the school, and the oppor-
tunities they provide for the
students at Interior from the school
carnival, to playground equipment,
to the field trips they pay for.
One opportunity Sandy believes
is the Interior students benefit
from is the ongoing partnership
with Badlands National Park. This
has brought many excellent experi-
ences for those students.
On May 2, Interior held their
spring concert. What Sandy did not
know was the entire school, along
with the community and and her
family, planned a surprise retire-
ment celebration for her.
Continued on page 4.
--by Rhonda Antonsen
After 33 years, a legacy of
teaching has come to a close at the
Interior School. On May 16, Sandy
Shortbull dismissed her class one
last time. As the halls grew quiet
one can only imagine what that
feeling was as Sandy looked back
at 38 years of teaching with 33
consecutive years with the Interior
School.
I had the opportunity to sit
down and visit with Sandy about
her years at Interior and the Inte-
rior School.
Before coming to Interior,
Sandy worked for one year at
McLaughlin and four years at
Rosebud. In the fall of 1979, Sandy
began teaching fifth and sixth
grade at Interior. At that time, she
was known as Miss Pettigrew to
her class. She later married Les
Shortbull and had two sons, Casey
and Jesse.
Her first classroom was located
in the “big room” upstairs before it
was remodeled and turned into
more classrooms. One of the mem-
ories she shared of that first year
was of her students decorating the
shades over the windows. Sandy
said, “The school promised they
would get me new shades. So, I
thought why not let the kids deco-
rate them.” So, her students di-
vided up into groups and did just
that.
Over the 33 years Sandy spent
at the Interior School, she had all
multi-grade classrooms, except for
one year. The youngest grade she
For years of dedication,
Sandy Shortbull honored
Mr. Nemecek (L) speaking at the Interior School spring concert about what makes
a great educator as they honored Sandy Shortbull for years of dedication.
The Kadoka Press
office will be closed
Friday, June 7.
Church Page …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
Letter to
the Editor
Obituaries
Upcoming Area Events …
T-ball has started call Sanna Rock for details 462-6151 or 381-6383.
KCBA will meet on June 6 at 6:30 p.m. at Club 27.
Jackson County Commissioners will met on Monday, June 10 at
9 a.m.
Kadoka City Council will hold their monthly meeting on Monday,
June 10 at 7 p.m.
Kadoka Area School Board will hold their monthly meeting on
Tuesday, June 12 at 7 p.m.
Mass at Our Lady of Victory Church will be at 8:00 a.m. Sunday,
June 9. The change for mass scheduling is due to the Year of Faith
event that will be held at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Church in
Martin begining at 12:30 that day.
Wednesday, June 12 at 10 a.m. the summer reading program will
begin at the Jackson County Library for ages 3-6 years old and 7-12
years old.
Read Job 5:7-11
“Why is this happening to me?” When we are bewil-
dered by life, we cry out to anyone who will listen, “What
is the point of trials?” Our thoughts become confused, our
emotions chaotic, and our steps slowed. Scripture answers these questions. In response to “Why,” it tells us
that we live in a fallen world filled with sinful people, that even the redeemed struggle with sin, and that
Satan—the “ruler of this world”—has great influence here. No wonder why trials happen!
But there is something else that we are wise to consider—namely, what is God’s purpose in our adversity?
It could be that He desires to get our attention because we have ignored His other signals. Or it could be to
keep our attention on Him. When the Israelites lived in the desert, it must have seemed a great trial to have
no food left at the end of each day. But God knew that if He provided more than one day’s supply at a time,
the people would stop looking to Him. This “trial” kept their attention on their Provider.
Adversity can also be a tool to remind us of God’s great love for us. We can become so used to His love
that we don’t appreciate it until we hit a bump. What’s more, hardships can help us to know the Lord in a
deeper way. To experience Him as our comfort requires that there be a need for comfort. Or perhaps He
wants to lead us into self-examination. We tend to ignore our wanderings from God’s ways. When halted by
an obstacle, we have time to discover the wrong turns we’ve made.
Whatever the reason for your trial, know that God has purpose in adversity and that He has allowed it
for your good (Rom. 8:28).
Advancing Through Adversity
Inspiration Point
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press, PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Kadoka Baseball Schedule
“B” Games at 5:30 p.m. “A” Game to follow.
Tues., June 11 at home with Philip
Thurs., June 13 at Murdo
Tues., June 18 at home with Wall
Thurs., June 20 at Philip
Tues., June 25 at Wall
Thurs., June 27 at home with Murdo
Tues., July 2 at home with Philip
Tues., July 9 at Murdo
Thurs., July 11 at home with Wall
Thurs., July 18 & Sat., July 20
League Tournament at Kadoka
Dear Editor,
THAT SHOULD SAY SOME-
THING...
In 1992 the United Nations con-
vened in Brazil advocated the abo-
lition of property rights as a part of
Agenda 21. This socialistic scheme
was to be accomplished by the 21st
century.
We can still own property. How-
ever, the EPA working under
aliases such as “enhancement dis-
tricts” is working to make local con-
trol a thing of the past with
promises of grants and assistance
in the writing of same. Once “com-
prehensive planning” is in place
those grants may be matching, if
available. Now we have a panel
drawing up zoning plans. Later
there will be fees, permits and
other demands on property owners.
The abolition of property rights
protected by the 5th Amendment is
being compromised with regula-
tions aimed at eventually making
property ownership unaffordable.
Our small town had experience
with matching grants due the
tremendous effort locals to match a
grant for a sprinkler system at our
licensed rest home. A street project
earlier would have cost about as
much for engineering as for mate-
rials and labor. Only the gracious
gift of labor by a retired resident
engineer saved the city those costs.
In spite of such examples our coun-
cil voted for a comprehensive plan.
The only businessman on the
council voted against the compre-
hensive plan. That should say
something.
/s/ Glenn T. Freeman
Box 406
Kadoka, SD 57543
(605) 837-2099
May Mednansky, age 91 of
White River, S.D., died Thursday,
May 30, 2013, at the Maryhouse in
Pierre.
Juanita “May” Shouldis Med-
nansky was born to Charles and
Mary A. (Atkins) Shouldis, Decem-
ber 12, 1921, in Mellette County.
May married Clarence Mednan-
sky in Valentine, Neb., September
16, 1940. Three children were born
to this union: Audrey (Ed) Bur-
nette, Pierre, Rodney (Oleta) Med-
nansky and Janice Ellis, White
River. From there the family grew
to include grandchildren, Angela
(David) Aud, Great Mills, Md., Guy
(Michele) Burnette, California,
Md., Sonya (Josh) Feaster, Tucson,
Ariz., Justin (Dena) Mednansky,
Richard Mednansky and Duane
Mednansky, White River, Chad
(Margarita) Ellis, Mexico, and Tri-
cia Shedeed, Otter Tail, Minn.;
great-grandchildren, Joey, Brandy,
Bailey, Sage, Taylor, Sharissa, Ash-
ton, Logan, Justin, Kade, Alexan-
dra, Michelle, Nathan, Lauren,
Kaise, Adam, Matthew, James and
Alana; and proud to have Nova
Maylynn as her great-great-grand-
daughter.
May barely answered to being
called Juanita but loved being
called Mom, Grandma, Grandma
Great, Aunt or Auntie May. May
sometimes spelled with an “e”,
sometimes with a “y”, just to keep
us on our toes. When asked about
doing something here lately, her
come back would be, “Well, I’m
ONLY 91!” She loved her family
and friends, going to the grandkids’
programs, concerts and games. She
loved seeing the sun and moon rise
and set, working with the livestock,
admiring the birds and flowers and
all that nature provided.
May was a sweet, hardworking,
quiet country girl. She worked side
by side with Clarence on the farm/
ranch as well as maintaining the
house and preparing the greatest
meals. The farm was a vacation
spot to many nieces and nephews
growing up and later to her grand-
children. Moving from “home” to
town was a big adjustment for both
May and Clarence.
After moving to town, she en-
joyed bird watching and neighbor
watching! She knew what every
bird was and what every neighbor
was doing. She was looking for-
ward to sitting on her new deck
this summer and had plans for
flowers she would be able to enjoy
as she soaked up the sunshine.
May loved playing canasta,
solitare, embroidering and crochet-
ing. May embroidered towels that
are raffled off at the Mednansky
family reunion and has them ready
for this year!
May was an active and proud
member of the Cottownwood
Ladies Aide and so enjoyed her
monthly outing. She often took a
quarter rather than a dime for
lunch – the big spender she was!
May came home full of news and
reported on what lunch consisted of
and, of course, wasn't really hungry
for supper that night.
May fought a courageous battle
but was overcome by kidney and
congestive heart failure. She was
one tough, brave woman to the end!
May was preceded in death by
her husband, Clarence, her parents
and her brothers and sisters, as
well as many special Shouldis and
Mednansky in-laws.
Services were held Tuesday,
June 4, at the White River Commu-
nity Events Center with Pastor
Craig Marshall officiating.
Music was provided by Linda
Blom with special music by great-
grandson, Sage Mednansky.
Guest book attendants were
Barb “Susie” Ketel and Michelle
Whitted. Ushers were Charles
“Pete” Shouldis and Bill Sinclair.
Pallbearers were Justin, Richard
and Duane Mednansky, Bruce
Boyd, Kevin Kusick and Dale
“Bobby” Wooden Knife. Honorary
pallbearers were the Cottonwood
Ladies Aide members and all of
May’s family and friends.
Interment was in the White
River Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
May Mednansky________________________________
Laura Morgan, age 102 of Philip,
S.D., died May 28, 2013, at her
son's home in Billings, Mont.
Laura Elizabeth Rossiter was
born March 2, 1911, at West Fork,
the daughter of Samuel and Bertha
(Sutter) Rossiter. She grew up and
attended rural school in the
Milesville area, including first
grade at the Chief Hump Rural
School. After high school, she at-
tended Spearfish Normal School
for one year and came back and
taught rural school in the Ot-
tumwa area.
Laura was united in marriage to
Homer Morgan on June 10, 1932,
in Philip. They moved to his dad’s
homestead one mile east and one-
quarter mile north of Milesville. In
1951, they moved into Philip where
their children attended school.
Homer passed away in 1980.
Laura continued to reside in Philip
until moving to Billings, Mont., in
November 2011.
Laura enjoyed reading and espe-
cially spending time with her fam-
ily.
Survivors include five sons, Ger-
ald Glen Morgan and his wife,
Gladys, of Rapid City, Philip Dale
Morgan and his wife, Nanette, of
Billings, Mont., Edward Samuel
Morgan and his wife, Bonnie, of
Miller, Kent Homer Morgan and
his wife, Twila, of Billings, and
Keith Lauren Morgan and his wife,
Norlene, of Billings; two daughters,
Connie Mae Parsons and her hus-
band, Bill, of Milesville, and Kyle
Elaine Taylor of Gillette, Wyo.; sev-
eral grandchildren, great-grand-
children, and
great-great-grandchildren; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Laura was preceded in death by
her husband, Homer; her son, Paul
Allen Morgan; a great-grandson,
Kirk Michael Parsons; a sister,
Mabel Ireland; two daughters-in-
law, Mary Morgan and Lorraine
Morgan; and one son-in-law, Fred
Taylor.
Services were held Saturday,
June 1, at the United Church in
Philip with Pastor Kathy Chesney
officiating.
Private family interment was
held at the Milesville Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Laura Morgan_________________________________
Carol Ruth Borelson, age 78, of
Kadoka, S.D., formerly of Rapid
City, died Sunday, June 2, 2013, at
the Kadoka Nursing Home.
Carol Ruth Borelson was born
October 13, 1934 at New Under-
wood, the third daughter of Tobias
“Toby” and Christine (Matthews)
Borelson. The family resided in
New Underwood for a while. After
the accidental death of Carol’s old-
est sister, Lorraine, the family
moved to their Rapid City area
ranch.
Carol grew up on the family
ranch and after her parents death,
she continued to reside on the
ranch with her sister and care
giver, Dorothy Borelson. On Sep-
tember 23, 2009 Carol moved into
the Kadoka Nursing Home, be-
cause of the failing health of her
sister, Dorothy. Carol continued to
reside at the nursing home until
her death.
Carol was baptized into the
Catholic faith.
Grateful for having shared her
life are her guardian, Robert “Bob”
Heidgerken and his wife, Peggy, of
Rapid City; a special friend, Paula
Vogelgesang of Wanblee; and the
residents of the Kadoka Nursing
Home.
Carol was preceded in death by
her parents and two sisters, Lor-
raine and Dorothy Borelson.
Visitation will be held one hour
preceding the services.
