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Kadoka Press, January 17, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 27
January 17, 2013
~ by Robyn Jones ~
Golden West
Capital Credits
Page 8
Basketball &
Gymnastics
Page 5
Public
Notices
Pages 6 & 7
Classified Ads
Statewide Ads
Page 9
Belvidere
& Norris News
Page 3
Obits:
Arnold Wolden
Clifford Ramsey
Erwin Latham
Page 2
News Briefs …
Funding available: Jackson
Kadoka Economic Develop-
ment Corporation has loan
funds available for businesses.
For information on the pro-
gram please go to our web page
www.growkadoka.com, call
(605)488-0206, or see Jo Beth
Uhlir.
The annual meeting of the
Kadoka Nursing Home will be
held on Wednesday, January
23, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the
nursing home dining room.
Dakota talent Chad Ferley, Jeff
Willert and Paul Tierney.
While the 2013 rodeo season of-
ficially began in October, January
and February provides an opportu-
nity to get a leg-up on the competi-
tion, and can set the tone for a
cowboy’s whole season. During the
two-week span that Rapid City
plays host to these contestants they
will be making their way across the
country trying to compete at thir-
teen different PRCA rodeos with
over seventy-performances.
The PRCA rodeo will be held at
The Rushmore Plaza Civic Center
in the Barnett Arena January 26th
at 1:30 p.m., January 31st at 7:30
p.m., February 1st at 1:30 p.m.,
and February 2nd at 1:30 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. Tickets are on sale now
and can be purchased online at
www.gotmine.com, by phone at 1-
800-GOT-MINE, or in person at
Rushmore Plaza Civic Center Box
Office M-F 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
The Black Hills Stock Show and
Rodeo® is only fifteen days away
and early entries show over 680
contestants will be making their
way to Rapid City, SD for the five-
performance rodeo held January
26th through February 2nd. With
over $156,000.00 paid out to con-
testants in 2012, it easy to see why
the cream of the crop is making
their way north again this year.
Current entries include some of
the more popular 2012 PRCA
World Champions, Trevor Brazile,
Kaycee Field, Jesse Wright and
Mary Walker along with an addi-
tional sixty-one of the one hundred
twenty contestant field seen at the
2012 Wrangler National Finals
Rodeo in Las Vegas, NV, this past
December.
In addition to these famous
names, there are twenty-four more
World Champions that have made
the list for 2013, including South
BHSS & Rodeo bringing the
who’s who of the PRCA
“a comparative bright spot of con-
tained spending” in a nation of fis-
cally short states. Minnesota,
Daugaard said, is $1.1 billion short
at the current time.
While the Governor studiously
avoided education reform topics in
his message, he did announce a
criminal justice effort aimed at
lessening the number of inmates
held in state prisons. Instead, he
noted the results of a criminal jus-
tice work group, highlighting three
of its recommendations.
Those included the creation of
alternative courts for repeat of-
fenders with serious addiction
problems. A pilot program has
shown an impressive 80 percent of
participants back on track, Dau-
gaard said.
He is asking the state to copy
Hawaii’s HOPE program that re-
quires participating drug offenders
to call in each morning for random
testing. Legislation would set up
one urban and one rural pilot pro-
gram.
Third, legislation will be calling
for ways to keep drug, alcohol and
mental health offenders from being
incarcerated. He said 80 percent of
persons admitted to prison are
those who have committed non-vi-
olent crimes.
“This is not being soft on crime,”
said the Governor, “but being
smart on crime.”
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
Gov. Dennis Daugaard com-
pared a recent shoring up of the
State Capitol’s floor to make it
structurally sound for the next 100
years with the efforts of the state to
strike a fiscal structural balance.
Daugaard called both “good
stewardship.”
The Governor delivered this
comparison during the State of the
State address Jan. 8 in Pierre on
the first day of the 2013 legislative
session.
He noted that South Dakota is
Gov touts fiscally conservative state
budget in State of State address
the influence of alcohol. Claimant
lost control of the vehicle; it trav-
eled into a ditch and rolled. The
victim was ejected through the rear
window of the vehicle and died on
scene.
Claimant’s blood alcohol level
was determined to be .281, two
hours after the crash. Claimant
pled guilty to involuntary
manslaughter on October 9, 2012.
The investigation was conducted
by the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion and Rosebud Sioux Tribe Law
Enforcement Services. Assistant
United States Attorney Marie H.
Ruettgers prosecuted the case.
Clairmont was immediately
turned over to the custody of the
US Marshal.
US Attorney Brendan V. John-
son announced that a Norris man
convicted of involuntary
manslaughter was sentenced on
January 10, 2013, by US District
Judge Roberto A. Lange.
Mark Clairmont, age 38, was
sentenced to 33 months in custody,
2 years of supervised release, and
$100 to the Victim Assistance
Fund.
Clairmont was indicted for in-
voluntary manslaughter by a fed-
eral grand jury on June 12, 2012.
The charge stems from an incident
occurring on February 17, 2012,
when Clairmont was driving a
motor vehicle at approximately 79
miles per hour, had been drinking
alcoholic beverages, and was under
Norris man sentenced for
involuntary manslaughter
Jackson County gets taste of winter
Not a nice day …Friday, January11 didn’t start out too bad of a day, however, by late morning snow, ac-
companied by wind, put together a winter storm. Winds picked up as the day went on and several businesses
closed down early. Sporting events were postponed as was some church services on Sunday.
--photo by Ronda Dennis
gler NFR qualifiers Trey Benton
III, of Rock Island, Texas; Kanin
Asay, of Powell, Wyo.; Ardie Maier,
of Timber Lake, S.D.; Trevor Kast-
ner, of Ardmore, Okla.; Cody
Samora, of Cortez, Colo.; Tate
Stratton, of Kellyville, Okla.; Cody
Whitney, of Asher, Okla., Beau
Schroder, of China, Texas; Clayton
Savage, of Casper, Wyo.; Brett
Stall, of Detroit Lakes, Minn.; and
Tag Elliott, of Thatcher, Utah.
The Xtreme Bulls Tour format
features 35 cowboys participating
in a long-go each night with the top
10 riders brought back for a short
round. The Rapid City champion
will be crowned based on the high-
est total score from both nights of
competition. The payout for the
Rapid City Xtreme Bulls event is
$52,000. Monies won at PRCA
Xtreme Bulls Tour stops count to-
wards the 2013 PRCA World
Standings, which determine quali-
fiers for the Wrangler NFR in Las
Vegas.
Performances on Friday, Jan. 25
and Saturday, Jan. 26 begin at 7:30
p.m. (MT).
70 of nation’s top bull
riders converge in
Rapid City, SD
The national PRCA Xtreme
Bulls Tour returns to Rapid City on
Jan. 25-26 at the Black Hills Stock
Show & Rodeo for the 7th Annual
Rapid City Xtreme Bulls. Seventy
of the world’s top bull riders will
converge on the Rushmore Plaza
Civic Center to compete for
$52,000.
The headliners scheduled to
compete at the Rushmore Plaza
Civic Center include 13 bull riding
qualifiers from the 2012 Wrangler
National Finals Rodeo in Las
Vegas, matched against the rank-
est PRCA bulls, many of which
were selected for this past Decem-
ber’s Wrangler NFR.
The reigning World Champion
Cody Teel, of Kountze, Texas is in
the lineup along with 2011 World
Champion Shane Proctor, of Grand
Coulee, Wash., 2004 World Cham-
pion Dustin Elliott, of North Platte,
Nebraska, and fellow 2012 Wran-
PRCA Xtreme Bulls tour set for
Black Hills Stock Show & Rodeo
The Jackson County Commis-
sioner held their meeting on Mon-
day, January 7 at 9 a.m.
Prior to the meeting being called
to order, oaths of office were given
to County Treasurer Cindy Willert
and commissioners Ronnie Twiss
and Larry Johnston. Johnston re-
places Delores Bonenberger on the
board.
Once the meeting was called to
order the minutes and financial
statement were approved.
Two notices of hospitalization
were received and both items re-
quired no action.
Glen Bennett was elected as
board chairman and Larry Denke
was elected vice chairman.
Appointment and designations
were approved: 4-H Advisor Board,
Bennett and Denke; Fair Board,
Bennett and Denke; Library Board,
Johnston; WSD Community Ac-
tion, Johnston; Badlands RC&D,
Denke and Jim Stilwell; Central
SD Enhancement District, Twiss
and Johnston; Local Emergency
Planning committee, Twiss and
Stilwell; JC Weed and Pest Board,
all commissioners and Kelly For-
tune; County surplus property ap-
praisal board, all commissioners;
4-H Advisor Board, Jackie Stilwell,
Nicki Bonenberger and Jim
Cantrell; Fair Board, Ryan Willert,
Jessica Magelky, JoBeth Uhlir,
Amy Smiley, Francie Davis and
Mark Slovek; Library Board, Ruby
VanderMay, Cloretta Eisenbraun,
Sydne Lenox, Diana Coller and
Loretta Ward.
