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Kadoka Press, July 18, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 107
Number 1
July 18, 2013
Melford Koester
was born in Pierre,
South Dakota on July
16, 1926.
The oldest of three
children, Melford has
one brother, Harold
Koester, of Rapid City,
South Dakota, and one
sister, Dolores
(Koester) Miller, who is
deceased from Pierre,
South Dakota.
Melford attended
school and graduated
in 1945 from Vivian
High School, Home of
the Bearcats.
He worked on his
father's farm through
his school years. As a
young boy he was ac-
tive in sports.
Melford married
Becky Moross on Octo-
ber 10, 1949 at the
Methodist Church in Murdo. They had three sons, Doug, Dan and Fred.
Melford and Becky continued to live and work on his father's farm in
Vivian. He also drove a school bus, sold eggs and cream from the farm
to make ends meet.
In 1956 Melford took a job as manager with the elevator in Quinn, SD.
In 1958 Melford moved his family to Wall, SD, to work at the elevator
there. They eventually moved to Murdo, and he continued to manage
the elevator there until about 1978. He worked at Moore Building Center
in Murdo until 1987. He then worked for the United States Postal Service
and was a mail carrier until he semi-retired in 1995.
Melford and Becky hosted several foreign exchange students from
Brazil and Sweden during the 1970s. They had the opportunity to visit
them in the homes of their own countries as well.
They traveled extensively in their lifetime. They visited Hawaii, Ger-
many, Sweden, Brazil, the Pyramid's in Egypt, the Great Wall of China
and many other places.
Melford's greatest joys are his 10 grandchildren and 12 great grand-
children.
Melford has always enjoyed sports. Any sport that was being played
was an interest of his. His main interest was baseball and he excelled in
this sport.
In 1950 he and his friends were playing baseball in the old dusty park
in Vivian when professional baseball scouts happened to be passing
through. They stopped and watch the game that was in progress. On the
spot they asked Melford if he would be interested in trying out for the
Cincinnati Reds baseball team and offered him a position with a farm
club that belonged to the team. This meant he would have to move his
family from the farm and to another state. He declined their invitation
and this was one regret that has always stayed with him.
Melford has always enjoyed conversation with just about anyone. He
has coached softball, baseball and been involved with about every com-
munity organization that there is, such as Lions Club, school board, and
city council.
Melford is always an easygoing and kindhearted fellow. He is very
funny to listen to. The staff enjoys having him as a resident at the nursing
home, as he always has a smile to share.
We want to congratulate Melford Koester for being selected as Kadoka
Nursing Home Resident of the Month.
Kadoka Nursing Home
Resident of the Month
The Philip American Legion
baseball team won the Belle
Fourche tournament held Friday
and Saturday, July 12-13.
They first defeated the Piedmont
team 10-9 on Friday. Early Satur-
day, they got by the Gillette, Wyo.,
team with a 3-2 victory. The final
game was a 12-10 win over Belle
Fourche.
The tournament came after
Philip defeated the Pierre White
Sox 15-8 on Monday, July 8.
Though high scoring at its end,
that game’s early score was only 3-
1 going into the seventh inning.
“It (the Belle Fourche tourna-
ment) was very big for the kids,”
said Foss. “They’ve worked hard for
three years, and it paid off. Win-
ning the tournament was a very big
thing for our program, with the
quality of the teams.”
Foss believes that two years ago
the team had only two wins during
the season. Last year, he believes,
they had only three wins. Now,
“We’ve done okay. We’ve actually
won five in a row,” said Foss.
“We are definitely playing our
best games lately. Which is what
you want to be doing as you go into
regions,” said Foss.
The Philip team will be going
into the Region 7B Tournament in
Winner on July 18-20 with a 8-12
record so far this season. The state
class B tournament will be in Web-
ster, July 26-30.
The Philip American Legion baseball team is on a winning streak. It consists of players from a number of surrounding com-
munities. Back row (L-R): coach Kory Foss, Philip, Avery Johnson, Philip, Zac Stone, Kadoka, Bubba Young, White River, A.J.
Bendt, Kadoka, and Nick Young, White River. Front: Jed Brown, Kadoka, Trevor Anderson, Wall, Chandlier Sudbeck, Kadoka,
Clint Stout, Kadoka, Aaron Janis, Kadoka, and Storm Wilcox, Kadoka. Not pictured: Riley Heltzel, Philip, Cass Lytle, Wall,
and Ryan Van Tassel, Philip. --courtesy photo
Legion baseball ready for districts
behind Dan Smiley’s shop.
Local law enforcement watched
the area behind Smiley’s for an
hour trying to see if the mountain
lion would appear. Sheriff Ray
Clements kept watch at the inter-
state to see if the mountain lion
would appear and cross the inter-
state. Unfortunately, they were un-
able to obtain a sighting of the
mountain lion once it moved into
the vegetation behind Smiley’s
shop.
Clements stated that no one else
has contacted their office complain-
ing of missing dogs, cats or any
other incidents involving a possible
mountain lion.
Game, Fish and Parks was con-
tacted about the incident. The
game warden felt the animal was
just traveling through.
Some Kadoka residents got a bit
of a surprise last Thursday, July 10
when a mountain lion was sighted
within the city limits.
According to law enforcement,
Tom Kukal encountered the moun-
tain lion as it ran in front of his
pickup while driving east on Poplar
Street. He said it crossed in front of
his pickup from the south side of
the road over to Bob Word’s drive-
way. It then continued through
Word’s driveway and headed north.
Sheila Herbaugh was the next to
see the mountain lion. She spotted
the lion near the Catholic Church.
Steve and Brian Doughty saw
the lion near the Ponderosa Motel,
and then continued to watch as it
crossed Highway 284 to the north.
They told authorities that it
then traveled into the vegetation
Mountain lion spotted
within Kadoka city limits
The Kadoka Area School Board
held their regular monthly meeting
on Wednesday, July 10, with all
board members in attendance.
The agenda, bills, financial re-
port, and minutes from the June 12
and June 24 meetings were ap-
proved as presented.
Superintendent Jamie Hermann
stated that plans are being final-
ized for the teacher-in-service that
will be held August 20, 21 and 22.
School will start on Monday, Au-
gust 26.
Student tests results will be ar-
riving soon and the data will be
used in setting class goals for the
next year.
Hermann stated that the bus
driver position for the Long Valley
route is currently vacant and sev-
eral options are being considered.
Currently the bus transport 22 stu-
dents.
The board entered into executive
session for personnel matters.
Upon returning to open session, a
motion carried to approve a con-
tract to Andrea Johnston for the
high school secretary position at $9
per hour.
Being the beginning of the new
fiscal year, the board reorganized
at this time. Oaths of office were
administered to Dan VanderMay,
Ken Lensegrav, Dawn Rasmussen
and Jo Beth Uhlir. Motions carried
to elect Dan VanderMay as board
president and Ross Block as vice
president.
A motion carried to adopt the
annual designations for the 2013-
2014 school term.
Board member compensation
will remain the same as $75 per
meeting for the president and $50
per meeting for the other board
members.
Discussion was held on break-
fast and lunch prices. Motion car-
ried to increase the price by 5¢ per
meal. K-5 grades $2.30; 6-12
grades $2.70; adults $3.80; seconds
$1.60; breakfast $1.15; adult
breakfast $$1.55; all seconds
breakfast $1.45. Milk will remain
the same at 30¢ per carton.
Activity admission prices will
not increase for the next school
term. The seniors golden pass will
be available for those over the age
of 60 and must be requested at the
business office.
Committee appointments were
approved: auditorium: VanderMay
and Lensegrav; Three Rivers Coop-
erative: Rasmussen; alternate, all
other members; buildings and
grounds: Block, VanderMay and
Dale Christensen; alternate Ras-
mussen; transportation: Block and
Lensegrav; policy: Rasmussen,
Mark Williams and Christensen;
technology: Lensegrav and Block:
alternate Mark Williams; sports
complex: Rasmussen and Williams;
negotiations: VanderMay, Chris-
tensen and Block.
Other action taken by the
board…
•Established bus routes to re-
main the same as the previous
year;
•assign fund balance in the
amount of $364,130 in the impact
aid fund;
•approve employee contracts as
presented;
•declare surplus property as
presented.
Kadoka school board prepares
for 2013-2014 school term
Fish too much? Can’t be done.
Several residents from the Kadoka Nursing Home enjoyed a fishing trip to Pierre on Tuesay, July 16. Charity Edwards (L), Shorty Ireland, Joy
Parker, Mel Koester, Mary Ellen Herbaugh.
Ruth Klundt (above left), Derald Kul-
havy (above), and Sylvan Kruse
(lower left) would agree that a bad
day fishing is better than a good day
working. They had a successful day
fishing, despite a flat tire on the way
to Pierre.
Church Page …
July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
Email your news and photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . . . . . . .911
or . . . . . . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
Obituaries
Chewy Cherry
Almond Bars
1 cup butter, softened
2 cups packed brown sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg
1 teaspoon almond extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups regular rolled oats
1/2 cup sliced almonds
1 12 ounce jar (1 cup) cherry
preserves
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Line a 13x9x2-inch baking pan
with foil, extending foil over the
edges of the pan. Grease foil; set
pan aside.
2. In a large bowl, beat butter
with an electric mixer on
medium to high speed for 30 sec-
onds. Add brown sugar and bak-
ing powder. Beat until combined,
scraping side of bowl occasion-
ally. Beat in egg and almond ex-
tract until combined. Beat in as
much of the flour as you can with
the mixer. Using a wooden spoon,
stir in any remaining flour, the
oats, and almonds.
3. Remove 1/2 cup of the dough
and set aside. Press the remain-
ing dough evenly into the bottom
of the prepared baking pan.
Spread with preserves. Crumble
the remaining dough evenly over
preserves layer.
4. Bake in the preheated oven
about 35 minutes or until lightly
browned. Cool completely in pan
on a wire rack. Using the edges
of the foil, lift the uncut cookies
out of the pan. Cut into bars.
Makes 36 bars.
5.Place bars in a single layer in
an airtight container; cover.
Store in the refrigerator for up to
3 days or freeze for up to 1
month.
Upcoming Area
Events …
Reading program every
Wednesday at the Jackson
County Library at 10 a.m.
Baseball game at Wall on
Thursday, July 11 at 5:30 p.m.
Baseball tournament in
Kadoka on Saturday, July 20.
Read Psalm 51
A church deacon once confessed a horrible sin in a social
media site. After giving a description of what he’d done,
the man commented, “I know there’s a price to pay for
this sin now. And that price is death.”
Not only was his heart broken over what he had done; he also knew that the effect on his friends and
family would be devastating. And yet, overshadowing his remorse was fear. He had become afraid of God,
believing that the sovereign Lord of the universe was now “out to get him.”
What would you say to this believer? Does his statement reflect an appropriate view of God’s response to
sin?
It’s true that Romans 6:23 clearly teaches that “the wages of sin is death”; however, this sorrowful young
man had overlooked the all-important second half of the verse: “but the free gift of God is eternal life in
Christ Jesus our Lord.” If our Father gives us a gift, we can trust that He will never take it away; it becomes
ours to keep—that’s what a gift is. We did nothing to deserve it, so we can do nothing to lose it. It all rests
on God’s initiative.
Moreover, a greater theological principle is at work here. If the believer’s sin after salvation could require
death—or any form of punishment—then Jesus’ sacrifice was insufficient. However, the Bible tells us that
Jesus’ death was wholly sufficient and a once-for-all payment of mankind’s sin debt (Heb. 10:10).
Either Jesus’ blood does cover our sins, or it doesn’t. There’s no middle ground. The Holy Spirit, Christ’s
words, and biblical testimony clearly assert that it does.
Jesus’ Sacrifice:
Payment in Full
Inspiration Point
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
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South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press, PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Myrtle Alma Rose Holst, age 89,
of Denton, Texas, died January 15,
2013, at the Silver Stone Home in
Denton.
Graveside services will be held
at 11:30 a.m. Sunday, July 21, at
the Rose Cemetery near Creighton,
S.D., with Duane Holst officiating.
The funeral procession will be
leaving the Wall Drug Store in Wall
at 10:30 a.m. Sunday for those that
want to go with the family to the
cemetery.
Myrtle Alma Rose Holst was
born on November 20, 1923, in a
log cabin in Pennington County to
Freeman and Penila (Potter) Rose.
She married Roger Duane Holst
on June 21, 1951 in Rapid City. She
worked in a variety of areas but
principally as a long distance oper-
ator for Bell Telephone, an airplane
relay tech during World War II and
most recently custodian for her
church. She also was a homemaker
and mother of four.
She is survived by her four chil-
dren, Diana Reaves and husband,
Bernard (Jack), of Aubrey; Texas,
Duane Holst of Midland, Texas,
Debra Holst of Dallas, Texas, and
Dawne Holst Adamson of Roseville,
Calif.; and four grandchildren, Troy
Reaves of Flower Mound, Texas,
Denise Chambers of Denton,
Michael Gratzinger of Bluffdale,
Utah, and Michelle Ross of Wash-
ington, D.C.; nine great-grandchil-
dren; and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Arrangement are with the Rush
Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Myrtle Alma Rose Holst____________
Faith Kunz, age 73, of Sioux
Falls, S.D., formerly of Philip, died
Thursday evening, July 11, 2013,
at the Sanford USD Medical Cen-
ter in Sioux Falls.