Mass of Christian burial will be
celebrated at 10:00 a.m. Thursday,
June 6, at the Kadoka Nursing
Home with Father Bryan Sorensen
as celebrant.
Music will be provided by Mari-
lyn Millage, pianist, and Susan
Davidson, vocalist. Pallbearers are
Michael, Jay and Paula Vogelge-
sang, and Robert, Aaron and Ben
Heidgerken. Honorary pallbearers
are the residents and staff of the
Kadoka Nursing Home.
Graveside services will be held
2:00 p.m. Thursday, June 6, at the
Black Hills National Cemetery
near Sturgis wth Father Bill Zan-
dri officiating.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Carol Ruth Borelson______________________________
Linda Kramer, age 67, of Philip,
S.D., died April 6, 2013, at St.
Joseph Hospital in Tucson, Ariz.
Linda Lee Long was born Sep-
tember 25, 1945, to Orville (Tim)
and Mathilda (Tillie) Long. She
was raised on the family farm near
Philip. She was baptized and con-
firmed at Philip's Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church. As a young girl,
she looked forward to finishing her
daily chores so she could spend
time with her sister, Sally, swim in
the stock dams, fish, and visit her
many cousins. After graduating
from Philip High School, she at-
tended the American Business Col-
lege in Rapid City and earned a
degree in business administration.
She married John (Jack) Still in
1967, who passed away in a plane
crash in 1968.
In June 1970, she married
Danny Kramer in Davenport, Iowa.
During their careers, they had the
opportunity to reside in a number
of states, including Illinois, Iowa,
Michigan, Washington and Califor-
nia. During her career, Linda
achieved significant success in both
the banking and mortgage indus-
tries. Following retirement, Linda
and Danny moved from Moorpark,
Calif., to Burlington, Iowa. In 2007,
they purchased a motor home so
they could spend more time visit-
ing family and friends around the
country. In June 2012, they sold
their home in Burlington to follow
their dream of becoming full-time
RV'ers. In her retirement, Linda
enjoyed reading, golfing, genealogy,
water aerobics and coin collecting
but most of all, she relished spend-
ing time with her five grandchil-
dren and, as she put it, "making
memories."
Grateful for having shared
Linda's life include her husband,
Danny Kramer, of Philip; her son,
John (Tonya) Kramer of Philip; her
son, Jason (Penelope) Kramer of
Corona, Calif.; five grandchildren,
Coy, Corbin and Colden (Philip);
Kaylee and Zachery (Corona); sis-
ter, Sally (Arthur) Campbell of Port
Washington, Wis.; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; a brother, Arnold; and
her first husband.
According to her wishes, her
body was cremated.
Memorial services will be held at
2:00 p.m. on Friday, June 14, at the
First Lutheran Church in Philip,
with Pastor Frezil Westerlund offi-
ciating.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be directed to the American
Lung Association.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Linda Kramer__________________________________
Monday, June 10
Ham and scalloped potatoes,
baked squash, bread and waldorf
salad.
Tuesday, June 11
Roast turkey, mashed potatoes
and gravy, broccoli, cranberry
sauce, dinner roll and pumpkin
bar.
Wednesday, June 12
Meatloaf, baked potato, peas,
bread and pineapple.
Thursday, June 13
French dip with aus jus, maca-
roni salad, seasoned green beans
and ice cream with strawberries.
Friday, June 14
Taco salad with meat and beans,
tortilla chips, fresh fruit and
cookie.
Meals for
the Elderly
Belvidere & Norris News …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 381-2147
Email your news, photos
and classified ads to:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Belvidere Store
Open Daily
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Diesel • Gas
Farm Fuel
Pop • Snacks • Beer
344-2277
We will also hold our CASH
raffle drawing that night!
See any BVFD fireman for raffle tickets!
Street Dance to Country Rush
Belvidere Firemen’s
Feed & Dance
Burgers, Brats, Beans & Beer!
Saturday, June 8
at the Belvidere Fire Hall
Downtown Belvidere
Free-will offering Feed at 6 p.m.
Dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Gardening is an iffy proposition
here in western South Dakota. We
never have quite enough rain so
watering, except in highly unusual
years, is required. We also have
strong winds, hail, plagues of
grasshoppers, hot temperatures,
and various wild critters that like
vegetables. If you do insist on gar-
dening and actually raise some-
thing, you have overcome the odds
and can be proud of yourself.
Like many of you, I rather like
to play in the dirt and have done
quite a bit of it over the years. I
started out helping my mom and
grandmother who were the main
gardeners when I was young.
Grandma was very good at it, and
Mom was okay although I don’t
think she enjoyed it much. I helped
with some of the weeding and the
picking of such things as peas,
beans and cucumbers. After a
while, I became the main gardener
in the family except for corn and
potatoes which were Dad’s fa-
vorites. My main problem at first
was getting carried away and
planting such a huge garden that
I couldn’t properly tend it all.
Sometimes it also produced more
stuff than we needed or could
freeze, can, or give away. When
those nifty seed catalogs come in
the dead of winter, it looks so easy,
and you decide you’d like to try
this, and that and some of those.
The first rule of gardening, then, is
to avoid getting carried away. Only
plant what you have the time and
energy to tend and not more than
you can reasonably use. I came to
that conclusion the hard way and
only through experience.
When it comes to watering, I did
come up with a system that
worked pretty well for me. I would
drag out the old two-row corn lister
and hitch it to the little Ford trac-
tor. I made deep lister rows going
slightly downhill, and planted in
the bottom of the rows. Then I
could run water down the rows in-
stead of sprinkling the whole gar-
den. This worked best if I used
some mulch as well to keep the
water from evaporating right away
in the hot days of July. My main
problem here was my father who
had learned in planting field corn
in the early years that corn should
be hilled up. If he got in the gar-
den, he tended to not only fill in
my lister rows but hill them up as
well. This made watering ex-
tremely difficult because water
runs off hills and doesn’t do the
plants there much good. As a re-
sult, I encouraged Dad to raise his
corn and potatoes in a different
place than I gardened so he would-
n’t start hilling all my stuff.
Then, after experimenting with
everything from huckleberries to
kohlrabies, it finally occurred to
me that what I most needed to
grow were those things that taste
much better home raised than pur-
chased. Tomatoes and cucumbers,
as you probably know, are ever so
much better home raised. Melons
may fit in that category too, but I
don’t hunger for those as much as
I do for tomatoes and cucumbers.
On the other hand, my taste buds
are not sufficiently sophisticated to
tell much difference between
onions and potatoes raised or pur-
chased. There is one exception to
that in those little early potatoes
you scratch around and pull out
before they’re completely mature.
Those are tasty.
One other rule I started to fol-
low was to plant nothing that was
a complete bug magnet. This espe-
cially applies to potatoes and any
member of the cabbage family. Dad
didn’t seem to mind strolling down
a row of spuds, picking off the po-
tato bugs, and throwing them in a
coffee can he carried that had a lit-
tle gas in the bottom. I didn’t have
quite enough patience for that.
Cabbage worms are harder to pick
off so insecticide is the usual re-
course there. I don’t like insecti-
cides so my cabbage, broccoli,
cauliflower and the like come to
me by way of the grocery store.
They probably have to use insecti-
cide to grow them too, but I just
wash them really well when I get
them.
Well, as often has happened to
me in my life, once I’ve experi-
mented with something to the
enth degree and worn myself out
with it, I somewhat lose interest
and go on to other things. That’s
sort of the way it is for me with
gardening. As a result, my efforts
this year only involve two potted
tomato plants and a few pots of cu-
cumbers. They say gardening is
good for the soul, so I hope those
few plants will sufficiently nourish
that part of me. If not, I can always
expand next year. Even then, how-
ever, I probably won’t get carried
away. I think in this case I’m bet-
ter off following another favorite
rule of mine which is, “Keep it sim-
ple, Stupid.” Not a bad idea when
it comes to gardening in good old
South Dakota where the odds are
somewhat stacked against us and
disaster can be just around the cor-
ner. Yet we still keep right on try-
ing. Why is that?
Garden Gambles
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
“By the time a man realizes that
maybe his father was right, he
usually has a son who thinks he is
wrong.” Charles Wadsworth
A new reading program for chil-
dren is starting this week at the li-
brary in the Mellette County
Museum. Karla Heyduck is start-
ing it on Wednesday, June 5, 2013.
A reception was held for Kathy
Chesney in Philip on Sunday, June
2, 2013. She recently received her
Divinity Degree.
Cliff, Elaine, Greg and Beau
Krogman traveled to Minnesota on
Thursday, May 23. The occasion
was the baptism of Olivia, Dee
Dee’s daughter. They all went to
Minnesota as that is where her
Godparents, Tim and Jennifer
Post, live. They returned home
May 27.
Elaine has garden planted, but
it is slow coming up.
Richard and Noreen Krogman
joined Clarence and Ellen for din-
ner on Memorial Day. Evan was
also a dinner guest that day.
Richard and Noreen have recorded
a total of 3.70 inches of rain for the
month of May.
After Dan Taff ’s physical ther-
apy session in Martin Thursday af-
ternoon, Dan and Susan visited her
parents, Alvin and Judie Simmons.
Heather and Morgan took their
fishing poles and tried for some fish
at the Deiss Dam Saturday after-
noon. The Tafts have been moving
cattle out to pasture when the
weather allows.
Orlana Schmidt joined with
friends and relatives in forming a
ladies team to play in the tourna-
ment Saturday at the Norris ball
field. Joining Orlana on the team
were Christine, Toni Lafferty, Vicki
Burbank, Tristan Arrow, Crystal
and Courtney Charging Hawk, Bri-
anna, and Georgianne Black Bear.
This was a fundraiser for the Nor-
ris youth to go to Montana for a
basketball camp. There were only
two ladies teams, but half a dozen
or so men’s teams, and the tourna-
ment continued on all day.
Jace Schmidt was among those
helping brand at Shane Bryan’s
one day last week.
Linda, Jeremy and Tyler Ring
left Wednesday after work and
headed for Montana. Linda’s par-
ents are celebrating their 50th
wedding anniversary. They live in
Hamilton, Montana.
Pastor Denke visited Robert and
Sharon Ring last Sunday, May 26.
Later that week a couple prairie
dog hunters from Nebraska
stopped in for a visit. Friday James
and Marjorie Letellier also visited
Robert and Sharon. Monday, June
3, it was back to Rapid City for a
check-up for Robert.
Wednesday Jessie Ring attended
a Title I workshop in Kadoka. Par-
ents from the various schools in the
Kadoka Area School District met to
discuss issues concerning the
schools. Bruce finished planting
corn, and also has been planting
trees from ASC and Arbor Day
foundation. It has been the right
kind of weather for sticking those
trees in the ground. Saturday af-
ternoon Jessie came over to June’s
for some rhubarb for that rhubarb
dump cake recipe.
Kevin and Kris Hachmeister,
now of Vancouver, British Colum-
bia, arrived Saturday, May 25, and
have been visiting in the area, as
well as staying with Jan Ras-
mussen. One day they visited Jan’s
sister, Betty Tesar, who is in the
hospital in Rapid City. The
Hachmeister’s left Sunday to head
back to Canada.
Pam Allard’s sister, Jerri, had
surgery last Tuesday and their
mother is now undergoing chemo.
Pam asks for prayers for their full
recovery.
Rev. Glenn Denke kept an ap-
pointment in Rapid City on Friday.
Kenda Huber’s nephew, Blaise
Nelson, stayed with them for a few
days last week. Nicole and Kenda
picked up some garden plants in
Valentine last week and hope to get
them in their gardens soon. Satur-
day Kenda was in Valentine again,
this time to attend the health fair.
Gary and Anne Heinert made a
quick trip to Sioux Falls on May 22
for the birth of their first grand-
child. They had to come back right
away, as Anne had another day of
school to finish. Then they re-
turned for the weekend to spend
more time with Paul and Amy and
young Miles Gary Heinert, who
weighed six pounds, 15 oounces
and measured 20 ½ inches. Erin is
home this weekend, taking a cou-
ple days off to help with branding
at home on Monday, the 3rd, if it
doesn’t rain.
The Kary guys have been help-
ing with branding at different
places when possible.
Correction to the news covering
the Kary Trio graduation reception
a couple weeks ago – Edna’s sister
and family now live in Coeur D
Alene, Idaho, not Montana.
Sue Larson brought Jakki and
Jimmy Burma home Friday to Nor-
ris after their visit with her last
week. Saturday LuAnn, Julie and
Sue took part in the VolksMarch at
Crazy Horse.
