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Kadoka Press, July 11, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 52
July 11, 2013
Fourth of
July
Celebration
Veteran Ronnie Gartner present the
United States of America flag with his
grandson, Brett Gartner, who carried
South Dakota flag.
Jerry Sharp
took third
place in
Senior Mens’
Breakaway.
Everyone gathered at the park
for community potluck and
blow-up games.
Veterans presented flags
from each branch of the
Armed Services.
Tigh Livermont (L) and Nathan WoodenKnife
battle it out during the water fights. IVFD members Reid Kruse (L) and Charlie Kruse
JR and JC Livermont rode in the parade
The famous boot scramble race.
$99,000.
Councilman Brad Jorgensen
questioned if Jackson County had
turned over the piece of land that
economic development had in-
quired about. Uhlir stated they had
not at this time.
The council said they would con-
sider the request from economic de-
velopment at the budget meeting
which will be held at a later date.
Jackie Stilwell addressed the
council at this time about the Jack-
son County Hazard Mitigation
Plan. This plan recommends haz-
ard mitigation actions that will
protect the people and property af-
fected by the natural hazards that
face the city.
The Jackson County Multi-Ju-
risdictional Hazard Mitigation
Planning Team, Jackson County
Emergency Management and the
Central South Dakota Enhance-
ment District have conducted over
a year’s worth of research and pub-
lic meetings to gather information
to prevent or minimize disaster im-
pacts on the City of Kadoka.
The city proposed a motion for
approval. Jorgensen questioned ap-
proval of the plan stating that the
council does not know what the
plan consists of. Willert stated that
he had been at the meetings during
the planning phase.
Stilwell encouraged the council
to read the plan. Motion was made
and carried to approve the Jackson
County Hazard Mitagation Plan.
Council reports were given at
this time. Nathan Riggins ad-
dressed the council about Stanley/
Johnson Concrete wanting to pur-
chase water from the city. The pro-
posed usage from this company
would be 80,000-100,000 a day for
40 days. SJC is requesting a tank
stand be set up for quicker filling.
The city would provide the meter.
Riggins stated they would need to
order a meter lock.
Stilwell contacted West River
Lyman Jones to make them aware
of the usage and to get an idea as
to what the charge rate should be.
The cost to SJC will be $500 set fee
and $6.00 per thousand gallons.
The council raised the question as
to who would be responsible if
there are any problems with the
tank stand or fire hydrant they will
be using to fill the tank stand.
Ulmen stated any problems caused
will be paid by SJC. Patrick Solon
asked if there will be an issue if the
city has to cut SJC off from the
water if the city starts to run short
of water. Ulmen again stated that
they know if the city runs short
SJC will be cut off.
Riggins went on to report that
the water tower had a leak but has
been fixed.
Willert gave the street report.
He stated the Kadoka Fire Hall is
currently being fixed due to water
damage. He said the brick on the
front of the fire hall is what caused
the leakage inside the hall. It has
been removed and tin siding will
replace the brick.
Willert felt the cost of all the re-
pairs to the sidewalk in front of the
fire hall will exceed the bid they
have received. He has contacted
Ruby Sanftner about whether the
Masons would have any funds to
donate to the project. She said they
currently do not have the funds to
donate. Willert said he would do
some more checking into the situa-
tion and let the council know.
Councilman Cory Lurz stated
that the pallet jack at the solid
waste station is broke. The pallet
jack is used to move the cardboard
at the waste station. Lurz has ob-
tained a price of a different one. He
also stated that some of the fence
around the dump needs to be fixed.
The council made a motion and mo-
tion carried to get a different pallet
jack and to purchase fencing sup-
plies for the waste station.
Tina Williams addressed the
council about reunion weekend.
She felt it went well. She said the
bar has been approached by Lan-
don Stout and Bryce VanderMay
for sponsorship of their softball
team. They currently are wearing
softball shirts with Kadoka City
Bar on the back.
Patty said they had sponsored
them last year at the cost of
$250.00. The council approved the
sponsorship of the softball team.
Williams stated that Ann Fu-
gate’s last day will be August 16.
The city needs to advertise for an-
other part-time bartender. She sug-
gested the possibility of three
full-time positions. Williams stated
that she had penciled it down on
the August calendar and it would
work. This would also allow the bar
employees a couple weekends off a
month.
The council questioned what the
cost would be to the city for a part-
time employee versus a full-time
employee. A full-time employee
would have to be paid benefits plus
retirement. The council decided to
table the motion until the next
meeting. In the meantime, the city
will advertise for a part-time bar-
tender.
Councilman Dick Stolley gave
the auditorium and park reports.
He said a camera had been put
down the sewer line and the pipes
are okay for now. He would like to
take the money from the budget
and use it for lighting at the audi-
torium. Billy Jo Eisenbraun will
also be checking into the cost of
new shower doors for the locker
rooms. Stolley said the new flag
pole has been installed at the mu-
seum.
The auditorium floor will be get-
ting refinished July 15-19. Due to
the toxic fumes from the finish, the
city office will be closed during that
time.
Stolley talked about the girl’s
softball team. He said he had been
visiting with L. Jorgensen, who
was hired as the coach, and there
was little to no interest this year
and therefore, there is not a girl’s
softball team this year. Brad Jor-
gensen felt there was not the girls
out there who wanted to play. He
suggested waiting a couple of years
to have another team. By then,
maybe, there would be an interest
again in a girl’s softball team.
Stolley felt L. Jorgensen should
be compensated for her efforts at
trying to get a team together. The
council agreed to pay L. Jorgensen
for here time.
The swimming pool discussion
was held for executive session.
The public safety report was
given by Arne Lund. He stated the
Forrest (Woody) Davis’ police car
has some paint chips on the car.
The question is whether to fix them
or not? Jorgensen questioned the
mileage and year of the police car.
It is a 2003 and the cost of repair is
not justifiable considering the year
and mileage. Jorgensen suggested
Davis check into what the cost of
having the care vinyl wrapped.
Davis stated he would check into
the cost.
Davis stated their was only one
driving under the influence and no
fights during reunion weekend.
Questions from the council arose as
to why there were three police offi-
cers standing right next to the
fence by the bar during reunion
weekend. Willert felt the police
presence was excessive.
Willert felt Davis could have
handled it by himself. Jorgensen
questioned why a certain individ-
ual had been hired to work as pub-
lic safety during reunion weekend.
He stated that council had decided
in the past that this certain indi-
vidual would not be hired again by
the city.
The first draft of the 2014
budget was presented. The $5,000
being requested by economic devel-
opment is not included in the
budget. The council decided to set
the budget meeting for Monday
July 29, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Ulmen stated the elected official
workshop is July 24 at the
Ramkota in Pierre. The purpose of
this workshop is to provide a basic
crash course on local government.
Lurz said he would be attending,
and Lund stated he will let Ulmen
know as soon as possible if he is
going.
The council entered into execu-
tivie session for personnel matters.
Once the council had returned to
open session, a decision to have a
meeting with the pool manager and
current lifeguards will be held with
Weller and Stolley. The decision to
close the pool from July 9-16 was
also made. Being there no further
business, the council adjourned.
--by Rhonda Antonsen
The Kadoka City Council met on
Monday July 8, 2013 at the city fi-
nance office. Mayor Harry Weller
called the meeting to order. Min-
utes from the previous meeting,
bills and the financial statement
were approved.
The public hearing for a malt/
beverage license was held for Aw!
Shucks Cafe and Sunset Grill.
Councilman Colby Shuck excused
himself from the meeting at this
time. Weller asked if there were
any proponents or opponents to the
application for the license.
Councilman Ryan Willert ques-
tioned the council as to how many
malt/ beverage licenses are allowed
within the city. Finance officer
Patty Ulmen stated it was up to the
discretion of the city. Willert went
on to ask Colby Shuck as to what
the hours of operation and what
kind of establishment Aw! Shucks
would be. Shuck went on to say it
would be a restaurant setting and
the hours of operation had not been
finalized just yet.
Dick Stolley made a motion to
approve the malt/ beverage license
and Cory Lurz seconded the mo-
tion. The motion carried to approve
the malt/ beverage license for Aw!
Shucks Cafe.
Sunset Grill’s malt/ beverage ap-
plication was reviewed next. Coun-
cilman Shuck reentered the
meeting at this time. Again, Willert
questioned Grant Patterson as to
what kind of establishment Sunset
Grill would be and what the oper-
ating hours would be. Patterson
stated that Sunset Grill would be
more like a fast food place than a
restaurant. He said they would
open around 7 or 8 a.m. and closing
would be between 10 and 11 p.m.
Ulmen questioned whether
there will be video lottery in the es-
tablishment. Patterson stated it
will be coming pending the applica-
tion. He needed the malt/beverage
license first before he applied for
video lottery.
Motions were made and the mo-
tion carried to approve the malt/
beverage license for Sunset Grill.
New business discussion began
with the Walton property. Weller
stated that Ken and Edna Walton
had answered the city’s letter
about the condition of their prop-
erty.
The Waltons had stated in their
letter that they are currently dis-
mantling the house and have a
deadline of August 1. They are ask-
ing if the city would provide dirt for
the east side of their house where
it would be used for back fill.
Weller asked whether the city
should haul dirt for them or if Wal-
tons should hire it done. Patrick
Solon felt Waltons should hire it
done. He has had other requests for
the the back fill dirt at the dump,
and he has turned down others. He
said the dump needs to keep their
supply of back fill dirt for the
dump.
Willert felt the city should hold
K. Walton to his deadline for dis-
mantling the property. The council
agreed, but Shuck felt the city
should be fair with the deadline.
Weller said he and Ulmen would
draft a letter to the Waltons letting
them know what the city council
had decided.
Rusty Olney and JoBeth Uhlir
addressed the city council at this
time about economic development.
Uhlir asked the city council if they
would consider budgeting in $5,000
to economic development. Olney
stated that Uhlir had addressed
the Jackson County commissioners
and asked for $5,000. Uhlir stated
that Jackson County felt strongly
about economic development, but
did not feel they could budget in
$5,000 for economic development.
Olney and Uhlir talked about
how economic development has
helped one business keep its doors
open in the community, and that
they have already received three
payments back on the first loan.
Olney stated since it is a revolv-
ing loan that as soon as the money
comes back in economic develop-
ment can loan that money back
out.
Economic development has ap-
plied for another grant. Olney felt
they should know by the end of
July. He was slightly pessimistic
that they would received another
City council addresses abandoned property,
approves new malt beverage licenses
Church Page …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
Email your news and photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
Obituaries
Area Upcoming Events …
Kadoka Area School Board will meet on Wednesday, July 10 at 7
p.m.
Baseball game in Murdo on Tuesday, July 9 at 5:30 p.m.
Baseball game at Wall on Thursday, July 11 at 5:30 p.m.
Baseball tournament in Kadoka on Saturday, July 20.
Read Isaiah 55:1-2
Have you ever found yourself standing in front of the
refrigerator, trying to find something to satisfy a vague
sense of emptiness or discontent? You aren’t looking for
anything specific, but you know you want to fill a long-
ing. Whatever you choose will probably not do the trick, because the empty spot is not in your stomach but
in your soul.