Arla Faith Johnson was born on
August 9, 1939 in Wasta to A.E.
“Doll” and Fern (Crosmer) John-
son. She grew up in the heart of the
Badlands in Interior and gradu-
ated valedictorian from Interior
High School in 1957.
As a young woman, she moved to
Omaha, Neb., to attend airline
hostess training. In the fall of 1958,
she attended Northern State Uni-
versity in Aberdeen, where she met
her future husband, Ted K. Kunz.
Ted and Faith were united in
marriage on June 5, 1960, in
Pierre. They made their first home
in Britton where she worked as a
school secretary. A year later, she
stayed home to raise her children
until moving to Philip in the sum-
mer of 1987. Referring to Philip as
“God’s country,” Faith loved living
there and she considered it a bless-
ing and privilege to spend time
with her mom. Faith loved caring
for children, so she decided to open
a day care in their home for a num-
ber of years. Ted and Faith contin-
ued to make their home in Philip,
until moving to Sioux Falls in July
2011.
Over the years, Faith was an ac-
tive member of the United Church
where she served on various com-
mittees. She was dedicated and
continued to show her love of work-
ing with children by teaching Sun-
day school and by volunteering
with the summer vacation Bible
programs. She was at her best, and
her happiest, helping others; she
loved every second that she was
able to spend with her family, her
mom or her grandchildren. She
was a faithful servant of God and
enjoyed reading her daily Bible.
Faith was preceded in death by
her husband of 51 years, Ted on
September 2, 2011.
Grateful for sharing her life are
her children, Rob Kunz and his
wife, Nancy, of Sioux Falls, Connie
Schmiesing and her husband, De-
Wayne, of Sioux Falls, Linda
Fisher and her husband, Travis, of
Polson, Mont., Randy Kunz and his
wife, Nichole, of Berthold, N.D.,
and Andrew Kunz and his wife,
Lisa, of Sioux Falls; 11 grandchil-
dren, Alex and Lauren Kunz,
James Schmiesing, Mollie and
Samuel Fisher, Taylor, Lanie, Jack-
son, and Connor Kunz, Joseph and
Claire Kunz; two brothers, Daryl
Johnson and his wife, Petey, of
Stanwood, Wash., and Harry John-
son and his wife, Florence, of Wa-
tertown; one sister, Deanna Hilton
and her husband, Billy, of Rapid
City; special friend, Caleb
Clements of Chamberlain; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
In addition to her husband, Ted,
Faith was preceded in death by in-
fant daughter, Julie Marie Kunz;
her parents, Doll and Fern John-
son; infant brother, Arell Johnson;
her parents-in-law, Andrew and
Lizzie Kunz; two brothers-in-law,
John and Alvin Kunz; and one sis-
ter-in-law, Adelaide Kunz.
Services were held Tuesday, July
16, at the United Church in Philip,
with Pastor Kathy Chesney offici-
ating.
Music was provided by Sally
Jankord, pianist, and Alex Kunz,
vocalist. Ushers were Norm Payne
and Milo Zeeb.
Pallbearers were Rob, Randy,
Andrew and Alex Kunz, DeWayne
and James Schmiesing, Travis
Fisher and Caleb Clements. Junior
pallbearers were Lauren, Taylor,
Lanie, Mollie, Samuel, Jackson,
Connor, Joseph and Claire.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Arla Faith Kunz___________________________
Floyd “Speed” Bendickson, age
81 of Philip, S.D., died Wednesday,
July 10, 2013, at the Hans P. Peter-
son Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Floyd B. “Speed” Bendickson,
was born September 14, 1931, in
Henning, Minn., the son of Benny
and Bertha (Underhill) Bendick-
son. He started his ranching career
working for Bob and Inga Blair at
the age of 14.
Floyd enlisted into the U.S.
Army in December, 1950 and
served in the Army Rangers in
Korea. He was wounded and was in
the hospital in Japan. He returned
home 1954.
Floyd married the love of his life,
Berit Irene Ingebrigtsen, on Octo-
ber 2, 1954. From this blessed
union four children were born.
They started their marriage at the
Ramey’s ranch from 1955 to 1956
and then worked for Bob and Inga
Blair from 1956 to 1959. In 1959,
they moved to Milesville where
they leased and worked for 10
years until 1969. Floyd eventually
purchased his own ranch in Cotton-
wood in January 1970, making a
home and living for his family.
Floyd also worked for Cenex for 20
years, delivering fuel to local farm-
ers and always having candy for
their children. Floyd and Berit sold
the ranch in 2006 and moved into
Philip to spend their retirement.
Floyd loved ranching, fishing,
and watching rodeos. He was
blessed with four children, 13
grandchildren and 15 great-grand-
children.
Floyd is survived by his wife of
58 years, Berit Bendickson; a
daughter, JoAnn West (Doug); two
sons, Keith Bendickson (Pauline),
and Kent Bendickson (Diana); two
sisters, Bonnie Peters (Roy Dow)
and Darlene Morency (Norm); two
brothers, Delbert Bendickson
(Gail), Kenneth Bendickson
(Glenda); a special nephew, Jim Pe-
ters; and favorite fishing buddy
Mike Hanson.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Benny and Bertha; sisters,
Joann and Arlene Bendickson; a
son, Floyd Bendickson, Jr; and a
grandson, Jeremiah Bendickson.
Services were held Monday, July
15, at the American Legion Hall in
Philip with Pastor Frezil Wester-
lund officiating.
Music was provided by Marilyln
Millage, pianist, and Kim Kanable,
vocalist.
Ushers were Scott Kennedy and
Mel Smith.
Military graveside services were
held Monday at the Black Hills Na-
tional Cemetery near Sturgis.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Floyd “Speed” Bendickson_________________________
Monday, July 22
Scalloped potatoes with ham
pieces, peas, corn bread and man-
darin oranges.
Tuesday, July 23
Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and
gravy, glazed carrots, bread and
pears.
Wednesday, July 24
Chicken filet on a bun with let-
tuce, pasta vegetable salad, car-
rifruit salad and tropical fruit.
Thursday, July 25
Eat at Jigger’s
Friday, July 26
Taco salad with meat and beans,
lettuce and tomato, chips and
peaches.
Meals for
the Elderly
39 million Americans or 13% of
the U.S. population are 65 and
older, and our nation’s 76 million
baby boomers are just beginning to
turn 65. A timely 2009 Pew Re-
search poll on growing old, found
encouraging words as well as a siz-
able gap between the expectations
of young people and what actually
happens.
The survey asked about nega-
tive benchmarks of aging such as
illness, memory loss, inability to
drive, an end to sexual activity,
loneliness and depression, and dif-
ficulty paying bills. The study dis-
covered that younger people
thought elderly would experience
more problems of aging than actu-
ally occurred. It’s good to know
they were wrong.
I found it encouraging that only
40% of those aged 85 or older expe-
rienced significant memory loss,
only 30% experienced feeling sad
or depressed, only 25% no longer
drove, and the vast majority had
made peace with their circum-
stances, with only 1% that said
their lives had turned out worse
than expected.
But in contrast the survey also
asked about benefits of aging such
as spending more time with family,
traveling for pleasure, having
more time for hobbies, and doing
volunteer work. Younger people
thought the elderly would experi-
ence more of these benefits than
actually occurred. That’s disap-
pointing.
But what is encouraging, the
survey found that older people
were just as happy as everyone
else, and the same factors for all
ages predicted it: good health, good
friends, and some degree of finan-
cial security.
The widest gap in old versus
young, not surprisingly, was the
percentage of young versus old
using the Internet, cell phones,
and social networking, although
that is changing. Another gap of
interest was the rate of religion
being an important part of one’s
life. Not surprisingly, 66% of those
over 65 said religion is important
to them, compared to 50% of those
30-49, and 44% of those 18-29.
I was encouraged to learn that
75% of those 65 and older said they
have talked with their family
about end-of-life matters, and that
the majority of these conversations
were initiated by the parent and
directed to their adult children.
Finally it was heartwarming to
learn that of all the good things
about getting old, the older adults
by far chose as their favorite:
spending more time with family
members, especially grandchil-
dren.
Don’t have any of those yet, but
I have expectations.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Expectations of the elderly
Donald D. “Don” Thorson, age
53, of Bartlesville, Okla,, formerly
of Philip, S.D., died Saturday, July
13, 2013, while on vacation in Med-
ford, Ore.
Donald D. Thorson was born
April 29, 1960, in Quinn. He grew
up on a ranch northwest of Philip.
He attended Alfalfa Valley Rural
School before going to Philip High
School where he graduated in
1978. He attended South Dakota
State University and earned an as-
sociate’s degree in December 1980.
He went to work for Scotchman In-
dustries and was there until 1989
when he went to Canyon, Texas,
and attended West Texas A&M
University. He graduated with a
bachelor’s degree in computer engi-
neering in 1991.
Don went to work for Conoco in
Ponca City, Okla. When Phillips 66
and Conoco merged, he spent two
years traveling the world merging
the computer systems of both com-
panies. Once his job was complete,
he was transferred to Bartlesville
where he has since resided.
Even though he moved several
different times throughout his ca-
reer, his heart always stayed in
Philip. He regularly visited Philip,
at least twice a year, catching up
with his family and friends. He es-
pecially enjoyed hiking, hunting,
fishing, golfing, camping, and play-
ing cards. One of his highlights was
traveling to Norway and finding
where his great-grandparents were
born.
Survivors include his mother,
JoAnn Thorson, of Philip; five sib-
lings, Laurie Dale of Amarillo,
Texas, Linda Thorson of Brooklyn
Park, Minn., Rick Thorson and his
wife, Selma, of Philip, Doug Thor-
son and his wife, Nancy, of Quinn;
and Rhonda Thorson of St. Paul,
Minn.; several nieces and nephews;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Don was preceded in death by
his father, Lauren Thorson, in 2005
and brother-in-law, Mike Dale, in
2006.
Visitation will be held from 1:00
a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, July
20, at the United Church in Philip,
followed by services at 2:00 p.m.,
with Pastor Kathy Chesney offici-
ating.
Interment will be at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Donald D. “Don” Thorson__________________________
Belvidere & Norris News …
July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
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Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
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Some surprises are rather fun.
Others are less so. One pleasant
surprise this week was when an
unknown plant in our rock border
threw out a huge white flower. I
walk by that area almost every
day and had noticed this plant
which I could never quite identify.
At first I thought it might be a
cocklebur. Then I wondered if it
could be some sort of sunflower.
Other possibilities came to mind,
but I was never quite sure enough
it was a weed to make myself pull
it out. Of course, there was a rag-
weed nearby that I recognized all
too well and didn’t pull either, but
this one at least was a little too in-
teresting to consider uprooting.
So, a couple of days ago I no-
ticed this foot-high plant throwing
out a big flower stalk in the mid-
dle. I watched it with interest. Fi-
nally, last evening, it unfurled. It
was a large white trumpet-like
blossom about the size of those you
see on Easter lilies and somewhat
similar except the edges were more
rounded and not as fluted. The
word, “moonflower,” came to mind,
but I wasn’t really sure why. I
showed the posy to wife Corinne
who also thought it might be that
flower. She went on the Internet to
do a bit of research and shortly
found a photo that proved we did
indeed have a moonflower in
bloom in the front yard. Nifty.
They are supposed to smell really
good, but so far I haven’t gotten
down on hands and knees to find
out. Maybe later.
Thinking back, I have probably
only seen moonflowers twice be-
fore in my life. The first was back
in grade or high school when one of
our neighbors in town had a bunch
of them. They were rather impres-
sive since they were big and nice
smelling. Quite a few years later, I
remember seeing some over at
Barb and Ted’s ranch some six
miles from us. They too had a lot of
them and seemed to think they
were quite fine. Even that latter
sighting of these flowers was well
over twenty years ago so the mem-
ory of them was not as active as it
might once have been. Anyway,
having a pretty and interesting
plant grow up and flower all on its
own was a nice surprise, especially
when you have no idea how it got
there.
Then we come to surprises that
are slightly less enjoyable. One of
those was also last evening after
the flower experience. As it hap-
pened, some weeks ago a tornado
or other strong wind tore the roof
off a machine/shop shed at our
river place and tossed it over north
towards the river. On the way by,
that pile of wood and twisted metal
did some damage to our big John
Deere tractor such as bending the
smokestack over, nudging the ra-
diator a little etc. In any event, the
tractor needed to be fixed.
I had considerable difficulty in
finding a way to get the thing to
town for repair, but John finally
came through with a truck and a
method. The tractor was loaded
and taken to town. Unfortunately,
the loading took longer than ex-
pected so the unloading would
have to be after dark. Since the
machine was going to our mailman
who is also experienced in tractor
repair, the delivery to him was
slightly out of town and John was
unsure of the exact location. He
called and asked me to serve as a
guide which was fine with me. I
met them by the sale barn and
confidently led them east.
