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Kadoka Press, July 25, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 107
Number 2
July 25, 2013
Second year in a row, Home Wreckers win Murdo Ranch Rodeo
Murdo Ranch Rodeo was held on Saturday, July 20 with
12 teams competing for the top slot. After the points were
total the Home Wrecker team took first place for the secondd
year.
Not only was prize money awarded to the top five teams, a
bonus of $100 per event was awarded for the fastest time.
First place: Home Wreckers: Frank Carlson, Lex Grooms,
Michael Jones, Tyler Jones
Second: Midland Food & Fuel: Bryer Jones, Shad Finn,
Colter Stout, Clint Nelson
Third place, three way tie: Coburn Trucking - Jake Coburn,
Kevin Lindwurm, Dusty Coburn, Nicholas Schrunk; Mama's
Boys Sponsored by Joseph Angus: Rozen Hill, Emmy Hill, Jon
Clark, Trent Buoy; and B&H Angus Ranch: Henry Ireland,
Cody Stahly, Jeremy Langdeau, Cayne Reinhard.
Event winners: hide race: Rusty Spur; range ride: Midland
Food & Fuel; trailer loading Home Wreckers; stray gathering:
Home Wreckers.
New to the rodeo this year was the mini bronc ride where
young cowboys and cowgirls competed. Making the whistle
and winning the event was Tyson Hill of White River, son of
Emmy and Rozen Hill.
A boot scramble and a candy scramble were held for the
younger portion of the crowd.
Midland Food & Fuel during the range gathering. Bryer Jones (L) and Colter Stout.
Not pictures Cling Nelson and Shad Finn.
Brunsch Ranch during the range gathering. Luke VanderMay (front L) and Joe Pavlas.
Klay O’Daniel (back L) and Alan Brunsch.
Conata Cowboys during the trailer loading. Cheyenne Burnette (L) Austin Livermont,
Cap Herber and Blaine Hicks.
Home Wreckers competing during the trailer loading. Michael Jones (L), Frank Carlson, Tyler Jones, Lex Grooms.
The 2013 Rangeland-Soil Days, co-
hosted by the Jackson and Haakon
County Conservation Districts, were held
at Kadoka June 25-26, 2013. Seventy-five
students from four categories: New
Rangers, Wranglers, Scouts, Go-Getters,
participated in the two day event.
Soil Days is held to teach about one of
the most important South Dakota re-
sources, our soils.
Rangeland Days is an opportunity to learn
more about one of the most important
South Dakota resources, our rangelands.
Learning activities were designed for a va-
riety of age groups and expertise, from
eight years old through adult. St a r t -
ing with plant morphology and identifica-
tion on up to judging habitat suitability for
cattle or grouse.
The two day event was made up of a
practice judging day followed by a timed
contest judging day, for student land (soil),
and range judgers.
Student land (soil) judgers identified
soil texture and structure, calculated
slope, determined top and subsoil depth,
and recommendedd conservation practices
to improve land capability.
Student range judgers participated in
plant and ecological site identification,
ecological condition rating, identifying
goals and making recommendations to
meet those goals, livestock carrying capac-
ity determination, and livestock and
wildlife habitat rating.
The winning 4-H Land (Soil) and Range
Teams qualifed to compete at the National
competition, which will be held in May of
2014, at Oklahoma City.
This event would not have been possi-
ble without the help and assistance of
many key people and organizations, par-
ticularly South Dakota Natural Resources
Conservation Service and South Dakota
State University specialists, and the local
people assisting in the coordination and
implementation of the event and activi-
ties.
The 2013 winning 4-H Land (Soils)
Team was Spink County 4-H
Hitchcock/Tulare, comprised of Cooper
Gordon, Trevor Hofer, Landon Gatzke,
Trista Fliehe.
The 2013 winning 4-H Range Team was
Perkins County, comprised of Kailyn Dix,
Shyenne Siedel, Quirt Beer, Rachel Siedel.
The 2013 speech winner was Kadon
Leddy of Stockholm, South Dakota. Kadon
qualified, to attend and present a speech
at the February 2014, International Soci-
ety for Range Management (SRM) meet-
ing in Orlando, Florida.
Top Hand “Buckle” winners were:
New Rangers (8-11) Top Hand (judge, give
speech, display) was Hunter Eide, Gettys-
burg, SD.
Wranglers (12-14) Top Hand (judge,
give speech, display) was Kaylen Stearns,
Edgemont, SD.
Scout (inexperienced high school age)
Top Hand (judge, give speech, display) was
Kadon Leddy, Stockholm, SD.
Go Getters (experienced high school
age) Top Hand (judge, give speech, dis-
play) was Ben Steigelmeyer, Selby, SD.
Kadoka students participating in the
events were Emily Knutson, Wyatt En-
ders, Dustin Enders, Makenzie Stilwell
and Faron Knutson. Emily Knutson took
first place in the Scout division (14-18 no
experience) for Range judging.
A special 30 year anniversary of South
Dakota Rangeland Days was celebrated to
honor the 30th year of the event, and
event originators, Rodney Baumberger-re-
tired National Resource Conservation
Service, Sturgis, Dr. Jim Johnson-retired
South Dakota State University Range
Specialist, and long time, strong support-
ing entities: SDSU, South Dakota Associ-
ation of Conservation Districts, South
Dakota Department of Agriculture, South
Dakota NRCS, and Society of Range Man-
agement South Dakota Chapter. These or-
ganizations all received plaques for their
efforts and 30 year commemorative caps.
A delicious supper meal was prepared
and served to 160 people by Bank West
right after the 30th Anniversary Range-
land Days Appreciation event.
Jeff Hemenway, South Dakota National
Resource Conservation Service State
Agronomist, from Huron, conducted a soil
health demonstration with a rainfall sim-
ulator simulating two inches of rain in 20
minutes showing water infiltration levels
on Jackson County soils based on different
cropping systems (no till versus conven-
tional till), and also on rangeland (low
level versus high level management).
The 2014 South Dakota Rangeland-Soil
Days event will be hosted by Brule-Buffalo
Conservation District based out of Cham-
berlain, South Dakota.
A rainfall simulator (pictured at left) simulating two inches
of rain in 20 minutes showing water infiltration levels on Jack-
son County soils based on different cropping systems (no till
versus conventional till), and also on rangeland (low level ver-
sus high level management).
Kadoka hosts 30th annual Soil and Rangeland days
Emily Knutson concentrates on identifiying the plant during the Range ID contest. Knutson along with other Kadoka
youth participated in the Soil and Rangeland Days in Kadoka on June 25 and 26.
David Pesicka (L), NRCS Tribal Liaison, Cheyenne River, instructs the participants during the practice day of Soil and Rangeland Days.
Wyatt Enders studies intently during the Range ID contest held during the Soil and Rangeland days in Kadoka.
Editorial
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 2
Fly Bait
There is no shortage of flies at
the moment. They are probably
not in any danger of being added to
the endangered-species list. On the
other hand, they tried to put
prairie dogs on that list a while
ago, and those troublesome rodents
are basically as endangered as
flies, so who knows.
Right now, though, sitting on the
deck during daylight hours is not
completely pleasant. Black flying
insects will see you sitting there
and decide to visit in droves. They
will land on any part of your
anatomy but are partial to skin.
You almost feel like they could
carry you away if they got really
well organized.
I am particularly displeased
when I’m trying to sip my coffee on
the deck and have to hold the cup
by its handle with one hand and
protect the rim with the other. Flies
love to land on the lip of your coffee
cup for some odd reason, and this is
not good. You don’t know where
those little feet have been, but you
strongly suspect it wasn’t any-
where clean. Their owners have a
predilection for manure and any-
thing rotten so there you are. I
don’t want fly feet on the rim of my
coffee cup. Oddly enough, you can
drink diet pop without worry since
it has absolutely no food value and
is scorned by the insect population.
They won’t give it a bit of attention.
It is no wonder we sometimes
get inundated with flies since they
can reproduce themselves so
quickly. A female can lay four to six-
hundred eggs within a short time,
and they can hatch within a day.
Then the larvae or maggots munch
around on really nasty stuff for a
few days before turning into pupae
and then adults. The whole process
is apt to take less than two weeks.
In other words, if the eggs from one
female produce a hundred more fe-
males in two weeks, and those hun-
dred each produce a hundred more,
you soon have a major surplus.
That’s about where we’re at here in
mid-July. Only frost or cooler
weather can probably save us.
This comes from someone who
has recently tried other control
measures. Fly swatters are effec-
tive in the short term, and it is sort
of like a computer game--see how
many bugs you can swat in five
minutes. Wife Corinne and I were
on the deck having a go at it to-
gether a few days ago, and I bet we
killed over fifty flies in ten min-
utes—maybe a hundred. It was
rather fun.
In a search for less time-consum-
ing control measures, I then went
out and bought a fly trap. This is a
dome-shaped hard-plastic contrap-
tion which has a funnel-type thing
leading up into it from the bottom.
You pour some water and smelly
liquid bait into that funnel and
then turn it right side up. The flies
come to the bait, crawl up into the
dome through the funnel, and are
apparently way too stupid to find
their way back out. Eventually
they drown in the water. This is all
well and good except for the fact
that the bait is so strong that it at-
tracts flies from quite a distance. In
fact, it attracts way more extra flies
than it traps. If you position it any-
where close to where you want to
be, you are worse off than you were
before. It might help if you put it
way out somewhere so the flies go
to it from the area where you are.
It definitely does not work to put it
close to you.
There are poisons, of course, but
I’m not a big fan of insecticides and
such. They make me nervous. I
don’t like being around anything
that kills things that live and
breathe like I do. I’m not even
overly fond of herbicides even
though I’m not a plant. Anything
very toxic might not be good for me
either, or so it seems to me.
As a result, I guess it’s back to
flyswatters. It does give you a small
feeling of power and usefulness to
be able to swat lots of flies and hor-
nets and rid the world of their pres-
ence. I’m aware they do have some
purpose in nature which is fine ex-
cept that I prefer them quite a
ways over there doing what they’re
supposed to do and not right next
to me.
One good thing about flies is
that they seldom bite except, of
course, when they’re trying to tell
you it’s going to rain. My mother,
anyway, said that flies only bite
when it’s going to rain. There
seems to be some truth to that al-
though I wouldn’t care to try to
prove it. Oh, yes. Another good
thing is that the life span of adult
flies is rather short—only a week or
two.
In the meanwhile, I guess I can
stay indoors more and wait for
frost. I can also sit on the deck
mostly after dark when the flies are
asleep. That’s a good time to be out
anyway since it’s cool and you can
watch the stars. As you can see, I
have no real answer to the fly prob-
lem. If you have a good one, be sure
to let me know. I’m a bit tired of
flies.
Education department
should focus on
helping students,
not implementing
ObamaCare
The U.S. Department of Educa-
tion (DoE) has a specific role within
the federal government, fostering
the education and growth of our na-
tion’s students. The coordination of
federal education programs, man-
agement of education activities,
and supplementing states efforts to
provide our students with the high-
est quality education is a massive
responsibility—one that requires
both financial and workforce re-
sources. So it was disconcerting
when it was revealed that DoE will
be assisting with the implementa-
tion and dissemination of informa-
tion of ObamaCare.
While the effects of the presi-
dent’s health care law will be felt by
parents, teachers, and their fami-
lies, it is unclear how the DoE’s in-
volvement in implementation will
further the department’s mission of
educating our nation’s students.
Further, the implementation of
ObamaCare will require taxpayer
dollars and/or federal employees to
shift focus from education related
efforts to focus on execution of a
law that should be spearheaded out
of the Department of Health and
Human Services—not DoE. The de-
partment’s involvement in these ef-
forts raise questions about why the
DoE is focusing on implementing
ObamaCare instead of fulfilling the
priorities of the agency’s mission,
and what authority the DoE and
other federal agencies have to dis-
seminate information and assist
with the implementation of Oba-
maCare, a law that 55 percent of
respondents in a recent Gallup poll
view unfavorably.
The DoE is not the first federal
agency that has indicated it will aid
in the implementation of Oba-
maCare. Numerous federal agen-
cies have announced intentions to
assist with the implementation of
the president’s signature health
care law, despite the fact that none
of these agencies have relevant ju-
risdiction.
Due to my concerns with the
DoE’s involvement in the imple-
mentation of ObamaCare, I re-
cently led a group of my Republican
Senate colleagues in sending a let-
ter to Secretary of Education Arne
Duncan questioning the DoE’s au-
thority to involve itself in the im-
plementation of ObamaCare. The
letter questions the amount of fed-
eral spending the department will
devote to implementation, the
number of DoE employees that will
be used for the effort, and what au-
thority the DoE has to disseminate
information and assist with imple-
mentation of ObamaCare.