Evan and Dorothy Bligh were in
Rapid City on May 27 to decorate
graves. They also visited Nick
Knutson and family. Rain and hail
greeted them at different places
that day. Wednesday Evan ran
some errands in Martin while
Dorothy had her physical therapy
session. Thursday Dorothy had
some business in Kadoka, and Sat-
urday ran to Valentine for some
supplies. Sunday Evan was among
those helping with branding at
Jerry Hicks’ and at Cheyenne
Schmidt’s.
Last Monday June Ring had a
call from Gert Ring, but the call
didn’t last too long, as the storm
moved in about that time with
lightning, rain and hail, and when
the lightning affects the line, it is
time to hang up!
Thursday June kept a dental ap-
pointment in Valentine, and also
visited Marylyn Ohlmann.
The rain gauge at the Ring’s
shop showed a total of 5.30 inches
of rain for the month of May.
Ed and Carol Ferguson attended
the funeral of Dorothy Brickman in
Winner on Thursday. Mrs. Brick-
man is the grandmother of Scott
Brickman, son-in-law of the Fergu-
sons. Granddaughter Moya left
with her parents on Wednesday to
be with family in Winner. Moya
played her violin at the funeral,
one of two great-granddaughters
performing special music. She re-
turned to Norris with the Fergu-
son's from Winner.
Carol Ferguson ran the post of-
fice in Wanblee on Friday and Sat-
urday. Ed Ferguson helped at
brandings at the Owen Ferguson,
Jerry Hicks and Cheyenne Schmidt
places this week.
Gene and Margie Popkes were
Sunday dinner guests at the Fergu-
son home.
The Belvidere Dam got a refill
last week thanks to the heavy rain
and/or hailstorm. It had gone down
enough that there wasn’t much
water west of the road, but now
that area is covered again. This
should make the resident pelicans
happy, as well as the resident fish-
ermen such as Betty Kusick. Other
dams and waterholes in the area
gained some water as well al-
though this was somewhat spotty
and not all over.
Betty Kusick was visited on Sat-
urday by her daughter and son-in-
law, Loretta and Lawrence
Schreiber, of Quinn. They brought
some raw rhubarb for Betty plus
some already cooked into a pie
along with some meat and other
supplies. Earlier in the week, Betty
drove to Kadoka and got a perm.
Scot and Jodie O’Bryan had
their daughter, Faye, home from
Rapid City this weekend with her
three children, JD, Stormie, and
Ruby. Faye is the closest of the kids
now so has to bring the grandkids
occasionally to keep the folks enter-
tained. She lives in Rapid Valley,
but works as a nurse for Dr. John-
son at Internal Medicine over close
to the hospital. She also mentioned
it isn’t far from the new Wal-Mart
in town which she says is nice to
have closer to where she normally
goes.
Tom DeVries had his daughter,
Sarah, home this weekend. Sarah
said she had no particular reason
to come except she felt a need to get
out after being cooped up by the
wet, cloudy, cool weather of last
week. At the coffee time after
church on Sunday, Tom, Glenn
Freeman, and Betty Kusick were
dealing in tomatoes. Betty had
given Tom some tomato plants, and
Glenn was giving Betty some
tomato cages. Tom quipped that it
was kind of a three-cornered deal,
and his dad had always warned
him against three-cornered deals.
Mary Johnston was visited
overnight on Saturday by Gay
Logan of Philip. Gay and Mary
used to be neighbors when they
lived over south and were first
married. They got married the
same year and have been friends
ever since which is going on some-
thing like sixty years. The have a
tradition of celebrating each other’s
birthdays by going out for prime rib
and staying overnight with each
other. Gay’s birthday was actually
on Feb. 24, but they somehow
couldn’t get together then due to
snow and other things. They got
around to it this weekend, however,
with a meal of prime rib at Club 27
in Kadoka and with Gay staying
overnight with Mary and coming to
church with her on Sunday. Mary’s
birthday is coming up in July so
they plan to do something similar
at that time over at Gay’s in Philip.
The Davis family moved to
Rapid City this week. That in-
cludes Chad and Francie and their
three sons, Grady, Garrett and
Gage. Francie just started a new
job as Territory Manager for the R.
J. Reynolds Company. The job re-
quires her to visit a variety of retail
outlets in the Rapid City area,
training store managers and their
employees on federal regulations
for tobacco products, and on gen-
eral store management. Francie
still has her Arbonne business and
will continue to grow that in the
Rapid City area. The boys will be
joining another home-school family
for classes this fall. At present, the
family is living in a house owned by
the son of Francie’s aunt/stepmom,
Ruth. They are actually house-sit-
ting for the summer which will give
them time to find a place of their
own to live in. The Davis family
has been living on the former Don
Word place for a while and had
lived previously in the former
Reuben and Irene Buxcel house in
Belvidere. They do plan to drive
down for church part of the time
depending on how things go.
A few years ago, Terry Baldwin
planted a row of lilac bushes be-
tween the church hall and the for-
mer Antonie Obr house. They are
still small, but this year they had a
lot of nice blooms on them and were
really pretty. Terry said they were
real nice to look at for three days
before the hailstorm came and, not
only knocked the blossoms off, but
also some of the leaves. They will
probably recover but aren’t quite as
pretty now as they were.
Jerry Sanftner and company are
making good progress on the reno-
vation of the brick building on
Main Street that used to house the
post office, drug store and bank at
various times. The ceiling has been
finished using patterned metal
that used to be siding on the
Brook’s store. It has been painted
white and looks nice. Insulation
has been placed on the walls, and
siding with knotty pine is partially
done now. On Sunday, James Carl-
son, Casey Jensen, and Eric and
Pam Osborn were checking things
out there and maybe helping a lit-
tle if called on to do so. The place is
right there where people go by so it
is easy to stop and chat with the
workers and watch the progress.
The rains of recent times have
been greatly appreciated by people
in the area, but it has also post-
poned a lot of brandings. DJ Addi-
son got his done on Sunday, and
Colter Carlson was scheduled for
Monday. Syd Iwan, Ted Vobr, and
Jim Addison had to postpone theirs
twice already and are hoping to fi-
nally get it done on Tuesday.
FOR SALE:
Catholic Diocese of Rapid City is now accepting Bids
on the former Sacred Heart Catholic Church building
in Norris, SD. Wood frame 24’ x 60’. To be moved or
dismantled and site cleared. Bids due July 15, 2013;
Building to be removed by September 30, 2013.
For bid info or to schedule a site visit, contact: Fr. Bryan
Sorensen, PO Box 567, Martin, SD 57551, 488-0162.
The Church reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Locals …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Kadoka Nursing Home
Cathy Stone • 837-2270
Gateway News
Lola Joyce Riggins
Local News
Sydne Lenox
Kadoka Nursing Home Fundraiser
5K Run / 2 Mile Walk & Bake Sale
Saturday, June 22
9:30 a.m.: Sack Race ages 1-9 years
10:00 a.m.: 5K Run / 2 Mile Walk
Awards and refreshments to follow.
Registration and fees due before
June 1 to be guaranteed a T-shirt.
Race Day registrations WELCOME,
but not guaranteed a T-shirt.
5K Run $25 • 2 Mile Walk $20 • Sack Race Free
Starting Line will be at the Kadoka Nursing Home
Questions or to register contact Keena at
knh5K@outlook.com or 605-837-2270
Stronger economieS together
Session #6
“exploring Strategies for
enhancing the regional economy”
Tuesday, June 11th
Wall Community Center
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Optional bus tour of Wall is being planned
prior to the session. Contact Lindsey
at the Wall Chamber for more information
279-2665
wallchamber@gwtc.net
If you haven’t attended SET sessions before,
it’s NOT too late. We are still looking for
interested, influential people in the region to help
design a regional economic development plan.
evening and said it hit homes and
businesses about five miles from
where they live. Wanda said that
many friends in Kadoka have
called her about their safety.
Joyce Hicks and Linda and Ray-
mond Hicks of Rapid City drove to
Pierre on Friday and spent the
weekend at the home of Chad and
Leslie Hicks. They returned to
their homes on Sunday.
Carmen and Tim Huffman went
to Wessington Springs on Satur-
day, May 25, and helped their son
and wife pack and move to Mo-
bridge where they will perma-
nently live by the end of June.
Casey and Curtis Huffman will be
employed in that area. Curtis will
be the middle school and high
school principle in Wakpala, and
Casey has employment at the Mo-
bridge hospital. They returned
home on Monday night. On their
way to Wessington Springs that
Saturday, they had lunch at Al’s
Oasis near Chamberlain with Car-
men’s mom, Dorothy Houska, of
rural Pukwana, and then visited
her Dad’s grave in Chamberlain
and Tim’s mother’s grave in Kim-
ball. While at Kimball they visited
awhile with his aunt and uncle,
Bob and Lue Folan, of that city.
Geraldine Allen and her daugh-
ter, Patsy Larsen of Gillette, WY,
returned home on May 26 after
going on a cruise to Alaska. The
cruise was a 90th birthday gift to
Geraldine from Patsy on her birth-
day in January. The ladies drove to
Vancouver, WA, and caught the
cruise ship there. They enjoyed the
beautiful scenery going and coming
back from Alaska and were im-
pressed with the beautiful flowers.
They even got to see a bear on the
trip which began on Sunday, May
19.
Kelda and Cooper Counts spent
last week at the parental Don
Oyan home. They returned home to
Steamboat Springs, CO, Saturday.
Phil and Marty Hogen of Black
Hawk, Doris Rock of Sturgis,
Sondy and Dennis Fox of Albu-
querque, NM, and Florence Hogen
were dinner guests of Randi and
Don Oyan on May 26. The group
went to the cemetery to decorate
graves later that day.
Keena Byrd-Moro ran in the
Deadwood Mickelson Trail
Marathon on Sunday and place
fourth in the women’s marathon
with a time of 3:36:07 and placed
30th overall, both women and men
participation. There were 1,342 fe-
male runners and 584 males in
both the full marathon and half
marathon races. Congratulations
to Keena.
Kim Ireland and Andrew Farley
were married in Winner on Satur-
day, June 1. She is the daughter of
Barbara and Richard Ireland of
Kadoka. Among other relatives at-
tending the wedding were grand-
parents, Cathy and Howie Ireland,
of Belvidere and great-grandfather,
Shorty Ireland, of Kadoka. The
couple will make their home in
Winner.
Sympathy is extended to two
families who have ties to Kadoka
and area this week. On May 30
May Mednansky, 91, of White
River died in Pierre. May was mar-
ried to Clarence Mednansky of
Kadoka in September of 1940.
They have several family members
here and attended many of the
Mednansky reunions which are
held on Father’s Day weekend each
year. Her funeral services were
held on June 4th at the White
River Community Events Center
and burial was in White River.
Carol Borelson, 78, died on June
2. She had been a resident of the
Kadoka Nursing Home since 2009.
Her funeral services are scheduled
at the Nursing Home on Thursday,
June 6, at 10 a.m. and burial will
be at 2 p.m. at the Black Hills Na-
tional Cemetery near Sturgis.
Lila Whidby and her sister, Lois
Lurz of Hot Springs and Barb
Plooster of Custer all went to ceme-
teries in Martin and Ainsworth,
Springview and Valentine, NE, on
Saturday, May 25. They stayed
overnight in Valentine and had
supper with Matt and Trish
Whidby and their son and girl
friend. On Sunday they traveled to
Corsica to visit and decorate the
grave of Tom Plooster, Barbara’s
husband. They came back to
Kadoka that night and also deco-
rated graves in the Kadoka ceme-
tery.
Deb and Marv Moor went to
Pierre on Sunday, May 26, to visit
her dad, Hank Kosters, and their
son, Mitchell. They enjoyed a Me-
morial Day indoor picnic on Mon-
day, and Marv and Mitch went
fishing both days.
Marylin and Mike Paulsen of
North Dakota spent a few days in
Kadoka recently and finalized the
sale of their home here. Both have
jobs in North Dakota since leaving
Kadoka.
Patty Ulmen drove to Rapid City
on Friday, May 24 and met her
daughter, Kim Miller of Gillette,
WY. On Saturday they went to the
National Cemetery to decorate
family graves there. They returned
to their homes on Sunday.
Laurie Pettyjohn of Rapid City
visited her parents, Vernon and
Hellen Uhlir, on Wednesday of last
week. She brought supper to them
and planted some tomato plants.
Hellen has been under the weather
with a bad cold and cough for sev-
eral weeks, but is on the mend. On
Sunday, her husband, Ted Pet-
tyjohn, came to the Frying Pan
Ranch south of Kadoka to attend
the annual branding. About 63 peo-
ple were at the ranch and enjoyed
the day with other relatives and
friends. The metal deer, made by
Tammy and Brett Prang is now on
display in front of Discount Fuel. It
is worth the drive to see “Scrappy”.