Whether the substance is food, career, possessions, or relationships, our souls are continually trying to
find satisfaction. But nothing in this world will fill the void. Since we were created for relationship with
God, He placed deep within us a yearning for Him. Though we may not recognize it as such, everyone knows
the feeling of dissatisfaction that at times seeps into our souls. Any time we seek fulfillment with worldly
substitutes, disappointment and disillusionment are sure to follow.
There are two possible menus from which we can choose to fill our emptiness. Satan’s menu is long and
full of enticing things that seem to promise gratification
and pleasure. These could include riches, relationships, prominence, acceptance, or recognition. Whatever
he offers looks like the good life that will bring content--ment, but it’s a deception. God’s menu, on the other
hand, is quite small. In fact, it lists just one “item”—Jesus. He is the only one who can fill the void.
Have you found the satisfaction you seek, or is there always a vague sense of discontent in your soul?
Make Jesus your highest priority, and spend focused, unhurried time with Him, He’ll satisfy you as nothing
else can.
The Nagging Sense of
Dissatisfaction
Inspiration Point
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
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TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HWY:
December 2012
Ye Wang, Minneapolis, MN $125
Gregory Hill, Sioux Falls $105
Jeri McGriff, Marathon, FL $105
Mason McCollum, Houston, TX $165
Jairaj Singh, Milwaukee, WI $105
Dallas Swanson, Hot Springs $145
January 2013
Nathan Reede, Aberdenn $85
Jennifer Bauman, Sioux Falls $85
Samuel Groenjes, Plattwmouth, NE $165
Armando Loyola, Loveland, CO $125
Carol Oocumma, Cherokee, NC $105
Robert Hudson, East Ampton, NJ $145
Kayla Rowen, Rapid City $85
Amy Pinela, Rapid City $85
Sandra Cox, Valentine, NE $85
Cynthia Hamilton, Rapid City $85
Taylor Mammenga, Rapid City $85
Kristina Safonova, Mocow, SX $120
Sean Tobyne, Lunenburg, VT $120
Hannah Bressler, Spearfish $85
Mariah Asheim, Rapid City $85
Sanford Deal, Fruitdale $85
Jeremy Wilson, Clearfield $85
William Wittig, Ft. Stewart, GA $85
Jeffery Ulvestad, Black Hawk $85
Summer Lassiter, Box Elder $85
SPEEDING ON STATE HIGHWAY:
December 2012
Darbe Wichman, Hermosa $105
SPEEDING ON OTHER ROADWAYS:
January 2013
Paul Kruse, Interior $165
Brandon Morrison, Philip $85
Cynthia Young, St. Francis $85
FAIL TO STOP AT WEIGH STATION:
January 2013
John Jablonski, Chicago, IL $170
Cody Wood, Sundance, WY $170
OPERATOR ASSURE PASSENGERS
5-18 WEAR SEATBELTS:
January 2013
Cherilyn Black Feather, Wanblee $25
CARELESS DRIVING:
January 2013
Kristina Safonova, Mocow, SX $120
FAIL TO REPORT ACCIDENT TO PO-
LICE OFFICER:
January 2013
Paul Melino, Sioux Falls $120
DRIVING TO LEFT ON APPROACH TO
INTERSECTION:
December 2012
Jeanette Miller, Kadoka $120
DRIVE VEHICLE WITH CONTENTS
LEAKING OR DROPPING:
December 2012
Fred Wolken, Piedmont $120
Forgery and Possess Forged Instrument with Intent to Defraud:
12-12-12: Jewel Quiver, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 9-19-12; For-
gery: Costs $104; one year of jail suspended. Forged Instrument: Costs
$104; 60 days jail with 30 days suspended with 14 days time served
credit. Jail suspended based on the following conditions: serve time in
Winner Jail; pay restitution and court costs to clerk of courts; repay court
appointed attorney fees; write apology letter to victim Mr. Totton and pro-
vided copy to CSO; no alcohol, possess of alcohol or enter establishment
where alcohol is main form of business; participate in a support group,
obtain evaluation and provide copy to CSO and follow recommendations;
warrantless search and seizure and submit to testing of blood and pay
for, submit to testing for drugs and alcohol and pay for; make monthly
payments of restitution and attorney bill; obey all laws for two years.
Possess Forged Instrument with Intent to Defraud:
12-12-12: Melfred Witt, Norris: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 9-19-12; Fines
$104; Two years jail suspended based on the following conditions: Serve
105 days in county jail with credit for time served of 105 days; obey all
laws, pay restitution and court appointed attorney fees within two years;
unsupervised probation and comply with Mellette Co. criminal file 11-67
conditions of probation.
Driving Under the Influence - 2nd Offense,
Open Alcoholic Beverage Container Accessible in Vehicle
and Fail to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
12-28-12: Lewis Brown, Long Valley: DUI: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 1-30-
13; Fine and costs $1,169; 60 days jail with 26 days suspended. Open
container: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 1-30-13; Fine and costs $120. Fail to
maintain: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 1-30-13; Fine and costs $150. Jail is
suspended based on the following conditions: obey all laws for two years,
pay fine and costs, including $85 blood test; reimburse county for court
appointed attorney fees, obtain behavior health evaluation, attend and
successfully complete any recommendations and file proof with clerk be-
fore 5-21-2013; pay $300 restitution to Jeff Willert; sentence review hear-
ing scheduled for 5-21-13.
Driving Under the Influence - 2nd Offense:
04-14-12: Chris Huber, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 1-30-13; Fine
and costs $1,169; 60 days jail with 50 days suspended based on the fol-
lowing conditions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including
$85 blood test; reimburse county for court appointed attorney fees; work
permit authorized upon proof of insurance and participation in 24/7 pro-
gram, obtain behavior health evaluation, attend and successfully com-
plete any recommendations and file proof with clerk; sentence review
hearing scheduled for 4-24-13; participate in 24/7 program, twice daily
PBT’s; report to Winner Jail to serve ten days.
Driving Under the Influence - 2nd Offense:
07-29-12: Luke Carlson, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 1-30-13; Fine
and costs $1,154; 60 days jail with 50 days suspended based on the fol-
lowing conditions: obey all laws for one year; pay fine and costs, including
$70 blood test; serve ten days in Winner Jail; work permit granted upon
proof of insurance and participate in 24/7 program; obtain alcohol evalu-
ation, attend and successfully complete any recommendations and file
proof with clerk.
Driving Under the Influence - 2nd Offense:
11-24-12: Jerome Hoffman, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 1-30-13;
Fine and costs $1,154; 60 days jail and $1,000 fine suspended based on
the following conditions: obey all laws for one year; pay costs, including
$70 blood test costs; reimburse county for court appointed attorney fees;
obtain behavior health evaluation, attend and successfully complete any
recommendations and file proof with the clerk; work/medical permit upon
proof of insurance and participation in 24/7 program; twice daily PBT’s.
Reckless Driving:
12-14-12: Jeffery Page, Interior: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 01-30-13; Fine
and costs $385; 30 days jail suspended based on the following condi-
tions: obey all laws; pay fine and costs, including $85 blood test fee; work
permit upon proof of insurance and proof of employment.
Monday, July 15
Chicken alfredo, sliced beets, ap-
pleslaw, french bread and apricots.
Tuesday, July 16
French dip with au jus, potato
salad, broccoli and cherry crisp.
Wednesday, July 17
Meatballs in gravy, wild rice
blend, mixed vegetables, sunshine
jello salad, bread and watermelon.
Thursday, July 18
Pork cutlet, mashed potatoes
and gravy, corn o’brien, dinner roll
and baked apple slices.
Friday, July 19
Pizza, tossed salad, fruit juice,
mixed fruit and cookie.
Meals for
the Elderly
Kassie 15 • Jarred 12
children of
Ted & Arlene Hicks
Dawson 9 • Madalyn 3
Landry 6 mos.
children of
Brandon & Sanna Rock
Carsyn 2
daughter of
Mary Pierce &
George Conroy
Bryler 2
son of
Brandon & Belinda
Mitchell
Cannon 5 • Trey 4
children of
Paul & Sara Speer
Alayna 1
daughter of
Cally Carlson &
Jeffrey Patterson
Tomorrows Leaders
Brought to you by Kadoka Press &
Thompson Photograhpics
Jean M. Burns, age 90 of Philip,
S.D., died July 7, 2013, at the Hans
P. Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip, surrounded by her family.
Jean Mae Burns, the first child
of Frank and Joy Keve Hauk, was
born May 18, 1923. Her childhood
was spent with her siblings,
George, Max and Mary Joy Hauk
on a farm northwest of Grindstone.
She worked her way through
high school by being a mother's
helper to the Bartholmew family
and roomed at the old Winchester
Hotel.
Shirley Burns introduced her to
Homer Burns at a dance in
Milesville and they married several
months later. Dancing remained a
lifelong source of happiness. Jean
and Homer had four children:
Bobby, Jack, Charlotte and Mara-
lynn.
Jean took great pride in her
homemaking skills. Keeping her
home clean and tidy was of great
importance to her. In fact, her
nephews were pretty sure that
when she wiped their faces there
was Clorox on the washcloth! She
loved making pies, bread, jelly, and
pickles. Her garden was her special
passion. Canning and freezing the
produce gave her great joy. Her
hobbies included embroidering and
making rugs. A local lady who
roomed with Jean and Homer
when she went to high school, re-
called that Jean always "freshened
up" and changed her housedress
when it was time for Homer to
come home from work.
A true child of the 1930s, Jean
frugally saved and stored anything
that might have value or serve a
practical purpose in the future.
When faced with a new domestic
challenge there was always some
stored item that could be modified
or adapted to solve the problem.
The variety of uses for a popsicle
stick was endless! No need to run
out and buy something new!
In her younger years, she was
active in community efforts to im-
prove the quality of life in Philip.
Among her activities she served as
the first president of the hospital
auxiliary.
When Homer died suddenly, she
carried on with her family respon-
sibilities since her four children
were all still at home. In addition,
she ran Homer's business with the
help of Red Couch.
Howard Pihlaja, Jean's compan-
ion of many years, survives her.
Jean is also survived by her chil-
dren, Bobby (Gerry) Sloat, Jack
(Marlene) Burns, Charlotte (Larry)
Gabriel and Maralynn Burns. In
addition, she is survived by 12
grandchildren, John (Carol) Os-
burn, Doug (Krista) Osburn, Julie
(Chad) Callahan, Andy (Samantha)
Sloat, Chris (Misti) Burns, Jeff
(Heather) Burns, Robyn (Steve)
Brazelton, Mindy (Lloyd) Metzger,
Jeff (Heather) Gabriel, Danielle
(Josh) Carlson, Dustin (Lynette)
Hummel, and Cassi (Alan) Rislov;
her great-grandchildren include,
Eddie and Jannine Osburn; Anak-
toria, Shane and Baylee Callahan;
Makenzie, Anthony and Zachary
Sloat; Nathan and Jace Brazelton;
Patrick and Will Burns; Taylor,
Brooke and Katie Burns; Sage,
Cedar, Ember and Latham Gabriel;
Cadan and Gage Carlson; Brayden
and Maelee Hummel; and Rio and
Ali Rislov; her brother, Max
(Nancy) Hauk; sister, Mary Joy
Hauk; two sisters-in-law, Peggy
Hauk and Mary Martha Burns;
and numerous nephews and nieces.