Before long, however, confusion
set in. I didn’t recognize the land-
marks. When we finally came to a
paved road, surprise, surprise, I
realized I had no idea where on
earth we were although we were
less than a mile from town. Like I
said, some surprises are not so
great. In this case, there was little
left to do but retrace our steps and
try again. This area, by the way,
has several roads meeting in a
small area and all leading differ-
ent directions. Instead of heading
straight east, I had gotten con-
fused in the dark and gone north-
east. When we then tried going
straight east instead of northeast,
that soon got us to where we
wanted to be. The tractor was duly
unloaded, and we could all go
home. I told John that I could mis-
direct him to several other places
if he wanted before I left, but he
said they were fine and could prob-
ably somehow muddle their own
way home without my help. This
was apparently a case of the blind
leading the unsure, but John was
now sure enough of his bearings to
get by without me.
So, yesterday was full of sur-
prises. At least it wasn’t dull. I
even later had to chuckle a bit
about getting lost when I was so
sure I easily knew the way. Ah
well, today has been fairly
straightforward. No odd plants
growing up and flowering and no
roads leading to nowhere. I can’t
decide which was better, yesterday
or today. I guess both were okay.
Surprise, Surprise
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
You buy the house; buy the
neighborhood. Russian Proverb
Last Friday night the Taft gals
went to Rapid City and spent the
night with Samantha in her new
apartment. Samantha Taft started
her job at Rapid City Regional Hos-
pital on Monday as a registered
nurse.
Dan and Susan Taft and daugh-
ters, Heather, Samantha and Mor-
gan, helped host a golden wedding
anniversary celebration for Susan’s
parents, Alvin and Judy Simmons,
of Martin the weekend of July 6-7,
2013. The family treated the group
of forty friends and family mem-
bers to a bus tour of the Black Hills
starting at Sturgis with Susan’s
brother, Jeff as, the driver. A few
highlights were a wine tasting at
Prairie Berry Winery in Hill City, a
stop at the Taffy Shop in Keystone,
and a poker run. The final stop was
in Rapid City at the Texas Road-
house for a delicious supper before
returning to Sturgis. Special guests
were the mother of the “bride,”
Beverly Comsey, 88, of Aberdeen
and her 91-year-old sister, Lila.
They enjoyed the trip as much as
everyone else and didn’t miss a
thing. The Taft ladies were guests
of Jeff and Michelle Simmons in
Sturgis that night and after a deli-
cious brunch they headed home.
The Tafts had been over a week
without being in the field due to
machinery breakdowns so when it
got fixed, Dan opted to stay home
and work, so he missed out on all
the fun.
Carol Ferguson worked at the
Wanblee Post Office several days
last week.
Monday afternoon, the Jason
Burma family returned home to
Norris after vacationing in the
east. They traveled to the New
Tribes Missionary Training Center
at Camdenton, Missouri. Jason and
JaLynn have been there with the
seniors from Sunshine Bible Acad-
emy several times and promised
their family they would take them
there sometime, too. There are lots
of recreational things to do there:
fishing, swimming, etc. Then they
went to Lexington, Tennessee, and
were guests of longtime pheasant
hunting friends before traveling on
to Cincinnati, Ohio, to Ken Ham’s
Creation Museum. They met up
with JaLynn’s missionary friends,
Mark and Marcy Harris, and fam-
ily there for a couple days. JaLynn
and Marcy had served as mission-
aries in Russia together several
years ago. They also enjoyed the
Cincinnati Reds baseball game
against the San Francisco Giants
July 3 that lasted 13 innings. It
closed with a big fireworks display
that night, too. The kids had a lot
to tell when they got home.
Tuesday, Bruce and Jessie Ring
were among those parents attend-
ing a meeting at the Long Valley
School. Grandma June Ring and
the twins went over and baby sat
while they were gone.
Weeds have really challenged all
the gardeners in this area. They
(like everything else) are really
growing. We are not complaining,
just working hard to help the gar-
dens and flower beds get ahead a
bit. Maxine Allard described her
garden as “a lovely jungle.” It is a
typical July in South Dakota, hot!
The winter wheat is ripening and
combines are waiting. Folks are
still haying, too! After last year’s
drought we are not letting any-
thing green and growing go to
waste.
Friday, James and Marjorie
Letellier enjoyed supper at the H
and H in Kadoka on Friday to cele-
brate their anniversary.
Janice Ring has been hosting
several basketball players and
coach Mike Ring at her home dur-
ing the basketball camp in White
River. Several players from Norris
have been attending as well.
Irene Kaufman of Valentine vis-
ited family in Norris on Sunday.
She, Jesse, Pete and Marla Fergu-
son were dinner guests in the Ed
and Carol Ferguson home.
Sunday, the James Letelliers
took Julie to Rapid City to get her
car. They visited in the Marty Lar-
son home and Sue returned home
with them that evening for a few
days.
Andee Beckwith came to Norris
Sunday evening and will be help-
ing with the Prairie Light Bible
School at Rosebud and Lakeview
this week.
Saturday Stan Allard of Rapid
City came to do some errands for
his mother.
Have a great week!
Marj and Marvin Street have
been in residence in their house by
the water tower for a couple of
weeks now. They came the day of
the school reunion and planned to
only stay two weeks. They got
started fixing on their house such
as painting and repairing the roof,
and that didn’t quite get done in
two weeks so they plan to stay a
few more days and finish up. While
here, they visited family and
friends, and Marj played the organ
for church the last two Sundays.
Syd Iwan and Marj have now been
playing the piano and organ to-
gether for church in Belvidere for a
bit over fifty years and are still at
it when Marj is here.
Rick and Ronda Dennis spent
the weekend in Rapid City with
Rick’s sister, Dana DeVries. They
spent the time doing a little shop-
ping and just hanging out. They
didn’t do anything all that exciting
but it was nice to get away for a lit-
tle while.
Nikki Bonenberger said they are
putting up their alfalfa hay at pres-
ent. The first cutting was hailed
out, but there has been enough
rain to grow it again for a second
crop.
Dave Calhoon said they are hay-
ing as well and watching the
grasshoppers. They are thick in a
few places, but the grass is growing
fast enough to keep ahead of them.
Dave said his son, Josh, is still into
probing grain cars on the railroad
and sending the results in for cer-
tain tests. This is just a part-time
job that Josh likes to do although
the work has slowed quite a bit in
the last ten days. It will no doubt
pick up again.
Howie Ireland mowed his yard
on Sunday. He is still hauling mail
during the week and Cathy is cook-
ing at the nursing home in Kadoka.
Howie and Cathy are like many in
the area right now that are just
getting on with the normal routine
and without a lot of extra stuff
going on.
Jenny Jo Johnston is currently
on vacation in Denver with her sis-
ter, Cora Jo. Every year since
Jenny was about eight, the two go
someplace together to keep in
touch as sisters. Jennie is now 16
so they have been doing this half of
her life. Cora now lives in Rapid
City but used to live in Denver. So
far they have ridden a mechanical
bull, gone roller skating and to a
water park and Six Flags. Other
activities are on the agenda. When
Jenny turns 21, they already have
plans to go to Las Vegas on their
annual vacation. Meanwhile, Larry
and Jo Johnston have been putting
up hay. Last weekend, they went to
West Whitlock and stayed with Jo’s
sister, Charlotte. Her boyfriend has
a trailer on the river so they went
there and did some fishing. Whit-
lock is near Gettysburg.
Drought concerns eased last
month, with widespread rainfall
and near average temperatures in
South Dakota. At this point, the cli-
mate outlook for July remains un-
certain.
“Copious amounts of rain fell in
the northeastern counties in June,”
said Laura Edwards, South Dakota
State University Extension climate
field specialist. “Some locations re-
ported three to five inches above
average rainfall for the month.
That is nearly double average for
those areas between Marshall and
Deuel counties.”
Edwards added that the south-
western corner of South Dakota re-
mains in moderate to severe
drought going in to the month of
July. “Unfortunately, the southern
Black Hills and areas between Fall
River and Todd counties continued
to be much drier than average in
June,” said Edwards.
Climatologically, the summer is
traditionally a dry season for those
counties. This, Edwards explained,
means that further drought recov-
ery will be unlikely in the coming
months. “As temperatures in-
crease, so does water demand by
plants, animals and people,” she
said.
Edwards said according to the
latest monthly and seasonal
drought outlooks from the climate
prediction center a drought is ex-
pected to persist in this area for
July and through September.
June’s temperatures have helped
crop producers across the state,
said Dennis Todey, SDSU state cli-
matologist. “Temperatures in June
were slightly below average for the
month, but nothing like what the
state experienced earlier this year,”
Todey said. “Statewide, June tem-
perature was just a degree or two
below the long term average. This
created a nice environment for crop
growth and rangeland recovery
over the last few weeks."
By the end of June, corn fields
appeared to be in good shape, and
soybean fields were improving.
A path of severe storms passed
through eastern South Dakota on
June 21. Most reports indicate that
damaged fields were able to be re-
planted after hail, high winds and
tornadoes affected the US 212 cor-
ridor that afternoon.
Looking ahead to the month of
July, Todey said computer climate
models are scattered in their pre-
dictions for the Northern Plains.
“There are no clear signs of wetter
or drier than average conditions for
the month,” he said. “Extended pe-
riods of excessive heat don’t seem
to be forthcoming.”
In the early part of the month,
models predict that South Dakota
will be in the path of cooler and
drier air from Canada, as high
pressure sits in the western United
States.
“This isn’t to say we are entirely
cut off from moisture,” Todey said.
“We will likely get small amounts
of rainfall here and there from
more sporadic thunderstorms.”
Edwards and Todey agreed that
the early part of July will be pleas-
ant. The sunny skies and moder-
ately warm temperatures will be a
boon to gardens and row crops in
the region, and will also prevent se-
vere heat issues for livestock.
Drought lingers in southwest
S.D. as summer heat returns
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July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
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Buffet Every Sunday
Includes Salad Bar & Dessert
serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
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Daily Noon Speicals
Monday through Friday
Serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Homemade Salad Bar
everyday of the week!
It was a full week for visitors!
Starting off on Sunday, Betty Van-
derMay got a visit from her daugh-
ter, Joan, and granddaughter,
Bree. They had a very special visit.
Then comes Shorty Ireland. He
had a visit from his son, Hal. They
had a good visit and Hal faxed his
dad back a copy of his life history,
that is what he can remember!
Dorothy and Brad Louder drove
down to see Dwight. They always
take a chance they will catch him
awake. And if he is, watch out he’ll
talk your ears off and will make
sure everyone is on top of their job.
Elaine Kemnitz had a visit from
her husband, Don, and her sister-
in-law, Sharon, and her brother,
Stanley Paulson. They always
share some good stories and
laughs. Also visiting with Elaine
this week was Juanita and Verna
Koskan, good friends from way
back.
Mary Ellen Herbaugh got a sur-
prise visit from her son, Fred, and
friend, Kathy. She loves it when
they catch a ride down to see her.
She also went out with her daugh-
ter, Starla, and granddaughter,
Tiffany. It’s always nice to get out
for awhile!
Joy Parker had a very busy
week for visitors. Her daughter and
son-in-law, Barbara and Lon
Parker, and her beautiful grand-
daughter, Landri, were here. Joy
was able to visit with them a couple
days. She also got her daily visits
from Renate, Ron and Wilma. Oth-
ers visiting this week were Gayle
and Oliver from Wall, and her
daughter, Martha, and son-in-law,
Thomas Tune.
Beth Murray drove over from
Philip to see her dad, Bob Young.
It’s always nice to see her with her
dad!
Linda Petras dropped into visit
with her mother-in-law, Mary, and
also went up to check on Ruth
Klundt. She checked out the gar-
den and had a good visit.
Welcome back Mary Bull Bear.
Mary was at the hospital for a
short stay, but she is back with us
and we all want to welcome Mary
back!
Connie Twiss was here to visit
with Glenn Bruhn. Glenn is Con-
nie’s uncle. Connie usually brings
Glenn his favorite snack; a straw-
berry shake or some chocolates.
Ruth Klundt had a good week
for friends and family. Her sister,
Zona, and husband, Daniel Malm-
berg, Bob and Sharon Mitchell, and
other friends dropped in to say
hello.
Betty Kusick popped in to see
Bunny Green, Edith Perault, Kate
DeVries, and Oliver Willert. She’s
always good for a few laughs!
Wanda Swan came by to visit
with Ruth Klundt and Bunny
Green.
Reverend Ray Greenseth
stopped by on his way back to
Murdo to see Mary Ellen Herbaugh
and Melford Koester.
Kate DeVries got a visit from
Jim DeVries and her daughter,
Ruth Ann, stopped in and enjoyed
some birthday cake and ice cream
on Monday afternoon.
Speaking of birthdays we cele-
brated all the monthly birthdays
last Monday. Those having birth-
days this month are: Ray Becker,
Melford Koester, Derald Kulhavey,
Melissa Ammons, Heidi Coller, and
Val Cork. Renate Carson supplied
the cake fixings and ice cream
while Cathy Stone shared her hand
in the baking of the cakes! Others
attending were Lois Pettyjohn,
Lova Bushnell, Val’s mom. Every-
one had a great time playing Bingo
before partaking in the goodies.