Rather than commandeering the
DoE and other federal agencies to
assist in the implementation of pro-
grams and provisions that are not,
and may never be ready—as evi-
denced by the administration’s lat-
est delay of the employer
mandate—the administration
should instead focus on solutions
that actually lower the cost of care
and allow Americans to keep the in-
surance they like. I will continue to
monitor the implementation of
ObamaCare to ensure the federal
government is not diverting impor-
tant resources from their intended
purposes to aid in the implementa-
tion of this broken legislation.
Lookin’ Around| Syd Iwan From the U.S. Senate | Senator John Thune
Supporting our Air
Force’s Workhorses
Following a 19 hour flight, Lieu-
tenant Colonel Tim Schepper
stepped out of the B-1 Lancer at
Ellsworth Air Force Base and was
surrounded by family and fellow
airmen. This wasn’t a typical flight.
In fact, this flight marked over
5,000 hours of flight time in the B-
1 for Lt. Col. Schepper – a mile-
stone that no one else in the world
has reached. I would like to not
only congratulate Lt. Col. Schepper
for this incredible achievement, but
also the many airmen that have
come before him and will come
after him, for their service to our
great country.
While the next generation
bomber is on track to be in service
by the mid-2025s, the B-1 bombers
are still the workhorses of our na-
tion’s bomber fleet and have been
part of military operations in
Afghanistan for over a decade.
Early last year, the B-1 flew its
10,000th combat mission.
It is crucial that our military’s
readiness is not jeopardized due to
recent budget cuts, which is why I
voted for and supported multiple
efforts to replace these so-called se-
quester cuts with targeted and re-
sponsible spending reductions that
did not disproportionately affect
our nation’s armed forces. Addi-
tionally, I have cosponsored legisla-
tion to prevent another planned
round of military budget cuts by
slowing the growth of the federal
workforce and freezing congres-
sional pay.
Earlier this year the Air Force
planned to ground the B-1s for the
rest of the year. I had the opportu-
nity to question the Air Force dur-
ing a House Armed Services
Committee hearing about the im-
pact the decision may have on mil-
itary readiness. The Air Force then
allowed for flying on a limited basis
and has now announced that flying
hours have been restored. This de-
cision is absolutely vital and in the
best interests of our country’s de-
fense. I believe we have a responsi-
bility and a duty to ensure that our
men and women are fully prepared
and equipped for their military
missions.
I will continue to fight for the B-
1 bomber and all the missions and
airmen, not only at Ellsworth but
across the state of South Dakota.
Lt. Col. Schepper has proudly
served this country for decades and
we owe it to him, and every other
service member, to support and
provide for our armed forces during
their missions and after they re-
turn home.
From the U.S. House | Representative Kristi Noem
A new partnership
to protect our water
and strengthen our
forests
This week, USDA and the De-
partment of Interior announced a
new effort, the Western Watershed
Enhancement Partnership, to en-
hance our forests and protect
America’s water supply. This is im-
portant for anyone who pays a
water bill, and it’s important for
the future of our environment.
Americans in our cities depend
on clean water at the tap, and our
farmers and ranchers rely on water
to irrigate their crops and sustain
livestock. Our public lands are very
important in this regard. Our Na-
tional Forests and interior lands
provide water for more than 60 mil-
lion Americans.
When forests are healthy, they
filter rain and snowmelt, regulate
runoff and slow soil erosion – deliv-
ering clean water at lower cost. But
a changing climate threatens a
greater risk for severe wildfires
that release sediment, debris and
ash into streams and rivers. Ulti-
mately, these impacts of wildfire
make it tougher to clean the water
at treatment plants. Water compa-
nies are forced to make expensive
repairs to equipment and those
costs are passed on to the con-
sumers.
The Western Watershed En-
hancement Partnership will bring
together the U.S. Forest Service,
the Department of Interior’s Bu-
reau of Reclamation, local partners
and private water users to restore
forest lands in a proactive way. By
bringing together land and water
managers from across the west, we
can increase forest resiliency, im-
prove water quality, and reduce the
risk of catastrophic wildfire. This
promises healthier forests, and sav-
ings for water users.
The new partnership was high-
lighted recently in President
Obama’s Climate Action Plan,
which calls for such proactive
measures to protect the nation’s
critical infrastructure and reduce
the impacts of a changing climate.
This week’s announcement also
complements USDA’s many other
efforts to conserve America’s natu-
ral resources. To ensure strong nat-
ural resource conservation in the
years to come, USDA will continue
to encourage Congressional pas-
sage of a comprehensive Food,
Farm and Jobs Bill. Farmers,
landowners and forest owners need
a Food, Farm and Jobs Bill to make
effective use of limited conservation
funds, while building on record con-
servation efforts underway today.
USDA is ready to combat the im-
pacts of climate change, and put
the environment on track to a
healthy future. We’ll keep working
together with our partners across
the country to protect America’s
natural resources, and we will con-
tinue to encourage Congress to
achieve passage of a comprehensive
Food, Farm and Jobs Bill.
U.S. Dept. of Ag| Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
Your questions
and answeres
Q: Several years ago I applied
for Social Security disability, was
not approved, and returned to work
for a while before recently stopping
again. Can I file for disability
again?
A: Yes, you can using a medical
onset date, meaning the date when
the disability began, after the time-
frame covered by your earlier appli-
cation. More importantly, you
would again need to have enough
work at the right time to be insured
for disability. If the work require-
ment is met, the application will go
on to receive a medical decision. If
not met, the application does not go
forward and is denied without a
medical decision being made.
If you need to file for disability, do
so without worrying whether you
have enough work. File the claim.
Social Security will determine if
you are insured. Whether concern-
ing insured status or a medical de-
termination, appeal rights exist if
you disagree with the application
decision.
Consider filing for Social Secu-
rity disability online. Everything
from the disability application to
the medical background informa-
tion and medical releases can be
completed online without an ap-
pointment, at any time of day. In
addition, you can leave the applica-
tion materials and return to them
later with a provided reentry num-
ber. Online applications are re-
viewed in your local office; you are
contacted if there are questions.
Whether or not using the online ap-
plication, learn what you can ex-
pect to be asked at
http://www.socialsecurity.gov/on-
line/ssa-16.html.
SSA also works with the sepa-
rate, income based, Supplemental
Security Income (SSI) program,
which does not have a work re-
quirement. Depending on your in-
come, resources and living
arrangements, you might also file
application for SSI.
Did You Know? Medicare was
signed into law by President Lyn-
don B. Johnson on July 30, 1965, to
provide health insurance for the
elderly. It was signed in Independ-
ence, Missouri, in the presence of
former President Harry S. Truman
who opened the fight for such leg-
islation in a message to Congress in
1945.
At the bill-signing ceremony,
President Johnson enrolled Presi-
dent Truman as the first Medicare
beneficiary and presented him with
the first Medicare card.
Social Security | Howard Kossover, Public Affairs Specialist
Raakon/1ackson
county Falr
4-R Achlevement
0ays
Friday, August 2nd: PhiIip Legion HaII
1:00 p.m. 4-H & Open Class Exhibits open to the
Public
3:00 p.m. 4-H Talk-Off
4:30 p.m. 4-H Project Runway
5:30 p.m. Free Will Barbecue &
Ice Cream Social
7:00 p.m. Talent Show *
* During intermission a Sweet Treats
live auction will be held
Saturday, August 3rd: PhiIip Legion HaII
8:30 a.m. 4-H Large Animal Show
9:00 a.m. Farmer`s Market & Trade Show Opens
9:00 a.m. Open Class & 4-H Exhibits open to the
public
10:30 a.m. 4-H Small Animal Show
12:00 p.m. Lunch, sponsored by Haakon/Jackson
Fair Board
2:00 p.m. Elke Baxter, Gardening presentation
3:00 p.m. Open Class Exhibits released
4:00 p.m. Rascal Rodeo, Philip Roping Arena
PhiIip Masonic
Saturday,August 3rd
4:00 p.m. at the
PhiIip Roping Arena
REGISTRATION:
2:00 to 3:45 p.m.
AGE GROUPS:
6 & Under ~ 7-8-9
10-11-12 ~ 13-14
ADMISSION:
$5/person · $15/family
• Goat Tying
• Barrel Racing
• Flag Racing
• Mutton Bustin’ and
Calf & Pony Riding
• Breakaway Roping
• Pole Bending
• Team Roping
Entries:
$5.00 per event
Fun for all
with or
without a
horse!
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to: Kadoka Press, PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of
Belvidere, the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka
School District #35-2.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
“There is no labor a person does
that is undignified if they do it
right.” Bill Cosby
Sincere sympathy is extended
to Jan Rasmussen and family on
the loss of her sister, Betty Tesar.
Her funeral is coming up toward
the end of this week.
Amy Lehman and Jan were in
Rapid City last Tuesday keeping
appointments.
Janice and Mike Ring had a
houseful of ‘basketball campers’
last week. They attended the bas-
ketball camp in White River.
Robert and Sharon Ring were in
Winner on business Tuesday.
Debbie Ring came home Friday,
and Saturday Debbie and Sharon
went to Pierre for the day.
Samantha Taft came home from
Rapid City on Wednesday, in time
to celebrate her birthday with
rhubarb cake. Thursday Dan and
Susan were in Philip for parts so
they could continue haying. Mor-
gan was a participant in Calhoon’s
Basketball Camp this past week.
Saturday afternoon Samantha
headed back to Rapid City.
Last week Elaine Krogman had
an enjoyable week camping with
her sisters near Spearfish. Her sis-
ters are Barb from Colombus,
Montana, Linda from Caspar,
Wyoming, Rhonda from Tea, South
Dakota, and Zelda from the Philip
and White River area. Thursday
Elaine visited with Clarence Kro-
grman and with Erna Hill in the
nursing home in Winner. Saturday
evening they went to Murdo to lis-
ten to South Pine play at the
Rusty Spur after the ranch rodeo.
Jeannine Woodward hosted the
Mellette County Cattlewomen
meeting at the museum Friday af-
ternoon. Others present were
Donna Adrian, Rose West, Eunice
Krogman, Jean Kary, and June,
Michael and Matthew Ring. June
gave a demonstration of ‘Teapot
Karaoke’ after the meeting. Satur-
day Jeannine was in Whitewood
for a family reunion of her Uncle
Fillmore’s family.
Wood held a branding party on
Saturday, July 20. They branded
boards that will then be on perma-
nent display at the Mellette
County Museum.
July 14, 2013 a sidewalk auc-
tion was held at the museum in
White River. It was a successful
endeavor to benefit the museum.
Wednesday Ken Koistenen of
Pierre stopped in to visit Maxine
Allard. Later that day, Maxine
rode with Dorothy Bligh to Valen-
tine, and visited with Jim Kruger
at Cherry Hills while Dorothy ran
her errands. Speaking of ‘cherry’,
Maxine found a couple ripe yellow
cherry tomatoes from one of her
tomato plants in her garden.
Kenda Huber was in White
River last Monday and Tuesday,
getting things done at the FSA of-
fice, along with other errands.
The Hubers have been baling
oats and peas.
Blake Lehman helped judge ex-
hibits at achievement days in
Murdo on Wednesday and Thurs-
day.
Andrea Beckwith helped with
Prairie Lights at Lakeview and
Rosebud. Then Saturday went to
Hills Alive in Rapid City.
Sue Larson visited Jim and
Marjorie Letellier Monday and
Tuesday, picked up her car at Ron
Patton’s and went back home to
Rapid City later on Tuesday.
The Burma family came to Jim
and Marjorie’s Saturday to watch
the movie “42” – the Jackie Robin-
son story.
Howard and Nette Heinert
were in Valentine and Winner on
business Tuesday. Wednesday
they were in Philip, and had din-
ner with Bob and Ellen Totton.
Saturday Chris and Beau joined
them and they all went in to Mis-
sion where they were supper
guests at Stanley and Maureece
Heinert home.
Noreen Krogman was in Mis-
sion the afternoon of July 14 for
the DNP quilting session. This
past Sunday afternoon Richard
and Noreen were in Winner to
visit Clarence, and also visited
Erna Hill, and her son, Derald,
who was visiting her from Belle
Fourche.
The Krogmans are getting a
second cutting of hay, even though
rain has been scarce in July.
Noreen shows only .52 so far for
July.
June, Michael and Matthew
Ring were supper guests Tuesday
evening at the Bruce Ring home.