Terry Deuter was also appointed
as Veteran’s Service Officer for a
period of four years.
Listed on the agenda for the af-
ternoon session was abatements,
but were reviewed and approved in
the morning session.
Two county residents were ap-
proved to make payments to the
treasurer for past due taxes.
Following a recess for lunch the
board reconvened at 1 p.m.
Veryl Prokop was present to dis-
cuss CS 28, which leads to his prop-
erty south of Kadoka along the
White River.
Moving CS 28 is complete and at
a previous meeting the commis-
sioner had directed Highway Su-
perintendent Dwight Deaver to
close the old portion of this road.
When Deaver contact Prokop about
closing the old road, since the new
road has been built, Prokop was
not in favor of this. According to the
commissioners, the purpose of clos-
ing the old road was because a new
road was built to use, it was a large
cost for county and could create li-
ability issues since maintenance
will be discontinued on the old
road. The reason for moving the
road was for safety concerns since
the road was next to the bank of
the White River and the edge of the
road was falling in to the river.
Prokop stated that he was con-
cerned with closing the old portion
of the road incase someone traveled
down the road and wasn’t aware of
the road change and would have an
accident. Another reason was if he
(Prokop) was unable to get a truck
down the road, in one section of the
old road, panels could be set up and
cattle could be loaded from there.
The commissioners stated that it
was important (for liability issues)
that using the old road needed to
be discontinued.
Assistant Jackson County
States Attorney Chip Kemnitz
stated that the legal way for any
road to be added, changed or re-
moved from the highway road sys-
tem was a petition needed to be
filed, advertise the changes for two
weeks, hold a hearing and pass a
resolution. Although the procedure
was not done legally, the road
changes were listed in the meeting
minutes.
Kemnitz recommended the com-
missioners pass a resolution with
at the meeting approving the road
change.
Kemnitz also recommended that
the old road be closed with a gate
and proper signage be installed
stating “road closed” and “no tres-
passing.” With the gate and signs
installed, it should prevent the
county and land owner from any li-
ability issues should an accident
occur.
Prokop also stated that even
though the road is improved it’s
still not finished, and in the future
the county needs to look at reduc-
ing the slope of the new road.
Later in the meeting a resolu-
tions was passed approving the
road changes.
The water statement from
WR/LJ was discussed. It has been
determined that there is a leak be-
tween the main line and the shop
building in Interior. It was stated
that the leak will need to be re-
paired and it is the county’s respon-
sibility.
Twiss questioned Deaver as to
the progress with changing the
flow to Lost Dog Creek. He said the
flow changes needed to be submit-
ted to the Corp of Engineers.
Deaver presented a price quote
for a jack hammer to use for in-
stalling road signs. The purchase
was approved.
Motion carried to enter in to ex-
ecutive session at 2:20 p.m. They
returned to open session at 2:41
p.m. with no action taken.
Emergency Manager Jackie Stil-
well stated that Green Valley Fire
Department is now receiving calls
through Pennington County 911.
Johnston stated that the
Belvidere Fire Department has ex-
pressed interest in also going
through Pennington County. Jackie
Stilwell said that all the equipment
has already been installed and the
only costs would be for the pagers.
Twiss and Jackson County Sher-
iff Ray Clements Jr. questioned
Kadoka Ambulance President
Jackie Stilwell and Kadoka Fire
Chief David Johnson as to why the
ambulance and fire department
kept a direct land line phone num-
ber to receive calls when 911 emer-
gency paging is available.
Clements stated that at a recent
house fire, the call was reported on
the local number instead of using
911 and it was approximately 15
minutes before he knew where the
fire was.
Twiss said that the county pays
a lot for the 911 service through
Pennington County and it should
be used, and if it’s not going to be
used, then why have it?
Jackie Stilwell stated that when
the local number is dialed the call
is answered by a local EMT with a
radio. The call can be heard by the
local EMTs and a crew is assem-
bled to go on the call. With 911 calls
there is some delay in receiving the
call.
Johnson said that when 911
began it was the fire department’s
decision to keep the local land line
number.
Clements stated that if the call
does not go through 911 then he
does not know where the call for
help or to report a fire is coming
from. Unless it (the call) goes
through 911, he will not respond to
the call.
Wages for county employees
were discussed. Motion carried to
approve a 25¢ per hour increase or
$520 annual increase for salaried
full time employees was approved
with the exception of Henry Bohan-
non, Ken Sheaffer, Josh Cadman,
Kelly Fortune, Aaron Richardson,
Dallas Kendrick and the commis-
sioners who will stay at their cur-
rent pay rate.
With no other business, Chair-
man Bennett entertained a motion
to adjourn. A motion was made by
Johnston, seconded by Twiss to ad-
journ, and carried.
Following adjournment, County
Auditor Vicki Wilson presented a
voucher approving expenses for
two people to attend the weed and
pest meeting in Huron. Motion was
made Stilwell, seconded by Denke
and carried to approve.
Glen Bennett elected Jackson
County Commissioner chairman
The Kadoka Area School Board,
City of Kadoka and Town of
Belvidere have announced terms
which are soon to expire.
Kadoka Area School Board
All are 3-year terms
Ken Lensegrav
Dawn Rasmussen
Dan VanderMay
City of Kadoka
Mayor (2-year term)
Harry Weller
Ward I (2-year term)
Richard Stolley
Ward II (1-year term)
Vacant
(2-year term)
L. Kieth Prang
Ward III (2-year term)
Ryan Willert
Town of Belvidere
Rudy Reimann
2 years left of a 3-year term
John L. Rodgers
3-year term
Circulation of nominating peti-
tions may begin on January 25,
2013 and may be filed in the re-
spective offices between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., moun-
tain standard time, not later than
the 22nd day of February, 2013, at
5:00 p.m., or mailed by registered
mail not later than the 22nd day of
February, 2013.
Nominating
petitions
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
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Church Page …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
For $150, place your ad
in 150 South Dakota
daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Email your news
and photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
Philippians 4:10-13
Have you ever heard a testimony from someone who
has been through a horrible tragedy? We tend to pay
very close attention to such accounts because the per-
son involved has witnessed firsthand God’s faithfulness
and power to restore a broken life.
Of all the witnesses to God’s grace in times of trouble, none is more compelling than the apostle Paul.
He was certainly no stranger to hardship. Throughout his ministry, he was chased, beaten, stoned, ar-
rested, shipwrecked, and accused of heresy by both the Jewish leaders and the Roman government. This
was certainly a stark contrast to his early life, in which he enjoyed the luxuries and opportunities that
his Roman citizenship and Jewish education provided.
There were amazing ups and downs in Paul’s life. As a result, he earned the right to make the procla-
mation found in Philippians 4:12: “I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to
live in prosperity.”
And what was the lesson the apostle came away with as a result of these experiences? He tells us in
verse 12: “In any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both
of having abundance and suffering need.”
Paul’s “secret” is really not a secret al all, for he reveals the source of his strength in the following
verse: “I can do all things through Him who strengthens me.” Faith in Jesus Christ and an increasing re-
liance on Him will make this limitless power source a reality in your life.
Overcoming Life's Ups and Downs
Inspiration Point
Monday, January 21
EAT AT JIGGER’S
Tuesday, January 22
Spaghetti with meatsauce, broc-
coli-cauliflower mix, tossed salad,
french bread, and apricots.
Wednesday, January 23
Oven fried chicken, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, harvard beets,
bread, and peaches.
Thursday, January 24
Salisbury steak in gravy, boiled
potatoes and gravy, spinach with
vinegar, bread, and mandarin or-
anges and pineapple tidbits.
Friday, January 25
Beef stew with vegetables, ap-
pleslaw, bread, and pumpkin bar.
Meals for
the Elderly
Despite all the gathered knowl-
edge available to physicians, some-
times we are helpless.
She was in her mid-80s, a nor-
mal-sized classy-dressed lady, who
walked into my office with yellow
eyes. She stated her urine had
turned dark and the stool turned
light about a week ago, was feeling
“ishy” now for a couple of weeks,
and had lost five or ten pounds
over the last month. She noted her
belly was bloated, her skin was
itching, and her get-up-and-go had
got-up-and-gone.
My patient reminded me she
was a farm-wife who, after her
husband’s death, moved to town
and lived in an apartment alone,
although kids lived nearby. She
had lead a careful life without ex-
posure to excessive alcohol or
drugs, was only taking a multiple
vitamin, no herbal supplements,
and had only one lifetime sexual
partner. She had never received a
transfusion, never been to a for-
eign country, no family history of
liver disease or cancer, never been
treated for diabetes, and no im-
mune condition like lupus.