The tornado that hit Broken
Arrow, OK, on Thursday evening,
missed the homes of Betty and
Dave Rasmussen and their sons.
They were in contact with her
mom, Wanda Swan, that same
Gateway residents if you would
like to have your news published,
please allow my phone to ring more
than three times or leave your
name on the machine so I can call
you back. Thank you.
Bonnie Riggins (Mrs. Wayne)
was taken by ambulance to the
Rapid City Regional Hospital Fri-
day evening. Her family was called
in Saturday evening due to her se-
rious condition. Please keep her in
your prayers.
Henry and Linda Yellow Elk
have made several trips to Wanblee
because of the loss of her father.
They are residents here at the
apartment complex. Please keep
them in your prayers.
Lova Bushnell had a siege of
shingles since January. She is
doing remarkably well, but al-
though, there is a constant re-
minder in her neck.
The quilters, Susie Bauman,
Margie Peters, Shirley Josserand,
Lova Bushnell, Marie Addison and
Beverly Howe, were busy at it on
Wednesday of this week. They got
two quilted and one more tied.
It was good to see Bryan back.
He has a swollen ankle from a for-
mer injury. It looks very painful
and uncomfortable.
Lola Joyce strained her back
and arthritis set in. It has been a
very painful two weeks. Three trips
to the doctor. One of those trips was
to Philip Clinic.
It was pleasant to see Frances
Terkildsen at the puzzle table Sun-
day morning. We really miss Lyle
and are so appreciative she enjoys
doing them with us.
Norma Hopkins is back for the
summer so we get to see her in the
dining room for the weekly noon
meals. Others who join us for the
meals are Lois Pettyjohn, Lova
Bushnell, Jean Neuman, Frances
Terkildsen, Web Osborn, Andy and
Mary Jane Hemmingson, Joyce
Hicks, Maye Alma Stout, Loretta
Ward, Frank and Myrth Bauman
and myself. Where is everyone?
They say there used to be up to 50
dinners guests. Penny Stout is a
good cook. It is worth looking into
the rules and regulations.
Virginia Coller of rural Long
Valley brought Bob Smith of Texas
here to visit Frank and Myrth Bau-
man. It had been quite sometime
since relatives had seen each other.
Thoughts to share, “Spring un-
locks the flowers to paint the
laughing wall”, and “every path
has its puddles.”
year. She bought a new camera and
plans to continue her love of pho-
tography. The students will con-
tinue to see her during the school
year when she subs for the school.
I had the pleasure of working
with Sandy as well as having all
three of my children in her class-
room. From owl pellets to crayfish,
Sandy made learning fun. She kept
a positive and safe environment
within the classroom. A gentle,
soft-spoken soul one who treated
everyone with respect. Sandy
Shortbull made sitting in her class-
room a positive joy.
She was definitely a positive im-
pact on education and truly amaz-
ing. She did her job to the fullest
every day. She put her heart and
soul in everything she did.
sented her with a beautiful start
quilt and her students read a poem
they had written especially for her.
I talked to Jeff Nemecek,
Kadoka Area elementary principal,
about Sandy and that day. He
shared with me what he said that
day as he took the microphone, “As
an educator, one looks for the qual-
ities of an effective educator. Look-
ing around this room says it all. As
I look around the room there is not
a dry eye in the room. There’s your
answer.”
When asked what she plans to
do now that she has retired, she
smiled and said that she plans on
spending time with her sister in
Washington. Now, she will be able
to spend time with her not only in
the summer, but other times of the
Contined from page one.
“What a surprise!” said Sandy.
“They called me up and presented
me with a plaque and when I
looked out into the crowd there was
Jesse, Casey and Ali. I thought
what are they doing here,” she said
with a laugh.
The staff had managed to keep
her sons and daughter-in-law hid
in the kitchen so she would not see
them. Jen Van Pelt who was part of
the organizing of the surprise pre-
sented Sandy with a scrapbook of
written memories that previous
students, her current students and
friends had shared. Julie Johndreu
from Badlands National Park
thanked Sandy for all her support
of the Park to School programs.
The Interior Booster Club pre-
Sandy Shortbull honored for years of teaching
A star quilt was presented to Sandy from parents and students as appreciation for the many lives that she impacted.
Hugs and good wishes from the students on her finals days as their teacher. -- courtesy photos
Dylan Riggsins - Bareback Riding
The last few weeks at the care
center have been very busy. School
is out for the summer, so we’ll be
having the kids drop by to assist in
walks, letter writing, cards play-
ing, etc. The residents really enjoy
the interaction with the kids.
Dwight Louder gets frequent
visits from his wife, Dorothy, and
his children. Nelva and Janet
Louder also stopped by to chat with
their brother.
Bunny Green had several visi-
tors including Tony Gould and her
granddaughter, Shalina Gould.
Deb and Vern Green from Black-
hawk stopped in on Sunday. They
shared stories and a lot of good
times. It always nice to see some
fresh faces here at the nursing
home.
We would really like to let all the
townspeople know how much we
appreciate them dropping in to
visit with many of the residents. It
makes their life so much happier.
Mae Whirlwind Horse came by
to visit with Mickie Word and Betty
VanderMay. They enjoyed their
time together. Micki gets daily vis-
its from Bob.
Elaine Kemnitz was a very pop-
ular lady this past week. She had a
birthday on May 26 and the family
brought in cake and ice cream to
share with everyone. The company
and refreshments were awesome.
Those visiting were: Don Kemnitz,
Casey and Valinda, Lori, Melvin
and Wilma, and L. Christensen.
Emma Jarl got to go spend the
day with her grandson, Steve Knis-
pel. He stopped by, picked her up
and they went out to the home-
stead, where they spent the day.
Emma always comes back with a
fun story to tell. On Saturday, Deb,
Trey, and Savannah stopped by
after going to the rummage sales.
Ruth Klundt received a visit
from her sister and brother-in-law,
Zane and Dan. They stopped and
picked up Ruth and then they
drove through the hills. They
stopped and had a bite to eat.
Later that week Arlyss Klundt and
Raynita came down from Rapid
City to spend time with his mom.
Shorty Ireland had several stop
by to wish him a belated birthday.
His family and friends gathered at
the Masonic Temple. Some of those
attending were Hal, Edie and
Brian, Tim and Callie Rhead, Con-
nie and Becky Holso.
SonQuest Rainforest
Fully Rely on God
2013 Vacation Bible School
Monday June 17 through ursday, June 21
at the Kadoka Presbyterian Church
8:30 a.m. to 12:00p.m.
Everyone is welcome!
Preschool through 8th grade
If you have any questions contact
Dana Eisenbraun 837-2388,
Julie Hermann 837-2085 or
Pastor Gary McCubbin 837-2085
*There is no cost and
each child will receive
a free T-shirt*
flies and a balloon-powerd car.
NASA SPACE SCIENCE FES-
TIVAL
Three...two...one...lift off! Ex-
plore the wonders of the universe.
Participants will build and launch
a rocket, make a land rover, train
like an astronaut trains, taste real
space food and much more.
KNEX AND LEGO FESTIVAL
If you love to build, this event is
for you! We supply the KneX and
Legos and you bring your imagina-
tions. Let's see what you can cre-
ate!
OOEY,GOOEY FESTIVAL
If you like to create ooey, gooey
goop and mucky, yucky stuff then
join us for this messy, but fun
event. Make sure you wear old
clothes.
If you have any questions con-
tact Annette VanderMay at 837-
2299.
Are you ready for an adventure?
Here we come! The South Dakota
Discovery Center is coming your
way with a newly designed pro-
gram!
This summer our classes will be
set up festival-style. Children will
rotate through the stations, explor-
ing an array of hands-on science ac-
tivities. Programs are designed for
kids from pre-school through mid-
dle school so kids of all ages can
come at one time.
No registration necessary. Just
show up for science fun!!
Kadoka School Little Gym: June
12, June 26, July 2, July 15 from
9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
EXTREME ENGINEERING
FESTIVAL
This is your chance to get your
creative juices flowing and build,
build, build! You will build bridges,
structure that can withstand a
strong force, an airplane that really
Science Hits The Road
The Presbyterian Church in
Kadoka will have Vacation Bible
School from Monday, June 17
through Thursday, June 21 at the
church in Kadoka. The theme this
year will be SonQuest Rainforest-
Fully Rely on God.
Vacation Bible School will start
at 8:30 a.m. each day and end at
12:00 p.m. It is for grades Pre-
school through eighth grade. There
is no cost and each child will re-
ceive a free T-shirt. Everyone is
welcome.
If you have questions call Dana
Eisenbraun 837-2388, Julie Her-
mann 837-2085 or Gary McCubbin
837-2485.
Vacation Bible School begins
Youth …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
WANTED
Dam Repair
or other
dirt work
Tom DeVries
Belvidere • 605-891-8022
Herbie O’Daniel, Kadoka, 18.61; 4. Brendon
Porch, Kadoka, 36.08
Average winner: Herbie O’Daniel,
Kadoka, 27.47
Breakaway Roping: 1. Cedar Jandreau,
Kennebec, 2.48; 2. Sierra Correll, Edgemont,
2.96; 3. Katie Lensegrav, Interior, 3.06, 4.
Mikahla Ferguson, Hill City, 3.52
Average winner: Sierra Correll, Edge-
mont, 5.63
Goat Tying: 1. Mazee Pauley, Wall, 8.82;
2. Cedar Jandreau, Kennebec, 9.18; 3. Rylee
Rutten, Colome, 10.11; 4. Katie Lensegrav,
Interior, 10.3
Average winner: Mazee Pauley, Wall,
17.65
Saddle Bronc: No qualified rides
Team Roping: 1. Grady Egly,
Olerichs/JD Kirwan, Bonesteel, 8.96; 2. Bren-
don Porch, Kadoka/Logan Christensen,
Kadoka, 10.86; 3. Rylee Rutten, Colome/Reid
Rutten, Colome, 12.43; 4. Jake Fulton, Valen-
tine/Jacob Kammerer, Philip, 13.73
Average winner: Grady Egly, Oelrichs/JD
Kirwan, Bonesteel, 32.22
Tie Down Roping: 1. Jake Fulton,
Valentine, 11.65; 2. Samuel Bolden, Oglala,
11.67; 3. Lathan Lauing, Oral, 14.97; 4. Jacob
Kammerer, Philip, 15.92
Average winner: Jake Fulton, Valentine,
23.27
Barrel Racing: 1. Mattee Pauley, Wall,
16.317; 2. Mazee Pauley, Wall, 16.449; 3. Jor-
dan Tierney, Oral, 16.518; 4. Katie Lensegrav,
Interior, 16.545
Average winner: Mazee Pauley, Wall,
32.958
Bull Riding: No qualified rides
Average winner: Dylan Riggins, Kadoka,
60
All-Around Cowgirl: Mazee Pauly, Wall
All-Around Cowboys: Jake Fulton,
Valentine; Lathan Lauing, Oral
Reserve All-Around Cowgirls: Mattee
Pauley, Wall, Jordan Tierney, Oral; Katie
Lensegrav, Interior
Reserve All-Around Cowboy: Grady
Egly, Olerichs
Martin Practice Rodeo
First Go
Pole Bending: 1. Mazee Pauley, Wall,
20.962; 2. Tawny Barry, Carter, 22.57; 3. Mat-
tee Pauley, Wall, 22.887 4. Katie Hostutler,
Midland, 22.968
Bareback Riding: Casey Reder, Philip,
63
Steer Wrestling: 1. Herbie O’Daniel,
Kadoka, 8.86; 2. Reid Rutten, Colome, 29.57;
3. Cameron Fanning, Olivet, 30.3
Breakaway Roping: 1. Sierra Correll,
Edgemont, 2.67; 2. Bailey Lytle, Quinn, 2.87;
3. Brooke Nelson, Philip, 2.93; 4. Hanna Hos-
tutler, Midland, 3.07
Goat Tying: 1. Mazee Pauley, Wall, 8.83;
2. Tawny Barry, Carter, 9.13; 3. Katie Lenseg-
rav, Interior, 9.17; 4. Cedar Jandreau, Ken-
nebec, 10.67
Saddle Bronc: No qualified rides
Team Roping: 1. Hanna Hostutler, Mid-
land/Brooke Nelson, Philip, 7.66; 2. Mattee
Pauley, Wall/Mazee Pauley, Wall, 9.83; 3. Jor-
dan Tierney, Oral/Lathan Lauing, Oral,
18.21; 4. Caleb Schroth, Olerichs/Trey
Richter, Quinn, 18.27
Tie Down Roping: 1. Jake Fulton,
Valentine, 11.62; 2. Samuel Bolden, Oglala,
12.73; 3. Jacob Waln, Martin, 13.72, 4. Dalton
Lessert, Martin, 16.48
Barrel Racing: 1. Katie Lensegrav, Inte-
rior, 16.505; 2. Mazee Pauley, Wall, 16.509; 3.