Then the twins stayed for a sleep-
over that night and Wednesday,
too.
Bruce has been helping combine
wheat at Rueben Ring’s.
Friday June gave Jean Kary a
ride in to White River for the Cat-
tlewomen meeting. On the way to
pick up Jean, the combine was not
going, but on the way back, we no-
ticed quite a bit had been com-
bined and the combine was still
going. As we headed back from
Jean’s, there were two hitchhikers
on the road, Stephanie and Ryan
had been riding with Bruce, but
came home with us. After playing
a while with the twins, they
pitched in and helped weed in the
garden.
The father of Bruce and Jessie’s
foster children passed away last
week, so Jessie took the children
to the wakes on Saturday and
Sunday, and to the funeral on
Monday.
Bruce took Stephanie to Bible
Camp by Pierre on Monday morn-
ing and also picked up some parts
while in Pierre.
The Parkinson Cousins Family
Reunion, held every three years,
was in Estes Park, CO., over this
past weekend. Forty-two family
members of the late Sid and Hazel
Parkinson, and a couple friends at-
tended the event. Among those
were Bill Stout and his wife,
Paulett Taggart of San Francisco,
CA; Chuck and Suzanne Parkin-
son of Rapid City; David Parkin-
son of Las Vegas, NV; Larry and
Deb Parkinson and daughter,
Katie of Alexandria, VA; Jerry and
Deb Parkinson of Portland, OR;
June and Floyd Starkjohann,
Ronda and Dennis Bruns, Krista
and Doug Beeman and two daugh-
ters, all of Windsor, CO; Scott and
Marty Starkjohann, Brandon,
Lindsey and Alissa, and a friend,
Corey Savala, all of Austin, TX;
Derek and Jamie Bruns and Han-
nah of Plattville, CO; Sydne Lenox
of Kadoka; Michael Lenox and
daughter, Erin, of Greenwood, IN;
Mark Lenox and his friend, Marty
Como (a nephew of Perry Como –
honestly) of Oregon, OH; Bruce
and Annie Lenox, Kyle, Kelsey
and Jack of Chesterfield, MO; Jon
and Carol Lenox, Jordyn and
Ethan of Weston, OH.; Lynda
Vigus (daughter of Butch Parkin-
son) of Freeman, SD; and Chris-
tine Engelen of Ft. Collins, CO, (a
granddaughter of Margaret and
Don Engelen, former Kadoka High
School graduates). The Starkjo-
hann family were the hosts this
year and only living four grand-
sons of Sid and Hazel were unable
to attend.
Ted Pettyjohn visited in Kadoka
a couple days this week. He ar-
rived on a bus from Minneapolis
on Sunday where he had been vis-
iting his daughter, Brenda, and
was a guest at the home of Nona
and Kieth Prang while here. He
returned to his home in Sturgis
early this week.
Lila Whidby and Wanda Swan
drove to Springview, NE., on Fri-
day, July 12, where they attended
the funeral of Bus Swan, Wanda’s
brother-in-law. Wanda’s daughter,
Betty Rasmussen, of Broken
Arrow, OK, was also able to be at
the funeral. Lila and Wanda re-
turned home on Sunday morning,
the 14th.
Lila and Bruce Whidby drove to
Watertown last Friday to attend a
softball tournament in which their
granddaughter participated. They
stayed at the home of their daugh-
ter, Diane and Chad Konradi, and
returned home on Sunday. They
said the hay crops in that area are
wonderful. Lila also said they re-
cently killed a rattlesnake at their
home recently, a small one but a
rattlesnake all the same.
The carpenter work at the fire
hall in Kadoka is nearing comple-
tion after discovering mold in the
walls. It looks beautiful as you
drive through Main Street.
The family of the late Ed and
Polly Kujawa held their reunion
this past weekend at the Dark
Shadow Campground near Rapid
City. Of their six children, only
Joanne and Tom Berman of Ab-
erdeen were unable to attend. In-
cluded in the attendees were
Karen and Jack Henderson of Lit-
tleton, CO; Kenny Kujawa of
Huntsville, MO; Jim and Arlene
Kujawa of Kadoka; Rita and Scott
Endres of Maple Grove, MN;
Rhonda Schultz of Gilbert, AZ;
Trina and Travis Thorn and sons
of Minneapolis, MN; Trista Hed-
derman of Sommerset, SD,
Chelsea and Chase McBride and
son, Brekkin, of McMillan, CO,
and Tootie and Tom Terkildsen of
Kadoka. Joanne and Tom Berheim
of Forbes, ND, and Jeremy Ku-
jawa were unable to attend.
Area saddle bronc riders:
Hamel, MN, July 11-14 – Ty
Manke 1st place with a score of 79,
$2,636; Dinosaur Roundup Rodeo,
July 11-13, Vernal, UT, – Louie
Brunson tied for 8th, 77, $202;
Laramie, WY, Jubilee Days, July
12-14 – 2nd place, Ty Thompson
with an 81, $1,197; Snake River
Stampede, Nampa, ID, July 16-20
– Chad Ferley, 2nd score 83,
$3,336; Louie Brunson tied for 8th
with a 79, $218; Finals – Louie
Brunson 5th place with score of
79, $350; average – Louie tie for
6th with 158 pts, $635 and Chad
8th place, 157 pts., $435. Mitchell
Corn Palace Stampede, July 18-21
– 1st Place J.J. Elshere, 79, $1,955
and Ty Thompson tie for 2nd place
with a 77, $1,303.
On Sunday, Ron Carson and
Wilma Carleton stopped by to visit
with their aunt, Joy Parker. She
always enjoys their company. Also
visiting was Beverly and Wilma on
Tuesday. Renate Carson drops by
quite often and checks on her and
many other residents each week.
Jade dropped in to see Micki
Word, she’s quite popular with the
school kids. Micki also had a visit
from her husband, Bob. She went
out of the facility a few days to go
and visit at her daughters. She
had a wonderful time.
Edith Perault got a surprise
visit from her great grandson, Ben
Headlee, and his wife on Monday.
She was so surprised to see them
and they shared a good visit. Vicki
Wilson stops in on a regular basis
to see her mom.
Fred Koester and Mel’s grand-
daughter, Libbi, came by to see
Melford for his birthday. It was
quite a day for Mel as he went
with us fishing in Pierre, 87 years
later to return to where he was
born in 1926. We had a great day
after we found the shady spot!
Clara Belle Weller went out for
the day with her husband, Bud, on
Tuesdday. On Wednesday, Bud
and his brother, Joe, and his wife
came by to see Clara Belle. It’s al-
ways a pleasure to get to see them
says Clara Belle.
Glenn Bruhn got a visit from
his good friend, Ron Twiss. Ron
and Connie live in the Interior
area.
Mel and Wilma Hartes, Elaine
Kemnitz brother and sister-in-law,
dropped in to see Elaine. They had
a real good visit on Friday and on
Saturday her husband, Don, drove
down. Elaine’s daughter-n-law,
Cindy, from Pierre came down to
the fishing area and enjoyed some
HOT time with her. They also
shared some cold lemonade. It was
a special treat for Elaine!!
Arlyss Klundt and his friend,
Raynita, stopped in and picked up
Ruth and took her for supper at
Club 27. Sounds like everything
was delicious.
Dorothy and Brad Louder drove
down on Friday to see Dwight.
Those also visiting with Dwight
were Charley, Susan, Kerri, John,
and Kyle.
Mary Bull Bear has been hav-
ing a lot of company since she re-
turned home from the hospital.
Those coming by were, Ajiah, Ne-
veah, Marlis, Jacob, Raya, and
many other family members and
friends.
On Tuesday, we took a big group
fishing in Pierre. Those residents
going were: Mary Ellen Herbaugh,
Ruth Klundt, Derald Kulhavey,
Melford Koester, Joy Parker,
Charity Edwards, Elaine Kemnitz,
Dwight Louder, Sylvan Kruse,
Elmer Williams, and Shorty Ire-
land. We so appreciated Dave
Johnson, Marsha Sumptner, Nikki
Bonenberger’s dad, Bill McDaniel,
for taking time and helping us
with our trip. The staff that went
along for fun-filled fishing trip
were Cathy Stone, Nikki Bonen-
berger, and Tara Underberg. Hats
off to an eventful day!
Derald Kulhavey will celebrate
his a birthday on the 30th.
We all so look forward to those
who come by each week and visit.
Some of our visitors include: the
Willert family, Shirley Josserand,
Lova Bushnell, Lola Joyce Rig-
gins, the Wilmarth family, the De-
Vries family, the VanderMay
family, and the Petras family, and
to all other’s that are so kind to
stop by. It sure brightens our day
to have visitors!
Dave and Sandy Bauman were
last weekend visitors at the
parental home of Frank and Myrth
Bauman. May we keep Dave and
Sandy in our prayers. They are
busy caring for foster children, and
Dave’s illness is progressing. May
we thank God it is slow now.
May I do spelling correction on
Robbie Hopkin’s beloved step-
granddaughter. Her name is
spelled Inah Matthew. I also looked
up the correct spelling for the
Luneberg Drug Store and the Bert
Dolloff tourist cafe years ago. They
are listed in the
Jackson/Washabaugh County Book.
On Wednesday afternoon the
quilters got quilts done, again.
They were a little short handed as
Marie had company, and Betty was
a little under the weather.
People are starting to notice that
grasshoppers are filling their vehi-
cle grills, and I see there are more
in our flower beds. I sure hope they
do not move in, in a swarm.
I am hearing that our everyday
habits at the apartments are
changing. We sure miss Lyle here
at the apartments.
Frank and Myrth shared that
their great grandson, Gus Stout,
visited them one day last week.
Brad and Jody Stout are his par-
ents.
I went over to the care center
and enjoyed some visits with the
residents. I also enjoyed playing a
few card games. One game was
Kings Up.
I also heard that (Wayne’s) Bon-
nie had a little setback. She will be
taking more radiation treatments.
May we keep her in our prayers.
I accompanied Chris and Dylan
Riggins to Wall Wednesday
evening. Dylan practiced on a cou-
ple of bareback broncs. Dylan qual-
ified for State Rodeo, but the bull
riding at Interior and Wall re-
arranged the qualifications.
I have had a good weekend. My
grandson, John, Jenny, Kylie, Jack-
son and Ethan Riggins took me out
to Jigger’s Saturday dinner. We had
a nice visit.
On Sunday, Chris called. He and
Anitalynn took me out to Jigger’s
for breakfast. The meals were
great. In the afternoon, we drove
out to my great-grandpa’s home-
stead. That is Kelly’s home and
ranch.
We have 16 puzzles put together
now that are not hung up yet. Most
are 1000 piece puzzles. I see Pat
Kozlik has put new pictures on her
door. They are interesting scenery.
My door is getting full. I have ani-
mals.
Several of us attended the
Steven Crane Country Gospel
Artist and Christian Comedian at
the Presbyterian Church Sunday
evening. He sang several songs for
us and shared some humor. He has
a beautiful voice and travels 365
days of the year with his wife and
boys.
Lois Pettyjohn, Lova Bushnell,
Faye Eisenbraun and Joyce Hicks
enjoyed Sunday dinner at Jigger’s.
Thought of the week: “Falling
down does not make you a failure,
but staying down and not trying to
get up does.”
Colter and Abby Carlson gained
another daughter last week when
Camree Mae was born to them at
Rapid City. She weighed in at six
pounds, two ounces and was eight-
een inches long. She joins two sis-
ters, Ashlynn and Erika. The
family was expected back home on
Sunday according to great uncle,
James Carlson, and cousin, Frank
Carlson. Local grandparents are
Mark and Tammy Carlson and
Troy and Ella Hindman.
Marie Addison gained another
great grandchild about ten days
ago when Francys Maye was born
to her granddaughter, Morgan
Tschetter, of Rapid City. Morgan is
Dixie Doyle’s daughter. This was
the third great grandchild of
Marie’s born this year, and two
more are expected before the end
of the year. Everyone came from
Rapid City to visit Marie at Murdo
last Wednesday and snap some
four-generation photos even
though Francys was only a week
old at the time. Marie said Fran-
cys is a little doll and seemed to
enjoy sitting outside with the fam-
ily for a while when she was here.
Morgan is a pharmacist there in
Rapid City.