Her husband had worked with
farm chemicals and insecticides,
and although they worked to-
gether sometimes moving cattle or
with fieldwork during harvest
time, her jobs mostly involved out-
side dealing with chickens and in-
side preparing for meals, without
much exposure to chemicals. In
short, she gave no clue to any-
thing, which may cause inflamed
liver or “hepatitis.”
We admitted her to the hospital
where we obtained blood tests, im-
aging tests, a liver biopsy, all the
while monitoring her carefully es-
pecially for bleeding problems. The
biopsy report described fulminant
or raging hepatitis, the viral test
was positive for cytomegalovirus
or CMV, and everything else was
negative. We then discussed her
case at length with the infectious
disease and liver specialists by
phone, and kept her in our hospital
as we were advised there was no
advantage gained by referral to a
larger hospital.
Despite following every recom-
mendation of the experts and the
textbooks, we observed how our
patient’s liver function continued
to deteriorate. Over the next week
and a half she slipped away from
our grasp and died in a coma, sur-
rounded by her children and their
families. This was some twenty
years ago and it taught me how
our lives truly depend on a func-
tioning liver.
But I still wonder about the
case. Why did this common virus
found in 80 percent of the adult
population kill her? What could I
have done differently to save this
lovely lady?
Despite all the gathered knowl-
edge available to physicians, some-
times we are helpless.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
A tale of hepatitis
Clifford D. “Cliff” Ramsey_________
Clifford D. “Cliff” Ramsey, age
81, of Philip, S.D., died Saturday,
January 12, 2013, at the Rapid
City Regional Hospital.
Clifford D. Ramsey was born
May 13, 1931, in Philip, the son of
Claude and Hilda (Sether) Ram-
sey. He attended Philip High
School and as a junior, was part of
the undefeated, unscored-upon
football team. He graduated from
Philip High School in 1950.
Cliff ’s dad died when he was 13,
so Cliff assisted in running his
parents’ ranch at a young age.
After high school he remained at
the ranch.
Cliff was united in marriage to
Rita Urban on July 25, 1951, in
Pierre. To this union were born
four children, Doug, Bart, Vicki
and Gary.
They remained on the ranch all
their 61 years of marriage. He
loved the family, outdoors, and
hunting. He cherished the time he
was able to spend with all of them.
Cliff still has the state record mule
deer.
Cliff was a member of the
United Church of Philip, a school
board member, and church board
member for many years.
Grateful for having shared his
life include his wife, Rita, of Philip;
three sons, Doug Ramsey and his
wife, Phyllis, of Sundance, Wyo.,
Bart Ramsey and his wife, Marcy,
of Philip, and Gary Ramsey and
his wife, Amber, of Colstrip, Mont.;
one daughter, Vicki Eide and her
husband, Marvin, of Philip; nine
grandchildren, Brittany (Scott),
Michelle (Nick), Krystal, Cara
(Brook) Chad (Paulette), Carla,
Christa (Trevor), Chelsea (Tyler)
and Taylor; 15 great-grandchil-
dren, Jordan, Haley, Ramsey, Pey-
ton, Caden, Wyatt, Charlee, Kiley,
Taegan, Brayden, Keagan, Colby,
Jensen, Rayler and Aven; one sis-
ter, Hazel Thompson of Spearfish;
his mother-in-law, Dorothy Urban
of Philip; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Cliff was preceded in death by
his parents and one brother,
Chuck Ramsey.
Memorial services were held
Wednesday, January 16, at the
American Legion Hall in Philip
with Pastor Kathy Chesney offici-
ating.
Music was provided by Sally
Jankord, pianist, and Glenn Par-
sons, vocalist.
Ushers were Norm Payne and
Dean Fitzgerald.
A memorial has been estab-
lished to the Haakon County
Prairie Transportation.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Arnold C. Wolden________________
Arnold C. Wolden, age 95, of
Philip, S.D., passed away peace-
fully on Tuesday morning, Janu-
ary 8, 2013, at the Hans P.
Peterson Memorial Hospital in
Philip, with his family at his side.
Arnold C. Wolden was born to
Johanna (Running) and Anton
Wolden on January 7, 1918, at
home in Union County, near Elk
Point. Both of his parents emi-
grated from Norway.
On March 9, 1930, the Wolden
family moved to Philip from Beres-
ford, driving two Model T Fords, a
1918 and 1925 touring car. The
family had loaded two box cars
with livestock, machinery and
household goods.
As a young man, Arnold farmed
the family farm northeast of Philip
with his parents. In the late 1930s
he was employed by Civil Conser-
vation Corps and Works Progress
Administration, which included
Lake Sunshine. He received his
pilot’s license in the late 1940s,
purchased a J3 Piper Cub airplane
and continued to fly until 1953. He
was a frequent attendee at fly-ins
and flight shows including
Oshkosh, Wis. Then he traded the
airplane for a new red Ford pickup
that was plagued with almost
“every problem on the planet” and
wished many times he had just
kept the airplane.
On January 30, 1952, Arnold
married Virginia Smith Johnson
at the First Lutheran Church in
Philip, where he was a charter
member. To this union five chil-
dren were born, Gene, Linda,
Roger, Mark and Terry, and he also
raised two stepchildren, Janet and
Michael.
Arnold participated in the Boy
Scouts with his sons, and he was
an active member of the South
Dakota Stockgrowers Association.
Other interests included attend-
ing auctions, rodeos, dances, visit-
ing with residents at the nursing
home and attending their dance
night. In addition to farming and
ranching, Arnold was also a grain
seed salesman for Sokota Seeds
and Conklin products.
Upon semi-retirement, Arnold
and Virginia took dance classes
and attended dances throughout
the local area. He also helped build
a house at age 80 years young.
Arnold enjoyed his children,
grandchildren and great grand-
children and taught most of them
how to drive sitting on his lap,
years before they were of legal
driving age.
Arnold was a kind, gentle man
that was wonderful husband, dot-
ing father, grandfather to 20,
great-grandfather to 22, and great-
great-grandfather to three; brother
to Julie Brooks and Helga War-
rington; and loyal friend to many.
He believed every child was the
brightest and cutest that ever ex-
isted. He will be forever loved and
dearly missed.
Arnold was preceded in death by
his parents; three sisters, Mabel
Kiel, Alice Hanson-Strand and
Agnes Fickbohm; two brothers:
Sam and Oliver; children, Janet
and Mark; great-great-
granddaughters, Tessa Brenner,
Logan and Emma Duran.
Services were held Friday, Jan-
uary 11, at the First Lutheran
Church in Philip with Pastor
Frezil Westerlund officiating.
Music was provided by Marilyn
Millage, pianist, and Kim Kan-
able, vocalist.
Ushers were Mike Brooks,
James Hoag, Roger O’Connell and
Daryll Dietrich.
Ushers were Patrick Craven,
Michael Johnson, Casey Johnson,
Jamie Johnson, Cory Wolden,
Blaine Wolden, Dustin Wolden,
Mark Osborn, Eric Wiedenman,
Todd Wolden, Trevor Wolden and
Jered Martin. Honorary pallbear-
ers were Michelle Brenner, Brita
Long, Naco See, Heather Claypool,
Bridget Duran, Jana Mead, Kit
Wolden Stadig and Elizabeth
Wolden.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Erwin Latham __________________
Erwin Latham, 85, passed away
Thursday evening, Jan. 10, 2013,
at Dahl Memorial Hospital in
Ekalaka, MT, after a long, ongoing
battle with cancer.
An era has come to an end with
the passing of Erwin. He was one
of the last of the old time cowboys,
a faithful husband, a good father,
a doting grandfather and a friend
to more people than he could
count. He was often found on the
phone catching up with old friends
or new ones he had dialed by acci-
dent. He was a great teacher with-
out a classroom, especially to his
nieces, nephews and grandchil-
dren. He was a patient man with
children and livestock. He always
made time to visit with anyone es-
pecially over a cup of coffee or a
glass of beer. He had an encyclope-
dic knowledge of his hometown
and county and could be counted
on to give you the whole story. He
was a giver of nicknames and had
one of his own from his nieces and
nephews “Big Uncle.” He was stub-
born at times. He was known for
his “Erwin-isms” like “You aren’t
wearing enough clothes to flag a
hand car.” He was a fixer of all
things. No matter the need, he was
always ready to give a helping
hand. He was a good man and a
true friend. He will be missed.