Jean was preceded in death by
her husbands Homer Burns and
Jud Fennell; her parents Frank
and Joy (Keve) Hauk; her brother
George Hauk; grandchildren
Christy and Bill Osburn; and
great-grandchildren Brace Allen
and Paxton Ryder Gabriel.
Services were held Wednesday,
July 10, at the United Church in
Philip with Pastor Kathy Chesney
officiating.
Music was provided by Marilyn
Millage, pianist, and Cindy
Nuzum, vocalist.
Ushers were Josh Carlson, Andy
Sloat, Chad Callahan and Alan
Rislov.
Pallbearers were Chris and Jeff
Burns, John and Doug Osburn, Jeff
Gabriel and Dustin Hummel.
Interment was be at the Ma-
sonic Cemetery in Philip.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial
has been established.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Jean’s online guestbook can be
signed at www.rushfuneralhome.
com
Jean M. Burns__________________
Friday, May 10, Mitchell Tech-
nical Institute's Class of 2013
graduated during commencement
exercises that were held at the
Corn Palace. 434 Associate of Ap-
plied Science degrees and diplo-
mas were conferred during the
ceremony.
Colter Stout, Kadoka
Electrical Construction
& Maintenance (AAS)
Orin VanderMay*, Long Valley
Heating & Cooling Technology
(AAS)
Trey Osburn*, Columbus, MT
Telecommunications (AAS)
College News
Belvidere & Norris News …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
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7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
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Diesel • Gas
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“My grandma likes to play with God,
They have a kind of game.
She plants the garden full of seeds,
He sends the sun and rain.
She likes to sit and talk with God
And knows He is right there.
She prays about the whole wide world,
Then leaves us in His care.”
Ann Johnson (Age 8)
James and Marjorie Letellier at-
tended the funeral of Charity Weiss
Monday morning, and in the after-
noon were in Kadoka to get some
parts. Thursday the fourth, they
were in Pierre, spending time with
the Beckwith family, and also en-
joyed the band and the fireworks at
the park. When they returned
home that night, Sue Larson, Julie
Letellier and Andrea Beckwith
were at their home. The three also
spent Friday with them.
Jason Lehman was home for the
long Fourth of July weekend. The
Lehman’s spent a relaxing fourth
at home, and then in the evening
went up to the Butte and enjoyed
watching fireworks from the sur-
rounding towns; they saw fire-
works from Murdo, Kadoka, White
River, Parmelee, Norris and the
Rosebud Casino. That sounds like
quite the lookout point!
Jean and Ace Kary were among
those at the funeral of Albert Jans
Thursday, June 27. Eric and Rae
Staab of Kansas came for a visit
that weekend, and were here to at-
tend the Weiss funeral with Jean
on Monday, July 1. That afternoon
Jean and Paul Kary joined them
when they went to Rapid City and
toured the museum at the School of
Mines, and also did a few other ac-
tivities, ending with supper at the
Golden Corral. Eric and Rae Beth
left for home Tuesday morning.
The Kary’s had a picnic in the
pasture on the Fourth of July, and
listened to the coyotes serenade
them there that evening. Friday
evening Brant had gone out to
check things, and was greeted by a
not so welcome sight as he re-
turned to the house. There on the
step was a big rattlesnake, which is
no more.
Erin Heinert spent a few days
home with her folks, Gary and
Anne Heinert, and helped cut hay
Saturday morning. That afternoon
she went to Rapid City to attend
the wedding of a friend. Ed and
Louise Heinert of Sparks, NE,
hosted a cookout for family and
friends on the Fourth of July. Gary,
Anne, Marilyn, Stanley and Mau-
reece Heinert, and Charissa and
family joined the throng there, en-
joying the cookout and the fire-
works afterward.
Pastor Denke was pleased with
all the help of the ladies of the
church and community at the fu-
neral for Charity Weiss.
Monday, July 1, Maxine Allard
attended the Weiss funeral with
Dorothy Bligh. Thursday morning
Maxine got the mower going, and
shortened the grass in her yard,
which she had purposely let go to
seed, hoping to thicken the lawn in
some barish spots. That afternoon
daughter Sharon arrived from
Spearfish and Friday they headed
for Gregory for the memorial serv-
ice of Maxine’s cousins, Warren and
Ruth Dale. They returned home
that evening, and later June Ring
and grandsons Matthew and
Michael visited. Saturday Sharon
woke up early and mowed the yard
before heading back home to
Spearfish. Saturday Maxine had a
call and chat from son Bruce from
California. She also had a call from
Maxine Faber, a school friend from
years ago.
Alberta helped get the hay all
mowed before heading back to
Yankton a while back, and since
then Clifford got it all baled, but
now needs to get it all in and
stacked.
Jan Rasmussen was a supper
guest of the Lehman’s on the 4th of
July. Saturday Kate Rasmussen
joined her for the day and was a
supper guest that evening.
Jeromy, Rachel, Cooper and
Memphis Sweeney of Cresco, IA,
arrived at the home of Jessie and
Bruce Ring Monday evening, bring-
ing Stephanie back with them.
Tuesday evening Bruce and
June Ring went to Rapid City, ran
some quick errands, and then went
to the airport to pick up Michael
and Matthew Ring of Texas.
Wednesday the Sweeney family
spent the day in the Hills. Thurs-
day Bruce and Jessie hosted the
4th of July cookout at their home,
and fortunately had most of the
food prepared and had the grill
going to do the meat, as the light-
ning strike took out the power, and
it didn’t come back on until they
were done eating. When it was
dark, they enjoyed the fireworks
that the Sweeney’s had brought
along, and also enjoyed the fire-
works that Cheyenne was setting
off at Dan and Lori Schmidt’s
home. The Sweeney family headed
back to Iowa Friday morning, as
Jeromy had a high school reunion
to attend that evening.
The lightening strike on Thurs-
day evening had fried the surge
protector on the television at June’s
house so Bruce came to fix it. Once
Bruce removed that, which was no
easy task with all the cords and
wires back there, and plugged
things into a different surge protec-
tor, the TV worked once more. Fri-
day afternoon Stephanie and Ryan
came over with Bruce and Michael
and Matthew got a break from
weeding the garden, and rode along
with them to watch as they cleared
away some of the beavers’ work on
the O’Bryan place.
The two Janice Ring’s were in
Rapid City Saturday to attend the
open house reception for newly
married Jonathan and Mary Ring.
They were married in Iowa in May
and this reception was planned at
Marsha Ring’s home for those who
were unable to make it to their
wedding in May.
Debbie Ring came home
Wednesday for the long Fourth of
July weekend. She cooked dinner
for Sharon’s birthday, which is on
the 4th, and Torey grilled supper
for the whole family that evening.
Pastor Denke was also a supper
guest that evening. Saturday
Robert, Sharon and Debbie were
also at the open house for Jonathan
and Mary Ring in Rapid City.
Torey and Linda Ring and sons
were in Rapid City on Wednesday
to keep doctor appointments, and
also do some activities with the
boys. They went again on Saturday
to the open house for Jonathan and
Mary Ring and that evening had
supper with friends Rick and Glo-
ria before returning home.
Dan and Lori Schmidt hosted a
Fourth of July cookout at their
home. Brandi and family,
Cheyenne and family and Wesley
and Junior Schmidt were there. As
already mentioned, Cheyenne sup-
plied the fireworks show. Saturday
Cheyenne and family were in Mis-
sion, as Jace was in a seventh and
eighth grade basketball tourna-
ment there. He is on the Blackpipe
team, and they took second place.
Way to go, guys!
Glen Krogman came from Fargo
to spend the fourth with his folks,
Richard and Noreen Krogman. He
got in on some haying while here,
as there is still about a week’s
worth to go. He left for home on
Sunday.
The Master Gardeners met at
the home of Nancy Storm on Satur-
day, south and west of Winner.
Those attending from around here
were Rose West, Jeannine Wood-
ward, Donna Adrian, JoAnn Letel-
lier, and Donita Denke. A lesson
was given on succulent plants.
The Howard Heinert family at-
tended the funeral of Charity Weiss
on Monday, July 1. They are busy
with haying, but Chris and Beau
did take time off to go to Valentine
on the fourth. Friday Howard,
Nette Chris and Beau were supper
guests of Chris and Dawn Letellier.
The Bill Huber’s had family over
for the fourth, and had fireworks
afterward. They are starting hay-
ing. Kenda’s nephews, Christian
and Blaise Nelson, have been
spending some time with them.
Jan and June Ring headed up to
Kadoka on Monday afternoon,
June 24, to catch a ride with two
ladies from Rapid City. After con-
vincing the ladies that they really
wanted to ride with them, and not
follow them down I-90 to Sioux
Falls, they returned to Kadoka to
leave June’s car at Tasha’s, and
rode with the ladies to Sioux Falls.
They all caught the bus chartered
by the LWML Tuesday morning,
and arrived at the National LWML
convention in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl-
vania Wednesday afternoon. The
convention “Quenched by the
Water” lasted through Sunday
noon. It was a great convention.
The bus brought us back to Sioux
Falls Monday afternoon and we
rode home with the ladies from
Rapid City as far as Kadoka, and
then picked up June’s car and ar-
rived home by midnight. There are
more bus tales, but that’s enough
for now.
Congratulations to Shawntae
Moran and Brandon Campbell of
Pierre on the birth of their precious
little daughter, Alexis Tonya. The
little lady arrived June 26, 2013
and weighed in at nine pounds,
three ounces and was 20 1/2 inches
long. Proud adopted grandma is
Linda Totton of Pierre, her grand-
parents are the late Tonya Totton
and the late Joe Moran, Richard
and Mary Pease of Pierre, and Chip
Campbell also of Pierre. Great
grandmothers are Karen Totton of
Clear Water, Florida, and Molly
Moran of White River. Great-great
grandparents are Erna Totton of
Sioux Falls and the late Richard
Totton formerly of Norris. This is
Erna’s first great-great grandchild.
Bread making is an old family
tradition around here. Some of my
earliest memories are of Mom and
Grandma placing a tall square
stool in the middle of the kitchen
and plunking a big old bread pan
on top of it. I think it was just an
oversized dish pan, but it was
large. From there, they added in-
gredients until the mixture was
thick enough. Kneading followed
until the dough was smooth.
As I recall, they scalded some
milk first off so it had time to cool.
Then they proofed the yeast which
involved dissolving it in warm
water to which a little sugar had
been added. If the mixture started
to bubble and expand, that
“proved” it was still good and
would do the job. After milk, water,
sugar, salt and Crisco (I think, or
lard) were mixed together and the
yeast was added, the flour was
worked in little by little until the
dough was elastic and of the right
consistency.
Next, the pan was put in a
warm place, covered with a white
dish towel and allowed to rise.
Then it was punched down and
usually made mostly into loaves,
but sometimes into coffee cake,
buns, or cinnamon rolls. It was at
this point that I liked to steal
pinches of the dough and eat it. I
liked it quite a lot, but Mom and
Grandma frowned if I ate too much
of it. I think they suspected it
would rise in my stomach and blow
me apart or something. It never
did, of course, but they had some
bias against my eating too much
raw dough.