Those who stop by to visit, it
means everything to a resident to
just have someone stop and say hi,
or ask how are you doing today? We
sure appreciate everyone who
takes the time to stop! Those stop-
ping by this week: Lola Joyce Rig-
gins, Lova Bushnell, Shirley
Josserand, Nancy Weller, Bonnie
Madsen, Carol Solon, Phyllis Word,
the Willert family, the Wilmarth
family, and our pianist, Lois Pet-
tyjohn.
Our garden is growing and the
little rain showers sure do help!
Can’t wait until we get to harvest!
Ellie Bettelyoun and daughters,
Rikki and Lorena and a friend,
Nakoda, of Lander, WY, spent the
Fourth of July weekend at the
home of her mom, Letoy Brown,
and visiting other relatives in the
Kadoka area. They arrived on
Wednesday, July 3 and returned to
Wyoming on Monday, the 8th of
July. The Bettelyouns are enjoying
living in Lander.
Joy Parker’s daughter and son-
in-law, Martha and Tommy Thune,
of Mineral Wells, Texas, arrived in
Kadoka on Monday, July 8, and
stayed with Ron and Renate Car-
son. They got to spend some time at
the Nursing Home with Joy and ar-
rived in time to visit with Martha’s
sister and husband, Bob and Lon-
nie Harper, of Cheyenne, WY, who
were also visiting at the Carsons
and with Mrs. Parker. Both couples
left Kadoka on Tuesday, the 9th.
Jim and Robyn Jones, Tyler,
Tanner, Michael, Kylie and Kelton
were in Valentine, NE, on Satur-
day. They visited Robyn’s parents,
Ray and Florence Osburn, and at-
tended the wedding of Jim’s
nephew, JT Jones, and Amanda
Ross.
There will a free music concert
at the Kadoka Presbyterian
Church on Sunday, July 21 at 6:30
p.m. Steven and Misti Crane will
be preforming. Everyone is invited
to attend.
band were back for a visit last
week. They are at Wanblee part of
the time.
My how times have changed.
When they built the apartment
building, they had welcome parties
for the new residents, entertain-
ment games, friendly people, intro-
ductions, socializing and getting
aquainted with everyone. There
does not seem to be the interest in
those activities anymore.
I accompanied Chris and Ani-
talynn Riggins to the rodeo for in
Wall on Saturday evening to watch
Dylan ride a bull. I am hearing
Chris and Anitalynn went to the
Kadoka rodeo arena to watch him
ride a bull this last Sunday after-
noon.
We have a bird nesting in a tree
here, and it is interesting watching
Mother Nature work with our
every day happenings. The bird
built her nest in quite a protected
branch and is busy setting on her
eggs.
They are tearing down the old
Doloff house (also known as the
Walton house). It kept Bert and
Betty. The house also kept school
kids, waitresses for Bert, families
and the last ones I remember was
Ray Gartner. My daughter stayed
with them her senior year of high-
school.
Thought of the week: Every ac-
complishment starts with the deci-
sion to try. Excellence is the
gradual result of always striving to
do your best.
Most of the regular quilting crew
worked on quilts. Lova cuts
squares and Margie, Susie, Shirley,
Marie, Phyllis and Betty tie quilts.
Most days two quilts are tied on
quilting day at the community
room on Wednesday afternoon.
I saw a meeting happening in
the community room about a week
ago, but nothing was on the calen-
dar.
Joyce Hicks and Lova Bushnell
were busy with their Rummikub
game Sunday afternoon.
Joe Hoffman was busy Sunday
morning.
I saw two pickups parked in
front of the old Linaberg Drug
Store. I am hearing they are get-
ting ready to open a restaurant
there on Main Street. It has been a
day or two since I got to buy a
chocolate ice cream cone there for a
nickel.
I had one of my delights Sunday
morning. A delightful, little bless-
ing in her dad’s arms handed me
my church bulletin with a beautiful
smile, and she wanted to give me
another one. What an inspiring
welcome to church.
I walked over to the care center
and got to see Katy Knutson of
Spearfish visiting her mother,
Clara Belle Weller. On down the
hall, I saw Oliver Willert, Ray
Becker, Emma Jarl and Ruth
Klundt. Bud Weller arrived down
the hall to visit Clara Belle and
Katy. I enjoyed a nice quick chat.
Linda Yellow Elk and her hus-
Kadoka Area School
Surplus Auction
Tuesday, July 30
6 p.m. in the Little Gym • Kadoka
Items can be viewed prior to auction on July 29 during
normal business hours at the little gym.
Wood desk
Floor scrubber -
(does not work)
2 Welders – part missing
Advance carpetriver -
(does not work)
Wood cabinet
Metal divider
6 Folding tables
Buffer (does not work)
Saw Rockwell/delta
Key making machine
Plasma cutter
Wood cabinet
Plastic stack shelves
Wood bench
Stainless steel kitchen cart
4 Table/desks
22 Chairs
V-Tel white board
Lockers
Stove
2 Ovens
Wood desk
Red desk chair
Metal cabinet
3’ x 6’ Table
Electric snow blower
Advance water vac -
(does not work)
Drill press
Wood shelf
Metal dolly
4’ File cabinet
3’ File cabinet
Dishwasher w/booster
Metal kitchen
mixer with bowls
119 – Dell Latitude
2100 Netbooks
100 - Dell Latitude
2100 Netbook Bags
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Uongratu|atìons to the Interìor kìndergarten c|ass of 1969!!
3ponsored by Philip Kruse at the Circle View Cuest Ranch, lnterior, 30
Thank you • Thank you • Thank you
To Susan Davidson, Larry Fite and Joe
Hoffman for mowing the foot tall weeds and
grass at the Gateway Apartments. After three
weeks it looks like a lawn again!
Your friends and neighbors,
Pat Kozlik, Joyce Hicks, Jean Neumann, Loretta DeBolt,
Rodney Schnee, Mary ShortBull, Richard Pinney,
Paul, Sara Speer and family, Bill Bouman,
Larry and Karen Denny, Marvin and Deb Moor,
Nona Prang, Curtis Anderson, Rick and Paulette Wilmarth,
Cindy Wilmarth, Charles Willert, Jan and Larry Miller,
Ethel and Claude Freeman
Monday, July 29
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Show & Dance with full band!
Steak
Out
&
Full Menu
Service
Come
early
for
Supper!
No Cover Charge
Big horn sheep in grazing in the badlands
Enjoying the nice green grass, a small herd of big horn sheep were in Badlands National Park near the doors and windows
section of the park.
Business Spotlight
Owners and operators
Vernon and Helen Uhlir
Thank you for your many years!
Kadoka Community Betterment Association
KCBA invites all community
members to join them in a
“Cash Mob”
at
H & H Restaurant
Friday, July 26
11:30 to 12:30 p.m.
Silver Court Motel
Community …
July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Email
press@kadokatelco.com
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
WANTED
Dam Repair
or other
dirt work
Tom DeVries
Belvidere • 605-891-8022
Kennebec Telephone
Construction
605-869-2220
Excavation work of ALL
types! Back Hoe
Trenching
Excavation
Waterers
Tire tanks
Class of 1963: standing (L-R): Caroline Guptill, Perry Guptill, Verne Richardson, Roxy Richardson, Jerry Jakeway, Bill Gropper,
Alice Jakeway, Deb Gropper, Marv Marlow, Bruce Whidby, Jeanette Cote, Lila Whidby, Raymond Hicks, Bob Zickrick, Linda
Hicks, Kathy Zickrick, Paul Thomas and George Young. Kneeling: Roger Baddley, Phil Hogen, Marti Hogen, Gene Waack and
Becky Waack. --courtesy photo
Class of 1948: standing (L-R): Bob McCormick, Nona (Pettyjohn) Prang, Beverly
(Williams) Larson of Belgrade, MT. Front: Iola (Solberg) Halligan of Carmichael,
CA, and June (Munger) Randael of Owatonna, MN. --courtesy photo
The Interior Ranch Rodeo was held on Saturday, July 6. Taking first place was the
Philip Livestock team. Team members were Tucker McDaniel (L), Colton McDaniel,
Tucker Amiotte, and Shannon Gartner (not pictured). Here the team competes in
the calf branding. --photos by Robyn Jones
The of Clint Nelson (L), Shad Finn, Bryer Jones, and Colter Stout took second
place. Here the team competes in the wild cow milking.
The hard luck award went to the team of Cap Herber (L), Blaine Hicks, Austin Liv-
ermont, and Kempton Olney.
Up, up and away
Interior Ranch Rodeo
The Afterschool students, with the help of Mr. Ken Graupmann, recently built and
launced hot air balloons. --courtesy photos
Kids fun night was held at the
O’Bryan Arena on Wednesday, July
3 in Belvidere.
Stickhorse Barrels: 1. Trey Carl-
son, Star; 2. Peyton Porch, Flicka;
3. Shaylee Porch, Dora; 4. Mylee
Gropper, Smoke
SH Keyhole: 1. JD O’Bryan,
Thunder; 2. Trey Carlson, Star; 3.
Mylee Gropper, Smoke; 4. Shaylee
Porch, Dora; 5. Peyton Porch,
Flicka; 6. Stormie O’Bryan, Red-
neck
Lead Barrels: 1. Peyton Porch,
Deuce; 2. Mylee Gropper, Pepsi; 3.
Shaylee Porch; 4. Sage Carlson,
Yellar; 5. Stormie O’Bryan, Faith;
6. JD O’Bryan, Buddy
Ground Roping: Tie 1, 2, 3.
Stormie O’Bryan, Peyton Porch
and Shaley Porch.
Jr. Barrels: 1. Tawny Gropper,
Do Se Do; 2. Dalton Porch, My new
horse; 3. Peyton Porch, Deuce; 4.
Shaylee Porch; 5. Adi Patterson,
Gumbo; 6. Eve Patterson, Angel
Jr. Poles: 1. Tawny Gropper, Do
Se Do; 2. Dalton Porch, My new
horse; 3. Eve Patterson, Angel; 4.
Adi Patterson, Gumbo
Jr. Roping: 1. Dalton Porch
Jr. Keyhole: 1. Tawny Gropper,
Do Se Do; 2. Dalton Porch, My new
horse; 3. Peyton Porch, Deuce; 4.
Trey Carlson, Yellar; 5. Eve Patter-
son, Angel; 6. Shaylee Porch
Open Barrels: 1D 1. Justina
Cvach, Red; 2. Jo Jandreau; 2D 1.
Sarah Gropper
Open Poles: 1D 1. Jo Jandreau;
2D 1. Justina Cvach, Red
Open Keyhole: 1. Tim Jandreau;
2. Justina Cvach, Champ
The next fun night will be held
on Wednesday, July 17. Enter at
5:30 p.m. and run at 6:00 p.m.
O’Bryan Arena fun night results
On Saturday, August 3, the
South Dakota Game, Fish and
Parks Department will host a free
youth event day at Lake Waggoner,
north of Philip.
Youth, depending on their ages,
can participate in all four of the
stations. State GF&P officials and
local volunteers will work with
youth on learning and practicing
archery, pellet gun shooting, fish-
ing and viewing demonstrations on
trapping. The trapping station will
be run by a state trapper. All sup-
plies will be provided.
Each station is anticipated to
last about an hour, though youth
may pick and chose, or repeat.
A free lunch will be provided,
but it is recommended that individ-
uals bring extra water to drink.
Though preregistration is not re-
quired, a head count would be ap-
preciated for the needed number of
lunches.
The day’s activities will begin
with registration from 8:00 a.m. to
8:30 a.m.
For more information and to
preregister, call Wildlife Conserva-
tion Officer Zach Thomsen at 859-
3006.
Philip youth day by local
Game, Fish and Parks
As South Dakota youth prepare
for upcoming county and state live-
stock shows many 4-H and FFA
members can also show off their
knowledge and skills during the
livestock skill-a-thons hosted dur-
ing the state livestock shows.
Coordinated by South Dakota
State Univiersity Extension, the
events highlight and reward
youth's knowledge within their an-
imal projects. All 4-H and FFA
members are encouraged to com-
pete in these free events.
There will be age divisions for be-
ginner, junior and senior. Youth do
not need to be an exhibitor in order
to compete and no pre-registration
is required. Youth may enter the
day of the event. Participants can
come during the time frame sched-
uled and expect to complete the
contest in 20-30 minutes.
The top five individuals in the
three age divisions will be recog-
nized. Winners will receive items to
encourage future development of
their own livestock projects.
Awards will be presented during
the various livestock shows.
The South Dakota Summer Spot-
light kicks off the first livestock
skill-a-thon on July 27 from 9:00
a.m. to noon in the Livestock Com-
plex at the South Dakota State
Fairgrounds in Huron. The contest
allows youth to demonstrate their
understanding and practical appli-
cation of livestock managerial
skills in the beef, sheep, swine and
meat goat areas.
Skill-a-thon stations will focus
on animal selection, meats, animal
health and welfare, nutrition and
reproduction. Youth who partici-
pate in the skill-a-thon will be ex-
posed to current and new
technology being utilized in live-
stock production while performing
hands on exercises and developing
their critical thinking and problem
solving skills through demonstra-
tion or matching type activities.
The South Dakota State Fair will
host four separate skill-a-thons:
beef, sheep, swine, and new to 2013
goat. On August 30, the swine skill-
a-thon will be from 9:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m. CDT and the sheep skill-
a-thon 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. CDT.