Erwin was born Oct. 25, 1927, to
Frank and Esther (Bickerdyke)
Latham at the home of Aunt Lilly
Turbiville in Camp Crook. He grew
up on the family ranch and he and
his sister, Marilyn, rode their pony,
Amos, to the Bullock School every
day. Little brother, Neil, joined the
family in 1938. Erwin started high
school in Camp Crook and at-
tended until the school burned
down. He returned to the ranch
where he lived and worked the rest
of his life.
Erwin was very active in the
community. He was a charter
member of the Camp Crook Rop-
ing Club and the Bullock Commu-
nity Club. He was on the Harding
County Fair Board for many years
and started the Sheep Shearing
Contest, serving as that division’s
Superintendent. He was also the
secretary/treasurer of Camp Crook
Fire Department for a number of
years.
Erwin married Shirley (Rowley)
May 29, 1970, at St. Paul’s
Catholic Church in Belle Fourche.
The couple moved to the ranch
north of Camp Crook where they
raised their three children.
Erwin is survived by his wife,
Shirley, Camp Crook; sons, Darwin
(Kay), Camp Crook, and Ben
(Kate) Kadoka; daughter, CoriAnn
(Richard) Battista, Snelville, GA;
grandchildren, John (Jenna)
Latham, Fort Pierre, Jason
Latham, Camp Crook, and An-
thony, Robert, and Cara Battista,
Snelville; sister, Marilyn Olson,
Bowman, ND; and sister-in-law,
Frankie Latham, Spearfish.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Frank and Esther
Latham; his brother, Neil Latham;
and brother-in-law, John R Olson.
Memorial services were held at
1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16, at the
Camp Crook Area Community
Center with the Reverend Tom
Martin officiating. Inurnment will
follow at Fairview Cemetery,
Camp Crook.
Black Hills Funeral Home in
Sturgis is in charge of the arrange-
ments.
Friends and family may sign the
online guest register and leave
written condolences at www.black-
hillsfuneralhome.com.
Bel videre News …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
press@kadokatelco.com
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
Stop by the Kadoka Press
for your office supplies.
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Winter Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
I lost a good friend last week
when Winona Carson tired of this
life after 94 years and went on
ahead of me to heaven. I’m not
even sure when she and I first got
acquainted, but it was over thirty
years ago and probably close to
forty. I think it was when her
grandson, Scott, worked for us for
a few years shortly after he got out
of high school. No matter how and
when we met, we’ve stayed friends
ever since.
Winona loved farm-raised eggs
since she said they tasted so much
better than those available in
stores. As a result, I delivered eggs
to her on a regular basis which
meant we got to visit some every
week or two. When I stopped in, it
was a rare occurrence for her to be
sitting idle. She was either baking,
cooking, sewing or doing some
other kind of work. “Loafing about”
was not in her vocabulary. “Useful
endeavor” was.
Neither did she mess about
doing things slowly. She moved
right along. I recall many times
when I delivered some old hens or
other surplus chickens to her. I
would call and tell her I was com-
ing which prompted her to put
water on to boil for scalding. When
I arrived, she grabbed her axe and
had those birds beheaded and
ready for plucking before I left the
driveway. After I visited the bank
and grocery store and took care of
any other business I had, I would
stop back to pick up my cages. In
that short amount of time, the
chickens were apt to be plucked,
washed and ready to cook up for
canning. Sometimes she would
later give me a jar of canned
chicken that made up nicely into
soup or other tasty fare.
Winona was a very sweet and
kind lady. She didn’t talk a lot, but
a smile was always close to the
surface. She was rather fun to
tease because it made her chuckle.
She didn’t often tease back, but
she didn’t mind being teased her-
self about little things. In short,
she was the kind of person you
would like to have as your grand-
mother. She strongly reminded me
of my own grandma who doted on
me and liked to do nice things for
me.
When I stopped in and there
were cookies or other treats sitting
on the table, I was always invited
to try them which I gladly did. One
such treat at Christmas time was
a fruit cake. Normally, I’m not big
on fruit cake, but this one was dif-
ferent. It was actually good. I
asked for the recipe which was
soon written down for me, and I’ve
made it several times. It makes a
huge batch that will not only last
through Christmas but probably
into March as well since part of it
can be frozen for later use. Oddly
enough, it is a no-bake cake that is
glued together with marshmallows
and other tasty goodies. I didn’t
make it this year, come to think of
it, but maybe I will gather the mul-
titude of ingredients needed to
construct it and call it an Easter
fruitcake in memory of my friend.
I know I’ll never make it without it
bringing Mrs. C happily to mind.
When I stopped in at Winona’s,
it was unusual for her to be alone.
Some friends or relatives were al-
most always there and had proba-
bly just been served a meal or were
going to be. Family was important,
and I met many of her kin includ-
ing some brothers and sisters,
kids, grandkids, and such. Her
place was where the family gath-
ered. On several occasions, I was
called on to take pictures at some
family reunion or event that
Winona wanted recorded photo-
graphically. Her living room was a
gallery of those she held dear.
Winona always remembered me
at Christmas. Usually she gave me
something she had made like
potholders or the like, and I treas-
ured them, partly because they
were nice things, but mostly be-
cause she’d made them. One of the
last things she gave me was a nifty
quilt. It was made with squares of
blue denim from old blue jeans on
one side and white, pink and red
flannel on the other. It was tied
with red yarn. She said I needed to
carry it in the new pickup I’d just
purchased, and, as a result, it was
partly done in red since that was
the color of the pickup. It was a
grand quilt, and it is still riding
around with me in my red Ranger.
You just never know when you
might need a quilt. It’s a comfort to
have along.
Well, although I’ll miss my
friend until we meet again up-
stairs, I know she was ready to go.
Old age was becoming a burden,
and her bags were packed, so to
speak. I imagine she’s already
looking around for useful things to
do up there in heaven. I’ll be glad
one day to resume our friendship,
and, until then, Winona will con-
tinue to live in my mind and heart.
Winona Bell Carson
(1918-2013)
Winona
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Chuck Willard is well on the way
to recovery after having hip-re-
placement surgery in Rapid City
last Monday. There were a few days
when the pain medicine caused
problems, but that seems to have
been adjusted now so things are
going better. Chuck had his other
hip replaced about five years ago
and said he was glad to now be out
of hips needing repair. It appar-
ently isn’t much fun. Tom DeVries
has been going down and helping
with chores. On Sunday, Jim Addi-
son picked Tom up in Belvidere and
drove him to Ted Vobr’s. Tom then
walked across the frozen river to
Chuck’s and started chores. Jim
did chores at Ted’s and then walked
across to Chuck’s as well. Tom and
Jim enjoyed coffee, cookies and din-
ner before heading back out.
Jim Addison was batching on
Sunday since Georgann and Jami
were staying in Murdo due to
weather and bad roads. Jim had
been to Murdo on Thursday for the
start of the Jones County Invita-
tional basketball tournament and
hoped to return on Monday for the
championship game. That game
was supposed to have been played
on Saturday, but blizzard condi-
tions caused a rescheduling of some
of the games.
Greg and Dana Badure are in a
period of transition after losing the
contract for maintenance of the
rest areas east of town. All the rest
areas between Tilford and the Mis-
souri River are now being done by
the same company. The whole fam-
ily has been entertaining colds this
week, and Brisa and Martin visited
the doctor in Philip. Flu didn’t
show up in tests so it was advised
to treat the troubles as colds. Greg
said his dad, Al, and Beverly were
planning a trip to Casper, WY, this
week since Beverly’s son is seri-
ously ill with heart problems.
Mark DeVries said this was the
first weekend they’d had off from
wrestling since Halloween. There
was a meet scheduled for Philip
this weekend, but it was called off
due to the nasty weather. The
roads seem good enough now, how-
ever, that the family can get to
school on Monday.
Delores Bonenberger is doing
better after the minor stroke she
recently suffered. The stroke was
apparently caused by high blood
pressure which is being treated.
She has been advised not to drive,
however, until after her next doctor
appointment so she hasn’t been
going many places. She did go
down the road to Brett and Nikki
Bonenberger’s on Sunday since
Brett was celebrating his 32nd
birthday with dinner, a couple of
cakes, homemade ice cream and
the works. Delores was taken over
by Keith and Pam who were also
there. Brett’s brother, Kade, was
there, too. Brett also celebrated his
birthday by getting his four-
wheeler stuck in a snow bank. De-
lores suggested he might have to go
back to checking the cows on a
horse, but that suggestion had a
cool reception.
Charlene Ceniceros said her
household has been hosting the flu
this last week. Her granddaughter,
also named Charlene, did go to
Pierre on Friday and got home just
in time before the storm got too
wild. Her husband, Daryl Romero,
had to stay over at work one night
due to bad weather and roads.
Church was called off in
Belvidere on Sunday as was the
potluck and annual meeting that
were to follow church. Quite a few
country people were blocked in by
snow, and it was a cold day to be
out and about. The annual meeting
will probably be held on the 27th.