Larry Grimme was visited last
week by his son, Marty, and his
two kids, Rylan and Race, of Yank-
ton. They came Wednesday and
stayed until Sunday. While here
they visited Wall Drug where the
kids enjoyed the dinosaur since
they have been studying those in
school. They also really enjoyed
1880 Town and visited there four
times. Larry said there are so
many things to climb on and inter-
act with that kids really seem to
enjoy themselves there. They also
liked eating a meal or two in the
railroad dining car and snacking
on pop and popcorn. Larry’s gar-
den is now starting to produce and
he brought a number of cucumbers
to church on Sunday to share with
anyone who wanted them.
Betty Kusick was visited by
both of her daughters last week.
Kathy and her husband came on
Monday and mowed the yard.
Loretta and her husband came on
Tuesday. They had already loaded
their lawnmower to bring and do
the lawn and were quite pleased
when Betty called and told them
that the job was already done.
They brought dinner instead.
After Kathy left on Monday, Jim
Addison dropped by and took
Betty fishing.
The Mansfield clan went to
Rapid City on Monday for sup-
plies. That included Fayola,
Aaron, Michelle, and Tyrel. Aaron
was able to go along since it was
too wet to hay. Jim, however,
stayed home and dealt with some
haying duties that could be done.
Chuck and Merry Willard were
visited this weekend by their
daughter, Niki, and her two kids,
Joshua and Caleb, of Hot Springs.
Merry said they’ve been putting
up hay but were delayed a bit one
day when Chuck somehow man-
aged to bale up a long piece of
angle iron. The iron was so long
that it stuck out from both sides of
the bale and had to be cut off be-
fore the bale could be moved out of
the baler. The metal was fairly
straight going in but in an S shape
afterwards. Merry said Chuck’s
baler is also somewhat fussy about
the hay it will bale. It can’t be too
dry or too wet or there will be trou-
ble.
Chris Baldwin is back home
after spending from about mid-
March until now in Texas with his
bees. He was back a little while in
June, but otherwise has been in
Texas. It was too dry here early for
bees so Chris kept them south to
work on the flowers of the Chinese
Tallow trees. These are plentiful in
Texas and make good honey. The
plants are very hardy and grow al-
most anywhere and under many
different conditions. Unfortu-
nately, they are weeds that cattle
won’t eat and that can reproduce
themselves quite easily. Now that
the bees are here, Chris is hoping
for continued good moisture so the
alfalfa grows up good after being
hayed and produces more flowers
for his bees to work on.
Wade Fox and Patty were vis-
ited this weekend by Patty’s mom
and sister, Earleen and Christina
Irigoyen, of Selby. They came to
visit and also to do some planning
and preparations for Wade and
Patty’s wedding which is sched-
uled for August 24.
Frank Carlson and his team
won the ranch rodeo in Murdo on
Saturday. His team included Lex
Grooms and Michael and Tyler
Jones. This crew has pretty good
luck in winning such events from
time to time. All of Frank’s family
was able to accompany him to
Murdo.
Rick and Ronda Dennis and
Larry, Jo and Jenny Johnston at-
tended the ranch rodeo in Murdo
on Saturday evening. On Sunday,
Ronda, Jo, Jenny, Scotti Block,
and Scotti’s daughter, Kayla An-
derson of Murdo, attended the the
luncheon and garden tours at Mid-
land, which included the gardens
of Buddy Manke, Mark Rieman,
and Tommy Jones. Over 50 people
attended the event. Later that
evening they were joined by their
husbands and enjoyed supper at
Larry and Jo’s house.
Jo Rodgers made trips to
Presho and White River this week
to conduct interviews for the post
office. Other days she was at her
normal office at Murdo where she
is the postmaster. Son Jory partic-
ipated in a baseball tournament in
Kadoka on Saturday. The Kadoka
team came in second.
Eric Osborn said his dad, Wib,
was down for supper on Friday.
This included grilled pork chops
and potatoes. Eric said his potato
crop doesn’t look that promising
this year as the grasshoppers
moved in and ate a lot of it before
he could get out with some insec-
ticide. He isgetting some tomatoes.
James Carlson is again a resi-
dent of Belvidere. He can leave at
a moments notice, however, since
he is staying in his camper which
is parked in the court behind the
bar.
Randy Peters is still living on
Main Street and said he didn’t
have a lot of news except that he
has been getting in a lot of good
fishing time.
Correspondent News
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 3
Norris News | June Ring, 462-6328
Kadoka Area News | Sydne Lenox, 837-2465
Kadoka Nursing Home | Cathy Stone, 837-2270
Gateway News | Lola Joyce Riggins, 837-2053 (Let it ring.)
Belvidere News | Syd Iwan, 381-2147
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Join us for lunch…
Buffet Every Sunday
Includes Salad Bar & Dessert
serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jigger’s Restaurant
837-2000 • Kadoka
Daily Noon Speicals
Monday through Friday
Serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Homemade Salad Bar
everyday of the week!
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
WANTED
Dam Repair
or other
dirt work
Tom DeVries
Belvidere • 605-891-8022
Kennebec Telephone
Construction
605-869-2220
Excavation work of ALL
types! Back Hoe
Trenching
Excavation
Waterers
Tire tanks
Monday, July 29
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Show & Dance with full band!
Steak
Out
&
Full Menu
Service
Come
early
for
Supper!
No Cover Charge
Youth & Sports
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 4
HERE COMES BRIDE
th
e
Please join us for a Come & Go Bridal Shower honoring
Andi Johnston
fiancée of Dana Kerns
Sunday, August 4
2 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Andi & Dana are registered at Bed, Bath & Beyond
& Target
“Let’s wrap up our
best wishes and
shower the bride
with love!”
at the Stevie Uhlir residence, 410 12th St., Kadoka, SD
Kadoka takes second at league tournament
The Kadoka “A” baseball team took second place in the league tournament that was held on Thursday, July 18 in Philip and Saturday, July 20 in
Kadoka. In the first round on Thursday, July 18, in Philip - Kadoka defeated Wall 4-3 and Philip over Murdo 16-3. In the second round on Saturday
in Kadoka - Philip defeated Kadoka 3-2. Pictured back row (L-R): Coach Jody Sudbeck, Jory Rodgers, Gage Weller, Abe Herber, Geoffrey DeVries,
Isiah Hogen, Lavin Bendt, coach Rich Lamont. Front row: Bryan Letellier, Jarred Hicks, Marcus Herber, Richard Lamont, Reese Sudbeck.
-- photo by Del Bartels
Legion baseball team finishes season
The Philip Legion baseball team concluded its regular season with a home game Monday, July 22. In a doubleheader against the Rapid City Pony
All-Stars, the first game went to the opponents 1-13. The second game went the same way, but with a final score of 0-3. The team, coached by Kory
Foss, consists of members from Philip, Wall, Kadoka and White River. Shown is Avery Johnson, Philip, pitching in the second game with Storm
Wilcox at second base. -- photo by Del Bartels
Ground beef was the surprize ingredient that 4-H members had to use in the fourth
annual Youth in Action “Iron Chef” contest, Thursday July 11, in Philip High School’s
home economics room. Contestants were given 90 minutes in which to prepare and
serve their recipe to a panel of judges. They were judged on cooking skills, food safety
and handling skills, kitchen clean up, and the nutritional knowledge for their dish.
They must know how many servings their recipe makes, the amount of calories per
serving, how the different ingredients fit into the food pyramid, as well as information
on the fats and sugars per serving. The beginner, junior and senior level competitors
earned ribbons, but the top winner will not be announced until the 4-H recognition
night in November. Those who took part in the challenge was: Josie Rush (taco bake),
Elle Moon (stromboli), Tagg Weller (cheeseburger bundles), Shaina Solon (meat loaf),
Savannah Solon (beef quesadillas), Gage Weller (chili), Dustin Enders (farmhouse
biscuits), and Mackenzie Stillwell (cheeseburger pie). The entries were judged by
Kathy Peterson.
4-H “Iron Chef” hamburger challenge held in Philip
Shania (L) and Savannah Solon
Judge Kathy Peterson (L), Gage Weller, Dustin Enders
Kids fun night was held at the
O’Bryan Arena on Wednesday,
July 17 in Belvidere.
Stickhorse Barrels: 1. Trey
Carlson, Crossfire; 2. Shaylee
Porch, Borrowed Time; 3. Mylee
Gropper, Smoke; 4. Carson Van-
derMay, Buster; 5. Peyton Porch,
Flicka; 6)Lilly Uhlir, Dora.
SH Keyhole: 1. Martin Badure,
Endgate; 2. Trey Carlson, Cross-
fire; 3. Taton Hill-Bullet; 4. Peyton
Porch, Flicka; 5. Mylee Gropper,
Smoke; 6. Shaylee Porch, Bor-
rowed Time; 7. Lilly Uhlir, Dora; 8.
Carson VanderMay, Buster.
Ground Roping: 1. Trey Carl-
son; Tie 2nd, 3rd, 4th: Lillly Uhlir,
Shaylee Porch, Taton Hill; 5. Car-
son VanderMay; Tie 6th, 7th:
Maraya VanderMay and Treston
Hill.
Lead Barrels: 1. Peyton Porch,
Deuce; 2. Lilly Uhlir, Daisy;
3)Mylee Gropper, Pepsi; 4. Shaylee
Porch, Satchett; 5. Haylee Porch,
Trigger; 6. Martin Badure, Sugar;
7. Trey Carlson, Yellar; 8. Raylie
VanderMay, Clyde.
Jr. Barrels: 1. Tawny Gropper,
Do Si Do; 2. Hunter Johnson,
Daisy; 3. Dalton Porch, Faith; 4.
Tyus Williams, Brown Bomber; 5.
Maraya VanderMay, Alice; 6.
Tyson Hill, Bunny Hopper; 7. Lilly
Jandreau, Angel; 8. Taton Hill,
Duke.
Jr. Polebending: 1. Hunter
Johnson, Daisy; 2. Tawny Gropper,
Do Si Do; 3. Maraya VanderMay,
Alice; 4. Tyson Hill, Bunny Hop-
per; 5. Dalton Porch, Faith; 6.
Tyus Williams, Brown Bomber; 7.
Peyton Porch, Deuce; 8. Hudson
Johnson, Backfire.
Jr. Dummy Roping: 1. Dalton
Porch; 2. Tyson Hill; 3. Hudson
Johnson.
Jr. Keyhole: 1. Dalton Porch; 2.
Hunter Johnson; 3. Maraya Van-
derMay; 4. Hudson Johnson.
Barrels: 1D: 1. Jo Jandreau,
Squirt; 2D: 1. Justina Cvach, Red;
2. Hunter Johnson, Daisy; 3.
Emmy Lu Hill, Cupid
Open Polebending: 1D: 1.
Justina Cvach, Red; 2. Hunter
Johnson, Daisy; 3. Jo Jandreau,
Squirt; 2D: 1. Lane Jandreau,
Peanuts.
Open Keyhole: 1D: 1. Hunter
Johnson, Daisy; 2. Lane Jandreau,
Peanuts; 2D: 1. Justina Cvach,
Red; 2. Jo Jandreau, Squirt.
The next fun night will be held
on Wednesday, July 31. Entries
will begin at 5:30 p.m. and run at
6:00.
O’Bryan Arena fun night results
One reason to enjoy the wind, build a kite
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
Read Psalm 139:1-10
In the light of God’s omniscience and omnipresence, it is easy to wonder
why Christians still attempt to run from Him. Jonah certainly demonstrated
that it could not be done, and yet people insist on trying. But why?
Sometimes people who try to run from God are acting out of pure selfish-
ness—it seems we have an unlimited capacity to believe we know what is
best for us, no matter what God thinks or says. At times we balk out of simple
fear: we are afraid that we might not succeed; we are concerned that others
will be critical of our efforts; or perhaps we fear obedience might be too costly.
But no matter what our reason is, we often fail to recognize the high price of
turning aside and trying to flee from the Lord.
Jonah paid dearly for his rebellion. Not only did he suffer embarrassment,
terror, and guilt, but he also jeopardized the lives of innocent men. You cannot
run from the Lord without inflicting heavy punishment on innocent people.
How many fathers and mothers walk away from their children and say, “I
can do what I want. It’s my own life.” No, it is not. You cannot leave little
children fatherless or motherless without reaping lifelong pain and suffering.
Nor can you sin against the Lord without paying a terrible price yourself and
hurting others in the process.
In spite of this awful reality, it is also true that God is forgiving—He offers
a second or third or fortieth or millionth chance (Jonah 3:1) He kept after
Jonah as long as it was necessary, and He will be faithful to you as well.
Inspiration Point
Community
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 5
What We Can Learn from Jonah
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
Church Calendar
Monday, July 29: Eat at Jigger’s
Tuesday, July 30: Barbeque pork, baked potato, broccoli with cheese,
bread and applesauce.