On August 31 the beef skill-a-thon
is from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. CDT
and the goat skill-a-thon will run
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. CDT.
The new goat skill-a-thon will ex-
pose youth to both the meat and
dairy production sides of the goat
project.
In addition to the livestock skill-
a-thons at State Fair, 4-H youth,
ages 11 to 18, that are exhibiting
beef, sheep, or swine may enter the
premier exhibitor program. Partic-
ipants in this contest will practice
their decision making and commu-
nication skills by competing in four
events: industry interview, skill-a-
thon, production and management
quiz, and showmanship. A panel of
judges, representing the South
Dakota beef, sheep or swine indus-
tries, will ask a few short questions
during the industry interview and
score youth on accuracy of their an-
swers and overall presentation
skills. Contact your local 4-H youth
program advisor to register for pre-
mier exhibitor.
Finally, the Western Junior Live-
stock Show October 9-12 in Rapid
City will be adding a livestock skill-
a-thon to its schedule for any youth
to participate.
For a full list of rules and sug-
gested study resources to help
youth prepare for the livestock
skill-a-thons this summer, refer-
ence the South Dakota State Fair
4-H Division Handbook. For ques-
tions about the premier exhibitor
or skill-a-thons, contact SDSU Ex-
tension 4-H youth livestock field
specialist Megan Nielson at
megan.nielson@sdstate.edu.
Skill-a-thons for 4-H, FFA
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly papers
through the
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
605-837-2259
Public Notices
July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Harriet Noteboom,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 13-3
NOTICE TO CREDITORS,
Notice is given that on May 6, 2013, John
Daum, whose address is 225 E. Dakota,
Spearfish, South Dakota 57783, was ap-
pointed as personal representative of the
Estate of Fae Johnston.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal
representative or may be filed with the
clerk with a copy of the claim mailed to
the personal representative.
Dated May 30, 2013.
/s/ John Daum
John Daum
225 E. Dakota
Spearfish, SD 57783
Lester Nies
Hood, & Nies, P.C.
109 Main Street
P.O. Box 759
Spearfish, SD 57783-0759
[Published July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013]
)
)SS
)
NOTICE
of Intent to Mine Gravel
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Highway Department, P O Box
594, Kadoka, SD 57543, will be conduct-
ing a gravel mining operation at SE4SE4
ex 15 acres & hwy, Section 24,
T 1 S, R 24 E, Jackson County, South
Dakota. The general location is four
miles east and seven and one-quarter
miles north of Belvidere, SD.
The operation is to begin August 15,
2013 and will be completed to include
final reclamation by August 15, 2023.
Proposed future use of the affected land
will consist of re-grading, replacing top-
soil and re-seeding to allow the area to
be returned to pasture land.
For additional information contact the
Jackson County Highway Department,
(605) 837–2410, or the S. D. Department
of Environment and Natural Resources,
Minerals and Mining Program, 523 East
Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501-3182
(605) 773–4201.
[Published July 11 & 18, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $22.76]
FINANCIAL REPORT
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR
THE PERIOD
BEGINNING
JUNE 1, 2013
ENDING
JUNE 30, 2013
GENERAL FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 1,420.96; Transfer
into account: (from MMDA account)
276,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 23,165.16; Jones
Co.Treasurer, taxes 3,737.09; Haakon
Co. Treasurer, taxes 25,026.14; County
apportionment 2,466.66; BankWest, in-
terest 102.37; First National Midland, int.
76.19; State of SD, state aid
100,474.00; Student Activities 1,822.70;
Student Participation fees 200.00; Sale
of supplies, reimbursement of expenses
1,112.95; State of SD, medicare admin-
istration 9,123.00; US Dept of Ed, Indian
Ed 10,468.03; Donations sound system
260.00; State of SD, Title I 50,660.00;
State of SD, mineral lease 44,887.00;
State of SD, REAP 9,821.00; Total re-
ceipts: 283,402.29; Transfers out: (to
MMDA) 225,568.71; Disbursements:
334,368.33; Ending balance, checking:
886.21; Money Market Deposit Account:
401,087.53; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count:(MB) 159,412.16; Petty Cash:
130.00; Total Balance of Account:
561,515.90
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: Checking ac-
count balance, beginning: 430.51; Trans-
fer in: 128,775.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 7,803.29; Jones Co.
Treasurer, taxes 1,711.21; Haakon Co.
Treasurer 10,659.08; First National, In-
terest 83.12; BankWest, interest 83.29;
Sophomore class, contribution 422.09;
Transfers out: 135,166.41; Disburse-
ments: 10,222.52; Ending balance,
checking: 4,578.66; Money Market De-
posit Account: 531,156.30; Money Mar-
ket Deposit Account:(MB) 162,147.53;
Total Balance of Account: 697,882.49
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: Checking
account balance, beginning: 2,285.81;
Transfer into account: from savings
24,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 9,540.49; Jones Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 2,098.18; Haakon Co.
Treasurer, taxes 13,069.55; First Na-
tional, interest 41.64; BankWest, interest
27.71; State of SD, medicade admin
981.00; State of SD, IDEA 8,566.00;
State of SD, state aid 1,691.00; Transfers
out: 18,387.58; Disbursements:
35,032.48; Ending balance, checking:
8,881.32; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count: (BW) 145,414.41; Money Market
Deposit Account: (MB) 49,745.27; Total
Balance of Account: 204,041.00
PENSION FUND: Checking account bal-
ance, beginning: 24,419.47; Receipts:
Jackson Co. Treasurer, taxes 2,036.82;
Jones Co. Treasurer, taxes 449.68;
Haakon Co. Treasurer, taxes 2,801.19;
Transfers out: 5,000.00; Disbursements:
24,645.00; Ending balance, checking:
62.16
IMPACT AID FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est 856.65; Transfers out: 145,000.00;
Money Market Deposit account
825,231.18; C.M.A. Account
1,017,830.79; Balance of Account:
1698918.62
CAPITOL PROJECTS FUND: Beginning
balance, checking 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est BankWest, interest 59.49; Transfer to
MMDA 59.49; Transfers out: 170,063.37;
Money Market Deposit Account
170,063.37; Balance of account: 0.00
FOOD SERVICE FUND: Beginning Bal-
ance: -4,654.43; Transfer in (from Impact
Aid) 20,000.00; Receipts: Sales
1,989.05; State of SD, reimbursement
6,384.02; Disbursements 9,877.05; Total
balance checking account: 13,841.59;
Cash change 0.00; Total balance ac-
counts: 13,841.59
TRUST & AGENCY FUND: Beginning
balance, checking: 38,081.08; Transfer
in: 0.00; Receipts: 66,915.97; Transfers
out: 47,003.38; Disbursements:
14,688.00; Balance, Checking:
43,305.67; Cash Change: 0.00; Money
Market Deposit Acct: 33,761.73; Total
balance of account: 77,067.40
ALBIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Non ex-
pendable trust fund: Beginning balance:
529.51; Transfer in: Receipts: 89.50; Dis-
bursements: 0.00; Ending Balance
619.01
/s/ Eileen C. Stolley
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
July 3, 2013
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OF THE REGULAR MEETING
OF THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION HELD
WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2013
AT THE KADOKA SCHOOL
AT 6:30 P.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Ken Lensegrav, Dawn Rasmussen, Ross
Block, Dale Christensen, and Mark
Williams.
Also present: Supt. Jamie Hermann, Jeff
Nemecek and Jo Beth Uhlir, business
manager. Visitors present: Eileen Stolley
and Robyn Jones.
At 6:30 the budget hearing portion of the
meeting was called to order by President
Dan VanderMay. All board members
were present.
Discussion was held on the budget, an
addition to the budget before final adop-
tion will be the Pre-K classroom will need
curriculum and furnishings.
At 7:00 p.m. the annual meeting of the
Kadoka Area School District was called
to order by President Dan VanderMay.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The Consent Agenda included the follow-
ing items: to approve the agenda, to ap-
prove the minutes of the June 12 and
June 24, 2013 meetings; to approve the
financial report; to approve the bills as
presented.
Dale Christensen moved to approve the
consent agenda. Motion was seconded
by Ken Lensegrav and carried.
GENERAL FUND: AMPLIFY INSIGHT,
MCLASS SOFTWARE 3,365.20; ARM-
STRONG EXTINGUISHER SERVICE,
ANNUAL MAINT MIDLAND 188.00;
ASBSD PROPERTY LIABILITY INC,
PROPERTY INC LIABILITY 7,121.00;
ASBSD WORKERS COMP INS, WORK-
ERS COMP INS 17,131.00; ASBSD,
DUES 1,084.88; BJ INSTURMENT RE-
PAIR, BAND INST REPAIR 810.00;
CARLSON, ABBY, PUPIL TRANS-
PORTATION 1,720.50; CHILDREN'S
CARE, OT&PT 100.00; COMFORT INN,
LODGING TRACK 554.50; DISCOUNT
FUEL, GAS 820.83; FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF OMAHA, SUPPLIES 354.09;
FOLLETT EDUCATIONAL SERVICES,
ELEMENTARY WORKBOOKS 403.26;
FOLLETT EDUCATIONAL SERVICES,
LIBRARY TECH SUPPORT RENEWAL
1,000.00; FROMM'S HARDWARE &
PLUMBING INC., SUPPLIES 552.64;
FROMM'S HARDWARE & PLUMBING
INC, PLUMBING 64.79; GOLDENWEST
TECHNOLOGIES, MAINT OF INTER-
NAL CONNECTIONS 8,925.00; GOLD-
ENWEST TECHNOLOGIES, PHONE
UPGRADE 806.71; GRAVES IT SOLU-
TIONS, ONLINE SERVER BACKUP
720.00; J&S RESTORE, REPAIRS
237.15; KASD T&A, REGISTRATION
FEES 40.00; CALENDARS 48.32;
TRAVEL 48.00; KADOKA CITY TRANS-
FER STATION, JUNE RUBBLE 9.70;
KADOKA PRESS, COMMUNICATIONS
AND ADVERTISING 459.42; MCGRAW-
HILL CO, ELEM BOOKS 239.10;
MILLER'S GARBAGE, GARBAGE
174.00; NAFIS, NAT'L IMPACT AID
DUES 514.00; NETWORK SERVICES
COMPANY, JANITORIAL WAX 622.74;
NEOPOST USA, POSTAGE MACHINE
RENTAL 133.50; OLSON'S PEST
TECH, INTERIOR SCHOOL 82.75; OTIS
ELEVATOR, SERVICE CONTRACT
3,848.60; POCKETFUL OF POSIES,
RETIREMENT 42.40; QUILL CORPO-
RATION, OFFICE SUPPLIES 54.33;
RASMUSSEN MECHANICAL, MAINT
CONTRACT 3,992.50; RENAISSANCE
LEARNING, AR RENEWAL 1,819.00;
RIDDELL ALL AMERICAN SPORTS
CORP, FB EQUIP RECONDITIONING
1,498.91; SASD, DUES 1,534.75;
SCHOOL SPECIALTY, ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 2,101.31; SD
TEACHER PLACEMENT, MEMBER-
SHIP DUES 420.00; SECTION 8002,
MEMBERSHIP DUES 25.00; SOFT-
WARE UNLIMITED, MAINT AGREE-
MENT 3,600.00; SUNGUARD PUBLIC
SECTOR, CURRICULUM RENEWAL
1,062.50; THREE RIVERS SPEC SERV
COOP, DUES & FEES 1,080.00; TRAIN-
ING ROOM INC, ATHLETICS SUP-
PLIES 1,479.77; WAGEWORKS,
MONTHLY SERVICE FEE 125.00; WEX
BANK, MONTHLY SERVICE FEE 4.00;
TEACHER SALARIES, ELEMEMEN-
TARY 32197.52; TEACHER SALARIES,
HIGH SCHOOL 15,954.86; PRE
SCHOOL SALARIES 739.60; TITLE II A
SALARIES 22,329.41; GUIDANCE
SALARY 2157.16; TITLE I SALARIES
21,752.75; OFFICES OF THE SUPT.,
PRINCIPAL AND BUSINESS MAN-
AGER 22,580.52; TECHNOLOGY
3,546.17; LIBRARY 162.23; OPERA-
TION OF PLANT SALARIES 5737.60;
PUPIL TRANSPORTATION 692.71;
BAND, BEJAMIN LATHAM 70.39; FFA,
BRANDY KNUTSON 135.40; AMERI-
CAN FAMILY LIFE ASSURANCE CO,
CC/IC INS W/H 1,622.87; WASHING-
TON NATIONAL INSURANCE CO, W/H
208.70; BENEFIT MALL, SD , LIFE INS
W/H 675.40; MG TRUST COMPANY,
403(B) W/H 2,000.00; CREDIT COL-
LECTION BUREAU, W/H 38.96; DELTA
DENTAL INS., GROUP DENTAL
3,445.61; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A
CAFETERIA ACCT., PAYFLEX W/H
692.00; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A
FIT/FICA ACCT., TAX 36,794.93; SD RE-
TIREMENT SYSTEM, TR AND MATCH
20,528.98; S.D. SCHOOL DISTRICT
BENEFIT FUND, GROUP HEALTH
33,341.10
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: ASBSD,
PROPERTY LIABILITY INC 23,746.00;
AVI SYSTEMS, INC, TECHNOLOGY
EQUIPMENT 10,864.00; DAKOTA 2000,
LICENSE FEE 150.00; EDGENUITY, LI-
CENSE FEE 6,000.00; EDLINE, LCC,
CONTRACT SUPPORT 558.70; ED-
MENTUM, SOFTWARE LIC FEE
1,095.00; FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
OMAHA, ELEM BOOKS 92.26; GOLD-
ENWEST TECHNOLOGIES, LAPTOPS
98,620.00; KADOKA CITY AUDITO-
RIUM, AUDITORIUM RENT 3,900.00;
LACREEK ELECTRIC ASSN, LV
SCHOOL 122.49; MCGRAW-HILL,
ELEM BOOKS 886.21; OIEN IMPLE-
MENT, BUS GARAGE RENT 600.00;
SOFTWARE, HARDWARE INTERGRA-
TION, MICROSOFT LIC FEE 5,277.70;
TIGERDIRECT, TECHNOLOGY EQUIP-
MENT 4,212.69; WEST CENTRAL
ELEC COOP, KADOKA & MIDLAND
2,194.03; WEST RIVER ELEC ASSOC,
INTERIOR SCHOOL 156.32; WR/LJ
WATER SYSTEM, INTERIOR
SCHOOOL 20.00
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: ASBSD
WORKERS COMP INS, WORKERS
COMPENSATION 778.00; CHILDREN'S
CARE, OT&PT 110.00; KADOKA
CLINIC, DOT PHYSICAL EXAMS
300.00; REGULAR SALRIES 10,306.59;
THREE RIVERS SPEC SERV COOP,
DUES & FEES 2,520.00
FOOD SERVICE: DISCOUNT FUEL,
GAS 33.00; MILLER'S GARABAGE,
KITCHEN GARBAGE 31.00
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT: Mr.