Given my upbringing, I guess it
was only natural that I should
take up bread making on my own
once I got settled back in at the
ranch after college and the Navy. I
started simply and learned as I
went along. With my love of exper-
imentation, I naturally tried all
different kinds of bread from sour
dough to French to whole-grain
and raisin. There were some disas-
ters and some triumphs. After I’d
learned all I wanted to know about
the various permutations, I more
or less settled down to plain old
white bread that I mostly made
into buns but also into cinnamon
and caramel rolls. I’m still doing
that whenever the freezer runs
low.
I have now gone more low-key,
however. At first, I’d mix up a huge
batch of dough using about twelve
cups of flour. That would make
three-dozen buns. Now I’ve become
sort of lazy and throw the ingredi-
ents in a bread machine and let
that contraption grind away mix-
ing and so forth. After the dough
has risen nicely in the machine
and is about to be baked into a
loaf, I turn the thing off, remove
the dough, and make it into twelve
buns. Those last me quite a while
for sandwiches and eating with
meals. I keep most of them in the
freezer and take them out little by
little so they don’t get old and dry
before I get around to using them.
Oddly enough, I didn’t eat a lot
of bread as a kid although it was
good with peanut butter, jelly and
honey (all three at once) as my
grandma used to make for me. Dis-
interest in bread at that time
might be partly because I’m
largely of German descent, and we
tend to be into hearty meaty foods
more than fluffy stuff like bread. I
happened to marry a Norwegian,
however, and that bunch of people
thinks no meal is really complete
if it doesn’t include bread. It must
be a contagious attitude since it
has rubbed off somewhat on me.
Most of my meals now include
some form of bread.
The thoughts of another group
of people have apparently rubbed
off on me too. That would be the
Bohemians or Czechs with their
kolaches. These goodies are basi-
cally bits of dough with a sweet
filling such as prunes, jelly, or a
kind of pie filling. There are two
groups of these people who do not
agree with each other about the
proper way a kolache is to be
made. One bunch says you just put
a flat piece of dough on a pan, let
it rise, put a thumbprint in the
dough, and fill it with sweet stuff
before baking. Others are just as
adamant that a real kolache is a
flattened piece of dough with the
filling put on top and the corners
pulled up and pinched together.
Both are good, but I prefer making
the former since it is easier and
quite fine with a topping of sour
cream, sugar, and cinnamon. I
make those a lot.
Anyway, bread making is a sat-
isfying endeavor. Dough is fun to
work with. The whole process also
makes the house smell nice while
you’re at it, and the end result
often tastes really good. What
more can you ask?
Bread Making
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Larry and Joy Dolezal, John and
Jamie Dolezal and children, and
Jackie Schofield attended a family
reunion at Carmen and Jim
Nemec’s home in Belle Fourche
over the weekend. Carmen and
Jim’s children, Dale, Joanna, and
Kayla, all of Belle plus Beth of Den-
ver, were there. Also attending
were Sarah DeVries of Rapid City,
Trisha Bork of rural Midland, Joy’s
dad, Jim Ramey, and Joy’s sister,
Jane, and her husband, Bryan, of
rural Deadwood. Joy’s brother,
John, and his wife, Anita, of Sacra-
mento, CA, were there with their
four kids and families. Those kids
are James and his four children of
Inman, KA, Holly and her hus-
band, Russ, and three children of
Sacramento, Dory and her hus-
band, Mario, and their two children
of Los Angeles, CA. Joy’s cousin,
John Alden, and his wife, Paula,
and their daughter of Tucson, AZ,
were also there. There were twelve
children under twelve which kept
things exciting. After a pancake
breakfast served up by Jim Nemec,
John Ramey’s clan headed on to
Bozeman, MT, to see (and/or trau-
matize) Joy’s sister, Ann. Those not
heading to Bozeman headed on
home.
Shawn Fox of Mobridge and his
wife and daughter, Jodi and Bailey,
were home for the weekend before
this. It was sort of a 4th-of-July
get-together with his parents,
Kenny and Roxie, and his brother,
Wade, and family. They went up on
a high place and set off some fire-
works. Rodney Sharp later said he
enjoyed the fireworks too since he
was in a nearby field doing some
haying after dark. This week, son
Jesse is expected on Monday at
Kenny and Roxie’s. Monday is his
birthday and he decided to cele-
brate it here. Roxie recalled that it
was 113 degrees on the day he was
born in Spearfish some years ago
and when they were living at
Alzada, MT.
Jim and DJ Addison and Andy
Schofield spent part of Sunday un-
scrambling DJ and Andy’s cattle
which had mixed themselves to-
gether. In the process, Jim lost his
cell phone but was happily able to
later find it. Also on Sunday, Addis-
ons had unexpected guests in the
form of their cousins, Mickey and
Stanley Sandy, of Australia. Their
mom was Edith Addison who was
Stanley’s daughter. They had a
place south of Okaton and still do
have some land here that they
come back to check on from time to
time. The Sandys also have an 88-
year-old aunt they like to come
visit occasionally. Georgann was in
Wall on Sunday running around
some barrels with her horse. Jami
has been working several days a
week at 1880 Town this summer to
gain a little spending money.
Clair Bitting had a checkup in
Sturgis this week complete with
EKG. The report was favorable in
this exam which is routinely done.
His daughter, Kolette, reports that
she isn’t doing a lot of gardening
this year except for some tomato
plants plus some cabbage and hot
peppers. The hot peppers are
needed for salsa if the tomato
plants produce enough. Haying is
in progress at the Bitting’s between
rain showers.
Scot and Jodie O’Bryan went on
vacation over the 4th, 5th, and 6th
of July. They had some cabins near
Whitewood where they and various
family members gathered. All their
kids but Wacey were there, and he
couldn’t come since he works in air
conditioning there in Texas, and
July in Texas is fairly warm so air
conditioning is a hot product. Son
Scotty and family came from Ft.
Worth, TX, Grady also from Texas,
and Taylor and family from Yank-
ton. Daughter Faye and kids came
from Rapid City. The day before the
reunion, Faye moved from one
place to another in Rapid City with
the help of her brothers. They got
it all done in one day. Jodie’s sister
and a friend from Oklahoma were
also there. Lorna and George
Moore came up for part of the time
as well. Besides several cabins,
they erected a tent for some of the
kids to stay in one night. It only
lasted one night, however, since
ghost stories were told before bed-
time which made the night some-
what unsettled. Safer quarters
were deemed more appropriate the
next night. On another day, Jodie
and her sister went to Mobridge to
visit their dad. They also visited
their mom at the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Jodie said this was the first
time she could remember of ever
actually going on a vacation and it
was fun. It was also tiring so quite
a bit of Sunday was devoted to rest-
ing up so work at 1880 Town could
continue on Monday. Some of Scot
and Jodie’s family members came
back to Belvidere and stayed until
Sunday.
Mark and Nicci DeVries and
sons were visited over the 4th by
Mark’s folks, Jim and Lynn, and
his brother, Tim, from Kansas.
Nicci’s dad from Idaho was also
there. Jim, Lynn, and Tim stayed
over at Velma and Wally’s old
house. Part of the time was spent
repairing haying equipment which
had broken down. It wasn’t dry
enough out to hay much for a few
days, but the equipment needed to
be ready when it was drier. Mark
said the baseball season is still in
progress but activity was sus-
pended over the week of the 4th. It
will resume this week. He also said
Jim used to come to help with hay-
ing quite a bit, but Mark’s sons are
now old enough to help with that
which frees Jim to come and go
more as he pleases.
Nancy Schofield reports that it
has been very busy with tourists at
1880 Town lately. Over the week-
end, they had three bus tours come
through which added a lot of visi-
tors. Kirby and the Dolezals have
been trying to hay when the fields
are dry enough. They’ve been get-
ting quite a bit of moisture. Kirby
has been fighting potato bugs in his
garden but thinks he has them
under control at the moment. He
will have a checkup this week
about the cancer he frequently has
to fight, but he has been feeling
fairly good in recent times.
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
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Eric Addison won the wild horse ride on July 4 at the Interior Rodeo. He rode his
bronc to the eight second whistle with a blindfold on.
Locals …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Kadoka Nursing Home
Cathy Stone • 837-2270
Gateway News
Lola Joyce Riggins
Local News
Sydne Lenox
Join us for lunch…
Buffet Every Sunday
Includes Salad Bar & Dessert
serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jigger’s Restaurant
837-2000 • Kadoka
Daily Noon Speicals
Monday through Friday
Serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Homemade Salad Bar
everyday of the week!
Mr. and Mrs. Jamie Meyer of Bismarck, ND, would like to announce
the engagement of their daughter, Megan Nicole, to Andrew Graupmann,
son of Ken and Mary Graupmann of Kadoka, SD.
Megan is a graduate of the University of South Dakota, with a degree
in Spanish. Andrew is also a graduate of the University of South Dakota,
with a degree in psychology. He is currently a FOCUS missionary at the
University of Nebraska, Lincoln.
An August 2, 2013 wedding is planned in Bismarck, ND.
Meyer, Graupmann to wed
With funds raised from several functions including the annual prime rib sup-
per, the Kadoka Nursing Home purchased a new stove for the kitchen. Brian
Fromm (above) finished installing the stove on Friday, July 5. The entire kitchen
staff, including Cathy Ireland (below), was anxious to put the stove to use.
--photos by Robyn Jones
A new stove at the nursing home
Greg and Lisa Uhlir of Sioux
Falls visited his parents, Vernon
and Hellen, last week. They were
on their way to Pierre and then on
home after attending the events of
the Miss South Dakota Beauty
Pageant in Hot Springs the previ-
ous weekend.
Tim and Carmen Huffman went
to Mobridge on the Fourth of July
to visit at the home of Casey and
Curtis Huffman. Mobridge had
quite a celebration with two pa-
rades and fireworks during the hol-
iday. Curtis and Casey are still
getting settled in their new home
and Tim was able to help them
with some clean-up projects. The
Huffmans returned home Saturday
evening.
Sarah and Jake VanderMay are
the proud parents of a baby girl
born in Rapid City on July 1. She
has been named Maggie Marie and
has a big brother, Gus. Sarah is a
teller at BankWest and both
mother and baby are doing fine and
are home.
Ron and Renate Carson’s aunt,
Joy Parker, was admitted to Rapid
City Regional on Tuesday of last
week; she was taken by ambulance
and returned back to the Kadoka
Nursing Home on Friday. Joy’s
daughter and husband, Bob and
Lonnie Harper, of Cheyenne, WY,
arrived on Sunday and spent until
Tuesday at the Carson home. On
Saturday Ron and Renate attended
the wedding of Oliver Carson’s son
of Wall. The wedding was held on
the SD State Capitol lawn in Pierre
on a very hot afternoon, as the tem-
perature was in the 90s.
Joe Kerns of Kettle Falls, WA,
and Susan Kerns of West Point,
NY, visited the Kadoka Stilwell
families and the Kerns families in
Murdo last week. They are the son
and daughter of the late Doris (Stil-
well) Kerns, who grew up in
Kadoka. They were on their way to
Idaho, where the Kerns lived for
many years. They are both teach-
ers in their respective communi-
ties. They arrived on Wednesday
and left for Idaho on Sunday.