Following the January tax law
changes made by Congress under
the American Taxpayer Relief Act
(ATRA), the Internal Revenue
Service announced today it plans to
open the 2013 filing season and
begin processing individual income
tax returns on Jan. 30.
The IRS will begin accepting tax
returns on that date after updating
forms and completing program-
ming and testing of its processing
systems. This will reflect the bulk
of the late tax law changes enacted
Jan. 2. The announcement means
that the vast majority of tax filers -
- more than 120 million households
-- should be able to start filing tax
returns starting Jan 30.
The IRS estimates that remain-
ing households will be able to start
filing in late February or into
March because of the need for more
extensive form and processing sys-
tems changes. This group includes
people claiming residential energy
credits, depreciation of property or
general business credits. Most of
those in this group file more com-
plex tax returns and typically file
closer to the April 15 deadline or
obtain an extension.
“We have worked hard to open
tax season as soon as possible,” IRS
Acting Commissioner Steven T.
Miller said. “This date ensures we
have the time we need to update
and test our processing systems.”
The IRS will not process paper
tax returns before the anticipated
Jan. 30 opening date. There is no
advantage to filing on paper before
the opening date, and taxpayers
will receive their tax refunds much
faster by using e-file with direct de-
posit.
“The best option for taxpayers is
to file electronically,” Miller said.
The opening of the filing season
follows passage by Congress of an
extensive set of tax changes in
ATRA on Jan. 1, 2013, with many
affecting tax returns for 2012.
While the IRS worked to anticipate
the late tax law changes as much
as possible, the final law required
that the IRS update forms and in-
structions as well as make critical
processing system adjustments be-
fore it can begin accepting tax re-
turns.
The IRS originally planned to
open electronic filing this year on
Jan. 22; more than 80 percent of
taxpayers filed electronically last
year.
Who Can File Starting Jan. 30?
The IRS anticipates that the
vast majority of all taxpayers can
file starting Jan. 30, regardless of
whether they file electronically or
on paper. The IRS will be able to
accept tax returns affected by the
late Alternative Minimum Tax
(AMT) patch as well as the three
major “extender” provisions for
people claiming the state and local
sales tax deduction, higher educa-
tion tuition and fees deduction and
educator expenses deduction.
Who Can’t File Until Later?
There are several forms affected
by the late legislation that require
more extensive programming and
testing of IRS systems. The IRS
hopes to begin accepting tax re-
turns including these tax forms be-
tween late February and into
March; a specific date will be an-
nounced in the near future.
The key forms that require more
extensive programming changes
include Form 5695 (Residential
Energy Credits), Form 4562 (De-
preciation and Amortization) and
Form 3800 (General Business
Credit). A full listing of the forms
that won’t be accepted until later is
available on IRS.gov.
As part of this effort, the IRS
will be working closely with the tax
software industry and tax profes-
sional community to minimize de-
lays and ensure as smooth a tax
season as possible under the cir-
cumstances.
Updated information will be
posted on IRS.gov.
IRS plans Jan. 30 tax season
opening for 1040 filers
Bad is never good,
until worse happens.
Danish Proverb
James and Marjorie Anne Letel-
lier and Andee Beckwith met up
with Julie Letellier at White River
on Tuesday afternoon and the four-
some traveled on to Lower Brule.
Sunshine Bible Academy was play-
ing four basketball games. The
girls won the “B” game and lost the
“A” game. The boys lost both
games, but the “A” game score was
55-57. It was a thriller of a game.
Cassie Beckwith is a member of the
girl’s team.
Sharon Ring took her grandson,
Jeremy, to his appointment at
Murdo on that windy Wednesday
morning.
Wednesday evening about 10
folks gathered in the Norris Post
Office lobby for a meeting about the
fate of our post office. Steve Carter,
Manager of Post Office Operations,
of Rapid City and Anne Fickoehm
represented the postal department.
Carter spoke to the group of the sit-
uation facing the post office and
told of the plans for cutting the
hours of window service at our local
post office. As it appears now the
hours for the Norris Post Office
window service will be 8:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. week days and Saturday
will be 9:30-10:30 a.m., however,
this will not take effect for 60 days.
Cutting the service of any business
is not a good policy for any busi-
ness.
On Thursday, Dan Taft was in-
jured in a four-wheeler accident.
Tafts were busy moving cattle in
preparation for the coming storm.
Dan was taken to Rapid City Re-
gional Hospital, where he had sur-
gery on his shoulder. He is now
home recuperating from the ordeal.
Get well quick, Dan, hope you will
soon be all healed up.
The Norris Fire Department
was a recent recepient of a gift of
$500 from the Mellette County
Community Foundation. We are
very grateful for the generousity
shown to our little burg. We all
know how important our local fire
departments were this summer.
Carol Ferguson was back at her
old job in the post office a few days
while Susan Taft was in Rapid
City.
Norris School news is that
DARE graduation is being planned
but the date has not been set yet.
Basketball is the big topic
around here as the Jones County
Invitational Tournament is still in
session with White River playing
Jones County for championship on
Monday night. We also had the
White River Middle School team
playing Kadoka on Monday night.
Norris has a lot of guys on both
teams so folks will really be keep-
ing the road busy tonight; hope
they get there safely and on time.
The time difference complicates it,
but being on Interstate 90 should
help some. We are very proud of
our kids, but they do keep us on the
go.
Maxine Allard hosted the Norris
Bible Church Sunday School this
week for the first time since Christ-
mas.
This week has been bitter cold,
but hope by the time you are read-
ing this that it will have warmed
up. We did get a few inches of snow
in the storm last week, but the
wind blew in drifts so some spots
are actually bare, too. It definitely
looks like January and feels like it
too! That explains the shortage of
news this week the best, too.
Youth, who have at least five
years of active membership in
South Dakota 4-H and are current
high school seniors or are enrolled
in post secondary education are en-
couraged to apply for South Dakota
4-H Scholarships.
"These scholarships are specifi-
cally for SD 4-H members and the
process makes it easy to apply for
as many as you would like," said
Audrey Rider SDSU Extension 4-H
Youth Leadership Field Specialist.
There are seven different schol-
arship opportunities and the dead-
line for all applicaitons is April 1,
2013.
To apply for South Dakota State
4-H Scholarship(s), applicants need
to submit the following four four
items:
•Cover letter of one typewritten
page (8½"x11"), with one inch mar-
gins, using a 12 point font.
•Résumé of one or two typewrit-
ten pages (8½"x11"), with one inch
margins, using a 12 point font
•Non-confidential one-page let-
ter of recommendation from ONE
of the following: 4-H club leader,
county 4-H Youth Program Advisor,
school administrator or teacher,
employer, pastor or someone who
can comment on the applicant's
goals and skills.
•For high school seniors, an of-
ficial copy of his/her high school
transcript with the current cumu-
lative grade point average (GPA),
rank in class and ACT/SAT scores.
For current college students, a col-
lege and/or technical institute tran-
script with the current cumulative
GPA.
•Students also have the option
of submitting one page of photos
with captions showing 4-H leader-
ship work/accomplishments.
To find out what to include in
your cover letter and resume
please refer to the 2013 South
Dakota State 4-H Scholarship Pol-
icy document in the 4-H Resource
library on iGrow.org.
A committee will review all ap-
plications and announce recipients
in early May. All applicants will be
notified via USPS mail regarding
their final status after selection of
recipients. All recipients must com-
plete and return the 4-H Scholar-
ship Acceptance Form to receive
the scholarship(s).
•4-H scholarship awards are
based on fulfillment of scholarship-
specific criteria and the following:
•40 percent scholastic achieve-
ment;
•10 percent character;
•40 percent 4-H project involve-
ment including Citizenship/Com-
munity Service and Leadership;
and
•10 percent financial need.
To learn more contact your local
SDSU Extension 4-H Youth Pro-
gram Advisor. For a complete list-
ing, visit iGrow.org.
4-H Scholarship deadline is April 1
drug testing of program partici-
pants, and funding of parole pro-
grams to keep drug, alcohol and
mental health offenders out of jail,
which will “save millions of dollars
in prison costs.”
Frerichs was in agreement, but
notes that the Governor “still
missed the boat when it came to
the big issues” of education and
Medicaid funding of nursing
homes.
However, said Frerichs, “there is
a different mood this year in the
Legislature.” The first year it was
cuts, he said, and the second it was
reform, but this year, there appears
to be more concern about providing
funds for education and nursing
homes.
Frerichs said there also appears
to be support for extending the
school year, which would address
additional funding.
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
Senate Democratic leader Jason
Frerichs, Wilmot, called it “refresh-
ing” that Gov. Dennis Daugaard’s
State of the State address was one
that was “not so divisive.”