Hermann reported that at the August
board meeting will cover the back to
school items. Test scores will be avail-
able for review and will aid in setting ac-
ademic goals for the school year.
In addition Mr. Hermann reported on the
community meeting at the Long Valley
School held the evening before. The po-
sition of Long Valley bus route driver is
still open. Janitorial services will be pro-
vided by the Kadoka custodians on Fri-
days, and the Long Valley boosters will
take care of the school during the school
week. The library has been moved into a
smaller room to accommodate a fourth
classroom to meet the educational needs
of the students.
BOARD COMMITTEE REPORTS: No
Reports
CITIZEN’S INPUT HEARING: No Input
EXECUTIVE SESSION: Ross Block
moved to go into executive session for
personnel matters at 7:19 PM the motion
was seconded by Dale Christensen and
carried. The board came out of executive
session at 7:55 PM.
CONTRACT: Mark Williams moved to
approve a contract to Andrea Johnston,
high school secretary, @ $9.00 per hour.
Motion was seconded by Dawn Ras-
mussen and carried.
REORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD:
Oaths of office were signed by board
members Dawn Rasmussen, Dan Van-
derMay, and Ken Lensegrav and by Jo
Beth Uhlir, business manager.
Supt. Hermann took the chair for election
of officers. Nominations were opened for
the position of president. Ken Lensegrav
nominated Dan VanderMay.
There being no additional nominations,
motion by Dale Christensen that nomina-
tions cease, seconded by Ross Block,
motion carried. Dale Christensen moved
that Dan VanderMay be elected. Motion
was seconded by Ross Block. Motion
carried. Dan VanderMay took the chair
and nominations for vice president were
opened. Dale Christensen cast a unani-
mous ballot for Ross Block and moved
that nominations cease. Dawn Ras-
mussen seconded the motion. Motion
carried.
ANNUAL DESIGNATIONS CONSENT
AGENDA included the following: desig-
nate Kadoka Press as official newspa-
per; b) authorize investment and
reinvestment of funds per policy; c) des-
ignate BankWest and First National
Bank, Midland, as official depositories
and continuation of accounts; d) appoint
Business Manager as administrator of
Trust and Agency Fund with the Super-
intendent authorized to sign checks in
her absence; e) authorize use of the im-
prest fund for referees, travel expenses,
co-curricular activities, postage, freight
and other expenses which may require
immediate payment; f) appoint the Su-
perintendent as authorized representa-
tive for Federal Property Agency g)
appoint the superintendent as Federal
Program Director h) appoint Jo Beth
Uhlir, Business Manager, as authorized
representative for the school lunch pro-
gram; i) appoint Eileen Stolley, Impact
Aid Coordinator, as authorized represen-
tative for the Federal Impact Aid Program
j) authorize the superintendent to insti-
tute the school lunch agreement with the
State of South Dakota; k) authorize ad-
vertising for bids for gasoline, diesel and
heating fuel for the 2013-2014 school
term with bids to be considered at the Au-
gust meeting; l) set the regular board
meeting dates on the second Wednes-
day of each month @ 7:00 p.m. with the
December - March meetings @ 6:00
p.m. and the November meeting desig-
nated as the date to visit all schools
within the district; m) approve member-
ship in the Associated School Boards of
South Dakota; n) approve participation in
the Emergency School Bus Mutual As-
sistance Pact; o) appoint Rodney Free-
man of Churchill, Manolis, Freeman,
Kludt and Shelton, as school attorney as
needed; p) authorize the superintendent
or his designee through the chain of
command to close school in the case of
inclement weather or emergency situa-
tion; q) adopt Parliamentary Procedure
At A Glance (Garfield Jones) as parlia-
mentary procedure; r) adopt the Offer vs.
Serve Policy for the school lunch pro-
gram; s) designate the elementary and
high school principals as Section 504
Coordinators; t) designate superintend-
ent as Title IX (Gender Equity) Coordina-
tor; u) schedule a special community
meeting to insure Tribal and parental in-
volvement in development of educational
programs of children residing on Indian
lands for Wednesday, March 12, 2014.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to adopt the
annual designations listed on the con-
sent agenda. Motion was seconded by
Ross Block and carried.
Ken Lensegrav moved to authorize the
Land O Lakes dairy pricing,
escalator/descalator, bid by Avera Pace.
Motion was seconded by Dawn Ras-
mussen and carried.
BOARD COMPENSATION: Ross Block
moved to set the school board compen-
sation as follows: President, $75.00 per
meeting; board members $50.00 per
meeting. Motion was seconded by Mark
Williams and carried.
AUTHORIZE BANK SIGNATURE: Dale
Christensen moved to remove Eileen
Stolley as authorized signature on school
district checks and to add Jo Beth Uhlir,
business manager as authorized signa-
ture. Motion was seconded by Mark
Williams and carried.
SCHOOL LUNCH PRICING: Discussion
on pricing for student meals. New re-
quirements will result in increased costs.
Dale Christensen moved to establish
school lunch pricing at five cents in-
crease over 2013-14 rates for all meals,
no change in milk prices. Motion was
seconded by Ken Lensegrav and carried.
ADMISSION PRICES: Dawn Ras-
mussen moved to set admission prices
as follows: Adults: $3.00; Students:
$2.00; Double header (boys and girls)
events: Adults $5.00, Students $3.00. Ac-
tivity tickets: 10 punch adult ticket,
$25.00; Students: all activities $20.00;
family, all activities, $100.00. (prices ex-
clude drama and tournaments). Seniors
Golden Pass, free age 60+. The golden
pass must be requested at the business
office. Motion was seconded by Ross
Block and carried.
ADVISORY COMMITTEES were ap-
pointed as follows: Auditorium: Dan Van-
derMay and Ken Lensegrav; Three
Rivers Cooperative: Dawn Rasmussen;
alternate, all other members; Buildings
and Grounds: Ross Block, Dan Vander-
May and Dale Christensen; alternate,
Dawn Rasmussen; Transportation: Ross
Block and Ken Lensegrav; Policy: Dawn
Rasmussen, Mark Williams and Dale
Christensen; Technology: Ken Lenseg-
rav and Ross Block: alternate Mark
Williams; Sports Complex: Dawn Ras-
mussen and Mark Williams; Negotia-
tions: Dan VanderMay, Dale Christensen
and Ross Block.
EMPLOYEE CONTRACT SALARY
PUBLICATION: Dawn Rasmussen
moved to publish the list of contracts per
SDCL 6-1-10. Motion was seconded by
Ken Lensegrav and carried.
1111-ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION:
GAIL REUTTER $41,750; MICHELLE
MANSFIELD $39,250; MARK REIMAN
$38,250; JEAN HOLZKAMP $41,750;
ARLENE HICKS $39,750; NANCY
WELLER $41,750; JENNIFER VAN
PELT $33,250; CLAIRE BECK $31,750;
MARY GRAUPMANN $41,750; SKYE
BRUCKLACHER $31,750; MIA WHIRL-
WIND HORSE $35,500; BARRY
HUTCHINSON $36,250; REBECCA
KEEGAN $38,250; GREGORY NORRIS
$36,250; VALERIE KRUSE, INSTRUC-
TIONAL AIDE $9.75/HR; NICOLE NEL-
SON, INSTRUCTIONAL AIDE
$10.05/HR; MARY PARQUET $41,750
1131- HIGH SCHOOL SALARIES:
CHRISTY WILLERT $36,250; DAVE
OHRTMAN $39,250; JESSICA
MAGELKY $32,750; DYLAN MORO
$32,750; BRANDY KNUTSON $41,750;
COLBY SHUCK $39,250; TERESA
SHUCK $39,250
1273- TITLE I SALARIES: MISTY
HAMAR $32,750; HARRY WELLER
$41,750; CASSIE DEROCHER $33,750;
BARBARA IRELAND $38,750; CAROL
KROETCH $39,750; NICHOLE THOMP-
SON $37,250; LAURIE PRICHARD
$42,250; VALERIE OHRTMAN $39,750;
EDNA KARY $37,750; RUTH McCUB-
BIN 3/5 TIME $29,433.75; RENEE
SCHOFIELD $41,000; MARIBETH
ROGHAIR $34,250; DEETTA TERKILD-
SEN $35,750; CARMEN HUFFMAN
10.95/HR; KAREN BYRD FEDERAL
PROGRAMS $48,500
TECHNOLOGY IN SCHOOLS: CHAD
EISENBRAUN $58,500
2129-GUIDANCE: KRISTIE STONE
$35,750; SUSAN SUDBECK $30,000
2321- OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT:
JAMIE HERMANN $77,500; KAY RECK-
LING $12.75/HR
2410- OFFICE OF PRINCIPALS:
DANIELLE STODDARD $11.75/HR;
JEFFERY NEMECEK $59,000;
GEORGE SEILER $59,000
2529- OFFICE OF BUSINESS MAN-
AGER: EILEEN STOLLEY $27,667;
EILEEN STOLLEY, IMPACT AID COOR-
DINATOR $8,500; JO BETH UHLIR
$35,000; CINDY VANDERMAY, PAY-
ROLL CLERK $12.75/HR
2549- OP & MAINT OF PLANT: POLLY
BROWN $11.00/HR; JAMES PLAGGE-
MEYER $9.75/HR; HARVEY BYRD
$10.50/HR; TARA LEACH $10.75/HR;
MATTHEW PLAGGEMEYER
$11.00/HR; LARRY MANLEY - INTE-
RIOR $11.25/HR; BRAD STONE
$11.00/HR; REUBEN VOLLMER, JR
MIDLAND $11.00/HR
2559- PUPIL TRANSPORTATION: TED
SCHNEE $10,259; LARRY MANLEY
$11,325; MELISSA VANDERMAY
$6,586; RICHARD STOLLEY, BUS
MONITOR $11.75/HR
2569- FOOD SERVICE: RICHARD IRE-
LAND $12.42/HR; TARA LEACH
$11.00/HR; LARRY MANLEY
$10.25/HR; LINDA RIGGINS $9.75/HR
1221-SPECIAL EDUCATION: CARRIE
SANFTNER $35,750; KATHLEEN
BROWN $39,250; AMY SMILEY
$39,750; MERILEE GRIMES $11.77/HR;
NICOLE DEVRIES $10.05/HR; DANA
EISENBRAUN $37,750; KATE
THOENNES LATHAM, INSTRCTIONAL
AIDE $9.75/HR; JANICE ALLEN
PERKINS $10.55/HR; ANITA LYNN RIG-
GINS $9.75/HR; SHANNON JINDRA
9.75/HR
2159-PRE SCHOOL/SPEECH: PAMELA
BONENBERGER $30,276.59; JOAN
ENDERS $25,547; SARA SPEER
$10.62/HR
LIBRARY: JOAN ENDERS $12.65/HR
CO-CURRICULAR CONTRACTS: BAS-
KETBALL: MARK REIMAN - head boys
$3,795; HARRY WELLER - cross coun-
try $2,145; FOOTBALL: CHAD EISEN-
BRAUN - head $3,630; JODY
SUDBECK - assistant $2,825; MARK
DEVRIES - Middle School $1,155; VOL-
LEYBALL: BARRY HUTCHINSON -
head $3,795; AMY SMILEY - Middle
School $1,155; BRANDY KNUTSON -
FFA advisor $2,310; HARRY WELLER -
activities director $4,235; TRACK: DAVE
OHRTMAN $3,300; DANA EISEN-
BRAUN, assistant $2,475; NICOLE DE-
VRIES, CHEERLEADING $330; COLBY
SHUCK, EXTRA CURRICULAR CHO-
RUS $605; COLBY SHUCK, WIN-
TER MUSICAL $1,320; COLBY SHUCK,
SPRING MUSICAL $1,320; TERESA
SHUCK, ONE ACT PLAY $660
SURPLUS PROPERTY: A list of surplus
property items was presented including
119 Dell Latitude 2100 Netbooks, shop
equipment, and other miscellaneous
items. Ross Block moved to declare the
items surplus to be sold at auction. Mo-
tion was seconded by Mark Williams and
carried.