Wednesday, July 31: Chef salad with turkey or ham, V-8 juice, dinner
roll and apricots.
Thursday, August 1: Oven fried chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy,
harvard beets, bread and fresh fruit.
Friday, August 2: Hamburger on a bun with lettuce and onion, potato
salad, baked beans and ice cream with strawberries.
Friday, July 26:
KCBA Cash Mob at H&H Café, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Monday, July 29:
Kadoka City Council special meeting at 7 p.m.
Notices:
The KHS Alumni Association is trying to locate class composite pho-
tos for all graduating classes from 1913 to 2013. If you have one, please
call Nona Prang at home 837--2684 or cell 488-0098.
Meals for the Elderely
Upcoming Events
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Belvidere Store
Open Daily
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Diesel • Gas
Farm Fuel
Pop • Snacks • Beer
344-2277
During space camp at the After School program, with the assistance of Ken Graupmann, the stu-
dents made kites and took them out to the golf course to fly them. Other activities during the
week included hot air balloons and building and launching rockets. Above Emerson Kukal (L)
and Graupmann get ready to fly her kite. -- photos by Rhonda Antonsen
Kylie Fromm with her kite.
Trey Carlson completing the barrel pattern.
Trey Speer sets her kite in the air.
Johathan MacFeat and Jackson Riggins work together with getting their kite into flight.
Notice of Policy
Adjustment
Jackson County Library
Jackson County Library Board will finalize
policy changes at their August 7, 2013
meeting. Policy modifications are avail-
able for review and comment at Jackson
County Library upon request for review
until August 2, 2013.
[Published July 25 & August 1, 2013, at
the total approximate cost of $10.84]
NOTICE OF HEATING
FUEL BIDS
Bids for the furnishing of fuel oil and
propane for the various schools within the
Kadoka Area School District for the 2013-
2014 school year will be accepted at the
Kadoka Area School Business Office up
until 2:00 p.m. on Monday, August 5,
2013. Bids should be submitted by school
site. Bids will be opened at this time in the
office of the business manager.
Bids will be considered by the Board of
Education at their meeting to be held on
Wednesday, August 14, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Denote on outside of envelope:
BID ON FUEL OIL:
INTERIOR SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
KADOKA SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
LONG VALLEY SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
INTERIOR SCHOOL LUNCHROOM
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
Area School District reserves the right to
accecpt or reject any or all bids.
Kadoka Board of Education
Jo Beth Uhlir,
Business Manager
[Published July 18 & 25, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $17.88]
NOTICE
FOR BUS/SCHOOL
VEHICLE FUEL BIDS
Bids for furnishing of regular gasoline and
diesel fuel for the school vehicles of the
Kadoka Area School District will be ac-
cepted until 2:00 p.m., Monday, August 5,
2013. Bids will be opened at this time in
the office of the business manager.
Bids will be considered by the board of ed-
ucation at their regular meeting to be held
Wednesday, August 14, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Bids will be for the 2013-2014 school
term.
Bidders please bid for the following buses
and bus routes:
KADOKA SCHOOL: gas: pump price, full
service/self service price diesel fuel:
pump price, full service/self service price.
INTERIOR ROUTE: bulk price, diesel
fuel, delivered to Larry Manley residence,
Interior, SD.
WANBLEE ROUTE: diesel - pump price,
full service/self service price.
LONG VALLEY ROUTE: bulk price,
diesel fuel, delivered to Long Valley, SD
and bulk price, gasoline, delivered to the
Matt VanderMay Ranch, Long Valley, SD
(300 gallon tank).
Diesel vendors shall be responsible for
federal tax exemption.
Denote on outside of envelope:
GAS BID DIESEL BID
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
School District reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bids.
Kadoka Board of Education
Jo Beth Uhlir,
Business Manager
[Published July 18 & 25, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $21.13]
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Harriet Noteboom,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 13-3
NOTICE TO CREDITORS,
Notice is given that on May 6, 2013, John
Daum, whose address is 225 E. Dakota,
Spearfish, South Dakota 57783, was ap-
pointed as personal representative of the
Estate of Fae Johnston.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date of
the first publication of this notice or their
claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal rep-
resentative or may be filed with the clerk
with a copy of the claim mailed to the per-
sonal representative.
Dated May 30, 2013.
/s/ John Daum
John Daum
225 E. Dakota
Spearfish, SD 57783
Lester Nies
Hood, & Nies, P.C.
109 Main Street
P.O. Box 759
Spearfish, SD 57783-0759
[Published July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013]
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
July 17, 2013
A regular meeting of the Town of Cotton-
wood was held at Town Hall on Wednes-
day evening, July 17, 2013 at 7 p.m.
Present were JC Heath, Scott Brech, Ted
& Mattie Degan, Dave Griffee, Doug Hov-
land, Vernon Omdahl, Bernie & Jeri Hanks
and Phil Stark. Absent: Jeff Heath.
The meeting was called to order by JC
Heath. The financial report was read.
Old Business: There was no old business.
New Business: The monthly bills were
presented as follows:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.70
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89.30
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,690.01
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,842.55
Following bill approval, a discussion was
held about the leaking roof of the Cotton-
wood Hall. Several felt that the town
should pay for at least a part of the re-
placement of the roof. Some felt that the
annual money raiser for hall upkeep
should bear the cost. With no agreement
reached, the roof replacement was tabled
until the next meeting.
With there being no other business to dis-
cuss, a motion was made and seconded
to adjourn. The next regular meeting will
be held on August 21, 2013 7 p.m. at
Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published July 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $17.23]
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
June 20, 2013
CALL TO ORDER:
he West River Water Development District
convened for their regular meeting at the
West River Water Development District
Project Office in Murdo, SD. Chairman
Joseph Hieb called the meeting to order
at 10:30 a.m. (CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper; Mike Vetter, City of Philip.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
None
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the agenda. Mo-
tion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the May 16, 2013, meeting
were previously mailed to the Board for
their review.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the May min-
utes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Joseph Hieb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
Marion Matt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
Lorne Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65.04
Lyman County
Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.30
Murdo Coyote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62.10
Pennington County
Courant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53.60
Pioneer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.21
Todd County
Tribune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103.38
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the May Financial Report is on file at
the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the May Finan-
cial Report. Motion carried unanimously..
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his June
report to the Board.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the Manager’s
Report. Motion carried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
PRELIMINARY FY 2014 BUDGET:
Manager Fitzgerald presented the Board
with the draft preliminary FY 2014 budget
for their review.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the FY 2014 pre-
liminary budget. Motion carried unani-
mously.
ESTABLISH FY 2014 BUDGET HEAR-
ING:
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to advertise the budget hear-
ing for 10:45 A.M. (CT) Wednesday, July
17, 2013. Motion carried unanimously.
MELLETTE COUNTY CONSERVATION
DISTRICT: Manager Fitzgerald presented
two funding assistance requests from the
Mellette County Conservation District. The
first request is for a cost-share Technician
Grant in the amount of $12,500. The tech-
nician provides assistance to any
landowner interested in a natural resource
conservation practice in the Mellette and
Todd County Conservation Districts. Last
year 80,000 feet of pipeline and 48 live-
stock watering tanks were installed under
the Technician’s assistance, along with
many other projects. Motion by Director
Matt, seconded by Director Prokop to pro-
vide half of the requested assistance in
the amount of $6,250 to be directed to-
wards the Mellette County Conservation
District for water resource and conserva-
tion related activities in Mellette County.
Motion carried unanimously.
The second funding assistance request
outlined a Pipeline IV Grant for installation
of pipeline, tanks and rural water hook-
ups. The primary beneficiaries will be
landowners and livestock producers in
Mellette County. The total cost of engi-
neering and technical assistance for these
projects would be $5,300 which is detailed
in the project plans provided by the Con-
servation District. Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to pro-
vide assistance in the amount of $5,300
to the Mellette County Conservation Dis-
trict for the estimated costs of engineering
and technical assistance for planned
pipeline projects in Mellette County. Mo-
tion carried unanimously.
CITY OF PHILIP: Mayor Mike Vetter sum-
marized the City of Philip’s current US
Highway 14 – SD Highway 73 Drainage
Issue Evaluation Project and provided
copies of engineering plans and cost esti-
mates. The City requests assistance in
the amount of $10,000 for the hydraulic
study. The study will determine if there is
adequate retention in the storage basin to
protect the downstream Philip area from
flooding, which the State is requiring in
order to release easements dating back to
1936 for the drainage area. Motion by Di-
rector Prokop, seconded by Director Krog-
man to provide $10,000 in assistance to
the City of Philip to be used for their hy-
draulic study. Motion carried 4-0, Director
Matt abstained.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 11:04 A.M.
(CT).
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
ATTEST:
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
[Published July 25, 2012 at the total appro
ximate cost of $166.50]
Official Proceedings
REGULAR MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
July 3, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in regular session on July 3,
2013 in the Commissioner’s Room of the
Jackson County Courthouse.
Chairman Glen Bennett called the meet-
ing to order at 9:00 a.m. with members
Larry Denke, Larry Johnston, Ron Twiss
and Jim Stilwell present.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Johnston moved, Denke seconded, that
the minutes of the June meetings be ap-
proved.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor presented financial
reports to the board. She also reported
that the 2013 PILT payment in the amount
of $258,143.00 was received.
The Auditor’s account with the County
Treasurer was approved as of June 30,
2013:
Total amount of
deposits in banks . . . . . . . . . .610.07
Total amount of
actual cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .927.93
Total amount of
actual cash ROD . . . . . . . . . . .250.00
Total amount of checks . . . . . .4,019.38
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
Returned checks . . . . . . . . . . .1,639.98
Money Market account . . . .864,363.83
Time Deposits . . . . . . . . . . .117,132.00
JCFSA Passbook
savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,020.45
Total Funds . . . . . . . . . . .1,007,841.63
TOTAL COUNTY
FUNDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .863,138.90
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541,417.69
Road & Bridge . . . . . . . . . . .118,517.54
CH & BR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,743.58
Secondary Road . . . . . . . . .138,264.74
911 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,259.25
Other Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,781.21
Emer./Disaster . . . . . . . . . . . .3,164.17
Abuse Center . . . . . . . . . . . .12,167.98
Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,616.66
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
L. E. S. T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,295.59
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . .1,032.00
TOTAL TRUST
& AGENCY FUNDS . . . . .144,702.73
Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72,755.25
Townships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .413.64
Towns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,743.67
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41,749.49
Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .755.03
JCFSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,020.45
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18,265.20
Register of Deeds June collections:
$2,876.44.
The S. D. Developmental Center, Red-
field, SD has billed Jackson County an ad-
ditional $60.00 for an accrued total of
$960.00 for client assessment. Jackson
County responded in June 2012 that
charges should be assessed to the appro-
priate federal government agency as per
SDCL 27B-3-27. Stilwell moved, Denke
seconded, that the billing be denied.
A notice of hospitalization was received
from Regional Behavioral Health. The pa-
tient may be eligible for IHS benefits. The
board took no action.
S. D. Human Services Center, Yankton,
sent a monthly statement to Jackson
County for mental illness costs with no
balance due.
A billing was received from the Penning-
ton County State’s Attorney for mental ill-
ness costs. Denke moved, Stilwell
seconded, that the billing in the amount of
$215.00 from the Pennington County
State’s Attorney be denied.
Report was made that the new furnace is
being installed at the courthouse and the
new air conditioner should be arriving next
week. Report was made that Kadoka Oil
has quoted $1,850 for a refurbished 1,000
gallon propane tank, and that Midwest Co-
operatives has quoted $1,500 for a used
1,000 gallon propane tank and $2,000 for
a new 1,000 gallon propane tank. Discus-
sion was held on possibly installing two
propane tanks if the other furnace at the
courthouse is replaced in a few years. It
was consensus of the board it would be
best to go with new propane tanks and in-
quire if the current small propane tank
could be used as trade-in on new tanks.
The board requested the Auditor to con-
tact 3 B’s Heating and Air Conditioning
about whether one or two 1,000 gallon
propane tanks would be needed for the
two furnaces and the generator, and that
the Auditor also contact fuel suppliers
about distance required to place the tanks
from buildings.
Report was made that the Treasurer has
obtained tax deed on a majority of the
properties that office was processing on
parcels with delinquent taxes. Discussion
was held on when to hold a public auction
to sell the parcels. It was the consensus
of the board at this time to hold the auction
in October.
At 9:30 p.m., Stilwell moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to interview applicants for the
Deputy Director of Equalization position.