This year, Daugaard centered on
criminal justice reform, which,
Frerichs noted, was “something we
can all agree on.” Last year’s pro-
posal for education reform,
HB1234, was divisive, he said,
from the beginning.
Daugaard on Jan. 8 in Pierre
proposed following the recommen-
dations of a criminal justice work
group, outlining three of the 18
proposals. Later, legislation was
filed in the Senate to accomplish
that.
The proposals deal with the use
of alternative drug courts, random
Democrat leader expresses concern
for education, Medicaid funding
Area merchants, holiday shop-
pers and BankWest branches once
again partnered to boost the re-
gional economy through the
BankWest Christmas Dollars pro-
gram.
BankWest VP Marketing
Kristin Brost said this year’s pro-
gram provided more than $366,000
in low-interest loans to area shop-
pers. The Christmas Dollars were
redeemable at nearly 400 partici-
pating businesses throughout cen-
tral South Dakota and bank
officials say interest in this year’s
program was about average from
previous years.
“The program is good for our
local businesses and it’s good for
our local shoppers,” Brost said.
“The interest rate is lower than tra-
ditional loans and it’s significantly
lower than what you would pay on
a credit card. The loans provide
greater buying power and those
purchases stay in our communities.
It’s truly a win-win situation and
it’s just one way that BankWest
reinvests in the communities it
serves.”
BankWest Christmas Dollars
were redeemable at 398 businesses
in 13 different communities. Those
communities included: Pierre, Fort
Pierre, Kadoka, Philip, Murdo,
Draper, Kennebec, Selby, Onida,
Gettysburg, Gregory, Winner and
Mitchell. Brost said the number of
participating businesses fluctuates
from year to year, but continually
grows.
BankWest Christmas dollars
support area economy
Locals …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Interior News
Jean Amiotte • 433-5386
Local News
Sdyne Lenox • Robyn Jones
Trevor Fricke and Melissa McConnell are pleased to announce their
engagement.
The bride to be is the daughter of Paul and Gwen McConnell of
Creighton, SD. She is a 2011 graduate of Wall High School, and currently
attending NCTA in Curtis, Neb. to gain her Associate Degree in Livestock
and Equine Production and minoring in Business. Melissa’s grandparents
are Bruce and Lila Whidby of Kadoka, and Don and Betty McConnell of
Ruthton, Minn.
The future groom is the son of Mike and Beth Fricke of Chappell. He is
a 2010 Garden County High School graduate, currently attending NCTA
in Curtis to obtain his Associate Degrees in Livestock Production and
Agribusiness. Trevor’s grandparents are Clarence (Mert) and the late
Pauline Fricke of Roscoe, Neb., and Bill and Jo Reutzel of Ogallala, Neb.
The couple is planning an August 17, 2013 wedding in Wall.
Engagement
gating murders. This time several
bodies have been unearthed at an
old WWII bombing range—only the
murderers occurred several years
apart and the “story behind them is
about to blow-up”…
Death on the Greasy Grass, the
much anticipated third book in
Wendelboe’s mystery series, will be
released in June 2013. Please join
us in welcoming C. M. Wendelboe
at Jackson County Library on
Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 4:00 p.m.
Questions—call Deb Moor at the li-
brary @ 837-2689.
Other Happenings
The JC Library discussion group
met on Sunday, January 6. Dorothy
Liegl led the discussion over the
book, We Band of Angels. Fourteen
participants enjoyed refreshments
following the discussion. Our next
book, Life on the Farm & Ranch, is
a collection of local stories and dis-
cussion is planned for Sunday,
April 7 at 2:00. Author Lori Arm-
strong will be signing her latest
book, Merciless, at the Rapid City
BAM (Books-A-Million) Store on
January 19th at 2:00 p.m.
The AARP Tax-Aide Volunteers
will be coming to the library start-
ing in February. These volunteers
provide free tax preparation assis-
tance for people of a variety of ages
and incomes. Watch for details.
Evelyn Fortune is available for
computer troubleshooting assis-
tance on Wednesday afternoons.
Questions?
Call Deb Moor at the Jackson
County Library at 837-2689, e-mail
at jclibrary2000@gmail.com, stop
in for a visit, or check out the web-
site at
https://sites.google.com/site/jack-
soncountylibrary/
Open House for Author
C. M. Wendelboe
Jackson County Library in
Kadoka will host an Open House
for author C. M. Wendelboe on Feb.
12 at 4:00 p.m. There will be dis-
cussion and questions, with a book
signing to follow. A South Dakota
Native and former Vietnam/Marine
veteran, Wendelboe has a law en-
forcement career spanning 38
years in various capacities—sev-
eral in South Dakota towns border-
ing Indian reservations. He revisits
Pine Ridge occasionally to research
his novels; harvesting an apprecia-
tion for Native American perspec-
tives.
The first book in his mystery se-
ries, Death Along the Spirit Road,
FBI agent Manny Tanno must re-
turn to his childhood home on the
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to
assist in a solving a murder. Agent
Tanno finds some things do not
change and the pressure is on to
solve the case.
Second in the series is Death
Where the Bad Rocks Live. This
mystery takes place in the South
Dakota Badlands, where agent
Tanno again finds himself investi-
3 Check It Out at the Library 3
Fresh Start Shower For
Skyler & Whitney Patterson
Sat., Jan. 19 • 6 p.m.
Club 27 • Kadoka
Let’s help them replenish after
losing their home & all their
belongings in a house fire.
I am going to write the Interior
news once more, just to let all of
you that live away from here know
that Interior is still on the map and
doing well!
Some of the highlights of last
summer are:
Matt Harvey has been working
in the oil fields in Tioga, North
Dakota, since last April. He gets
home to see his family when he
can.
Our local Elsie Fortune, daugh-
ter of Wayne and Kathy Fortune,
did very well at the South Dakota
High School Rodeo in Belle
Fourche the last part of June. She
won the title of South Dakota High
School Rodeo Queen for 2012 and
was the State champion for the
girls break away roping. In July,
she went to Rock Springs, WY, to
compete in the national rodeo
queen contest and ended up plac-
ing 21st over all in the queen con-
test, plus getting 10th place for
personality. She made Interior
proud.
Anne Kruse, daughter of Charlie
and Beth Kruse, married Bryan
Shore in a beautiful outdoor wed-
ding on June 30, 2012 at the Char-
lie and Beth Kruse ranch. They are
making their home in Sioux Falls,
where both are employed.
Many people from near and far
came to Interior for the Fourth of
July celebration. They had a nice
parade, plenty of excitement at the
rodeo, lots and lots of good food and
good visiting. They also had a
huge fireworks display with some
people coming from a distance just
for that event. The people of Inte-
rior and surrounding area are to be
commended for all of their work to
put on such a fine family celebra-
tion.
The summer was hot and dry,
but the grasshoppers were more
than plentiful! Ol' Man White
River even dried up completely for
two and a half months! The deer
had to come to the stock tanks for
water. Hopefully, we'll get some
nice moisture for this spring and
summer.
Kelly and Pat Fortune joined the
South Dakota Stock Growers on a
trip to Ireland last October. They
toured ranches and farms and said
it was a most enjoyable trip.
Kyle and Tricia Amiotte and
family of Wall spent the Saturday
and Sunday before Christmas at
the home of Kyle's mother, Asta
Amiotte. Asta spent part of Christ-
mas Eve with Tucker and Corinn
Amiotte and family, then left for
Winner to spend some time at the
home of Jeff and Dondee Kro-
likowski and family.
Jesse and Alice Baysinger went
to Phoenix, AZ, to spend Christmas
with their son, Wesley, and Lupe
Baysinger and Taylor. They had an
enjoyable time and returned home
on December 29. Jesse and Alice
are now living in Rapid City per-
manently now. They would enjoy
hearing from their Badlands
friends.
Terry and Shirley Gartner have
sold their Badlands Grocery store
to Brett and Christi Guptill re-
cently. The Guptill's took over Jan-
uary 1 and are anxious to do
business with you.
Judy Livermont and her daugh-
ter, Stevie Uhlir, went to Chamber-
lain and Ft. Pierre a couple weeks
ago to attend gymnastic meets.
Stevie's daughter, Shelby, com-
peted at the meets. This is Shelby's
first year and she did a good job.
Asta Amiotte enjoyed supper at
the Chuck and Jan Carlbom home
about a week ago.
Wayne and Kathy Fortune went
to Wall last weekend for the Wall
high school senior projects. Their
daughter, Elsie, is a senior in Wall
this year.
Carpel tunnel surgery seems to
be the going thing around here
lately. Jena Amiotte had surgery on
both hands last summer, Norman
Amiotte had surgery on one hand
in November and Chuck Carlbom
had surgery on one hand in Decem-
ber and will have the other hand
done this Tuesday, January 15.