Cloretta Eisenbraun, Helen
Good, Rex and Nancy Totton at-
tended the Fourth of July celebra-
tion at Interior and enjoyed the
picnic and fireworks.
Gary and Linda Petras met their
daughter, Jody, and John in Wall
for dinner on Thursday.
Richard and Clara Jobgen at-
tended the rodeo and fireworks in
Interior on the fourth.
Rich and Shawna Bendt and
family went camping over the
weekend at the Big Sioux State
Park near Brandon, SD, with some
of Rich’s cousins. On Saturday they
attended an anniversary party for
Rich’s aunt and uncle who were cel-
ebrating their 50th wedding an-
niversary. They returned home on
Sunday.
Ray and Florence Osburn of
Valentine, NE, came on Thursday
and spent the day visiting Jim and
Robyn Jones and family. On Satur-
day, Kelton Jones came to stay and
on Sunday, they met Michael and
Kylie in Martin to return him to his
parents.
Seventeen bicyclists stayed
overnight in the Kadoka City Park
on Saturday night. They are on the
Big Ride Across America and this is
about the eighth year they have
stayed in Kadoka. They ride from
the State of Washington and will
arrive in Washington, DC, about
the eighth of August. They left
Kadoka for Pierre on Monday as
they try to ride about 100 miles a
day and are doing this for the ben-
efit of the American Lung Associa-
tion.
Linda Briggs, wife of Roger
Briggs of Rapid City, underwent
surgery last week for a tumor that
was close to her brain. The surgery
went well and it had not attached
itself to her brain and was not ma-
lignant, according to Roger’s sister,
Bonnie Riggins, who has visited
with them several times this week.
Marv and Deb Moor, son
Matthew from Cedar Rapids, IA,
and son Mitch of Pierre left on Sun-
day, June 30 for a short vacation.
They visited Marv’s mother,
Dorothy, and brothers, John and
Harlan, in Bonesteel and then
went on to Ft. Robinson in Ne-
braska, before touring Wind Cave
and various other tourist attrac-
tions in the Black Hills. Marv and
Deb came home on Wednesday of
last week and then went on to
Pierre for the Fourth of July to visit
Deb’s father, Hank Kosters, and
her two sisters and their families,
and to take in a cookout with the
family and watch the fireworks in
Ft. Pierre.
The saddle bronc riders from the
area have been busy this past
week. July 2-4 in Mobridge: Je-
remy Means and Jeremy Meeks
tied for fourth place with a score of
76, winning $460 each; Ty Manke
tied for 6th with a 75 getting $121;
Mid Western Rodeo in Manawa,
WI, – Ty Thompson, 6th with score
of 74, $266; Mandan Rodeo Days in
North Dakota, July 2-4 – James
Willert, for 5th place, score 76,
check for $670; Greeley Stampede,
June 20-July 4 – Louie Brunson,
Chad Ferley and Cole Elshere, tie
for second with score of 84, $1,634
each; Final – Chad Ferley, 87,
$1,650 and Louie Brunson, fifth
with score of 80, $350; Average –
Chad Ferley first with 171 points,
$2,884 and Louie fifth with 164
points, $673. Black Hills Roundup
in Belle Fourche, July 4-6 – Chad
won second with a score of 88,
check of $3,867. Chad is sixth in
the World Standings with winnings
of $37,978.
Please call or take your local
news to the Press office for the next
two weeks, as I will be attending a
family reunion in Colorado.
Thanks.
Wow! What a week and the 4th
of July celebration was great, well
except for the little shower we had
during lunch hour. Some of our res-
idents endured the weather and
enjoyed their lunch underneath the
gazebo. Austin Romero grilled the
brats and hot dogs and they were
awesome!
Shorty Ireland went out for the
day with family and the that
evening he took in their fantastic
fireworks show. Anyone who hasn’t
seen their performance should take
it in next year at the baseball field
it’s absolutely awesome!
First off, I want to welcome Joy
Parker back home. She was sick,
but she’s back and we sure love her.
Her family and friends stop by
quite often.
Jolaine Chapman dropped in to
see her mom, Becky Chapman.
Becky might not say too much but
she listens and she will give that
hand squeeze and it tells it all!
Betty Kusick came by to see
Bunny Green. We visited about the
fishing trip to Pierre next Tuesday,
16. She might go with and show us
how to catch some real fish. Bunny
also got to go for an overnight stay
this week, and had a visit from her
friends, Glen and Lucy Freeman.
They also had the pleasure of visit-
ing with their sister, Clara Belle
Weller.
On Tuesday, Frances Terkilsen
called Bingo for us and Geraldine
Allen came along to play.
Pat Kozlik stopped by to see
Ruth Klundt, Bunny Green, and
others. She always has some of the
town news!
Grandma Emma Jarl went to
the firework show over in Philip
with Stan, Deb, Trey and Savan-
nah. It started at dusk and went on
for a short while, there were some
very pretty fireworks and some
awful loud ones too.
Ray Becker got to go out for the
4th, his uncle, David Hammel,
came and picked him up. He had a
great day.
Melford Koester got a surprise
visit from his son, Fred. It was an
early Christmas for Mel as he got
new shirts, sweats, etc. Mel is re-
ally lookin’ good these days!
Arlyss Klundt and Raynita
drove down to see his mom, Ruth,
and took her out for some of miss
Jean’s delicious pizza, which is
Ruth’s favorite food.
All the Wilmarth’s were in this
week to visit with their mother,
Alice. Alice is having mixed feel-
ings on the new fence we put in. I
hope she’ll grow to like it and take
advantage of going out and sitting
in the fenced area, since it’s for
their enjoyment!
We really appreciate all those
who come by each week to visit.
Come again!
Murdo Ranch Rodeo to
include fun for all ages
The annual Murdo Ranch Rodeo
promises fun for all ages this year
with added events including a
mini-bronc ride and a boot and
candy scramble for the kids.
The ranch rodeo will take place
at the Murdo Rodeo Arena on Sat-
urday, July 20 at 5 p.m. with the
calcutta starting at 4:30 p.m.
Spectators and participants will
enjoy events such as: stray gather-
ing, a hide race, trailer loading,
candy and boot scrambles, and a
mini-bronc ride.
Teams entered this far include:
Newsam Angus Ranch, Steinke
Horse Shoeing, Rozen Hill and
Roghair Ranch. Up to 10 teams
may enter the event and will have
a chance at a 100 percent payback
added purse.
Kevin Pinney, Philip, and Dean
Hawk, Rosebud, will provide mini-
ture horses for the mini-bronc ride
for children ages 7-14. All children
entered will receive a $5 concession
ticket sponsored by the Turner
Youth Foundation and the high
point ride in the mini-broncs will
receive a buckle sponsored by the
Hill Ranch of White River. The
mini-bronc ride is sponsored by
Donna and Kelly Green.
A Top Hand Award sponsored by
the CJ Rea Ranch will be awarded
and first place jackets will be given
to the winning team. The jackets
are sponsored by Range Country
and Prairie Pizza.
Entertainment will follow the
rodeo at the Rusty Spur.
The Ranch Rodeo committee,
made up of has been working hard
to get the event lined up, as well as
making improvements on the
arena. With the help of a donation
from the Chamber of Commerce,
proceedings from the ranch rodeo,
and other community donations,
Lori Waldron, Ranch Rodeo com-
mitte, said the arena will be
equiped with lights in the near fu-
ture, making it easier for the com-
munity to host other rodeo events,
better utilizing the facility.
Other rodeo sponsors include:
Cowboy Construction, Mike and
Lori Waldron, Rusty Spur, Pioneer
Country Mart, Newsam Angus
Ranch, Christopher Nix and Donna
and Kelly Green.
For more information, contact
Kelly Green at 530-5226 or 669-
3310 or Sharon Connot at 516-
0800.
to Interior to attend the Interior
Rodeo on the 5th. The Interior citi-
zens and their roping club are to be
commended for their hard work
and detail. It spoke well of thier ef-
forts.
Frankie and Myrth enjoyed the
week of the 4th with son Dave Bau-
man and his wife Sandy of Carson,
North Dakota, Jean of Loveland,
Colorado, Bill and Virginia Strat-
ton also of Loveland and Steve and
wife from back east. The group also
stayed and visited with Frank and
Myrth’s daughter that lives in this
area.
Norma Hopkins enjoyed The 4th
of July with grandkids Robert, Jen-
nifer, Isiah, Klarissa and Mathew.
The young man that was so re-
spectful last week was accompa-
nied by his young friend and can I
blame age, I do not seem to remem-
ber her name.
Our dining room tables are dec-
orated by Lois Pettyjohn this
month with yellow sunflowers in a
vase and a doily.
Chris and Anitalyn returned
home last week and her dad has
been released from the hospital.
Thought of the week: Accept the
challenges so you may feel the ex-
hilaration of victory.
Last Monday morning, I went
over the the care center to listen to
Lois Pettyjohn play the piano for
the residents while they sang, but
unfortunately Lois came down with
a bug and was unable to play. The
residents started the week right
anyway with their hour of singing.
The ambulance took Joy Parker
for a quick ride to the hospital. I
stopped at the care center Satur-
day evening, and the sandman had
her full attention. The sandman
also had the attention of Bunny,
Clara Belle, Ruth, Emma and
Edith I noticed.
The quilters, Margie, Susie,
Betty, Marie and Lova, were busy
this last Wednesday afternoon.
When I stopped, Shirley had
slipped home to visit her company.
My apology to Margie for writing
too much. Things are fine now.
Liz and helpers here at the
Gateway Apartments put on a good
July 4 feed in the community room
for everyone to enjoy.
I was busy with Chris and Ani-
talyn and boys. We were out to
Kelly’s for awhile, and then at-
tended that spectacular fireworks
display at the softball field. Several
citizens combined their supply and
set them off for everyone to enjoy.
I accompanied Chris and family
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Community …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
WANTED
Dam Repair
or other
dirt work
Tom DeVries
Belvidere • 605-891-8022
Kennebec Telephone
Construction
605-869-2220
Excavation work of ALL
types! Back Hoe
Trenching
Excavation
Waterers
Tire tanks
Midland “C” baseball team. This season they played five games, against Kadoka and Philip. Back row, from left: Cass Finn,
Abby Finn, Bobbi Jarvi, Jess Jones and Colby Fosheim. Front: coach Jenna Finn, Ashley Hand, Kash Block, Logan Sammons
and coach Katie Sammons. Not pictured: Eagan Fitzgerald and Kaitlyn Schofield.
Midland baseball finishes season
Midland “T” baseball team. This season they played six games, against Murdo, Kadoka and Philip. Back row: Johnathon
Neuharth, Josie Jones, Ellie Nemec, Morgan Sammons, Ridge Furnival, Don Schofield and Cole Finn. Front: coach Jenna
Finn, Sarah Huston, Karlee Block, Dacoda Harry, Fayth Martin, Kalli Fosheim and coach Katie Sammons. Not pictured:
Evan Blye, Stetson Jones and Rydek Neilan. --courtesy photos
Kadoka defeats Philip baseball team
Interior SDRA Rodeo results
Marcus Herber hits a double.
Geoffrey DeVries is safe at second.
Colby Porch heading and Matt Nelson heeling in team roping.
Sonnie Gartner in breakaway roping.