ASSIGN FUND BALANCES: Ken
Lensegrav moved to assign fund bal-
ances as follows to be applied to the
2013-2014 budget: Impact Aid fund,
$364,130.00. Motion was seconded by
Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
ESTABLISH BUS ROUTES: Ross Block
moved to establish bus routes the same
as the 2012-2013 school year. Motion
was seconded by Mark Williams and car-
ried.
There being no further business, Ken
Lensegrav moved that the meeting be
adjourned and the next meeting would
be August 14 at 7 p.m. Motion was sec-
onded by Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
Jo Beth Uhlir, Business Manager
[Published July 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $164.73]
NOTICE OF HEATING
FUEL BIDS
Bids for the furnishing of fuel oil and
propane for the various schools within
the Kadoka Area School District for the
2013-2014 school year will be accepted
at the Kadoka Area School Business Of-
fice up until 2:00 p.m. on Monday, August
5, 2013. Bids should be submitted by
school site. Bids will be opened at this
time in the office of the business man-
ager.
Bids will be considered by the Board of
Education at their meeting to be held on
Wednesday, August 14, 2013 at 7:00
p.m.
Denote on outside of envelope:
BID ON FUEL OIL:
INTERIOR SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
KADOKA SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
LONG VALLEY SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
INTERIOR SCHOOL LUNCHROOM
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
Area School District reserves the right to
accecpt or reject any or all bids.
Kadoka Board of Education
Jo Beth Uhlir,
Business Manager
[Published July 18 & 25, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $17.88]
NOTICE
FOR BUS/SCHOOL VE-
HICLE FUEL BIDS
Bids for furnishing of regular gasoline
and diesel fuel for the school vehicles of
the Kadoka Area School District will be
accepted until 2:00 p.m., Monday, August
5, 2013. Bids will be opened at this time
in the office of the business manager.
Bids will be considered by the board of
education at their regular meeting to be
held Wednesday, August 14, 2013 at
7:00 p.m.
Bids will be for the 2013-2014 school
term.
Bidders please bid for the following
buses and bus routes:
KADOKA SCHOOL: gas: pump price,
full service/self service price diesel fuel:
pump price, full service/self service price.
INTERIOR ROUTE: bulk price, diesel
fuel, delivered to Larry Manley residence,
Interior, SD.
WANBLEE ROUTE: diesel - pump price,
full service/self service price.
LONG VALLEY ROUTE: bulk price,
diesel fuel, delivered to Long Valley, SD
and bulk price, gasoline, delivered to the
Matt VanderMay Ranch, Long Valley, SD
(300 gallon tank).
Diesel vendors shall be responsible
for federal tax exemption.
Denote on outside of envelope:
GAS BID DIESEL BID
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
School District reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids.
Kadoka Board of Education
Jo Beth Uhlir,
Business Manager
[Published July 18 & 25, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $21.13]
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
EMPLOYMENT
HELP WANTED: ASSISTANT MAN-
AGER of convenience store in Lem-
mon, SD. Will assist in the
day-to-day operations of a c-store.
Please call or send resume to Deb
Stoltman, 701-223-0154; P.O. Box
832, Bismarck, ND 58502. Salary
negotiable.
FAULK COUNTY HIGHWAY DE-
PARTMENT accepting applications
for FT Highway Maintenance Per-
son. Competitive salary, benefit
package. EOE. Closes July 29. For
application call 605-598-6233.
CHS MIDWEST COOPERATIVES is
seeking people interested in an
agronomy career. Various positions
in central South Dakota available.
Email Dan.haberling@chsinc.com
or call Midwest Cooperatives
1(800)658-5535.
NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOLS
EDUCATION Cooperative opening:
part-time early childhood special ed-
ucation paraprofessional for the
2013-2014 school year: Contact Di-
rector Cris Owens 605-466-2206,
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
TEACHING POSITIONS OPEN AT
MOBRIDGE-POLLOCK School Dis-
trict #62-6 for 2013-2014 School
Year: HS Math; MS Special Educa-
tion and Birth to 2nd Grade Special
Education. Contact Tim Frederick at
605-845-9204 for more information.
Resumes and applications can be
mailed to the school Attn: Tim Fred-
erick at 1107 1st Avenue East in Mo-
bridge SD 57601. Open until filled.
EOE, Signing Bonus available.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver's License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact: Dou-
glas County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
HUTCHINSON COUNTY HIGHWAY
SUPERINTENDENT POSITION.
Duties include supervising staff,
scheduling shifts, planning and or-
ganizing department activities,
preparing budget, representing de-
partment at public meetings. Must
maintain valid SD Driver's and Com-
mercial Driver's License. Salary de-
pendent on experience. Applications
from Hutchinson County Auditor's Of-
fice, 140 Euclid Room 128, Olivet SD
57052 (605) 387-4212. Applications
close 4:30 p.m. July 26, 2013.
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-on
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedicated
Routes *2500 Miles Weekly *$50
Tarp Pay (888) 692-5705
www.drive4ewwylie.com.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
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Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
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NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Buy • Rent • Sell
Get it done in the Classifieds
Call 837-2259
Suduko Answers
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Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
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Located in
Kadoka, SD
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING
JULY 8, 2013
7:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert; Colby Shuck; Dick
Stolley; Arne Lund; and Cory Lurz. Brad
Jorgensen arrived at 7:05 p.m. Others
present: Patty Ulmen, Finance Officer;
Jackie Stilwell; Forrest Davis; Nathan
Riggins; Tina Williams; Patrick Solon;
and Rhonda Antonsen. Grant Patterson
arrived at 7:03 p.m.; Rusty Olney arrived
at 7:04 p.m.; and JoBeth Uhlir arrived at
7:08 p.m.
Willert made Motion 13-07-08:78 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of June 10, 2013. The motion was sec-
onded by Shuck, with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 5-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
Shuck made Motion 13-07-08:79 to ap-
prove the bills as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Lund. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 5-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
JULY 8, 2013 MEETING.
Bank West, Petty Cash 1,500.00;
AFLAC, Monthly Premium 85.82; Delta
Dental, Monthly Premium 482.30; North-
ern Hills Collections, Inc., Wage Assign-
ment 75.00; SD Retirement, Monthly
Contribution 2,009.88; Verizon Wireless,
Cell Phone 80.18; City of Philip, Mos-
quito Spraying 267.23; Dakota Supply
Group, Supplies 64.49; Davis, Forrest,
Reimburse/Postage 17.34; Electro
Watchman, Inc., Security System 80.85;
Fromm Hardware & Plumbing, Supplies,
712.09; Golden West, Telephone/Cable
792.14; Hauff Mid-American Sports,
Supplies 50.00; Heartland Paper, Sup-
plies 443.46; In the Swim, Supplies
174.87; J & S Restore, Repairs 258.05;
Jackson Co. Conservation, Supplies
19.00; John Deere Credit, Monthly Pay-
ment/Front End Loader 2,023.03;
Kadoka Oil, LLC, Heating/Vehicle/Equip-
ment Fuel 2,564.80; Kadoka Press, Pub-
lishing 314.18; Kadoka Water Dept.,
Refund Meter Deposits 105.00; Michael
Todd, Supplies 533.12; Northwest Pipe ,
Supplies 93.82; O'Connell, Dale, Lawn
Mower Repair 40.00; Oien Implement,
Supplies 8.29; Pahlke, Alvin, Legal Serv-
ices 150.00; Paulson, Mikel, Refund
Meter Deposit 35.00; Peoples Market,
Supplies 895.09; Pierre Landfill, Tipping
Fees 652.72; Pool & Spa Center, Sup-
plies 819.30; SD Dept. of Health, Lab
Samples 26.00; SD Dept. of Public
Safety, Annual Scale Inspection 48.00;
SD Dept. of Revenue/Malt/Liquor, Malt
Beverage License Renewal Fees
600.00; SD Dept. of Revenue/Sales Tax,
Sales Tax 2,063.05; Servall, Laundry
268.79; Spartan Promotional Group,
Supplies 247.08; West Central Electric,
Electricity 4,890.91; West River Excava-
tion, Solid Waste Transporation/Backhoe
1,153.80; West River Lyman Jones,
Water Payment 5,783.75; Chamberlain
Wholesale, Liquor Supplies 1,270.81;
Coca Cola, Liquor Supplies 234.00;
Dakota Toms, Liquor Supplies 127.60;
Eagle Sales, Liquor Supplies 13,613.30;
Jerome Beverage, Liquor Supplies
3,279.67; Johnson Western Wholesale,
Liquor Supplies 1,943.04; Republic,
Liquor Supplies 2,583.93; ACH With-
drawal for Taxes, Federal Employment
Taxes 2,009.88; ACH Withdrawal for
Dakota Care, Health Insurance Premium
4,837.69; Total Bills Presented:
60,328.35
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of June was distributed. After a re-
view of the information, Shuck made Mo-
tion 13-07-08:80 to approve the financial
report. The motion was seconded by
Willert. A roll call vote was taken, with all
members voting yes and the motion car-
ried 5-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 6-30-13:
Revenue: General Fund - $40,757.48; 3
B’s Fund - $2,382.26; Street Fund -
$3.85; Liquor Fund - $38,592.15; Water
Fund - $8,515.52; Sewer Fund -
$2,117.85; Solid Waste Fund -
$5,068.13.
Expense: General Fund - $42,163.68;
3B’s Fund - $524.08; Liquor Fund -
$34,987.14; Water Fund - $37,361.12;
Sewer Fund - $770.40; Solid Waste Fund
- $3,057.21.
Payroll: Mayor/Council - $2,030.00; Ad-
ministration - $3,059.80; Streets -
$3,963.26; Police - $2,628.46; Audito-
rium/Parks - $2,379.20; Summer Recre-
ation - $4,517.89; Liquor - $5,087.78;
Water/Sewer – $3,059.64; Solid Waste -
$924.84; Group Health/Dental -
$7,404.33; Retirement - $2,009.88; So-
cial Security/Medicare - $5,990.65.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$894,433.21; ATM Account - $3,699.10;
Certificates of Deposit - $769,778.11.
Malt Beverage Hearing: Mayor Weller
opened the public hearing on the appli-
cations for two new malt beverage li-
censes. The first application to be
considered was from Aw! Shucks Café.
Colby Shuck declared a conflict of inter-
est and excused himself from the council
table. There was no objection from mem-
bers of the public present. After discus-
sion, Stolley made Motion 13-07-08:81 to
approve the application as submitted.
The motion was seconded by Willert. A
roll call vote was taken: Stolley-yes;
Willert-yes; Lund-yes; Lurz-yes; Jor-
gensen-abstain; and Shuck-abstain. The
motion carried 4-0-2. Colby Shuck re-
joined the council. The second applica-
tion was from Sunset Grill, LLC. There
was no objection from members of the
public present. After discussion, Stolley
made Motion 13-07-08:82 to approve the
application as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Willert. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 6-0.
Citizen Input: No one was present to ad-
dress the council.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. Walton Property: A letter was received
from Kenneth Walton regarding his prop-
erty in Kadoka. He stated that his target
date for completion of the demolition
project is August 1, 2013.
B. Economic Development: On behalf of
the economic development corporation,
JoBeth Uhlir and Rusty Olney requested
that the city consider including $5,000.00
in their 2014 budget for the Economic
Development Corporation to cover their
operating expenses. This request will be
considered during the upcoming budget
meeting.
C. Jackson County Hazard Mitigation
Plan (Resolution 2013-1R): Jackie Stil-
well, Jackson County Emergency Man-
ager addressed the council regarding the
updated plan for Jackson County. This
plan is necessary to have in place in
order to be able to apply for federal funds
in the event of a disaster. After discus-
sion, Willert made Motion 13-07-08:83 to
adopt Resolution 2013-1R. The motion
was seconded by Shuck. A roll call vote
was taken: Stolley-yes; Willert-yes; Lund-
yes; Lurz-yes; Shuck-yes; Jorgensen-no.
The motion carried 5-1.