They all say it is instant relief and
are glad to have it done.
The Interior Volunteer Fire De-
partment is building a new fire
house in Interior. It is bigger and
mostly enclosed now.
Charlie and Beth Kruse enjoyed
a nice Christmas with all of their
kids and their spouses home. Sev-
eral of the Kruse family and friends
left January 2 to go skiing at
Steamboat Springs, CO.
Carla Mcleron has been in the
swing bed at the Philip hospital for
some time now and could use your
prayers. She also enjoys visitors.
Shirley Gartner sure appreci-
ated all of her family and friends,
from near and far, for all of their
prayers, lovely gifts and flowers
during her illness. She is grateful
to all of you.
All of my family got together and
had a birthday supper for me at the
home of Ken and Julie Bartlett on
Saturday evening. Besides all of
my family, Chuck and Jan Carlbom
and Gene and Alecia Fortune and
Jett were there. Family, friends
and delicious food makes for a good
time.
The post office hours are as fol-
lows: Lobby open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday; win-
dow open from 11 a. m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday; and the
window is open from 10:30 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. on Saturdays.
If anyone of you would like to
write the Interior news, please do
so! People living in other places like
to hear what is going on in Interior.
Have a good week!
However, Gilbertson said, the
Northern Hills Drug Program,
which was what he called “a leap of
faith” five years ago, is now being
used as an example of what can be
accomplished statewide. In recent
years, the program has been ex-
panded to the southern Black Hills,
as well as Pierre and Sioux Falls.
This past year an alcohol court was
begun in Aberdeen and a drug
court in Yankton began this month.
The first graduates of the 18-
month program said to a person
that “it would have been easier to
just go to the pen and do their
time,” said Gilbertson, but they
have proved that with proper guid-
ance people can be returned a pro-
ductive member of society. So far,
the success rate is in the 81-per-
cent range.
These courts, he stressed are for
drug and alcohol addicts, not for
drug pushers or violent criminals.
This alternative to probation or
penitentiary time are “proven to
work better to break the revolving
door of crime with fewer tax dollars
being spent,” said Gilbertson.
“They give the sentencing judge
tools in addition to the traditional
penitentiary sentences and proba-
tion.”
The previous day a comprehen-
sive bill entitled the South Dakota
Public Safety Improvement Act
was filed in the Senate as SB70.
The proposed legislation, according
to Gov. Dennis Daugaard, is en-
dorsed by everyone in the system
from sheriffs and police up to the
chief justice.
The bill is the result of a task
force study.
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
The skyrocketing cost of housing
drug and alcohol offenders in the
S.D. Penitentiary system and the
number of repeat offenders is com-
ing under scrutiny by the state ju-
diciary system.
South Dakota Supreme Court
Chief Justice David Gilbertson said
Jan. 9 that the state cannot con-
tinue on its current path because
the spiraling costs of the penal sys-
tem–at $25,000 per year to house
an inmate—or there will be noth-
ing left in the future to spend on
other programs, such as education.
Gilbertson said, as an example,
in the 1980s there were 32 beds in
the women’s prison, where now
today there are 450 females. That,
he said, is a 15-fold increase in 20
years. The increase is male prison-
ers is similar, he added.
Much of that increase, he said, is
in non-violent crimes resulting
from alcohol and drug abuse.
Gilbertson noted that after 37
years in the criminal justice sys-
tem, he is now seeing “a third gen-
eration of certain families running
afoul of our criminal laws,” and the
choices have only been sending
them to prison or back out on pro-
bation.
Substance abuse remedy:
Drug and alcohol courts… or prison?
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Wanda Swan returned home on
January 10 after spending a month
with her daughter and son-in-law,
Betty and Dave Rasmussen, of Bro-
ken Arrow, OK. She left on Decem-
ber 10 and also got to visit the
families of her two grandsons while
there. While she was gone her sis-
ter, Marjorie Jeffords, celebrated
her 90th birthday on December 31.
Marjorie lives in the There’s a Hart
Assisted Living Center in Rapid
City.
Bill Bouman underwent surgery
at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,
MN, on Monday, January 7. He
was dismissed on Friday and the
family started home that day but
stayed in Mitchell that night be-
cause of bad weather. They re-
turned to Kadoka on Saturday and
he is recouperating at home.
Word was received by friends of
Cliff Ramsey, Philip, of his death at
Rapid City Regional Hospital on
Saturday, January 12. Sympathy is
extended to his family which in-
cludes former Kadoka resident
Marcy (Olney) Ramsey, who is a
daughter-in-law. Cliff ’s funeral was
held Wednesday afternoon in
Philip.
Brett and Tammy Prang spent
the weekend in Valentine, NE, vis-
iting at the home of Lonnie Jo and
Gabe Doney and sons. While there
they attended the annual fireman’s
party, as Gabe is a fireman there.
They said that Valentine didn’t
have the snow storm that this area
experienced Friday and Saturday.
Jackson County Unit 27, Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary held its Jan-
uary meeting on the 10th.
Donations were made to the USO,
Auxiliary Emergency Fund, the
Fisher House, Special Olympics
and Veteran’s Creative Arts Festi-
val. Membership Chairman re-
ported that 118 members have paid
dues so far, with quota being 154.
Twenty-eight dictionaries were
given to the third graders in the
Kadoka Area School District. Cour-
tesy cards have been sent to the
Kujawa, Cadman, Schnee, Patter-
son and Carleton families. The
Mid-Winter Conference is set for
Feb. 8-10 at Cedar Shore Resort
near Chamberlain. The next meet-
ing will be held on Thursday, Feb-
ruary 14.
Miss South Dakota, Calista
Kirby, of Brookings took part in the
Miss America pageant in Las Vegas
this past weekend. Most of her
family members, including the
Bendts and Leuteneggers of
Kadoka were on hand for several
days of the competition. They were
scheduled to return home Monday
afternoon. Miss New York was
named Miss America for 2013.
News from Joyce Anderson of
Gold Canyon, AZ, to this reporter
was that her mom, Margaret Jet-
ter, who is in a nursing home near
her home, will be 99 years old on
January 19. Joyce said she will be
taking treats to the home on her
birthday, especially for the staff,
who have taken such good care of
Margaret. John and Margaret op-
erated a motel in Kadoka many
years ago.
Cindy and Kenny Wilmarth re-
turned home on Monday from a va-
cation trip to Cancun. They left on
January 6 for Denver and flew out
on the 7th. Cindy said it was warm,
but very windy every day that they
were there. It is hard to feel too bad
for them, as South Dakota was ex-
periencing a major winter storm,
which began Friday night, closing
schools, Interstate 90 in several
places and many events.
Kadoka Press
Classifieds
605-837-2259
Happy 90th Birthday Mom!
January 17, 2013
Love,
Paul, Diane,
Vern & Dave
Cards may be sent to:
Bertie VanderMay
26800 Fish Creek Rd.
Long Valley, SD 57547
Sports …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
press@kadokatelco.com
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
All-around: 6th Michaela Schae-
fer 23.95, 4th Myla Pierce 26.55,
3rd Jerica Coller 26.9, 1st Kate
Rasmussen 28.75
JV as follows:
Beam: 5th Heather Dauksavage
4.8, 4th Kallie Anderson 5.1
Floor: 3rd Heather Dauksavage
6.8
Vault: 6th Jossie Kukal 5.6, 5th
Kallie Anderson 6.3, 4th Raya Gar-
rett 6.5, 3rd Heather Dauksavage
6.5
~~~~~
Stanley County Meet
December 15, 20121
The Wall/Kadoka gymnasts are
proud to say that they placed run-
ner-up at the Stanley County Meet.
Bars: 5th place Michaela Schae-
fer 5.9, 4th place Jerica Coller 6.85,
3rd place Kate Rasmussen 7.05
Beam: 4th place Michaela
Schaefer 7.25, 3rd place Jerica
Coller 7.7
Floor: 4th place Kate Ras-
mussen 8.35
All-Around: 4th place Jerica
Coller 29.2, 3rd place Kate Ras-
mussen 29.45
~~~~~
Chamberlain Triangular
January 4, 2013
We placed 3rd as a team but had
some personal bests. Jerica Coller
made her first qualifying meet
which each gymnast must score a
31 or higher to qualify.
Beam: 2nd place Jerica Coller
8.4
Floor: 4th Kate Rasmussen 7.65
All-Around: 5th place Jerica
Coller 31.25
~~~~~
Stanley County Hula Luau
January 5, 2013
Athough we didn’t have anyone
place, we had some personal bests.
Shelby Uhlir made her 1st no fall
beam routine. Jennifer Emery
scored her personal best on Vault
with a 7.05 and Kelly Green scored
her personal best with a 7.3.