Kelsey Lensegrav competed in the barrel racing.
The Kadoka “A” team hosted Philip on Tuesday, July 2.
Kadoka defeated Philip in tough game.
Isiah Hogen (above) gets a base hit and advances the run-
ners.
Lavin Bendt scoops up a ground ball.
SD 6.0 $244.61
5. Tye Hale Faith, SD
6.5 $157.25
6. Jayce Doan McKenzie, ND
7.4 $87.36
Team Roping
1. Eli Lord, 5.3 $754.46
Jade Nelson, 5.3 $754.46
2. Tucker Dale, 5.7 $624.38
Levi Lord, 5.7 $624.38
3. Devin McGrath, 5.8 $494.30
Dalton Ritcher, 5.8 $494.30
4. Don Bettelyoun, 5.9 $364.22
Lynn Williams, 5.9 $364.22
5. Tyrell Moody, 6.1 $234.14
Rory Brown, 6.1 $234.14
6. Jake Nelson, 6.2 $130.08
Jeff Nelson 6.2 $130.08
Interior Frontier Days Rodeo
was held in conjuction with the
Town of Interior Fourth of July cel-
ebration on July 4 and 5.
Bareback Riding
1. Corey Evans Valentine, NE
74 $412.03
2. Joe Wilson Long Valley, SD
72 $340.99
3. Chance Englebert Burdock, SD
71 $269.95
4. Lonny Lesmeister Rapid City,
SD 67 $163.39
5. Wesley Cole Atkinson, NE
67 $163.39
6. Shane O'Connell Rapid City, SD
66 $71.04
Barrel Racing
1. Shelby VinsonWorthing, SD
17.04 $707.14
2. Jorry Lammers Carpenter, WY
17.08 $585.22
3. Wendy Suhn Hermosa, SD
17.31 $463.30
4. Lann Shorb Belle Fourche, SD
17.36 $280.42
5. Katie Lensgrav Interior, SD
17.36 $280.42
6 Kylee Cahoy Sheridan, WY
17.38 $121.92
Bull Riding
1. Casey Henninger Ft. Pierre, SD
75 $445.44 $143.37
2. Chasen Cole Hermosa, SD
72 $368.68 $143.37
3. Tyson Donavon Sturgis, SD
67 $291.84 $143.37
4. Ground Money
$215.04
5. Ground Money
$430.12/3= $143.37 $138.28
6.
Calf Roping
1. Chad Pelster Belle Fourche, SD
13.6 $556.80
2. Carson Musick Pierre, SD
14.9 $460.80
3. Treg Schaak Edgemont,SD
15.1 $364.80
4. Mark Cuny Porcupine, SD
16.5 $268.80
5. Jayce Doan McKenzie, ND
18.0 $172.80
6. Rex Treeby Hecla, SD
22.2 $96.00
Ladies Breakaway
1. Jill Jandreau Kimball, SD
2.1 $672.86
2. Toree Gunn Wasta, SD
2.1 $672.86
3. Syerra Christensen Kennebec,
SD 2.4 $532.03
4. Samantha Nelson Creighton, SD
2.6 $438.14
5. Jacque Murray Isabel, SD
3.1 $344.36
6. Katie Jo Morgan Valentine, NE
4.2 $250.37
7. Tana Bonnet Rapid City, SD
4.6 $165.48
8. Brenda White Oelriches, SD
4.7 $62.58
Saddle Bronc
1. Lane Stirling Buffalo, SD
75 $545.66
2. Travis Schroth Buffalo Gap, SD
73 $404.54
3. Trell Etbauer Grover, TX
73 $404.54
4. Eric Addison Caputa, SD
69 $216.38
5. Seth Longbrake Howes, SD
69 $216.38
6. Cole HindmanBelvidere, SD
66 $94.08
Sr Mens Breakaway
1. Lynn Williams Faith, SD
1.7 $556.80
2. Terry McPherson Sturgis, SD
1.9 $460.80
3. Jerry Sharp Longvalley
2.1 $364.80
4. John Hoven McLaughlin, SD
2.4 $268.80
5. Lyle Wilcox Red Owl, SD
2.7 $134.40
6. Mark Schumacher Wolsey, SD
2.7 $134.40
Steer Wrestling
1. Ty Melvin Tryon, NE
4.3 $463.01
2. JB Lord Sturgis, SD
4.3 $463.01
3. Troy Wilcox Red Owl, SD
5.4 $331.97
4. Jerod Schwarting White River,
Good Luck at Nationals …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Harriet Noteboom,
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 13-3
NOTICE TO CREDITORS,
Notice is given that on May 6, 2013, John
Daum, whose address is 225 E. Dakota,
Spearfish, South Dakota 57783, was ap-
pointed as personal representative of the
Estate of Fae Johnston.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal
representative or may be filed with the
clerk with a copy of the claim mailed to
the personal representative.
Dated May 30, 2013.
/s/ John Daum
John Daum
225 E. Dakota
Spearfish, SD 57783
Lester Nies
Hood, & Nies, P.C.
109 Main Street
P.O. Box 759
Spearfish, SD 57783-0759
[Published July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013]
)
)SS
)
SPECIAL MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
June 26, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in special session at 1:00
p.m., Wednesday, June 26, 2013 in the
Commissioner's Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Glen
called the meeting to order with mem-
bers Larry Denke, Jim Stilwell and Ron
Twiss present. Larry Johnston arrived
shortly after the meeting began. The pur-
pose of the meeting was to attend to mat-
ters that had arisen since the last
meeting and review 2014 Jackson
County budget requests.
Chairman Bennett moved the meeting to
the basement of the courthouse due to
the air conditioner not working.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
At 1:07 p.m., Twiss moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to interview applicants for the
WIC / CHN Secretary and Deputy Audi-
tor. Four persons were interviewed for
the WIC / CHN Secretary. Chip Rom-
bough, S. D. Public Health, and Vicki
Daly, WIC / CHN Nurse were present for
these interviews. One person was inter-
viewed for Deputy Auditor. Vicki Wilson,
Auditor, was present for this interview.
The board came out of executive session
at 3:33 p.m.
Johnston moved, Denke seconded, that
Tammy Soulek be hired as Deputy Audi-
tor starting July 1, 2013 for a 90 day pro-
bationary period with beginning wage of
$10.00 per hour.
Rose Bennett, Director of Equalization,
met with the board. She reported that a
company has requested records from
that office and inquired what should be
charged. Following discussion, Denke
moved, Twiss seconded, that a charge of
$1,500.00 for director of equalization
property records be charged, plus ship-
ping costs and sales tax.
Rose Bennett reported that the second
computer in the Director of Equalization
office needs to be replaced as the
mother board is going out.
Rose Bennett reported that a county res-
ident has applied for the disabled vet-
eran’s exemption. She reported that the
state has informed her that the Commis-
sioners can allow the exemption to be in-
cluded in 2013 and this year’s
assessment be adjusted, or the county
can request that the resident reapply for
next year. Stilwell moved, Denke sec-
onded, that the county request that the
resident reapply in November 2013 for
the exemption to take place in 2014.
Rose Bennett requested authorization to
attend the annual assessor’s school in
September, and requested that registra-
tion payment for classes be approved.
Johnston moved, Denke seconded, that
Rose Bennett be authorized to attend the
annual assessor’s school and that regis-
tration and book in the amount of
$340.00 be approved.
The board was notified that the Nebraska
National Forests and Grasslands will be
holding a consultation meeting on July
24, 2013 at the National Grasslands Vis-
itor Center, Wall, SD for interested par-
ties to participate in the development of
a Programmatic Agreement with the S.
D. State Historic Preservation Office.
The following quotes were received for
replacement of the larger air conditioning
unit and new furnace.
3 B’s Heating and Air Conditioning,
Philip, SD .American Standard 1 –
120,000 BTU 2 stage variable speed
propane furnace and thermostat; 1 – 5
ton 3 phase air conditioner and 1 - 5 ton
aluminum coil; propane plumbing inside
building and ductwork $13,954.11;
Ken’s Refrigeration, Wall, SD: Lennox
2 – 85,000 BTU propane furnaces with
thermostat and twinning kit; 2 – 36,000
BTU, air conditioners; ductwork to hook
up to existing ductwork, chimney piping
for furnaces, linesets for air conditioners
and remove old, equipment; does not in-
clude electrical, disposal of old equip-
ment and fork lift to remove old air
condition from roof $13,879.26;
Pietz Heating and Air Conditioning,
Pierre, SD: Lennox ML193 LP gas fur-
nace; Lennox TSA060 3 phase air con-
ditioning unit; labor, materials, mileage to
install equipment; disposal of old equip-
ment; does not include electrical, re-
moval of A/C unit from roof, and exterior
LP, plumbing or tank $11,943.00;
Action Mechanical, Rapid City, SD: Re-
place the compressor on the existing
system with a 6 ton 3PH, with new Freon
$3,168.00. Due to short notice was not
able to provide pricing for new furnace
and air conditioning units.
No action was taken on the air condition-
ing and furnace quotes at this time.
Discussion was held on new computers
for Director of Equalization, Treasurer
and Auditor offices. Report was made
that the Treasurer has gotten the Gov-
Teller system to work, and that Connect-
ing Point has reported that Microsoft will
be discontinuing support for Windows XP
and that planning to replace computers
next year would be advised. Johnston
moved, Stilwell seconded, that the Audi-
tor, Treasurer and Director of Equaliza-
tion office each order one computer at
this time.
2014 Jackson County budget requests
and estimated salary information was
presented to the board for their review.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. met with the
board. The 2014 Highway Department
budget request was reviewed.
A water line easement for Kenny Fox to
have water line cross county highway
right of way was discussed. The roads
affected are Pine Springs Road (CS 82)
and Plum Creek Road (CS 84). Denke
moved, Stilwell seconded, that the water
line easement be approved.
Discussion was held on the signing plan
that is to be in place in 2013.
Discussion was held on obtaining gravel
at Addison’s, and that a new mining per-
mit will need to be obtained for the new
location.
Dwight Deaver reported that Ken Sheaf-
fer has applied for highway maintenance
worker. Denke moved, Twiss seconded,
that Ken Sheaffer be hired as full time
highway maintenance worker for a 90
day probationary period at $10.50 per
hour.
Twiss left the meeting.
Discussion resumed on air conditioner
and furnace quotes. Denke moved,
Johnston seconded, that the quote of
3B’s Heating and Air Conditioning be ac-
cepted.
Discussion was held on holding the reg-
ular July meeting on July 3rd instead of
July 8th.
There being no further business to come
before the board Denke moved, Stilwell
seconded, that the meeting be adjourned
and that the board meet in regular ses-
sion at 9:00 a.m., July 3, 2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Glen A. Bennett, Chairman
[Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $69.54]
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING TO ADOPT
FY 2014 BUDGET
A public hearing will be held at the Murdo
Project Office, 307 Main St., Murdo, SD
on July 17, 2013, at 10:45 A.M. (CDT) to
consider the proposed Water Develop-
ment District budget for Fiscal Year (FY)
2014, beginning January 1, 2014.
The purpose of holding this hearing is to
provide the public an opportunity to con-
tribute to and comment on the Water De-
velopment District proposed operating
budget for Fiscal Year 2014.