Jordan Tierney, Oral, 16.672; 4. Mattee
Pauley, Wall, 16.684
Bull Riding: 1. Dylan Riggins, Kadoka,
60
Second Go
Pole Bending: 1. Mazee Pauley, Wall,
21.025; 2. Brandy March, Hot Springs,
23.239; 3. Payton Pravecek, Winner, 23.695;
4. Baily Lytle, Quinn, 25.096
Average winner: Mazee Pauley, Wall,
41.987
Bareback Riding: 1. Casey Reder,
Philip, 68; 2. JD Anderson, Hill City, 64;
Average winner: Casey Reder, Philip, 131
Steer Wrestling: 1. Cameron Fanning,
Olivet, 7.96; 2. Grady Egly, Oelrichs, 8.29; 3.
Martin HS rodeo results
River Region - Winner: 1st Go
Bareback Riding: 1. Casey Reder 61; 2.
Dylan Riggins 56
Barrel Racing: 1. Laura O’Leary 16.965;
2. Kailee Webb 17.062 ; 3. Madison Rau
17.260; 4. Jordan Bickel 17.377; 5. Katie
Lensegrav 17.640; 6. Moriah Glaus 17.717; 7.
Taryn Lessert 17.798; 8. REmi Wientjes
17.814; 9. Taylor bothwell 17.819; 10. Tatum
Ward 17.820
Breakaway Roping: 1. Rylee Jo Rutten
3.040; 2. Brooke Nelson 3.140; 3. Kailee Webb
3.500; 4. Tanegai Zilverberg 3.560; 5. Tawny
Barry 3.630; 6. Sloan Anderson 4.650; 7.
Tierny Hamlin 12.570; 8. Bailey Tibbs
12.730; 9. Remi Wienjes 12.910; 10. Sydney
Cowan 13.420
Bull Riding: 1. Scott Shoemaker 63.0; 2.
Nolan Hall 59.0; 3. Casey Heninger 58.0; 4.
Casey Reder 57.0; 5. Dylan Riggins 52.0; 6.
Brady Jandreau 51.0; 7. Olathe Schmidt
49.0; 8. Trey Maier 47.0
Boy's Cutting: 1. True Buchholz 72.0; 2.
Logan Christensen 65.0; 3.
Carson Musick 64.5; 4. Zane Whitney 64.0; 5.
Dillion DeJong 63.5; 6.
Klay O’Daniel 63.0; 7. Olathe Schmidt 62.0
Goat Tying: 1. Katie Lensegrav 7.650; 2.
Remi Wientjes 7.670; 3. Cedar Jandreau
7.700; 4. Tawny Barry 8.780; 5. Brandi
Cwach 9.520; 6. Rylee Jo Rutten 10.270; 7.
Payton Pravecek 10.590; 8. Schae Hanson
10.720; 9. Abbie Ramsey 10.770; 10.
Cheyenne Salonen 10.780
Girl's Cutting: 1. Erin Kenzy 72.0; 2.
Taylor Bothwell 70.0; 3. Kailee Webb 70.0; 4.
Katie Lensegrav 67.0; 5. Tanegai Zilverberg
65.0; 6. Karissa Odenbach 64.0; 7. Marti Her-
ber 62.0
Pole Bending: 1. Sydeny Cowan 21.198;
2. Jordan Bickel 21.441; 3. Remi Wientjes
21.490; 4. Brandi Cwach 21.751; 5. Laura
O’Leary 21.785; 6. Taylor Bothwell 22.535; 7.
Kelsey Garber 22.736; 8. Josey Aasby 22.909;
9. Katie Hostutler 23.047; 10. Mykala R.
Wells 23.128
Saddle Bronc: 1. Bill Chauncey 56.0
Steer Wrestling: 1. Jacob Kammerer
7.010; 2. Wyatt Schaack 8.880; 3. Wyatt Ful-
ton 12.960; 4. Nolan Richie 13.620
Team Roping: 1. Tyler Gaer and Carson
Musick 17.770; 2. CY Christnsen and Wyatt
Schaack 19.830; 3. Rance Johnson and Jacob
Kammerer 22.300; 4. Casey Heninger and
Robert Tolton 25.730; 5. Brandi Cwach and
Savanna Glaus 34.690; 6. Pearson Wientjes
and Reece Wientjes 41
Tie Down Roping: 1. Pearson Wientjes
13.030; 2. Nolan Richie 14.760; 3. Logan
Christensen 16.100; 4. Wyatt Fulton 17.440;
5. Jacob Kammerer 18.640; 6. Thomas Doolit-
tle 19.450; 7. Wyatt Schaack 19.970; 8. Reece
Wientjes 22.000; 9. Carson Musick 25.030;
10. Jake Fulton 27.100
Winner - 2nd Go
Barrel Racing: 1. Kailee Webb 16.725; 2.
Laura O’Leary 16.884; 3. Taylor Bothwell
17.068; 4. Madison Rau 17.082; 5. Bailey
Tibss 17.166; 6. Brandi Cwach 17.209; 7. Jor-
dan Bickel 17.281; 8. Savanna Glaus 17.320;
9. Cedar Jandreau 17.521; 10. Hanna Hostut-
ler 17.548
Breakaway Roping: 1. Cedar Jandreau
2.440; 2. Tangegai Zilverberg 2.930; 3. Katie
Lensegrav 2.990; 4. Remi Wientjes 3.200; 5.
Katie Hostutler 4.510; 6. Bailey Tibbs 4.780;
7. CY Christensen 5.640; 8. Hanna Hostutler
7.000; 9. Jessica Olson 7.340; 10. Jordan
Bickel 12.720
Bull Riding: 1. Casey Heninger 71.0; 2.
Levi Schonebaum 66.0; 3. Jesse White 61.0 ;
4. Jake Frazier 58.0; 5. Scott Shoemaker
57.0; 6. Dylan Riggins 55.0; 7. Brady Jan-
dreau 54.0; 8. Trey Maier 51.0; 9. Nolan Hall
50.0
Boy's Cutting: 1. Zane Whitney 73.0; 2.
Carson Musick 72.0; 3. Logan Christensen
71.0; 4. True Buchholz 70.5; 5. Dillion DeJong
70.0; 6. Klay O’Daniel 69.0
Goat Tying: 1. Remi Wientjes 7.210; 2.
Cedar Jandreau 7.340; 3. Tawny Barry 7.800;
4. Katie Lensegrav 8.010; 5. Bailey Tibbs
8.510; 6. Brandi Cwach 8.680; 7. Schae Han-
son 9.050; 8. Kailee Webb 9.050; 9. Tanegai
Zilverberg 9.180; 10. Jessi White 9.240
Girl's Cutting: 1. Erin Kenzy 73.5; 2.
Katie Lensegrav 71.5; 3. Kailee Webb 71.0; 4.
Tanegai Zilverberg 69.0; 5. Karissa Odenbach
68.0; 6. Marti Herber 65.0; 7. Taylore Both-
well 64.0
Pole Bending: 1. Jordan Bickel 20.924;
2. Remi Wientjes 21.359; 3. Taylor Bothwell
21.441; 4. Brandi Cwach 21.773; 5. Hanna
Hostutler 21.860; 6. Schae Hanson 21.974; 7.
Payton Pravecek 22.171; 8. Rylee Jo Rutten
22.341; 9. Ashley Theobald 22.737; 10.
Mykala R. Wells 22.792
Saddle Bronc: 1. Bill Chauncey 67.0; 2.
Casey Heninger 65.0; 3. Collin Carroll 61.0
Steer Wrestling: 1. Tyler Gaer 6.070; 2. Jake
Fulton 6.830; 3. Logan Christensen 8.890; 4.
Nolan Richie 13.960
Team Roping: 1. Tyler Gaer and Carson
Musick 8.510; 2. Rance Johnson and Jacob
Kammerer 13.640; 3. Brandi Cwach and Sa-
vanna Glaus 14.160; 4. Cedar Jandreau and
Dalton Lessert 14.520; 5. Sloan Anderson and
Nolan Hall 16.820; 6. Samuel Boldon and
Klay O’Daniel 19.910; 7. CY Christensen and
Wyatt Schaack 21.340; 8. Jordan Bickel and
Wyatt Fulton 25.130; 9. Aage Ceplecha and
Bill Chauncey 40
Tie Down Roping: 1. Nolan Richie
11.540; 2. Samuel Boldon 13.500; 3. Pearson
Wientjes 13.740; 4. Jake Fulton 13.940; 5.
Carson Musick 20.140; 6. Reid Rutten 22.550;
7. Tyler Gaer 23.710; 8. Rance Johnson
23.890; 9. Zane Whitney 34.940
Southwest Region - Wall
1st Go
Bareback Riding: 1. Shane O’Connell
69.0; 2. JD Anderson 61.0
Barrel Racing: 1. Mazee Pauley 16.224;
2. Keenie Word 16.232; 3. Mattee Pauley
16.580; 4. Ashley Peterson 16.650; 5. Cassidy
Mutchler 16.732; 6. Sierra Correll 16.763; 7.
Kaitlin Peterson 16.771; 8. Alyssa Lockhart
16.834; 9. Mackenzie Yordy 16.882; 10. Bailey
Lytle 16.977
Breakaway Roping: 1. Sierra Correll
3.070; 2. Elsie Fortune 3.510; 3. Mattee
Pauley 3.530; 4. Carlee Johnston 3.670; 5.
Kimberlee Scherer 3.680; 6. Brainna Clemet-
son 3.760; 7. Alyssa Lockhart 4.230; 8. Mika-
hal Ferguson 4.400; 9. Kaylee Clark 4.750;
10. Keenie Word 5.130
Bull Riding: 1. JD Phelps 62.0
Boy's Cutting: 1. Josh Hunt 73.0; 2. Treg
Schaack 73.0; 3. Cort Baker 72.0; 4. Jeb Hunt
70.5; 5. Jamses Kirwan 67.0; 6. Clint Stangle
66.0; 7. Herbie O’Daniel 65.0; 8. Wyatt Ma-
ciejewski 65.0
Goat Tying: 1. Carlee Johnston 8.570; 2.
Mazee Pauley 9.550; 3. Kaitlin Peterson
9.570; 4. Brianna Clemetson 11.110; 5. Cas-
sidy Mutchler 11.180; 6. Jordan Tierney
11.390; 7. Kailey Rae Sawvell 12.780; 8.
Mackenzie Yordy 12.940; 9. Karlee Peterson
13.040; 10. Matte Pauley 13.180
Girl's Cutting: 1. Kassidy Batie 72.0; 2.
Kaitlin Peterson 72.0; 3. Karlee Peterson
71.0; 4. Brandy March 69.0; 5. Riley Ann
Smith 69.0; 6. Karlie Robertson 68.0; 7. Geor-
gia Edoff 62.0; 8. Tylee Evans 62.0; 9. Cassity
Goetz 61.0; 10. Ta' Te Fortune 61.0
Pole Bending: 1. Alyssa Lockhart
21.436; 2. Mazee Pauley 22.514; 3. Carlee
Johnston 22.668; 4. Whitney Gimpel 22.850;
5. Kassi McPherson 23.128; 6. Bailey Blain
23.266; 7. Cassidy Mutchler 23.325; 8.
Kendra Johnson 23.328; 9. Carlee DeWolfe
23.389; 10. Josie Blasius 23.427
Saddle Bronc: 1. Teal Schmidt 62.0; 2.
Paul Kruse 61.0; 3. David Gibbons 57.0
Steer Wrestling: 1. Kaiden White Bear
6.570
Team Roping: 1. Treg Schaack and Levi
Lord 6.450; 2. Jade Schmidt and Connor Mc-
Nenny 11.150; 3. Teal Schmidt and Cort
Baker 12.140; 4. Grady Egly and James Kir-
wan 12.800; 5. Keith Hodson and Jacob Waln
14.790; 6. Brandy March and Kassi McPher-
son 17.340; 7. Wyatt Mann and Prestyn
Novak 18.160; 8. Herbie O’Daniel and Elsie
Fortune 19.780; 9. Sierra Correll and Lathen
Stevens 21.890; 10. Wyatt Maciejewski and
Tryn Robertson 22
Tie Down Roping: 1. Treg Schaack
10.530; 2. Grady Egly 12.690; 3. Wyatt Mann
13.240; 4. Lane Blasius 14.220; 5. James Kir-
wan 14.430; 6. Connor McNenney 15.090; 7.