Persons who met with the board during
executive session were Vicki Wilson, Au-
ditor, Rose Bennett, Director of Equaliza-
tion, and Mitzi Mitchell, Register of Deeds.
Three applicants were interviewed for the
position. The board came out of executive
session at 11:11 a.m. No action was
taken by the board at this time.
Jo Beth Uhlir and Rich Bendt of the Jack-
son – Kadoka Economic Development
Corporation met with the board. They pre-
sented the JKEDC 2014 budget, and re-
quested $5,000 from Jackson County in
2014. They reported that they are contin-
uing to attempt to attract new businesses
to Jackson County and reported on other
activities in which they are currently in-
volved. Report was made that an addi-
tional grant has been applied for which will
provide additional funding for the estab-
lished low interest loan revolving fund.
The loans can be used for start up of a
new business, purchase of a current busi-
ness or upgrading a current business. The
board informed them that in 2014 the
county will only be allowed to levy an es-
timated additional $23,000 over what was
levied in 2013. The board informed them
their request would be included in the draft
budget, but there was no guarantee fund-
ing in the amount of $5,000 could be con-
firmed at this time. The board reported
that the county is trying to fund repairs to
or replacement of the Kadoka County
Highway Shop building and the Jackson
County Library building, and of the need
to increase wages paid to county employ-
ees so they don’t leave once they receive
experience.
Discussion was held on filling the position
of Deputy Director of Equalization. Denke
moved, Johnston seconded, that the
hours for the Deputy Director of Equaliza-
tion be reduced from 40 hours per week
to 24 to 32 hours per week.
Johnston moved, Twiss seconded, that
Janet Theye be hired as the Deputy Direc-
tor of Equalization for a 90 day probation-
ary period with benefits that would apply
to the reduced hours to be worked, that
she become certified as per SDCL, and
that she be offered full time status with ad-
ditional hours to be worked in the Register
of Deeds office.
At 11:53 Twiss moved, Stilwell seconded,
that the board go into executive session
to discuss legal matters. Present during
executive session were Daniel Van Gorp,
States Attorney, Rose Bennett, Director of
Equalization, and Vicki Wilson, Auditor.
The board came out of executive session
at 12:40 p.m.
Johnston moved, Denke seconded, that
the board recess for lunch.
The board reconvened at 1:25 p.m. with
members Bennett, Denke, Johnston and
Stilwell present. Twiss was absent.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt., was present.
Carl Engwall, National Park Service, was
not able to attend the meeting, but sent an
e-mail reporting on the Minuteman Missile
Historical Site. On
July 1, 2013 they had 800 visitors which
is a record one day high, and on July 3,
2013 they had 54 people waiting for the
doors to open at 8:00 a.m. The new visitor
center project is steadily progressing. The
FLAP application prepared by the Na-
tional Park Service is currently in the re-
view process. Report was made that
Duane Bubac, Superintendent, has
drafted the Minuteman / Jackson County
collaboration agreement, and the agree-
ment is currently at the Midwest Region,
Omaha office for review. Mr. Engwall also
thanked Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. and
the highway crew for the gravel and main-
tenance on the road leading to the Minute-
man Missile Historical Site.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. presented a
draft “Sign Retroreflectivity
Assessment/Management Plan” for Jack-
son County. The board reviewed the plan.
Denke moved, Stilwell seconded, that the
plan be adopted, signed and sent to the
state.
Discussion was held on haul road agree-
ments. The board requested more legal
information be obtain on haul road agree-
ments.
Dwight Deaver reported that he has re-
ceived authorization from John Berry to
dig test holes for additional gravel on his
property.
Report was made that gravel has been
tested on property owned by Lee Addison,
and that he is willing to sell gravel to Jack-
son County. A contract to purchase gravel
from Lee Addison was drawn up.
A Notice of Intent to Mine was drawn up
for the Lee Addison property. The board
instructed that the Notice of Intent to Mine
at the SE4SE4 ex. 15 acres & hwy., Sec-
tion 24, T 1 S, R 24 E be published.
At 2:28, Denke moved, Johnston sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. was present.
The board came out of executive session
at 3:04 p.m.
Discussion was held on an inquiry by the
Town of Belvidere about developing road
access to the Belvidere Dam. Commis-
sioner Johnston presented a map for re-
view. The board determined the county
would not be involved as the road access
would be within the city limits of the Town
of Belvidere.
Commissioner Johnston reported that
Veryl Prokop had reported he plans to
haul hay across CS 29 and inquired as to
whether the county plans to do anything
about the steep hill on the road. It was
consensus of the board that nothing would
be done at this time due to cost to reduce
the grade of the hill.
Discussion was held on the proposed
state plan for construction on I-90 in 2014,
and the use of a county road to detour
local traffic around the construction. CH
11, CH 12 and CS 23 west of Cactus Flats
are the county roads affected by the de-
tour. No cost information has been re-
ceived from Brosz Engineering to upgrade
the county road for the detour.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt., reported that
the state has contacted him with a pro-
posal to grind up the paved section of
road at I-90 Exit 172 that leads south to
SD Hwy 248. The board instructed Dwight
Deaver to inform the SDDOT that Jackson
County is not in favor of their grinding up
the section of road south of I-90 Exit 172,
and that the state paved the road that con-
nects the interstate to SD Hwy 248 when
the interstate was built.
Dwight Deaver reported that Ken Sheaffer
has started work as full time highway
maintenance worker.
Debra Moor, Librarian, met with the board
and reported the Library at the Long Val-
ley School has been moved to a smaller
room. Denke reported that the Kadoka
Area School District is holding a public
meeting on the evening of July 9, 2013 at
the Long Valley School. He reported that
the school district is not planning to add
on for additional classroom space at the
Long Valley School, but is planning to
build a new gym at Kadoka.
The 2014 Library budget request was re-
viewed. The board requested the Library
submit a revised 2014 budget request.
The board was informed that the WIC /
CHN secretary position has been offered
to Ashley Carpenter. Johnston moved,
Stilwell seconded, that the salary of Ash-
ley Carpenter, part-time WIC / CHN sec-
retary be set at $9.75 per hour for a 90
day probationary period.
A request was presented to the board that
Jamie Dolezal be authorized to work an
additional two weeks to assist in training
the new WIC / CHN secretary. Stilwell
moved, Denke seconded, that Jamie
Dolezal be authorized to work an addi-
tional two weeks, and that the contract
with the state be revised to show addi-
tional funding be allowed to the county for
the additional cost.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor reported that the
computer in the Auditor’s office that is the
main server for the county program was
down from noon on Monday until late af-
ternoon on Tuesday. The Auditor, Treas-
urer and Director of Equalization offices
were not able to use the county program
because of this. She also reported that a
separate computer has been ordered to
be the server for the county program, and
that one new computer each for the Audi-
tor, Treasurer and Director of Equalization
offices have been ordered.
The following bills from the files of the
County Auditor were presented, exam-
ined, allowed and ordered paid:
Salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31,669.10
BankWest, payroll tax . . . . . . .8,711.32
American Family Life
Ass’r. Co., ins. prem. . . . . . . . .878.36
Jackson Co. Flexible
Spending Acct.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222.92
Chase, def. comp. ded. . . . . . . . .30.00
S. D. Retirement,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,658.25
Colonial Life, ins. prem. . . . . . . . .25.56
Wellmark, group health . . . . . .9423.84
Credit Collection Bureau,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .700.54
Wage Works, adm. fee . . . . . . . .50.00
Boston Mutual Ins.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148.04
Dearborn Nat’l. Life,
group life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86.40
Jamie Dolezal, repl.
exp. check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.00
To Whom It May Concern,
05/13 tax apport. . . . . . . . .65,995.03
Music Parents, calendar . . . . . . . .9.82
Pennington County 911,
PSAP pmt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,568.17
S. D. Assn. of Assessing
Officer, school
registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .340.00
City of Kadoka, service . . . . . . .124.88
Golden West, service . . . . . . .1,095.06
Knology, 911service line . . . . . . .51.93
LaCreek Electric, service . . . . . . .42.69
S. D. Bureau of Info &
Technology,
internet access . . . . . . . . . . . . .57.00
Verizon Wireless,
cell phone service . . . . . . . . . .310.04
West Central Electric,
service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .881.82
West River Electric, service . . . . .40.53
West River Lyman Jone
Water, service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.00
James Stilwell, medical
exp. reimb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .547.14
Haakon County, Adm.
Asst. salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .600.12
Sheryl Hansen, expenses . . . . . .40.33
Carrie Weller, expenses . . . . . . . .96.99
Petersen Variety, supplies . . . . . . .3.74
Zeeb Pharmacy, supplies . . . . . . .8.01
Armstrong Extinguisher,
service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .367.00
Avera Queen of Peace,
CDL lab fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66.90
Boot Barn, uniform pants . . . . . . .55.08
Butler Machinery, glass . . . . . . .588.44
Century Business Leasing,
copier rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180.93
Raymond Clements, Jr.,
cell phone accessories . . . . . . .90.08
D & T Auto Parts, parts . . . . . . .297.99
Dakota Business
Ctr., supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225.43
DataSpec, VSO program . . . . . .399.00
Demco, supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.28
Digital Ally,
video camera . . . . . . . . . . . .1,925.00
Discount Fuel,
gas & supplies . . . . . . . . . . .1,287.84
Jamie Dolezal, expenses . . . . . . .27.00
Double H Feed, oil . . . . . . . . . . . .27.38
Excel Truck & Trailer
Repair, repair Volvo . . . . . . .3,078.95
Fromm’s Hardware,
supplies, tools, parts . . . . . . . . .75.39
J&S Restore, service . . . . . . . . . .61.15
Jackson Co. Cons. Dist.,
’13 approp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,500.00
Kadoka Care Center,
office rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500.00
Kadoka Clinic, CDL
testing, empl. physicals . . . . . .310.00
Kadoka Gas & Go., gas . . . . . . .119.71
Kadoka Oil, fuel . . . . . . . . . .12,783.05
Kadoka Press, publications . . . .681.04
Kemnitz Law Office,
office expense . . . . . . . . . . . . .391.50
Kennedy Implement, parts . . . . .133.94
Konst Welding, blade hitch . . . .486.65
Dorothy Liegl, books . . . . . . . . . .16.00
Kevin Lewis,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . . .2,150.75
McLeods, supplies . . . . . . . . . . . .24.25
Microfilm Imaging
Systems, scanner rent . . . . . . .75.00
Midwest Coop., hose . . . . . . . . .116.28
Miller Garbage, service . . . . . . . .60.00
Debra Moor, supplies . . . . . . . . .100.41
Neve’s Uniforms,
metal clipboards . . . . . . . . . . .147.47
Newman Traffic Signs,
sign & posts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96.32
Oien Implement,
batteries, parts . . . . . . . . . . . .456.66
Terry Pechota,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . . .1,480.00
Pennington Co. Jail,
prisoner board . . . . . . . . . . . . .748.00
Pennington Co. Sheriff,
prisoner transport . . . . . . . . . .253.80
People’s Market, supplies . . . . .135.12
Philip Motor, freight . . . . . . . . . . .35.00
R D J Specialties, candy . . . . . .273.16
Reliable Office
Supplies, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .18.57
Carol Schofield,
window blinds . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79.44
Servall, rugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165.81
Sheehan Mack, repairs . . . . . . .492.11
Sioux City Foundry, bits . . . . . . .750.72
S. D. Assn. of Co. Comm.,
CLERP pmt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .517.87
S. D. Assn. of Co. Comm.,
Mod. & Preserv. Fees . . . . . . .$66.00
S. D. Library Network,
annual fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .675.00
S. D. Public Assurance
Alliance, tractor and 2013
blade insurance . . . . . . . . . . .986.00
Jackie Stilwell, cell
phone costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00
TruGreen, lawn service . . . . . . .168.25
Ultra, Inc., annual
computer support . . . . . . . . .9,795.21
Ultra, Inc., computer, parts,
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,303.00
Western Communications,
Hwy. radios & installation . . .1,347.50
Whiting, Hagg, Hagg,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . . .3,857.47
Winner Regional Heathcare
Ctr., prisoner medical . . . . . . . .85.00
Winner Police Dept.,
prisoner bd. & trans. . . . . . .4,365.75
Zeeb Pharmacy, fans . . . . . . . . . .79.96
Glen Bennett, expenses . . . . . . .19.24
Larry Denke, expenses . . . . . . . .56.24
Larry Johnston, expenses . . . . . .35.52
Ron Twiss, expenses . . . . . . . . . .33.30
Century Link, 911 access
& database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146.17
Golden West, 911 access &
database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .765.45
Kadoka Telephone, 911
access & database . . . . . . . . .160.43
Stilwell moved, Johnston seconded that
employment ads continue to be published
for positions of full time highway worker,
part time highway worker and part time
highway weed sprayer.