Persons interested in presenting data,
opinions, and arguments for and against
the proposed budget may appear, either
in person or by representative, at the
hearing and be heard and given an op-
portunity for a full and complete discus-
sion of all items in the budget.
[ P u b -
lished July 11, 2013, at the total approx-
imate cost of $10.47]
Town of Belvidere
Regular Meeting
June 10, 2013
A motion was made by Rudy Reimann to
call the meeting to order. Wayne Hind-
man seconded the motion. The following
people were present: John Rodgers,
Rudy Reimann, Wayne Hindman, Jo
Rodgers, Scot O’Bryan, Frank Carlson,
Toni Romero, Wally Wells, Casey Jensen
and Jerry Sanftner.
OLD BUSINESS:
Minutes for the May 6, 2013 meeting
were read. With there being no changes,
Rudy Reimann made a motion to accept
the minutes. Wayne Hindman seconded
to motion.
West Central had come and marked the
poles that will be getting the new style
security lights and staked the ground for
the whole new security lights and poles.
NEW BUSINESS:
There being no objections presented for
the businesses renewing their Malt Bev-
erage License. A motion was made by
Rudy Reimann and seconded by Wayne
Hindman to approve the renewals. Jo will
send in the fees and paperwork to the
state for their approval.
The city council will be taking sealed bids
on the east town pasture land. Bids will
need to be into the city office or mailed to
the city by July 8, 2013 by 5:00 p.m. local
time. The bid opening will be at 7:30 p.m.
July 8, 2013 during the town council
meeting.
The South Dakota Department of Trans-
portation gave their approval on the two
new culverts to be installed.
John Rodgers mentioned that a repre-
sentative from the South Dakota Central
Enhancement District stopped to visit
and look over the town. Jo mentioned
that the membership fees are due. A mo-
tion was made by Rudy Reimann and
seconded by Wayne Hindman to keep
our membership.
Jo informed the council that on July 10,
2013 the Postal Service will be having a
community meeting on the reduction of
hours for the Belvidere Post Office. The
meeting will start at 5:00 p.m. local time.
Discussion was held on the boundaries
and fence line on Outlot B-1 for putting in
a road that will go around the Belvidere
Dam. A motion was made by Rudy
Reimann and seconded by Wayne Hind-
man to call Brosz Engineering to have
them come and locate all the pins.
BILLS APPROVED AND PAID:
Central SD Enhancement
District, dues . . . . . . . . . . .205.00
Ernie’s Building Center,
fencing supplies . . . . . . .1,981.85
Golden West, phone
& internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107.38
Jo Manke-Rodgers, wages . . . .50.79
Kadoka Press,
publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82.05
SD Dept of Revenue,
license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300.00
SD One Call, locates . . . . . . . . . .3.15
Tollefson Law Office,
consult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50.00
Tom DeVries, dirt work . . . . . . .234.00
West Central, electricity . . . . . .578.93
WR/LJ, water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62.50
With there being no further business a
motion was made by Wayne Hindman to
adjourn the meeting. Rudy Reimann sec-
onded the motion. The next town council
meeting will be July 8, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
in the city office..
John L. Rodgers
Council President
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $35.10]
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
June 19, 2013
A regular meeting of the Town of Cotton-
wood was held at Town Hall on Wednes-
day evening, June 19, 2013 at 7 p.m.
Present were JC Heath, Dave Griffee,
Bernie Hanks and Doug Hovland. Absent
Jeff Heath.
The meeting was called to order by JC
Heath.
New Business: The monthly bills were
presented.
The following bills were approved:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.70
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89.30
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,861.71
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,842.55
With there being no other business to
discuss, a motion was made and sec-
onded to adjourn. The next regular meet-
ing will be held on July 17,2013 at 7 p.m.
at Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published July 11, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $12.68]
NOTICE
of Intent to Mine Gravel
Notice is hereby given that the Jackson
County Highway Department, P O Box
594, Kadoka, SD 57543, will be conduct-
ing a gravel mining operation at SE4SE4
ex 15 acres & hwy, Section 24,
T 1 S, R 24 E, Jackson County, South
Dakota. The general location is four
miles east and seven and one-quarter
miles north of Belvidere, SD.
The operation is to begin August 15,
2013 and will be completed to include
final reclamation by August 15, 2023.
Proposed future use of the affected land
will consist of re-grading, replacing top-
soil and re-seeding to allow the area to
be returned to pasture land.
For additional information contact the
Jackson County Highway Department,
(605) 837–2410, or the S. D. Department
of Environment and Natural Resources,
Minerals and Mining Program, 523 East
Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501-3182
(605) 773–4201.
[Published July 11 & 18, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $22.76]
Legal Deadline
Friday at Noon
Good Luck at
National High School Finals Rodeo
July 24-28 • Rock Springs, WY
H & H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287
BankWest
Gene Christensen: 837-2281
BankWest Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Midwest Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600
Kadoka Clinic
837-2257
Discount Fuel
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Phone: 837-2271
People’s Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697
J&S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376
Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston:
837-2241
Double H Feed & Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976
Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Kadoka Booster Club
Promoting Spirit
State Farm Insurance
Jan Hewitt: 859-2559
Peters Excavation
Brent Peters: 837-2945
Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350
Kadoka Press
Ronda & Robyn: 837-2259
Midland Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen: 843-2536
West River Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Groven’s Chemical
Rick Groven: 837-2550
Stadium Sports
Mission, SD: 1-888-502-3066
Headlee Vet Clinic
Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee
Kadoka: 837-2431
Philip: 859-2610
Katie Lensegrav • Cattle Cutting True Buchholz • Cattle Cutting
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
EMPLOYMENT
TEACHING POSITIONS OPEN AT
MOBRIDGE-POLLOCK School Dis-
trict #62-6 for 2013-2014 School
Year: HS Math; MS Special Educa-
tion; and Birth to 2nd Grade Special
Education. Contact Tim Frederick at
605-845-9204 for more information.
Resumes and applications can be
mailed to the school Attn: Tim Fred-
erick at 1107 1st Avenue East in Mo-
bridge SD 57601. Open until filled.
EOE, Signing Bonus available.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact: Dou-
glas County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
HUTCHINSON COUNTY HIGHWAY
SUPERINTENDENT POSITION.
Duties include supervising staff,
scheduling shifts, planning and or-
ganizing department activities,
preparing budget, representing de-
partment at public meetings. Must
maintain valid SD Driver’s and Com-
mercial Driver’s License. Salary de-
pendent on experience. Applications
from Hutchinson County Auditor’s
Office, 140 Euclid Room 128, Olivet
SD 57052 (605) 387-4212. Applica-
tions close 4:30 p.m. July 26, 2013.
STORE MANAGER - JOHN DEERE
DEALERSHIP. Store manager
sought by multi-store John Deere
dealership operation. Position cur-
rently open is at Greenline Imple-
ment, Miller, SD, a part of C&B
Operations, headquartered out of
Gettysburg, SD. Applicants should
possess the ability to manage sales,
parts, and service personnel in a
growth oriented dealership. We offer
progressive marketing plans, com-
petitive pay, full benefit package, in-
cluding bonus plan. Please send
resume to Mark Buchholz, at buch-
holzm@deerequipment.com or call
Mark at 605-769-2030.
HEALTH/BEAUTY
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-on
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedicated
Routes *2500 Miles Weekly *$50
Tarp Pay (888) 692-5705.
www.drive4ewwylie.com.
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal place-
ment of mesh for pelvic organ pro-
lapse or stress urinary incontinence
between 2005 and the present? If
the mesh caused complications, you
may be entitled to compensation.
Call Charles H. Johnson Law and
speak with female staff members 1-
800-535-5727.
FOR SALE
10 CHOICE COMMERCIAL ACRES.
Any business will work here. Be-
tween Hill City and Custer on High-
way 16. Has two wells, two homes,
six good out buildings. CFD.
$100,000 down. Vaun H. Boyd. 605-
673-5503.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892
SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Digital
Phone-Satellite. You`ve Got A
Choice! Options from ALL major
service providers. Call us to learn
more! CALL Today. 888-337-5453
HIGHSPEED INTERNET every-
where By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW &
GO FAST! 1-888-518-8672.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
The PDR Hunt is a FREE deer hunt
for physically disabled children ages
12-18, September 13-15, 2013.
Clark, South Dakota. Call Dean Ras-
mussen (605) 233-0331, www.pdry-
outhhunt.com.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up to
48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy,
A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
July
12-13-
14-15:
Now You
See Me
Rated:
PG-13
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Suduko Answers
Sudoku
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
HOUSE FOR SALE: 1 bedroom, 1
bath, large two car unattachd
garage, Kadoka. Sam or Danielle
Stoddard 462-6244 or 441-2670.
K52-4tp
IMMEDIATE POSITION OPEN: at
the Kadoka City Bar for a part-time
bartender, flexible schedule to work
either morning or night shifts, ap-
proximately 16-24 hours per week.
Required application forms are
available at either the City Finance
Office or the Kadoka City Bar. Com-
pleted application form must be re-
turned to the City Finance Officer,
PO Box 58, Kadoka, SD 57543 be-
fore 4:00 p.m. Friday, July 26, 2013.
EOE K52-3tc
SERVICE: Need a plumber? Li-
censed plumbing contractor for all
your indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call Dale
Koehn 441-1053 or leave a mes-
sage at 837-0112. KP52-4tc
POSITIONS OPEN: Sunset Grill
and Subway (former Happy Chef
building) in Kadoka have positions
open for cooks and sandwich artists
with a variety of duties, all shifts
available. Begin work mid-July.
Apply in person at Subway.
KP52-2tc
HELP WANTED: Part-time mainte-
nance person. Call 800-877-1113.
K51-2tc
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff, and assistant
manager position(s) are available for
Aw! Shucks Café opening soon at
909 Main Street in Kadoka. Please
apply within or contact Teresa or
Colby Shuck for more information:
837-2076. K50-3tc
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay. Deliv-
ery available and volume discount
available. Call 798-5413.
KP49-11tc
HOUSE KEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED: High
school and college students are wel-
come to apply. Will train. Apply at ei-
ther America’s Best Value Inn and
Budget Host Sundowner in Kadoka
or call 837-2188 or 837-2296.
KP47-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Weed Sprayer. Seasonal
part-time employment spraying
county highway right of way. Com-
mercial herbicide license required or
to be obtained before start of work.
Pre-employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
KP52-3tc
POSITION OPEN: Part-time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Tractor operator to mow
county road right of way, and per-
form other duties as directed. Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447.
KP48-5tc
POSITION OPEN: Full time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Truck driver, heavy equip-
ment operator, light equipment oper-
ator. Experience preferred, but will
train. CDL required, or to be ob-
tained in six months. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Benefits package. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted. Informa-
tion 837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. KP48-5tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
is accepting applications for full time
Deputy Director of Equalization. Se-
lected applicant may be required to
become certified as per SDCL. Must
work well with the public, and have
clerical and computer skills. Jackson
County benefits include health insur-
ance, life insurance, S.D. Retire-
ment, paid holidays, vacation and
sick leave. Position open until filled.