Jace Philipsen 16.810; 8. Lathan Lauing
16.950; 9. Riley Fortune 17.910; 10. Marcus
Heath 18.290
Wall - 2nd Go
Bareback Riding: 1. Shane O’Connell
70.0; 2. JD Anderson 65.0
Barrel Racing: 1. Keenie Word 16.523;
2. Cassidy Mutchler 16.852; 3. Alyssa Lock-
hart 16.939; 4. Kaitlin Peterson 16.965; 5.
Ashley Peterson 16.984; 6. Jordan Tierney
17.161; 7. Cassidy Stratman 17.188; 8.
Mackenzie Yordy 17.264; 9. Kassi McPherson
17.461; 10. Josie Blasius 17.464
Breakaway Roping: 1. Jordan Tierney
3.230; 2. Tryn Robertson 3.340; 3. Bailey
Hapney 3.360; 4. Kassi McPherson 3.800; 5.
Brandy March 3.950; 6. Mykelsi Schnose
4.140; 7. Mattee Pauley 4.170; 8. Sabrina
Fanning 4.780; 9. Kassidy Batie 5.460; 10.
Tylee Evans 7.480
Bull Riding: 1. Miles Englebert 72.0; 2.
Chasen Cole 69.0
Boy's Cutting: 1. Josh Hunt 73.0; 2. Cort
Baker 72.0; 3. Jeb Hunt 71.0; 4. Wyatt Ma-
ciejewski 68.0; 5. Herbie O’Daniel 67.0; 6.
Treg Schaack 67.0; 7. James Kirwan 67.0
Goat Tying: 1. Kaitlin Peterson 8.070; 2.
Carlee Johnston 8.080; 3. Cassidy Mutchler
8.810; 4. Jordan Tierney 9.640; 5. Riley Ann
Smith 9.670; 6. Kailey Rae Sawvell 9.710; 7.
Mazee Pauley 9.800; 8. Kaylee Clark 9.980;
9. Jade Mosher 11.060; 10. Karlee Peterson
11.730
Girl's Cutting: 1. Kaitling Peterson 74.0;
2. Kassidy Batie 72.0; 3. Ta' Te Fortune 72.0;
4. Brandy March 71.0; 5. Riley Ann Smith
69.0; 6. Karlie Robertson 67.0; 7. Georgia
Edoff 66.0; 8. Cassity Goetz 66.0; 9. Tylee
Evans 64.0; 10. Karlee Peterson 64.0
Pole Bending: 1. Alyssa Lockhart
21.040; 2. Mazee Pauley 21.801; 3. Riley Ann
Smith 21.983; 4. Carlee Johnston 22.301; 5.
Josie Blasius 22.456; 6. Kendra Johnson
22.526; 7. Mykelsi Schnose 22.605; 8. Brandy
March 22.644; 9. Zoey Osmotherly 23.123; 10.
Bailey Hapney 23.123
Saddle Bronc: 1. Teal Schmidt 72.0; 2.
Jordan Hunt 59.0
Steer Wrestling: 1. Clint Stangle 9.760;
2. Herbie O’Daniel 26.780
Team Roping: 1. Teal Schmidt and Cort
Baker 7.560; 2. Wyatt Mann and Prestyn
Novak 12.970; 3. Carson Johnston and Lane
Blasius 13.580; 4. Trey Richter adn Caleb
Schroth 14.660; 5. Jade Schmidt and Connor
McNenny 15.140; 6. Treg Schaack and Levi
Lord 19.100; 7. Herbie O’Daniel and Elsie
Fortune 21.490; 8. Jorddan Hunt and Josh
Hunt 23.610; 9. Lathan Lauing and Jordan
Tierney 26.010; 10. Riley Fortune and July
Kammerer 31
Tie Down Roping: 1. James Kirwan
10.890; 2. Lathan Lauing 11.370; 3. Grady
Egly 11.980; 4. Carson Johnston 12.370; 5.
Charles Risse 13.040; 6. Jade Schmidt
13.500; 7. Connor McNenney 13.500; 8. Jacob
Waln 14.650; 9. Jace Philipsen 14.700; 10.
Derek Knodel 14.810
River and Southwest Regional Rodeo results
Herbie O’Daniel took first place in the afternoon performance, third in the evening
performance and first place in the average for steer wrestling at Martin.
Aage Ceplecha header and Bill Chauncey heeler
Logan Christensen - steer wrestling
True Buchholz - cattle cutting
Klay O’Daniel header and Samuel Boldon heeler
Community …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
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Two-year-o|d Angus bu||s for sa|e!
8ons & grandsons of:
8 A V 004 Trave|er 4412 & N ßar Pr|me T|me 080ô
- 3erer Tesled & 3crola| Veasured
- Ca|v|rg Ease & Valerra||y 8red
- 3e|||rg Pr|vale Trealy
ßob Fortune: (ô05} 488-1003
6huck Fortune: (ô05} 891-8197
SAV004 TraveIer 4412
STATE BIRTH RECORDS
ACCESSIBLE THROUGH COUNTY
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Certified copies of birth records from across the state are avail-
able in Jackson County, according to Mitzi Mitchell, Register of
Deeds. The office has access to computerized birth records
statewide and can issue a certified copy of any South Dakota
birth. In the past, birth records were only available from the county
where the birth occurred or from the South Dakota Department of
Health, Vital Records Program.
Birth records are available from 1905 on.
As earlier years are entered in the computerized system,
records from those years will also become available.
The cost for a certified copy of a birth record is $15.00 as of
July 1, 2012.
Emily Knutson
Summer Last Horse
Paul Smiley
McKenzie Stilwell
Emma Stone
Jacob Rosales
Kelsey Lensegrav
Miranda Dale
Carson Good
Jeremy Ring
Ninth Grade
Jerica Coller
Shai Lamont
Braden Letellier
Scout Sudbeck
Cami Uhlir
Tenth Grade
Destiny Dale
Elizabeth Hoon
Yuki Hotsumi
Myla Pierce
Dylan Riggins
Eleventh Grade
*Foster Berry
*Raven Jorgensen
Logan Ammons
Logan Christensen
Emery Little Thunder
Taylor Merchen
April Perkins
Kate Rasmussen
Racheal Shuck
Chandlier Sudbeck
Austin Thayer
Shelby Uhlir
Twelfth Grade
*Kwincy Ferguson
*Chance Knutson
*Katie Lensegrav
*Mariah Pierce
*Clint Stout
*Tessa Stout
*Kenar VanderMay
Kahler Addison
Marti Herber
Shaley Herber
Rebekkah Kary
*Denotes a 4.0 average
Sixth Grade
*Kaylee Eisenbraun
*Marcus Herber
*Anna Stone
*Cameron Good
Marcella Baldwin
Liliauna High Horse
Katy O'Daniel
Savannah Solon
Seventh Grade
*Esperanza Hartman
*Rosemary Hoon
*Aybree Pitman
*Justena Amiotte
Mikayla Addison
Tyra Fugate
Ajiah Ortiz-Pierce
Gage Weller
Eighth Grade
*Venessa Buxcel
*Ciara Stoddard
*Kirsten Kiewel
*Shaina Solon
AJ Bendt
David Kary
Kadoka Area School District
second semester honor roll
“A” Honor Roll
“B” Honor Roll
Sixth Grade
Kianna Badure
Katherine Plenty Bull
Christina Red Owl
Karlee Witt
Tel VanderMay
Seventh Grade
Patrick Brown
Raya Garrett
Sage Keegan
Reese Sudbeck
Trevaun Myers
Eighth Grade
Chloe Baldwin
Geoffrey DeVries
Colby Enders
Storm Wilcox
Sydney Word
Kreid Amiotte
Phillip Leithauser
Mariah Dale
Jackie Thayer
Lindsey Vander
Ninth Grade
Kassie Hicks
Allie Romero
Jarrett VanderMay
Tenth Grade
Jed Brown
Wyatt Enders
Herbie O'Daniel
Brendon Porch
Eleventh Grade
Myles Addison
True Buchholz
Aage Ceplecha
Lane Patterson
Emily Schlabach
Matthew Waters
Twelfth Grade
Misti Anderson
Lonte Ashley
Ty Merchen
Shane Ring
The South Dakota Humanities
Council welcomes members of the
public to participate in the 2013
One Book South Dakota program
by attending an upcoming One
Book discussion in Kadoka, SD.
Through a SD Humanities grant,
Kadoka was selected as one of 20
sites to host author Danielle Sosin
for a discussion of her book, is “The
Long-Shining Waters”. We invite
and encourage you to take part in
an upcoming discussion/open house
with author, Danielle Sosin at
Jackson County Library in Kadoka
on June 27, 2013 at 5:00 p.m.
The 2013 One Book SD is “The
Long-Shining Waters” by Danielle
Sosin, which illuminates the mys-
terious powers of Lake Superior by
telling the stories of three charac-
ters living along its shores during
three different eras. Sosin’s book
will be read and talked about by
community reading groups across
the state during discussions such
as the one that will take place in
Kadoka leading up to the 2013
South Dakota Festival of Books in
Deadwood Sept. 20-22. As the One
Book author, Sosin will tour 20
cities statewide, as well as provide
a keynote lecture at the 2013 Fes-
tival.
The Long-Shining Waters fits
SDHC’s 2013 programming theme
of “Water.” These themes provide a
platform for communities across
the state to focus on issues that
dominate current South Dakota
discourse -- issues that affect all of
us on some level. We encourage
you to join the ongoing conversa-
tion. All are welcome to attend the
upcoming One Book SD discussion
in Kadoka. Sosin’s book is available
now at the library—stop in to reg-
ister and get started reading!
Questions, call Jackson County Li-
brary at 837-2689.
The South Dakota Humanities
Council is a non-profit organization
founded in 1972 whose sole mission
is to deliver humanities program-
ming to the people of South
Dakota. As a steward of the state’s
heritage, the Council promotes the
appreciation of South Dakota his-
tory, literature, and other related
humanities subjects through grant-
making and cultural programs,
such as the Festival of Books, the
One Book South Dakota program,
and others. The Council’s core mis-
sion is to support and promote the
exchange of ideas to foster a
thoughtful and engaged society.
More about the South Dakota Hu-
manities Council is online at
www.sdhumanities.org
Author Danielle Sosin to visit
Jackson County Library June 27
4-H youth benefit from Philip range workshop
Area youth from eight years old up through high school attended a range workshop
May 22 near Philip to not only learn how to identify plants, but also how those plants
impact the land and the animals that graze them. The Milesville Rangers 4-H club
sponsored the workshop with Nina Pekron, district conservationalist, Haakon County
National Resource Conservation Service, coordinating the event. Instructing the stu-
dents were at left Dave Ollila, Extension sheep specialist, Newell; bottom left photo
in back Tate Lantz, NRCS, Rapid City; and Pekron in the bottom right photo. The in-
structors broke the youth up into three different age groups with the youngest learn-
ing basic skills and the teenage group having more indepth instruction. The morning
session was held in a pasture west of Philip. Pressing and preserving plant speci-
mans for 4-H exhibiting was part of the afternoon session. Ollila is a former ag
teacher who is involved in the South Dakota Range Camp and South Dakota Range-
land Days and Soils Days. Range Camp will be June 4-6 in Sturgis, and Rangeland
Days and Soil Days is June 25-26 in Kadoka. Preregistration is required for both
events. To register for Range Camp contact Ollila at 394-1722 or email david.ollila
@sdstate.edu. To preregister by June 10 for Rangeland Days and Soil Days contact
Jackson County Conservation District at 837-2242 or email mayola.horst @sd.nacd-
net.net or Haakon County Conservation District at 859-2186 or email hccd@gold-
enwest.net.
Marti Herber - Cattle Cutting Katie Lensegrav - Goat Tying
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
AVON – Only $10 to start. Call for in-
formation without any obligation. 1-
877-454-9658.
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SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
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Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW &
GO FAST! 1-888-518-8672.
EMPLOYMENT
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online www.sdwork.org.
#constructionjobspaybetter.
THE DUPREE SCHOOL DISTRICT
is seeking applications for a HS Math
Instructor (w/wo Head Boys BB
Coach); Base Pay - $34,150 plus
signing bonus. Contact Supt. Lenk
at Dupree School (605) 365-5138.
IROQUOIS SCHOOL HAS OPEN-
INGS for Science Teacher, PT Pre-
school Teacher, Head Boys
Basketball Coach & Head Girls Bas-
ketball Coach. Send Resume To: Iro-
quois School, Mark Sampson, AD,
PO Box 98, Iroquois, SD 57353.
SISSETON SCHOOL DISTRICT
Openings: SPED K-12 (2 Positions),
SPED Early Childhood. Contact: Dr.
Stephen Schulte, Supt. 516 8th Ave.