The board decided to meet at 1:00 p.m.,
July 17, 2013 to review the proposed
2014 budget.
There being no further business to come
before the board, Denke moved that the
meeting be adjourned and that the board
meet in special session at 1:00 p.m. July
17, 2013 to review the proposed 2014
budget and that the board meet in regular
session on Monday, August 12 , 2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Glen A. Bennett, Chairman
[Published July 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $183.90]
)
)SS
)
Public Notices
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 6
Deadline 10 a.m. Tuesday
EMPLOYMENT
HELP WANTED: ASSISTANT MAN-
AGER of convenience store in Lem-
mon, SD. Will assist in the
day-to-day operations of a c-store.
Please call or send resume to Deb
Stoltman, 701-223-0154; P.O. Box
832, Bismarck, ND 58502. Salary ne-
gotiable.
FAULK COUNTY HIGHWAY DE-
PARTMENT accepting applications
for FT Highway Maintenance Person.
Competitive salary, benefit package.
EOE. Closes July 29. For application
call 605-598-6233.
CHS MIDWEST COOPERATIVES is
seeking people interested in an
agronomy career. Various positions
in central South Dakota available.
Email Dan.haberling@chsinc.com or
call Midwest Cooperatives
1(800)658-5535.
NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOLS ED-
UCATION Cooperative opening: part-
time early childhood special
education paraprofessional for the
2013-2014 school year: Contact Di-
rector Cris Owens 605-466-2206,
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
TEACHING POSITIONS OPEN AT
MOBRIDGE-POLLOCK School Dis-
trict #62-6 for 2013-2014 School
Year: HS Math; MS Special Educa-
tion and Birth to 2nd Grade Special
Education. Contact Tim Frederick at
605-845-9204 for more information.
Resumes and applications can be
mailed to the school Attn: Tim Fred-
erick at 1107 1st Avenue East in Mo-
bridge SD 57601. Open until filled.
EOE, Signing Bonus available.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver's License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact: Dou-
glas County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
HUTCHINSON COUNTY HIGHWAY
SUPERINTENDENT POSITION. Du-
ties include supervising staff, sched-
uling shifts, planning and organizing
department activities, preparing
budget, representing department at
public meetings. Must maintain valid
SD Driver's and Commercial Driver's
License. Salary dependent on expe-
rience. Applications from Hutchinson
County Auditor's Office, 140 Euclid
Room 128, Olivet SD 57052 (605)
387-4212. Applications close 4:30
p.m. July 26, 2013.
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-on
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedicated
Routes *2500 Miles Weekly *$50
Tarp Pay (888) 692-5705
www.drive4ewwylie.com.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders repre-
senting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892
SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Digital
Phone-Satellite. You`ve Got A
Choice! Options from ALL major
service providers. Call us to learn
more! CALL Today. 888-337-5453
HIGHSPEED INTERNET every-
where By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW &
GO FAST! 1-888-518-8672
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
July 26-27-28-29:
August 2-3-4-5: The Heat
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Classifieds
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 7
Classified Advertising & Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum for 20 words, plus 10¢ for each additional word.
To place an ad call 605-837-22259 or email: press @kadokatelco.com
Statewide Classifieds:
South Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-word classified ad in each of the states’ 150 daily and weekly newspapers. Your message
reaches 375,000 households for just $150.00! This newspaper can give you the complete details. Call (605) 837-2259.
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff, and assistant
manager position(s) are available for
Aw! Shucks Café opening soon at
909 Main Street in Kadoka. Please
apply within or contact Teresa or
Colby Shuck for more information:
837-2076. KP2-tfn
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:
Kadoka Area School District is ac-
cepting applications for a middle
school special education teacher
and an assistant cook. Applications
are available on the website at
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or contact
Supt. Jamie Hermann at 837-2175.
KP1-2tc
IMMEDIATE POSITION OPEN: at
the Kadoka City Bar for a part-time
bartender, flexible schedule to work
either morning or night shifts, ap-
proximately 16-24 hours per week.
Required application forms are avail-
able at either the City Finance Office
or the Kadoka City Bar. Completed
application form must be returned to
the City Finance Officer, PO Box 58,
Kadoka, SD 57543 before 4:00 p.m.
Friday, July 26, 2013. EOE
K52-3tc
POSITIONS OPEN: Sunset Grill and
Subway (former Happy Chef build-
ing) in Kadoka have positions open
for cooks and sandwich artists with a
variety of duties, all shifts available.
Begin work mid-July. Apply in person
at Subway.
KP52-2tc
HOUSE KEEPERS AND LAUNDRY
PERSONNEL WANTED: High
school and college students are wel-
come to apply. Will train. Apply at ei-
ther America’s Best Value Inn and
Budget Host Sundowner in Kadoka
or call 837-2188 or 837-2296.
KP47-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Weed Sprayer. Seasonal
part-time employment spraying
county highway right of way. Com-
mercial herbicide license required or
to be obtained before start of work.
Pre-employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
KP2-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Part-time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Tractor operator to mow
county road right of way, and perform
other duties as directed. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening re-
quired. Applications / resumes
accepted. Information 837-2410 or
837-2422, Fax 837-2447. KP2-
4tc
POSITION OPEN: Full time Jackson
County Highway Department
Worker. Truck driver, heavy equip-
ment operator, light equipment oper-
ator. Experience preferred, but will
train. CDL required, or to be obtained
in six months. Pre-employment drug
and alcohol screening required. Ben-
efits package. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-
2447.
KP2-4tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 1 bedroom, 1
bath, large two car unattachd
garage, Kadoka. Sam or Danielle
Stoddard 462-6244 or 441-2670.
K52-4tp
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass seed
and high test alfalfa hay. Delivery
available and volume discount avail-
able. Call 798-5413.
KP49-11tc
SERVICE: Need a plumber? Li-
censed plumbing contractor for all
your indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn 441-1053 or leave a message
at 837-0112. KP52-4tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877-
867-4185. K45-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will do
all types of trenching, ditching and di-
rectional boring work. See Craig,
Diana, Sauntee or Heidi Coller,
Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-2690.
Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee cell
390-8604, email wrex@gwtc.net.
27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assistance
or not, we can house you. Just call
1-800-481-6904 or stop in the lobby
and pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢ each.
At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be ordered
at the Kadoka Press. Regular or self-
inking styles. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thank you to all who sent cards
and flowers for my 90th birthday. It
brightened my day every time the
mail came.
Wilma Stout
Help Wanted
Real Estate
Farm / Ranch
Supplies
Thank You
Rentals
Business
CIarence "Smokey¨ Petoske Estate & ArIine Petoske
Smokey was well-known for his earth moving business which he started in 1947.
AßS0LUTE AUCTI0N
Sun., Aug. I8, 20I3 · I0.00 a.m. MT
22969 Dusty Ridge Rd, MidIand, SD
Time to enjoy Small Town Charm in western South Dakota, as this
real estate absolutely sells on auction day with no minimums or reserves.
----Would make great hunting lodge/complex----
>>>>>>>>>>>>Stunning View & Location<<<<<<<<<<<<<
* 5.2 acres w/home & garage, pIus 26 x 48 steeI shop buiIding & 20 x 24 country schooI buiIding .
outstanding location for motel, convenience store, feed store, repair shop, retail business, or hunting lodge w/ excellent
access on NW corner of Hwys 14 & 63, but set back far enough to enjoy the countryside ~~ Overlooks "Bad River" & town
of Midland ~~ Includes possibility for additional building site with great view & excellent access just north of the present
home ~~ Includes small triangular grassland piece on south side of Hwy 14
·IncredibIe View ·City Water
·No Covenants or zoning ·GoIden West CabIe TV
·IdeaI for Horses, Pets, or Farm AnimaIs ·The benefits of town Iiving, w/ country property
Also selling: * 1 acre Small Pasture w/small shed, {Corner of Main & Capa Roads} east of Midland & east
of the cemetery (ideal for horses, or hobby pets)
Showings: Wed. Aug. 7 from 5 - 6 pm
Sun. Aug. 11 from 5 - 6 pm
More Info & Photos at www.PiroutekAuction.com or www.ArnesonAuction.com
AIso seIIing 500 gaI. LP TANK, 500 gaI. FueI Tank, Ford 8N Tractor, TooIs, License PIates, Antiques,
Furniture, FossiIs, ArIine's Paintings & Ceramics, KiIn, PooI TabIe, More
Owner: ArIine Petoske Auctioneers represent seIIer.
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Dan Piroutek · R.E. Auctioneer #282 Lonnie Arneson · R.E. Auctioneer #11296
605-544-3316 605-798-2525
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
Kadoka Area School
Surplus Auction
Tuesday, July 30
6 p.m. in the Little Gym • Kadoka
Items can be viewed prior to auction on July 29 during
normal business hours at the little gym.
Wood desk
Floor scrubber -
(does not work)
2 Welders – part missing
Advance carpetriver -
(does not work)
Wood cabinet
Metal divider
6 Folding tables
Buffer (does not work)
Saw Rockwell/delta
Key making machine
Plasma cutter
Wood cabinet
Plastic stack shelves
Wood bench
Stainless steel kitchen cart
4 Table/desks
22 Chairs
V-Tel white board
Lockers
Stove
2 Ovens
Wood desk
Red desk chair
Metal cabinet
3’ x 6’ Table
Electric snow blower
Advance water vac -
(does not work)
Drill press
Wood shelf
Metal dolly
4’ File cabinet
3’ File cabinet
Dishwasher w/booster
Metal kitchen
mixer with bowls
119 – Dell Latitude
2100 Netbooks
100 - Dell Latitude
2100 Netbook Bags
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
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Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BBQ: 11.00-1.00 FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M.
(MT}. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: ESTIMATING 25UU HEAD.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷ FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, V÷VEANED
REEDY - 250 DLK STFS ..............................................900-1000=
KNUPPE - 250 DLK, HEFF & X DFED STFS & OPEN HFFS
(200 HFFS, 50 STFS} ..................................................550-700=
PALMER - 200 DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS ........................700-800=
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - 200 DLK & X DFED STFS .....900-1000=
LONG - 165 CHAF X FANCY HF SPAY HFFS ..................850-950=
PETERSON - 120 DLK OPEN HFFS ......................................700=
ROSETH BROTHERS - 100 DLK HOME FAISED TESTED OPEN
HFFS .........................................................................800-850=
WILLIAMS RN - 70 DLK & FEW FED STFS ....................800-850=
EISENBRAUN - 70 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS .................700-750=
HAMM - 65 DLK & DWF FALL CLVS; FS,NI,
NOT WEANED ............................................................700-750=
YOUNG - 55 DLK & DWF STFS; NI ...............................900-1000=
CASPERS - 50 DLK STFS & TESTED OPEN HFFS .........700-800=
MARTI - 40 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS ...........................700-750=
CASSENS - 40 DLK & DWF STFS & OPEN HFFS; NI ......700-750=
SANDER - 40 DLK & DWF TESTED OPEN HFFS ...................800=
NESS - 30 DLK STFS ............................................................900=
PRICHARD - 30 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS ...........................800=
HALL - 20 DLK STFS .....................................................600-650=
WELLER - 20 DLK STFS .......................................................850=
BARRY - 15 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS ...........................700-800=
JOHNSTON - 15 DLK FALL CLVS; FS,W ...............................600=
LARSON - 15 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS ........................750-800=
RIGGINS - 13 DLK FALL CLVS & YFLCS .......................600-800=
RADWAY - 10 DLK ULTFASOUND OPEN HFFS .............900-950=
WILLERT - 9 XDFED STFS & HFFS ..............................800-900=
PAIRS & SPRING CALVES:
CONSIGNMENT - 70 DLK 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS
W/DLK & FED CLVS AT SIDE (EXPOSED DLK; JULY 1}
GRAVATT - 30 DLK SPFINC CLVS 300=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH
AT tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT
LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAVA-
CANZA HOFSE SALE. CATALOG DEADLINE: MON., AUCUST 5. CO
TO www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICNMENT FOFMS.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JULY 2S, 2DJS
Ano1Þer b1g run o] ue1gÞ-up oous, bu11s,
ond Þe1]ere11es. MorKe1 uos verg s1rong!