Beginning wage $9.00 per hour. Ap-
plications are available at the Jack-
son County Auditor’s office or send
resume to Jackson County, PO Box
280, Kadoka, SD 57543. Ph: 837-
2422. KP48-5tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877-
867-4185. K45-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
Thank you to KCBA for the deli-
cious lunch that you served at the
Haakon/Jackson County 4-H Horse
Show. It was much appreciated by
the contestants and their families.
Haakon/Jackson County 4-H
Thank Yous
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
Horses test the strength of the
cowboys at the wild horse ride
Brett Gartner holds tight while the horse fights during the wild horse ride during
the ranch rodeo in Interior on Saturday, July 7.
Shannon Gartner
Kempton Olney
Agriculture …
July 11, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE
SALE. SALE TIME: 10:00 A.M. (MT)
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC
& FALL CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEF-
SAFY DDQ
TUESDAY, AUG. 6: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 13: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY
SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY
SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT.
17÷ FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-
DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED
HEIFEF SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT.
SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS
SALE, MUST DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE
PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|-
f|ed NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS
ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF &
STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, JULY 16: OPEN CONSICN-
MENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE CAT-
TLE SALE.
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAV-
ACANZA HOFSE SALE. CATALOG DEADLINE: MON., AU-
CUST 5. CO TO www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com FOF CONSICN-
MENT FOFMS.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JULY 9, 2DJS
A b1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups. MorKe1 s1rong. TÞe oous
Þove reo11g 1oged on 1Þe ue1gÞ1 u11Þ 1Þ1s good
gross. TÞese oous ore br1ng1ng good moneg per
Þeod.
WEIGHUPS:
JOEL DEERING - WASTA
1................................................CHAF COW 1305=..................$89.00
2 ..............................................CHAF COWS 1463=..................$87.00
6 ..............................................CHAF COWS 1301=..................$86.00
1..................................................FED COW 1310=..................$82.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1340=..................$81.50
SEAN DEAL - DUPREE
1..................................................FED COW 1320=..................$88.00
1..................................................FED COW 1195=..................$84.50
7......................................DLK & DWF COWS 1471=..................$81.00
WILLERT RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2190=................$108.50
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 1940=................$107.00
TK SAMPSON - INTERIOR
1..................................................DLK COW 1410=..................$86.50
2......................................DLK & DWF COWS 1430=..................$80.25
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
1 .................................................FED DULL 1970=................$108.00
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2140=................$107.00
1 .................................................FED DULL 1910=................$105.50
JIM WILLERT - BELVIDERE
1..................................................FED COW 1370=..................$84.50
GARY HOWIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
6................................................DLK HFFTS 889=..................$105.50
BAXTER ANDERS - WALL
1..................................................DLK COW 1320=..................$83.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1255=..................$82.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1240=..................$82.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1490=..................$81.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1340=..................$80.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1265=..................$80.00
1.............................................X DFED COW 1440=..................$79.50
JOE WISHARD - LANTRY
1..................................................DLK COW 1235=..................$83.00
1................................................HEFF COW 1130=..................$82.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1155=..................$80.50
SHANE & SHAD FINN - MIDLAND
1 .................................................FED DULL 1865=................$107.50
TRIPLE T RANCH - RAPID CITY
1..................................................DLK DULL 1860=................$107.00
TRAVIS & JONE ENRIGHT - UNION CENTER
1..................................................DLK DULL 1990=................$106.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
4..................................................DLK COW 1301=..................$82.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1460=..................$80.50
3 ................................................DLK COWS 1177=..................$78.00
3 ................................................DLK COWS 1443=..................$76.00
RANDY VOLMER - OWANKA
1..................................................DLK COW 1200=..................$82.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 1745=................$106.50
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
1................................................HEFF DULL 2085=................$105.00
CHARLIE PROKOP - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK DULL 1930=................$105.00
GENE FERGUSON - HERMOSA
6......................................DLK & DWF COWS 1146=..................$81.75
1..................................................DLK COW 1105=..................$80.00
LARRY SCHELL- WALL
1..................................................DLK COW 1185=..................$81.50
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1400=..................$81.00
RYAN VIG - OPAL
5 ................................................DLK COWS 1265=..................$80.75
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK COW 1655=..................$80.50
1..................................................DLK COW 1570=..................$78.50
ANDY LINN - ELM SPRINGS
10....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1435=..................$80.25
COLBY SHEARER - WALL
1..................................................DLK COW 1550=..................$80.00
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK DULL 1815=................$104.50
EARL PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 .................................................FED DULL 2350=................$104.00
DAN SCHOFIELD - PHILIP
1..................................................DLK DULL 2080=................$104.00
LONNIE ARNESON - ELM SPRINGS
1..................................................DLK DULL 1930=................$104.00
14 ...................................DLK & DWF HFFTS 995=....................$94.00
1............................................DLK COWETTE 980=....................$86.00
CASEY SLOVEK - PHILIP
5................................................FED COWS 1425=..................$79.75
LARRY SWIFT - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1343=..................$79.75
1..................................................DLK COW 1215=..................$79.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1340=..................$77.00
CHAD HANRAHAN - MILESVILLE
1..................................................DLK COW 1475=..................$79.50
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1653=..................$79.25
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2130=................$103.50
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
1..................................................DLK DULL 1905=................$103.50
JOHN & PAULINE STABEN - ORAL
1 .................................................FED DULL 1755=................$103.50
1 .................................................FED DULL 2090=..................$98.50
HOVLAND HEREFORDS - PHILIP
1................................................HEFF DULL 2055=................$103.00
HOSTUTLER RANCHES INC - MIDLAND
1 ...............................................CHAF DULL 2050=................$103.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
1..................................................DLK DULL 1920=................$103.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
1 .................................................DWF COW 1605=..................$79.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1220=..................$78.50
1 .................................................DWF COW 1315=..................$78.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1..................................................DLK COW 1330=..................$79.00
1................................................CHAF COW 1540=..................$77.50
1................................................CHAF COW 1440=..................$76.00
1..................................................DLK COW 1635=..................$75.50
HARLAN & LINDA EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
7 ................................................DLK COWS 1329=..................$78.75
MARY JOHNSTON - BELVIDERE
2..............................................CHAF DULLS 2115=................$102.50
PAUL & GWEN MCCONNELL - CREIGHTON
1..................................................DLK COW 1345=..................$78.50
DAVE JENNINGS - OELRICHS
1..................................................DLK COW 1610=..................$78.00
JACK KERSTENS - PIEDMONT
1..................................................DLK COW 1470=..................$77.50
JERRY WILLERT - KADOKA
1..................................................DLK COW 1475=..................$77.00
KENNY MCILRAVY - PHILIP
4 ....................................CHAF & FED COWS 1518=..................$76.75
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK COWS 1528=..................$76.25
4 ..........................................DLK COWETTES 1081=..................$86.00
CHARLES TIPTON - BOX ELDER
1..................................................DLK COW 1815=..................$75.00
MATT JONES - MIDLAND
1 .................................................DLK HFFT 805=....................$99.00
TRENT SHEARER - WALL
1 .................................................DLK HFFT 975=....................$94.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
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Rent
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Classifieds
Call 837-2259
The Value of Disease
Resistance
During a recent session of col-
lecting wheat samples for disease
analysis with SDSU Small Grains
Pathologist, Shaukat Ali, and Ag
Research Manager, Rick Geppert,
we found a field containing signif-
icant leaf rust. A quick phone call
to the producer revealed that the
field was planted to a variety
known for desirable characteristics
he considered important for that
field, but not resistance to leaf
rust.
The producer knew the variety
was susceptible to leaf rust,
planned to make a fungicide appli-
cation, and did, but not before
there was some level of infection.
We made visits to several other
fields in the area and found little
or no leaf rust.
In this time of relatively high
commodity prices and the proven
effectiveness of fungicides, fungi-
cide applications have become
somewhat commonplace. For some
producers it’s not a question of
whether they will apply a fungi-
cide to their wheat, but when,
which product, and/or how many
times.
This raises the question of the
value to today’s farmers of the ef-
forts of pioneers in wheat breeding
like Norman Borlaug and Edgar
McFadden, who developed wheat
varieties with resistance to rust.
After hearing multiple research re-
ports citing the effectiveness of
fungicide applications at a meeting
in the past year, I somewhat face-
tiously asked the question, is dis-
ease resistance still valuable? The
answer, which I expected, is obvi-
ously, yes.
For most of the fields we sam-
pled on the day referred to earlier,
resistance to leaf rust was working
well, and could very well make a
fungicide application unnecessary.
While leaf, stripe and stem rust
are currently all confirmed to be
present in South Dakota this year,
many wheat fields remain rela-
tively free of those diseases. This
lack of disease is partly due to the
lack of rain many areas have been
experiencing, but also to the resist-
ance bred into the varieties
planted in those fields. If wet
weather does prompt fungicide ap-
plications, the disease resistance
provides some of the protection as
no fungicide is 100% effective, can
be applied at the ideal time, or
lasts long enough to keep the
plants completely free of infection.
Questions are still coming in as
to whether fungicide applications
can still be made to wheat fields.
At least in south-central South
Dakota, about all of the spring and
winter wheat fields are in the milk
stage or later, well past the labeled
time for fungicide applications.
The good news is, once wheat is at
the hard-dough stage, which isn’t
far off, late-season disease infec-
tions will no longer be harmful.
Calendar
8/20-22: DakotaFest, Mitchell
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
When Leafy Spurge's yellow
flowers begin to bloom, landown-
ers can evaluate the effectiveness
of their control program, says Paul
Johnson, SDSU Extension Agron-
omy Field Specialist.
"If you have been doing a good
job at control in the past, it may be
a little slower and, if you have
been doing a really good job, there
may even be fewer plants out there
than last year," Johnson said.
He adds that the only way to get
spurge under control is to be on it
every year and get the root re-
serves depleted so the plants will
start to die.
"A cold winter helps to take out
the spurge when the root reserves
have been depleted," Johnson said.
"As soon as the yellow flowers are
out it is time to start spraying."
Johnson says the control win-
dow is only about one month be-
fore there will be viable seed in the
plant.
"If you also have thistles in with
the spurge you may want to wait a
little until thistles are at bud to
make sure you get good coverage
and control on both of the weeds,"
he said.
But again, Johnson says be
careful not to wait too long.
"Waiting too long only allows
the root reserves to build back up
in the plant, and then you will not
make any progress on getting rid
of the plants. Instead, they will
come back stronger than ever," he
said.
New Control Tools Available
Based on SDSU test plots in
Moody County a new compound
called Perspective® looks like it
should be as good as Tordon® in
controlling Leafy Spurge, but
Johnson says this compound has
fewer use-restrictions; and it is
more environmentally friendly.
"It should be able to be used in
more areas that have a shallow
ground water problem," he said.
"This is the first new product that
has effect on thistles and spurge
that has been developed in the last
40 years."
At present, Perspective is not
labeled on any areas that are
cropped or hayed, Johnson says
until more labeling is done, it will
be limited on where it can be used.
Also some grass injury will need to
be tolerated with its use.
"Usually the grass will recover
the next year," he said. "And, I al-
ways want readers to know that
use of the product's names does
not imply endorsement. Informa-
tion is based on SDSU research
and observations."
Before use, landowners need to
verify information on current prod-
uct labels prior to application.
To learn more, visit iGrow.org.
New control
available for
leafy spurge

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