W. Sisseton, SD 57262. (605)698-
7613. Positions open until filled.
EOE.
THE CITY OF FREEMAN, SD is
seeking applications for the position
of City Administrator. Minimum qual-
ifications required are a graduate
from an accredited college or univer-
sity with a public administration back-
ground and two (2) years’ of
progressively responsible profes-
sional management position in a sim-
ilar or larger sized municipal
environment, or any equivalent com-
bination of experience, education
and training, which provides the de-
sired knowledge, skills and abilities.
Full benefit package and salary
DOQ. Please send resume and let-
ter of application to Lisa Edelman, Fi-
nance Officer, PO Box 178,
Freeman, SD 57029. Deadline for
applications is June 28, 2013.
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
CAREER! 3 Week Hands-On Train-
ing School. Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Excavators. National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Placement Assistance.
VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-
6497.
BUILDING TRADES INSTRUCTOR
opening for 9TH – 12TH grade pro-
gram in Northwest South Dakota.
Competitive wage, excellent bene-
fits, car provided. For more informa-
tion contact Cris Owens, Northwest
Area Schools, 605-466-2206 or
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
ALEXANDER, ND, SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT is seeking 1 elementary
teacher, 1 Pre-School teacher, and a
Title 1 Teacher. Send a letter of ap-
plication and resume with refer-
ences: Alexander Public School,
Lynn Sims, PO Box 66, Alexander,
ND 58831, or
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
lynn.sims@sendit.nodak.edu. EOE.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online www.sdwork.org.
#constructionjobspaybetter.
COUNSELORS: SPEARFISH &
RAPID CITY. Outpatient Counselor,
Family/Child Counselor, Crisis Serv-
ices Counselor. Details/Apply: BM-
SCares.ORG.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact: Dou-
glas County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
SMART SALES AND LEASE seeks
business account manager. Work
online from home. Hourly/salary
based on experience. Some
evenings, weekends. Degree/man-
agement experience preferred. ca-
reers@smartsalesandlease.com.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has full time Occupational Therapist,
RN and LPN or Medical Assistant op-
portunities available. We are located
in the beautiful southern Black Hills
of SD - just a short distance from
Mount Rushmore, Wind Cave Na-
tional Park, Custer State Park, Jewel
Cave National Park and many other
outdoor attractions. Call 605-673-
2229 ext. 110 for more information or
go to www.regionalhealth.com to
apply. EOE.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online www.sdwork.org.
#constructionjobspaybetter.
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549
SISSETON SCHOOL DISTRICT
Openings: SPED K-12 (2 Positions),
SPED Early Childhood. Contact: Dr.
Stephen Schulte, Supt. 516 8th Ave.
W. Sisseton, SD 57262. (605)698-
7613. Positions open until filled.
EOE.
FOR SALE
2004 CASE IH JX100 with 5ft. Tigger
mower. SER/AGJX10AB132358
11,000 hrs. $22,000 firm. Can be
seen at Kennebec highway shop.
605-869-2261 or 605-280-5478.
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
2004 CASE IH JX100 with 5ft. Tigger
mower. SER/AGJX10AB132358
11,000 hrs. $22,000 firm. Can be
seen at Kennebec highway shop.
605-869-2261 or 605-280-5478.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent, loca-
tion and other options.
www.sdhousingsearch.com South
Dakota Housing Development Au-
thority.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS $1000 SIGN-ON BONUS.
New Pay Program! * Earn up to 50
CPM *Home Weekly * Excellent
miles, $50 tarp pay. Must be Canda-
ian eligible (888) 691-5705.
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
WANTED
WANTED: HUNTING LAND for
Pheasant, quality Mule Deer 170”
class+, Whitetail Deer 150” class+
and Merrium Turkey. Call 605-448-
8064.
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Blg, 8tout Yearllng Angus Bulls
F0R 8ALE
· Iebruary & March Year|ìng Angus ßu||s
· Most|y ca|vìng ease bu||s
· 5emen checked & ready to go!
Bulls located 3 mlles SL
of 0owntown Rapld 0lty
0ontact· 0an (605) 39l-7090
1amle (605) 39l-6399
Rapid City
Excellent Germination
Cleaned - Priced to Sell
Call Nicholas Patterson
605-484-5663
Proso Millet For Sale
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
is accepting applications for a full
time Deputy Auditor. Must work well
with the public, have clerical, secre-
tarial and computer skills and per-
form other duties as directed.
Knowledge of governmental ac-
counting and payroll beneficial. Se-
lected applicant will also work with
voter registration and the election
process. Jackson County benefits
include health insurance, life insur-
ance, S.D. Retirement, paid holi-
days, vacation and sick leave.
Hourly wage. Position open until
filled. Applications are available at
the Jackson County Auditor’s office
or send resume to Jackson County,
PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD 57543.
Ph: 837-2422. KP47-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Community Health Services Part
Time Clerical. Skills required in-
clude: reception services, typing,
computer experience, data entry,
bookkeeping. Health care experi-
ence preferred, but not required.
Hourly wage, limited benefit pack-
age. Applications available at Jack-
son Co. Auditor’s Office, 700 Main
Street, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD
57543, 837-2422. Resumes encour-
aged. Jackson County reserves the
right to reject any/all applications.
Position open until filled. KP47-2tc
TREE CLOSE-OUT: Many varieties
still available. Conservation grade to
7’ in height. Evergreens, hardwoods,
shrubs, grapes, fruit trees, native
and perennial plants and grasses.
Jackson County Conservation Dis-
trict, 805 Main Street, Kadoka. 837-
2242, 280-6853 or
mayola.horst@sd.nacdnet.net
KP47-1tc
SOFTBALL/BASEBALL FIELD
work day Saturday, June 8 at 2 p.m.
All volunteer help needed. Any
questions call 837-2609. K46-2tc
HOUSE KEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED: High
school and college students are wel-
come to apply. Will train. Apply at ei-
ther America’s Best Value Inn and
Budget Host Sundowner in Kadoka
or call 837-2188 or 837-2296.
KP47-tfn
OFFICE POSITION: The position
requires the ability to effectively co-
ordinate available resources and pri-
oritize multiple projects and meet
deadlines, communicate with others,
both orally and in writing, and main-
tain accurate records. Working
knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel,
Outlook and PowerPoint is required
along with excellent mathematical
skills and ability to read and write
legal descriptions. Duties will include
lifting, sorting, cataloging and filing
of documents, and other general of-
fice duties as required. Must be able
to learn and use proprietary soft-
ware. Must have or be able to obtain
a valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense. Position will be located at
Murdo, S.D. An application form
may be completed online at
www.wce.coop or sent to Steve
Reed, CEO, West Central Electric
Cooperative, P.O. Box 17, Murdo,
SD 57559. Email
steve.reed@wce.coop EOE. Appli-
cations will be accepted until posi-
tion is filled. KP46-2tc
ACCEPTING BIDS: Kadoka Area
School District 35-2 is accepting
bids to provide the school lunch pro-
gram at the Midland School. The bid
will include ordering, preparing,
serving, and clean up after lunch
each and every day school is in ses-
sion. Student milk and free com-
modities will be available to the
successful bidder and these fluctu-
ate on a monthly basis. Please sub-
mit bids on a per plate basis to:
Kadoka Area School 35-2, Attn:
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543, 837-2175 ext.
100. Application deadline is June 10,
2013. The Kadoka Area School Dis-
trict reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all bids.
KP46-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Weed Sprayer. Seasonal
part-time employment spraying
county highway right of way. Com-
mercial herbicide license required or
to be obtained before start of work.
Pre-employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, fax 837-2447.
KP45-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge construction
/maintenance preferred. CDL Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422 Fax 837-2447
KP45-4tc
SERVICE: Need a plumber? Li-
censed plumbing contractor for all
your indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call 441-1053
or leave a message at 837-0112.
K44-4tp
LAWN AND YARD MOWING
SERVICE call 837-2320 or 515-
0616 or contact Dick Stolley.
K41-10tp
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
is accepting applications for full time
Deputy Director of Equalization. Se-
lected applicant may be required to
become certified as per SDCL.
Must work well with the public, and
have clerical and computer skills.
Jackson County benefits include
health insurance, life insurance,
S.D. Retirement, paid holidays, va-
cation and sick leave. Position open
until filled. Beginning wage $9.00
per hour. Applications are available
at the Jackson County Auditor’s of-
fice or send resume to Jackson
County, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD
57543. Ph: 605-837-2422
KP45-4tc
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877-
867-4185. K45-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
May 15, 2013
The regular meeting of the Town of Cot-
tonwood was held at Town Hall on
Wednesday evening, May 15, 2013 at 7
p.m. Present were JC Heath, Doug Hov-
land, and Jeff Heath. The meeting was
called to order by JC Heath.
Old Business: none.
New Business:
Read the Finance report.
The following bills were approved:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Trustee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101.00
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86.25
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.32
First National Agency . . . . . . . . .100.00
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,771.90
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,837.83
With there being no other business to
discuss, the meeting was adjourned.
The next regular meeting will be held on
June 19, 2013 – 7p.m. at Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published June 6, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $12.35]
Thank you friends and family for
all the nice cards, hugs and good
wishes I received for my 80th birth-
day on May 14. Thank you to my
family for the birthday open house
they held for me on May 11. It was
wonderful and I will cherish the day
of memories forever.
Delores Bonenberger
Thank Yous
Agriculture …
June 6, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL PAIF & FALL CALVINC DFED COW SALE
& FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M.
PAIRS, BRED CATTLE & FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}.
FALL CALVING COWS:
KENNEDY'S H&S PARTNERSHIP - 100 DLK ANC HOME FAISED 3 YF
OLD COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV. 9-1 FOF 45 DAYS
DAN WICKS - 23 DLK & DWF 3 YF OLD COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV. 8-10
PAIR DISPERSIONS:
JOSH HEDRICK ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 140 DLK 3 YF OLD TO
DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS (DLK CLVS}
LORENCE EDOFF ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 100 HEFF & DWF 3 YF
OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RAUSCH & RAUSCH - 95 DLK CLVS ...................................................650=
NORDSTROM - 50 DLK FALL CLVS .....................................................500=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|-
f|ed NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JUN£ 4, 2DJS
We Þod o11 o1osses o] oo111e on our morKe1 Þere Tuesdog. Good
demond o11 1Þe uog 1ÞrougÞ. TÞe po1rs uere o11 1n pooKoges.
Po1r Speo1o1 & Fo11 Co1v1ng Cous So1e Þere ne×1 Tuesdog.
We1gÞ-ups o1 JDAM.