RESOLUTION 2013-1R
WHEREAS; City of Kadoka
has experienced severe dam-
age from strong winds, flood-
ing, hail, heavy snow, heavy
rain, and other various natural
disasters, resulting in property
loss, economic hardship, and
threats to public health and
safety;
WHEREAS; the Jackson
County Multi-Jurisdictional
Hazard Mitigation Planning
Team, Jackson County Emer-
gency Management, and the
CSDED have conducted over
a year’s worth of research and
public meetings to gather in-
formation to prevent or mini-
mize disaster impacts on the
City of Kadoka and,
WHEREAS, the citizens of the
City of Kadoka have been af-
forded the opportunity to par-
ticipate, comment and provide
input in the plan content and
mitigation strategies; and,
WHEREAS; the plan recom-
mends hazard mitigation ac-
tions that will protect the
people and property affected
by the natural hazards that
face the City;
WHEREAS; the Jackson
County Multi-Jurisdictional
Hazard Mitigation Planning
Team, recommends the adop-
tion of the Jackson County
Hazard Mitigation Plan (2013
Update) and,
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED by the Mayor and
the City of Kadoka City Coun-
cil that:
1. The Jackson County Multi-
Jurisdictional Hazard Mitiga-
tion Plan (2013 Update) is
hereby adopted as an official
document that identifies haz-
ard mitigation goals and
strategies for projects within
the City of Kadoka.
2. That the Jackson County
Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard
Mitigation Plan (2013 Update)
shall be incorporated into any
Comprehensive Plans devel-
oped and approved by the City
of Kadoka.
3. The City of Kadoka City
Council will seek to update the
plan prior to the plan expiring
five years after adoption.
PASSED by the City of
Kadoka City Council this
8th day of July, 2013.
Harry Weller, Mayor
Attest: Patty Ulmen, Finance Officer
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: Maguire Iron fixed a
small leak in the water tower. Stanley
Johnson Concrete is doing a road project
on I-90 and will be purchasing between
80 and 100 thousand gallons of water a
day for approx. 40 days.
B. Streets: Further discussion was held
on the sidewalk in front of the fire hall. No
decisions have been made.
C. Solid Waste: There is a need to pur-
chase a replacement pallet jack to move
cardboard at the transfer station. Also,
wire needs to be purchased to repair the
fence.
D. Liquor: There was a request to once
again sponsor a softball team. The re-
quest was for $250.00. After discussion,
Jorgensen made Motion 13-07-08:84 to
approve the sponsorship of the softball
team. The motion was seconded by
Shuck. A roll call vote was taken, with all
members voting yes and the motion car-
ried 6-0. An ad for a part time bartender
will be place in the Kadoka Press.
E. Auditorium/Park: Stolley stated that
when the sewer lines in the auditorium
were inspected, it was determined that
the problem was not the lines, but at the
manhole on the street; therefore the
sewer lines do not need to be replaced.
He stated that he would like to pursue
lighting for the auditorium, possibly utiliz-
ing the funds that were included in the
budget for the sewer line.
F. Public Safety: The monthly report was
distributed. It was noted that the paint on
the patrol car is chipping and peeling.
G. Mayor’s Report: The first draft of the
2014 budget was included with the
monthly information. July 29, 2013 at
7:00 was the time set for the budget
meeting. There will be an elected offi-
cial’s workshop in Pierre on July 24,
2013.
Executive Session per SDCL 1-25-2
(1)/Personnel: Shuck made Motion 13-
07-08:85 to go into executive session for
personnel. The motion was seconded by
Lund, with all members voting yes and
the council, along with Patty Ulmen and
Forrest Davis went into executive ses-
sion at 8:13 p.m.
The council was declared out of execu-
tive session at 9:04 p.m.
Shuck made Motion 13-07-08:86 to close
the swimming pool from July 9, 2013 to
July 16, 2013 and to have a mandatory
employee meeting with the manager and
employees at 10:00 am on July 16, 2013.
The motion was seconded by Willert.
After further discussion, Shuck withdrew
his motion.
Lund made Motion 13-07-08:87 to au-
thorize Mayor Weller and Councilmem-
ber Stolley to hold a mandatory meeting
with the pool manager and all lifeguards
on July 9, 2013. The motion was sec-
onded by Lurz. A roll call vote was taken,
with all members voting yes and the mo-
tion carried 6-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-07-08:88 to close
the swimming pool from July 9, 2013
through July 15, 2013 for the purpose of
assessing the current swimming pool sit-
uation. The motion was seconded by Jor-
gensen. A roll call vote was taken, with
all members voting yes and the motion
carried 6-0.
Willert made Motion 13-07-08:89 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Shuck, with all members voting yes and
the meeting was adjourned at 9:17 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published July 18, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $129.96]
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:
Kadoka Area School District is ac-
cepting applications for a middle
school special education teacher
and an assistant cook. Applications
are available on the website at
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or contact
Supt. Jamie Hermann at 837-2175.
KP1-2tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 1 bedroom, 1
bath, large two car unattachd
garage, Kadoka. Sam or Danielle
Stoddard 462-6244 or 441-2670.
K52-4tp
IMMEDIATE POSITION OPEN: at
the Kadoka City Bar for a part-time
bartender, flexible schedule to work
either morning or night shifts, ap-
proximately 16-24 hours per week.
Required application forms are
available at either the City Finance
Office or the Kadoka City Bar. Com-
pleted application form must be re-
turned to the City Finance Officer,
PO Box 58, Kadoka, SD 57543 be-
fore 4:00 p.m. Friday, July 26, 2013.
EOE K52-3tc
SERVICE: Need a plumber? Li-
censed plumbing contractor for all
your indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn 441-1053 or leave a mes-
sage at 837-0112. KP52-4tc
POSITIONS OPEN: Sunset Grill
and Subway (former Happy Chef
building) in Kadoka have positions
open for cooks and sandwich artists
with a variety of duties, all shifts
available. Begin work mid-July.
Apply in person at Subway.
KP52-2tc
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay. Deliv-
ery available and volume discount
available. Call 798-5413.
KP49-11tc
HOUSE KEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED: High
school and college students are wel-
come to apply. Will train. Apply at ei-
ther America’s Best Value Inn and
Budget Host Sundowner in Kadoka
or call 837-2188 or 837-2296.
KP47-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Weed Sprayer. Seasonal
part-time employment spraying
county highway right of way. Com-
mercial herbicide license required or
to be obtained before start of work.
Pre-employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
KP52-3tc
POSITION OPEN: Part-time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Tractor operator to mow
county road right of way, and per-
form other duties as directed. Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
KP48-5tc
POSITION OPEN: Full time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Truck driver, heavy equip-
ment operator, light equipment oper-
ator. Experience preferred, but will
train. CDL required, or to be ob-
tained in six months. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Benefits package. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted. Informa-
tion 837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. KP48-5tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877-
867-4185. K45-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
Thank you to everyone who
prayed, sent a card, or visited me
while I was recovering from my rat-
tlesnake bite. Thank you to Terry
Henrie, PA, and the medical staff at
the hospital in Philip for the quick
and efficient care I received.
With sincere thanks,
Merry Willard
Thank Yous
Agriculture …
July 18, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
This Ad
will
disappear
in seconds
if we put it on
the radio.
~~~
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
~~~
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
with offices at:
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Philip
605-859-2516
Wall
605-279-2565
Murdo
605-669-2271
Managing Herbicide
Resistant Weeds
The leadership of the CCA (Cer-
tified Crop Advisor) program
asked the members to take part in
an online survey on the issue of
herbicide-resistant weeds. Nearly
1,700 people responded to ques-
tions about the resistant weed
pressure in their areas, the most
effective management tools and
approaches, and the obstacles to
achieving wider adoption of best
management practices (BMPs) for
managing herbicide resistance.
The respondents came from a
variety of backgrounds, with
roughly 75% being retail agrono-
mists, independent agronomists
and retail sales managers. The re-
maining respondents were made
up of manufacturer representa-
tives, wholesale representatives,
Extension and university, produc-
tion agriculture, and government
employees. The largest number of
responses came from the north
central United States.
Forty-nine % of respondents re-
ported a moderate level of resist-
ant weed pressure in their regions,
34% reported minimal, 12% heavy,
3% none, and 2% an epidemic
level. When asked what they felt
the most effective tool was in the
fight against resistant weeds, 52%
of the CCA’s said different chemi-
cal modes of action. Twenty-four %
listed crop rotation, 8% tillage, 8%
Best Management Practices
(BMP’s), 4% education, 3% new
chemical solutions, and 1% seed.
Herbicide resistant crops have
been available for a number of
years and enjoyed a wide level of
adoption. Nearly 60% of respon-
dents thought they were an exten-
sion of the problem, 25% thought
they were a solution to the prob-
lem, 10% considered them a tool,
but not the solution, 3% considered
them a short-term solution, and
4% both a solution and extension
to the problem.
When asked what they thought
the next “silver bullet” in the fight
against herbicide resistant weeds
will come from, 57% indicated
knowledge and implementation of
BMP’s. Nineteen % of respondents
said there is no silver bullet, 9%
suggested chemical solutions, 7%
thought traits, 2% reported grower
innovations, and 1% suggested me-
chanical solutions. Two % chose a
combination of these choices, an-
other 2% chose all of these solu-
tions, and 1% selected other.
As indicated in the second para-
graph, the vast majority of respon-
dents were in some type of
advisory role relative to managing
herbicide resistant weeds and
were asked what describes their
growers’ actions/thoughts when
considering adoption of weed re-
sistant BMP’s. Forty % said grow-
ers would only adopt BMP’s if
resistant weeds became a problem
in their fields. Another 30% re-
sponded that their growers were at
least trying BMPs or were "jump-
ing right in" because it was the
right thing to do. Twenty-five %
stated that their growers were
open to BMPs, but were also con-
cerned about the cost and effort of
implementing them. Three %
thought their growers would adopt
BMP’s only if their neighbors did
too, and 5% chose other options.
Herbicide resistant weeds is a
very real problem, and becoming
worse. Visit www.igrow.org for
more information on managing
them.
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Consumers are more interested
than ever in purchasing locally
grown food - and that includes
meat explained Shannon Sand,
Livestock Business Management
Field Specialist.
"In recent years a consumer
driven movement to know where
their food comes from has evolved.
This movement is anecdotal evi-
dence of greater demand for locally
produced meats," Sand said,
adding that according to a 2007
study, direct-to-consumer sales
only accounted for 0.4 percent of
total agricultural sales.
Sand said support for local ani-
mal products is not surprising
given the value animal agriculture
can bring to communities, particu-
larly in a state like South Dakota.
"Animals provide nutrients for
cropland and can make productive
use of land where crops do not grow
well. By processing locally, farmers
and ranchers can capture a greater
portion of the revenue stream,"
Sand said.
In 1997, locally produced farm
products in the U.S. accounted for
$551 million dollars in sales. By
2007 sales jumped to $928.9 mil-
lion - even accounting for inflation
this is an increase of 59 percent.
"Among all vegetable and melon
farmers 44.1 percent sold directly
to consumers in 2007, while only
6.9 percent of livestock producers
sold directly to consumers. Sixty-
five percent of gross farm sales for
fruit, vegetable, and nut farms
came from the sale of locally pro-
duced products (this includes local
sales through packers to local sup-
ply houses)," Sand said.
However, Sand pointed out that
only 37 percent of gross annual
sales of livestock and field crop pro-
ducers came from local markets.
"This leads to the question why
aren't more livestock producers
selling locally? Even when demand
for local meat exists, sometimes
there is not a local processor," Sand
said.
Sand pointed to a USDA report
which showed that one issue affect-
ing producer's ability to bring local
meats to market is a lack of meat
and poultry processing facilities.
Sand said challenges may include
producers having to travel long dis-
tances to reach the nearest in-
spected processing facility or
delivering only a few head at a
time.
"This results in increased trans-
portation and opportunity costs.
Also, producers may have difficulty
getting slaughter dates during
processors' busy times of the year.
Some smaller processing facilities
may not offer specific services that
farmers and their customers' de-
mand," Sand said.
When a local processor is avail-
able, Sand said they are often
smaller and have a hard time
breaking even. Smaller sized
processors often lack the steady
and consistent business needed to
be profitable while providing high
quality services to individual cus-
tomers.
"Demand for local processors'
services is highly seasonal. Esti-
mates suggest that to be profitable
a small processing plant providing
basic services must annually
process a minimum of 450-head of
cattle, or the revenue equivalent
from combinations of other live-
stock," Sand said. "Operations of-
fering more sophisticated services
require higher volumes to meet ex-
penses. Thus, the processor may
try to pull volume from other
places, and as a result local pro-
cessing may not always be avail-
able when farmers want it."
In order to bring local meat and
poultry to market, Sand said it is
necessary to stabilize and enhance
processing capacity for local mar-
kets, therefore producers and
processors must establish good
business relationships. This means
shifting from a relationship of "con-
venience" to a longer term "com-
mitment" relationship.
"Key or anchor customers are
critical for processors to ensure a
steady volume of businesses. Ag-
gregators or "Brands" which bring
livestock from multiple farms and
have the ability to coordinate the
rest of the supply chain can be
valuable partners for processors.
Aggregators are often in a better
position than an individual to coor-
dinate scheduling, create a steady
flow of animals, and serve as a cen-
tral point of communications,"
Sand said.
Sand said commitment matters
for both parties.
"Producers and processors must
demonstrate a commitment to pro-
viding, maintaining, and improv-
ing quality services," Sand said.
"By building business relation-
ships, processors can work more ef-
fectively with their customers,
build loyalty, and ultimately in-
crease demand for their own serv-
ices."
To learn more, visit iGrow.org.
Large demand for locally
produced and processed meat

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