Ne×1 ueeK: Speo1o1 Yeor11ng & Fo11 Co1]
So1e ond Regu1or Co111e So1e & Ann1ver-
sorg BBQ. So1e 11me JD:DD MT & ]ree
BBQ JJ:DD MT. Come on 1n ond uo1oÞ
1Þe so1e ond ]o1n us ]or 1unoÞ.
SPRING CALVES:
TERRY GREGG - HARROLD
10 .................................DLK CALVES 342=......$640.00/HD
ACE KARY - NORRIS
8 ...................................DLK CALVES 314=......$600.00/HD
WEIGH-UPS:
MIKE NOTEBOOM - PHILIP
1.......................................FED COW 1160= ...........$88.00
1 .......................................DLK COW 1300= ...........$87.50
1.......................................FED COW 1280= ...........$85.00
STEVE CULLUM - CUSTER
1.......................................DLK DULL 1985= .........$110.00
SHAW RANCH INC - WHITE OWL
1.......................................DLK DULL 2030= .........$109.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 2050= .........$108.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 2170= .........$107.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 2090= .........$105.50
BAXTER ANDERS - WALL
1 .......................................DLK COW 1490= ...........$86.00
1 ......................................DWF COW 1355= ...........$85.50
1 .....................................HEFF COW 1245= ...........$84.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1405= ...........$84.00
8 ...........................FED & DLK COWS 1316= ...........$82.00
1.......................................FED COW 1365= ...........$81.50
1 ......................................DWF COW 1205= ...........$80.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1510= ...........$77.50
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ......................................DWF COW 1115= ...........$85.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1245= ...........$84.00
KENNETH MCILRAVY - PHILIP
1.....................................CHAF COW 1375= ...........$85.00
BART & JANICE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 .......................................DLK COW 1845= ...........$84.50
MATT BROTHERS - ELM SPRINGS
1.....................................CHAF DULL 1775= .........$108.00
ROALD MITCHELL - DUPREE
1.......................................DLK DULL 1890= .........$107.50
TERRY HOTCHKISS - REVA
1 .......................................DLK COW 1330= ...........$84.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1570= ...........$81.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 2000= .........$107.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1860= .........$105.50
EARL PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 .......................................DLK COW 1130= ...........$84.00
10....................................DLK COWS 1581= ...........$81.50
3......................................DLK COWS 1310= ...........$81.00
DOUG THORSON - QUINN
1 .....................................HEFF COW 1290= ...........$82.50
1 .....................................HEFF COW 1285= ...........$81.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1890= .........$101.50
CINDY NU2UM - PHILIP
1.......................................DLK DULL 1845= .........$107.00
LYNN DENKE - CREIGHTON
1.......................................DLK DULL 1735= .........$105.50
BRUCE JENSEN - OWANKA
1.......................................DLK DULL 2145= .........$105.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 2300= .........$101.50
HOWARD & DELORES KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 .......................................DLK COW 1435= ...........$82.00
1 ......................................DWF COW 1545= ...........$77.50
STEVE CLEMENTS - PHILIP
1 ..............................DLK COW (WET} 1415= ...........$82.50
1 .............................DWF COW (WET} 1410= ...........$81.50
1 .............................DWF COW (WET} 1350= ...........$78.00
1 .............................DWF COW (WET} 1555= ...........$74.00
1 .............................FWF COW (WET} 1530= ...........$73.00
LYLE O'BRYAN - BELVIDERE
2...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1398= ...........$82.00
5...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1429= ...........$78.75
KENNY MATT - ELM SPRINGS
1.......................................DLK DULL 1595= .........$104.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1680= .........$103.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1710= .........$101.50
1.......................................DLK DULL 1795= .........$101.00
RON TWISS - INTERIOR
1.......................................DLK DULL 2095= .........$104.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1 .......................................DLK COW 1455= ...........$81.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1360= ...........$79.50
5...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1300= ...........$79.00
3...........................DLK & DWF COWS 1315= ...........$78.00
1.............................DLK & DWF COW 1465= ...........$77.50
BILL MUNROE - UNION CENTER
1.......................................FED COW 1330= ...........$81.50
A CONSIGNMENT
2....................................HEFF COWS 1433= ...........$81.00
1 .......................................DLK COW 1925= ...........$79.00
1 .......................................DLK COW 1795= ...........$75.00
LINDA ANDERS - MUD BUTTE
1 .......................................DLK COW 1400= ...........$81.00
MEL DUTTON - FAITH
1 .......................................DLK COW 1415= ...........$80.50
1 .......................................DLK COW 1525= ...........$80.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 2115= .........$104.00
DON RAVELLETTE - PHILIP
1 .......................................DLK COW 1540= ...........$80.00
1.................................DLK COWETTE 1055= ...........$97.00
DAN LEWIS - RAPID CITY
1 .......................................DLK COW 1355= ...........$80.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
1.......................................DLK DULL 1860= .........$103.50
JASON FANNING - MARTIN
1.......................................DLK DULL 1710= .........$102.50
1.....................................CHAF DULL 1620= .........$100.50
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1.......................................DLK DULL 1765= .........$102.00
1.......................................DLK DULL 1970= .........$101.00
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
2.....................................DLK HFFTS 978= .............$96.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
E-mail news,
stories or
photos to:
press@kadoka
telco.com
editor@kadoka
telco.com
Low Test Weight Wheat
Many wheat fields appear to be
a week or more away from harvest
maturity, those in particularly dry
areas are progressing quickly. A
few fields in south-central South
Dakota have already reached ma-
turity, but as they began to harvest
the crop, some producers have
learned that the test weight was
very low. One field produced wheat
that weighed 47 lbs. /Bu. As test
weights drop below 60 lbs. /Bu, dis-
counts begin to mount. The lowest
test weight that wheat can be mar-
keted at grain elevators is 50 lbs.
/Bu., with discounts in the neigh-
borhood of $0.70/Bu at that level.
There are several potential rea-
sons for wheat being low in test
weight, including drought, root and
crown rots, viral diseases, fungal or
bacterial foliar diseases, scab, etc.
It is difficult to determine the test
weight of a wheat crop until it is
mature and harvested, but the
presence of a substantial percent-
age of shriveled kernels should
raise a red flag.
If wheat is low in test weight,
one strategy may be to open the
sieves on the combine and turn up
the wind in hopes of blowing some
of the lighter, shriveled kernels out
the back. Wheat that is already
harvested and found to be light
might also be cleaned aggressively
in an attempt to gain test weight.
If the majority of the kernels are
lighter and shriveled, the potential
of gaining much test weight by is
likely to be limited. If using either
of these strategies, producers
would need to compare the benefit
of gaining test weight against the
yield loss due to blowing the light
seeds out the back of the combine
or aggressive cleaning.
The remaining options are to
harvest the wheat to sell as feed
wheat at a significant discount, or
harvest as hay. Unfortunately, crop
insurance may not offer substan-
tial coverage for wheat that is low
in test weight. The adjustment for
light wheat doesn’t reach signifi-
cant levels until the bushel weight
drops into the low 40 lb /Bu range.
If producers suspect they may have
wheat that is low in test weight,
they can contact their crop insur-
ance agent to evaluate the options
before cutting for hay or harvesting
the crop as grain.
Pesticide Container
Recycling Collections
Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture (SDDA) will again conduct col-
lections of pesticide containers in a
number of locations across the
state. The program collects and re-
cycles agricultural, home and gar-
den pesticide containers. The
planned dates for each location are
listed on igrow.org at:
http://igrow.org/up/articles/P6028-
2013.pdf (all times are local). The
containers collected must be made
from high density polyethylene
(HDPE) embossed with recycling
symbol #2. Containers must be
empty and triple-rinsed to be recy-
cled. Caps and other non-HDPE
parts such as metal handles and
rubber linings cannot be recycled
and can be disposed of as regular
waste. It is recommended to re-
move labels from the containers be-
fore recycling.
Calendar
August 27: Winter Wheat Meet-
ing, 6:30 pm, Auditorium, Draper
Conservationists
encouraging “soil
checkups”
This growing season, producers
should take some time to assess
the condition of their cropland soil
resource say conservation profes-
sionals. Healthy soil is essential
for plant growth and resilient to
things that stress it, such as
floods, drought, diseases and
pests. Agronomic specialists with
the Natural Resources Conserva-
tion Service (NRCS) are urging
producers to take a look at the
health of the soil in their own
fields and pastures and get help if
their soil isn’t functioning as well
as it should.
A top factor is organic matter
because it holds nutrients and
water for plant use and growth.
NRCS Conservation Agronomist
Jason Miller, Pierre, S.D. says
“People can’t do much about the
type of their soil, but we can ad-
just management to increase the
amount of organic matter in our
soil.” Increasing organic matter
increases the soils’ capacity for
regulating plant available water
along with other benefits.
A “healthy thing” is use of cover
crops. However, Miller comments
that corn-soybean rotations in a
large portion of South Dakota can
have challenges for incorporating
successful cover crops into rota-
tions since moisture and timing
are limiting factors.
Bill Nelson is using cover crops
for his cropland in Lake County,
SD. Because of the diversity in his
cropping sequence, Nelson is see-
ing benefits of reduced soil com-
paction and improved nutrient
uptake and management. “My
fields are gentle, rolling hills typi-
cal of eastern South Dakota, but
erosion is not happening here,”
says Nelson, “The residue and or-
ganic matter has greatly improved
infiltration and soil water holding
capacity.”
Miller says other options for
healthier soil are diversifying the
plants covering the soil surface
and keeping living roots in the soil
as long as possible. “Producers, es-
pecially in eastern South Dakota,
should be incorporating a small
grain into the rotation that will
then allow a successful cover crop
to be incorporated behind the har-
vest,” he explains. So, for example
in a five-year rotation, Miller ex-
plains, “Producers can have a por-
tion of their corn acres going into
small grains (that contain a cover
crop the previous year) and an-
other portion going into soybean
stubble. That small grain stubble
allows better opportunity for es-
tablishing and getting the most
benefit out of cover crops–using
nutrients from the previous crops
and increasing organic matter.”
These practices build organic
matter with positive effects on the
biological life in the soil. “Active
micro-organisms are what helps
keep the health of the soil in bal-
ance,” explains Eric Barsness,
NRCS Conservation Agronomist,
Brookings. In mid-July, he used a
soil probe in Nelson’s fields and
found a rich, dark top soil about a
foot deep that has resulted from
the good cropping rotations based
on soil condition, residue
amounts, and use of cover crops.
“The soil probe easily slid into
Bill’s soil because of the organic
matter, good structure and aggre-
gate stability,” says Barsness.
Nelson’s crop rotation for this
no-till field was oats (2011), cereal
rye as a cover crop, soybeans
(2012), and soybeans (2013). He
put the cereal rye in with a fall
seeding and when the snow came
off, the rye was green. “That year
(2012), we had a lot of spring rain
and prevent plant acres around
the county,” Nelson explains. “The
root system from that rye cover
crop in my rotation held up the
machinery up so we could get the
soybeans planted.”
The rye was terminated prior to
it competing with the soybeans.
This worked out well for Nelson,
he says, “Then, that mat left from
the rye root system and the above-
ground residue was just what the
fields needed.” Additional residue
can reduce weed pressure and
helps fields hold moisture if the
weather turns hot and dry.
Nelson used the rye in his rota-
tion to help get to his goal of main-
taining or increasing organic
matter (OM) on his land to mimic
levels found in natural prairie
soils. Soil tests average 5.0 to 6.3
percent OM in Nelson’s fields.
Another benefit he’s seeing, Nel-
son told Barsness, is the ‘break’
from weed and pest problems.
“With my rotation, I just don’t
have pest and weed issues such as
corn root worm or Glyphosate-tol-
erant weeds,” says Nelson.
“When a system gets out of bal-
ance, problems can pop-up. If
you’re seeing disease or pest is-
sues with your crops,” Miller says,
“Maybe it’s time to look past the
symptoms and get to the source.
Diversifying crop types and incor-
porating cover crops can help your
soil to be more healthy.” Contact
Natural Resources Conservation
Service for free on-site farm or
ranch resource consultations. On
the web, links to technical publi-
cations and guides are available at
http://www.sd.nrcs.usda.gov/tech-
nical/CoverCrops.html.
A healthier soil means better
moisture infiltration, retention or
movement through the soil profile.
“This is a major benefit in the
long-term,” says Miller. “By eval-
uating what their soil needs, pro-
ducers can feel better about
management decisions as they
make adjustments to their opera-
tion.”
Agriculture
Kadoka Press - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Page 8
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist 842-1267
Health of soil factor for
weed and pest issues

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
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