FEEDER CATTLE:
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE - PHILIP
49.........................................DLK & DWF HFFS 517= .........$155.50
KEN & MARLENE ROHRER - VOLBERG, MT
64 ...................................................DLK HFFS 739= .........$142.00
76 ...................................................DLK HFFS 698= .........$143.50
TIM NELSON - MIDLAND
74 ...................................................DLK HFFS 704= .........$139.50
32 ...................................................DLK HFFS 565= .........$141.50
SHAW RANCH INC. - WHITE OWL
12............................................DLK SPAY HFFS 705= .........$136.50
7..............................................DLK SPAY HFFS 554= .........$146.00
MIKE NELSON - PHILIP
18..........................................FED & DLK STFS 516= .........$165.00
7 ...........................................DLK & DWF STFS 474= .........$168.00
ALLEN HODGMAN - UNION CENTER
6 ...........................................FED & DLK STFS 564= .........$158.00
6......................................................DLK STFS 708= .........$147.00
5...........................................FED & DLK HFFS 618= .........$137.50
PAIRS:
JOE STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
3 ..............................................DLK HFF PAIFS 1140=.....$1,880.00
2 ...............................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1508=.....$1,750.00
12 ..............................DWF SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1428=.....$1,570.00
4..............................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1410=.....$1,410.00
PAUL SCHNOSE - BUFFALO GAP
26 ............................DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1224=.....$1,800.00
4.................................DLK SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1304=.....$1,550.00
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
15 ...........................HEFF 3 TO 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1412=.....$1,685.00
NEIL FANNING ANGUS - SIMI VALLEY, CA
6 ..............................................DLK HFF PAIFS 984=.......$1,640.00
16 .............................DLK 3 TO 4 YF OLD PAIFS 1211=.....$1,640.00
3 ...............................DLK 5 TO 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1330=.....$1,580.00
2.................................DLK SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1390=.....$1,560.00
BILL GOTTSLEBEN - PHILIP
29.....................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1538=.....$1,590.00
14 ............................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1512=.....$1,440.00
MORRIS, JEFF & JON JONES - MIDLAND
30.....................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1432=.....$1,580.00
20..................FED & DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1457=.....$1,460.00
2.....................FED & DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD PAIFS 1275=.....$1,625.00
REX GILLES - RED OWL
15 .............DLK & DWF 5 TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1463=.....$1,570.00
17..................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1508=.....$1,510.00
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
5.................................DLK SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1415=.....$1,560.00
2..............................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1585=.....$1,540.00
HAVEN STUCK - RAPID CITY
7................DLK & DWF 3 TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1278=.....$1,530.00
5..............................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1384=.....$1,300.00
SCHULTES RANCH LLC - HOWES
16.....................FED & DLK SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1450=.....$1,510.00
WO WELLER - KADOKA
20.............DLK SOLID AND DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1489=.....$1,490.00
DENNIS HALL - ENNING
3...........CHAF & DLK 5 TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1483=.....$1,340.00
WEIGH-UPS:
PAUL HARVEY - INTERIOR
1......................................................DLK DULL 1860=........$110.00
MARVIN & VICKI EIDE - PHILIP
8....................................................DLK HFFTS 736= .........$121.50
1 .....................................................DLK HFFT 805= .........$106.00
MARTY WILLIAMS - WALL
4.....................................................DLK COWS 1213= .........$88.00
NORMAN DELBRIDGE - FAITH
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1285= .........$83.50
3 ....................................................FED COWS 1423= .........$77.75
PASS CREEK RANCH - KADOKA
1......................................................FED COW 1350= .........$81.50
1......................................................FED COW 1335= .........$78.50
10 .................................................FED HFFTS 868= .........$102.00
JOHN JONES - MIDLAND
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1280= .........$81.50
MIKE PERAULT - BELVIDERE
1 ....................................................HEFF COW 1390= .........$81.50
1 ....................................................HEFF COW 1300= .........$81.00
GENE FORTUNE - INTERIOR
1......................................................DLK DULL 1875=........$103.50
LARRY DENKE - LONG VALLEY
1 .....................................................FED DULL 2085=........$103.50
SHAWN & STACY KISTLER - GILLETTE, WY
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1255= .........$81.00
BRUCE MURDOCK - HOT SPRINGS
1......................................................DLK DULL 2240=........$102.00
ROBERT YOUNG - UNION CENTER
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1435= .........$80.50
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
7..........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1226= .........$79.75
BILL GIKLING - BOX ELDER
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1245= .........$79.50
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1275= .........$79.00
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1245= .........$77.00
2.....................................................DLK COWS 1310= .........$76.75
1................................................DLK COWETTE 990= ...........$85.00
1 .....................................................DLK HFFT 1035= .........$95.00
2....................................................DLK HFFTS 943= ...........$91.00
JUDY DALY - MIDLAND
1......................................................DLK DULL 2440=........$101.00
CLIFF POSS - PHILIP
1......................................................DLK DULL 1890=........$100.00
LOUIE BRUNSON - INTERIOR
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1370= .........$79.00
DUSTIN HARVEY - INTERIOR
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1180= .........$79.00
MARG PETERS - MURDO
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1400= .........$78.50
AMELIA HURLEY - PHILIP
1......................................................FED COW 1340= .........$78.50
1......................................................FED COW 1330= .........$77.00
JIGGS O'CONNELL - RAPID CITY
3.....................................................DLK COWS 1380= .........$78.25
2.....................................................DLK COWS 1310= .........$76.75
SHAW RANCH INC. - WHITE OWL
6.....................................................DLK COWS 1163= .........$78.25
DON KELLY - QUINN
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1395= .........$78.00
LYNN FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
1 .....................................................DWF COW 1380= .........$78.00
COBB CATTLE CO. - UNION CENTER
1 .....................................................DWF COW 1230= .........$78.00
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1425= .........$75.00
1 .....................................................DLK HFFT 985= ...........$90.00
MORTENSON CATTLE CO LLC - HAYES
3..........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1195= .........$78.00
2....................................................FWF COWS 1218= .........$77.00
1 .....................................................DWF COW 1065= .........$76.50
MIKE VAUGHN - KYLE
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1375= .........$77.50
1......................................................DLK DULL 1795=........$103.50
1................................................DLK COWETTE 950= ...........$86.00
CLYDE & CONNIE ARNESON - ELM SPRINGS
1 .....................................................DWF COW 1370= .........$77.50
2.....................................................DLK COWS 1075= .........$76.50
WILCOX & RHODEN - UNION CENTER
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1350= .........$77.50
3....................................................DLK HFFTS 1013= .........$96.50
DAVE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
3.....................................................DLK COWS 1467= .........$77.25
MONTE REICHERT - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ....................................................HEFF COW 1535= .........$77.00
LELAND PAULY - MARTIN
9.....................................................DLK COWS 1547= .........$76.75
4.....................................................DLK COWS 1340= .........$76.25
2 ..............................................DLK COWETTES 1155= .........$96.00
WINK CATTLE CO. - HOWES
3.....................................................DLK COWS 1435= .........$76.75
19........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1378= .........$76.25
6.....................................................DLK COWS 1378= .........$75.50
5.....................................................DLK COWS 1534= .........$74.75
JIM JOHNSON - QUINN
3.....................................................DLK COWS 1330= .........$76.75
GERALD & SHARLA JULSON - QUINN
3.....................................................DLK COWS 1195= .........$76.75
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1595= .........$76.50
MONTY WILLIAMS - BOX ELDER
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1440= .........$76.00
2 ..............................................DLK COWETTES 988= ...........$91.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE COMPANY - QUINN
8.....................................................DLK COWS 1474= .........$75.75
CASEY SLOVEK - PHILIP
2 ....................................................FED COWS 1320= .........$75.75
RICHARD & LORAYNA PAPOUSEK - QUINN
3....................................................DLK HFFTS 897= ...........$99.00
CRAIG ROBERTSON - CAPUTA
18 .........................................FED & DLK HFTS 930= ...........$97.50
JOHN CAPP RANCH INC - FAITH
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1520= .........$75.50
1 .....................................................DWF COW 1475= .........$76.50
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1480= .........$75.50
TRAVIS DEJONG - PHILIP
4....................................................DLK HFFTS 908= ...........$97.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1380= .........$75.50
2....................................DLK & DWF COWETTES 1145= .........$88.00
SCHAAF ANGUS - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1595= .........$75.00
LAVON SHEARER - WALL
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1345= .........$75.00
MONTE SCHOFIELD - MIDLAND
1....................................................CHAF DULL 2085= .........$98.00
JEN MURDOCK - HOT SPRINGS
1....................................................HEFF DULL 2055= .........$98.00
LIVERMONT BROTHERS - MARTIN
2.....................................................DLK COWS 1435= .........$74.00
KEVIN VANDERMAY - NORRIS
1 ......................................................DLK COW 1350= .........$73.00
1......................................................DLK DULL 1990= .........$98.00
1......................................................DLK DULL 1615= .........$97.50
PAUL VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1................................................DLK COWETTE 1075= .........$90.00
PAUL RICHTER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1................................................DLK COWETTE 1075= .........$87.00
ADAM JOHNSON - VETAL
1 .....................................................DLK HFFT 1055= .........$90.50
DIANE MCDANIEL - PHILIP
1.....................................................DWF HFFT 1060= .........$89.00
AARON & JIM MANSFIELD - KADOKA
1......................................................DLK DULL 2025= .........$96.00
1......................................................DLK DULL 2000= .........$94.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Never give up on Winter
Wheat?
“Never” is an extreme term, and
certainly should be reserved for ex-
treme situations. Although winter
wheat is a tough crop and known
for surprising growers and agron-
omists with its resilience, there are
times when abandoning fields are
justified.
In the spring of 2013 there was
a great deal of lost sleep over the
decisions to keep winter wheat
fields, destroy them and plant an-
other crop, or interseed a forage
crop to add to the volume of live-
stock feed hoped for at harvest. In
the end, there were many cases of
all three decisions arrived at.
Many of the decisions were heavily
influenced by crop insurance ad-
justments, which provided options.
There is still uncertainty as to
how the fields remaining intact
will turn out at harvest, but the re-
cent moisture has produced dra-
matic improvement in their
appearance and condition. At the
time many fields were adjusted,
the main concerns were plant den-
sity, the uncertainty as to whether
the plants vernalized, and the late-
ness of development.
Plant density is very closely re-
lated to yield, and being somewhat
compensated for as cool, moist con-
ditions have promoted tillering.
Tillering cannot compensate for
large areas with no plants, but the
worst of those fields were the ones
abandoned. Even the winter wheat
that didn’t germinate or emerge
until spring is now beginning to
joint in south-central South
Dakota, which would not occur if it
didn’t vernalize. There may be
plants that did not vernalize,
which should be easy to see in the
near future, if not already as they
will not elongate and produce
nodes or heads. The remaining
concern is the lateness of develop-
ment and maturity. Yields and test
weight will depend heavily on tem-
peratures and soil moisture as the
crop is flowering and completing
grain fill. Scouting and properly
managing weeds, insects and dis-
eases according to IPM principles
will be an important factor that
growers have some control over.
For information on managing this
year’s wheat crop or future crops,
consider attending the upcoming
SDSU Extension “Wheat Walks”:
•June 11 at 9:30 a.m. CDT –
.Agland Coop, 2 miles south and 3
miles west of Delmont, SD, or 5
miles south and 6 miles east of Ar-
mour, SD. Sponsored by Agland
Coop.
•June 11 at 2:30 p.m. CDT –
Jorgensen Farm, from Winner, SD,
8.5 miles north on N County Road,
2.5 miles west, 4 miles north and
0.5 miles west. Also 1 mile east, 1
mile north and 0.5 miles west of
the Ideal, SD Post Office. Spon-
sored by Winner Seed, Simplot Soil
Builders and Country Pride Coop.
•June 12 at 9:30 a.m. CDT –
Dakota Lakes Research Farm, 17
miles east of Pierre on SD Hwy
#34, sponsored by AgriPro Wheat.
•June 12 at 2:30 p.m. CDT –
Robbenolt Farm, from the junction
of SD Hwy 83 and 212, 5 miles
west of Gettysburg, SD, go 1 mile
south on 305th Ave. Sponsored by
Northern Plains Coop.
SDSU Extension Agronomy
State and Field Specialists will
provide expertise in plant pathol-
ogy, weed control, entomology, soil
fertility and agronomic informa-
tion. For more information, visit
http://igrow.org/ or call 842-1267.
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Knowing the difference between
conception rate and pregnancy
rate has a big impact on cattle pro-
ducer's bottom line says, Kalyn
Waters, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf
Field Specialist.
"When producers sit down to
figure out if they will use a
straight Time AI (TAI) synchro-
nization protocol (for example the
7-day CO-Synch+CIDR) or include
heat detection (for example the Se-
lect Synch), or to calculate the suc-
cess of their breeding season at its
conclusion, this difference is key,"
Waters said.
Waters says there are three key
calculations cattle producers
should take into account: synchro-
nization rate percent or the per-
centage of females detected in
estrus compared to the total num-
ber of cattle synchronized; concep-
tion rate percent or the percentage
of pregnant females compared to
the number of females insemi-
nated; and pregnancy rate percent
or the percentage of pregnant fe-
males compared to the total num-
ber synchronized.
"Many people will just look at
the overall pregnancy rate, how-
ever when evaluating the amount
of labor and resources to the num-
ber of pregnancies achieved, all
factors should be included. Using
conception rates as an indicator of
the overall success can be mislead-
ing. Conception rate does not take
into account the number of females
that were not inseminated."
Waters shares the following ex-
ample: Herd A, 100 head of cattle
were synchronized for breeding
using the Select Synch protocol, 50
of them were detected in heat and
inseminated, resulting in 70 per-
cent of those females becoming
pregnant. And, in Herd B, 100
head were also synchronized using
the 7-day CO-Synch + CIDR and
bred, however this herd was bred
with a straight TAI that resulted
in 55 percent of the females becom-
ing pregnant.
"In using Herd A and Herd B as
an example, at first look, it seems
as though Herd A had the most
successful AI breeding season, but
often times producers fail to take
into account the number of females
that are not bred if TAI is not used
into their overall evaluation," Wa-
ters said.
She adds that in this case, while
Herd A had much higher concep-
tion rates, the 50-head that were
not inseminated were not taken
into account.
"Thus, taking all factors into ac-
count, and evaluating these two
herds based on pregnancy rates,
which include all females, shows
that actually Herd B had greater
AI success than Herd A," she said.
Waters said taking all three fac-
tors into consideration will help
producers best manage their
breeding season. In addition when
choosing an AI protocol for their
herd, producers need to consider
the females that will not be ex-
posed to AI breeding if TAI is not
utilized.
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Calculating the
success of an
A.I. program

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