Good job ladies! You keep im-
proving which will count in the
end!
--by coach Heidi Coller
The Wall/Kadoka Gymnasts are
working hard and improving at
every meet.
Hot Springs Meet
December 7, 2012
Varsity as follows:
Bars: 6th Myla Pierce 4.2, 4th
Michaela Schaefer 5.0, 2nd Jerica
Coller 5.8, 1st Kate Rasmussen 6.9
Beam: 5th place tie Kate Ras-
mussen & Myla Pierce 6.9, 4th Jer-
ica Coller 7.15
Floor: 7th Michaela Schaefer
6.85, 6th Kate Rasmussen 6.9, 3rd
Myla Pierce 7.4
Vault: 6th Jerica Coller 7.6, 2nd
Myla Pierce 8.05, 1st tie Kate Ras-
mussen 8.2
Gymnastics team going strong
Gymnastics, runner up at Stanley Co. … Back row: Michaela Schaefer, Jerica Coller, Kate
Rasmussen, Myla Pierce, Shelby Uhlir, Heather Dauksavage, Jennifer Emery, Kelly Green and Cami Uhlir.
Coach Heidi Coller and Assistant Coach Tracy Enders.
Putting on the defense … Marti Herber (L) and Raven Jor-
gensen put pressure on this Lady Scottie in a matchup played in Philip
on January 10. --photo by Nancy Haigh
Tough defense …Lane Pat-
terson #23 (L) steps up the defense.
--photo by Karlee Barnes
the Kougars with 9 points apiece.
Christensen put in 5, Buchholz 4
and Porch and Yuki Hotsumi had 2
apiece.
“Bennett County outworked us
on the boards and just had too
many second chances.” said
Reiman.
Kadoka 10 22 30 37
Stanley Co. 13 22 38 58
Playing out the tournament for
7th and 8th place, Kadoka was
matched up with the Stanley
County Buffaloes.
“We had beaten Stanley County
earlier this year with a very well
played game,” Reiman said.
“Again, the first half was solid
for us and I think our defense was
key. Our press altered the game
early with some easy baskets and
created turnovers for us. I wish I
could say the same for the second
half. We didn’t show up.”
Coach said their offense was
sluggish and they weren’t aggres-
sive in their press. Without the in-
tensity, their half-court defense
and rebounding suffered. That al-
lowed Stanley County easy shots.
Once again VanderMay led the
team with 19 points and he was 4/7
from the line. Lane Patterson and
Hotsumi had 5 points apiece,
Christensen 4, Shane Ring 3 and
Porch 1.
“The boys can put together some
strong quarters, but we need to see
more consistency. We have flashes
of high energy which keeps us
strong on both sides of the ball.
The bad thing is just like a light
switch it goes off. As we continue,
we need to have tough practices
with high energy and see if the
team can start putting four quar-
ters together. I know it’s there we
just have to find it. Keep working
Kougars!
--by Coach Mark Reiman
Kadoka 4 14 21 32
White River 33 56 73 90
“Our first opponent of the Jones
County Invitational was the num-
ber one rated White River Tigers.
It was a struggle early in the game.
White River opened up with a big
lead in the first quarter. After the
initial push I thought the boys set-
tled in and played well. We missed
some easy shots early but kept our
composure and played a good sec-
ond half,” Kadoka head coach Mark
Reiman said.
From the starting line-up,
Kenar VanderMay led the Kougars
with 16 points. He was the only
Kougar to step to the line, making
2/4 shots.
Also scoring, True Buchholz put
in 8, Chris Anderson 4 and Logan
Christensen and Brenden Porch
put in 2 apiece.
Scoring from the Tiger lineup
there were five players in double
figures with Wyatt Krogman 18,
Travis Burbank 16, Joe Cameron
15, Gilbert Morrison 13 and Nic
Waln 10.
Each team had 8 fouls.
Kadoka 10 21 23 31
Bennett Co. 4 20 34 48
The Kougars were up against
the Bennett County Warriors in
their second game of the tourna-
ment.
“The boys played a very strong
first half. We executed well in our
half-court offense and rebounded
the ball well. Our energy right out
of the gate was terrific. The second
half was not like the first. We were
slow with our cuts on offense and
didn’t take care of the ball,”
Reiman said.
Bennett County outscored the
Kougars 14-2 in the third quarter.
The fourth quarter was similar to
the third.
VanderMay and Anderson led
Kougars struggle at the
Jones County Tournament
Jerica Coller on the beam.
Myla Pierce during her floor routine.
turnovers and fouls down, which
gave them a first quarter lead of
10-6. Lyman stepped up the second
quarter and outscored the Kougars
12-6, which gave the Raiders a two-
point lead at halftime. The
Kougars struggled the second half,
unable to convert their shots and
committing 16 second-half fouls.
The Lady Kougars played hard to
the end, but couldn't make it up.
Kwincy Ferguson ended the
game with 8 points, Tessa Stout
and Raven Jorgensen with 5
points, Marti Herber, Taylor
Merchen and Shaley Herber with 4
points and Katie Lensegrav with 2.
The Kougars were 8/21 from the
free throw line and had 12
turnovers.
Kadoka 11 18 35 47
N. Underwood 11 30 39 55
The Kadoka Lady Kougars had
their first game of 2013, travelling
to play the New Underwood Tigers.
Both teams played a good first
quarter. However, New Underwood
stepped up and outscored the
Kougars in the second quarter 19-
7. Kadoka also found themselves in
foul trouble by the time they
headed for the locker room. Kadoka
came back fighting in the third
quarter, outscoring the Tigers 16-9
and only trailing by five at the end
of the third quarter. The fourth
quarter was a battle as the lead
kept changing between the
Kougars and the Tigers. During
the final minutes, Kadoka got in
foul trouble, which put New Under-
wood on the free throw line.
Kadoka worked hard, but was un-
able to get the win.
Taylor Merchen had a good de-
fensive game and also led scoring
with 16 points. Tessa Stout fol-
lowed with 14 points and was 6/6 at
the free-throw line. Kwincy Fergu-
son contributed 10 points, Katie
Lensegrav 6 points and Marti Her-
ber had a free throw. As a team,
Kadoka was 14/22 on the line and
New Underwood was 22/40. It was
a hard-fought game to the very
end. The girls worked as a team
and kept positive, talking and en-
couraging each other the whole
way. This is what the team needs to
do every day in practice as well in
every game.
Kadoka 9 17 31 45
Philip 6 14 21 37
Kadoka travelled to Philip on
January 10 to take on the Lady
Scotties. Kadoka took a first quar-
ter lead of 9-6. The second quarter
found Kadoka in foul trouble, but
was still able to keep a three-point
lead going into halftime. Kadoka
came out strong in the third quar-
ter and outscored the Scotties 14-7.
The fourth quarter found Kadoka
losing Marti, Katie and Raven to
fouls. The girls were able to make
some key shots and Taylor
Merchen was 4/4 on the line in the
fourth to pull out a win for the
Kougars. The Kougars were 11/28
on the line and Philip was 13/26.
Katie Lensegrav led scoring
with 12 and Tessa Stout followed
her with 11. Taylor Merchen had 7
points, Marti Herber 6 and both
Kwincy Ferguson and Tori Letellier
had 4. Raven Jorgensen added a
free throw.
The Kadoka Lady Kougars will
be playing in the Southern Plains
Tournament this week at White
River and Colome. The girls will
play White River in the opening
game at 5:30 p.m. MT at White
River. Friday’s games will also be
in White River and Saturday's
games will be in Colome. Good luck
Lady Kougars!
--by Coach Annette VanderMay
Kadoka 16 30 40 49
Philip 10 15 21 32
The Kadoka Lady Kougars
hosted the Philip Scotties on Dec.
17. The girls played good defense
the first half, having only four
fouls, which gave the Kougars a 30-
15 leading going into halftime.
Both teams played hard the second
half, but Kadoka outscored the
Scotties 19-17, and won the game
49-32.
Kwincy Ferguson led scoring
with 17 points. Tessa Stout put in
10 and Marti Herber 9. Shaley
Herber and Raven Jorgensen each
added 4 points. Katie Lensegrav
and Destiny Dale each had a
bucket and Mackenzie Word added
a free throw. The Kougars were
11/17 from the free-throw line and
ended the game with 13 total fouls.
Kadoka 11 19 26 45
Stanley Co. 11 16 23 36
The Lady Kougars hosted Stan-
ley County Dec. 21. Both teams
came out playing hard, ending the
first quarter with a score of 11-11.
Both second and third quarters
were close as the Kougars were up
by three points the end of each
quarter. The girls were able to pull
ahead in the fourth quarter by
making some key shots as well as
free throws.
Taylor Merchen led the game
with 12 points, followed by Kwincy
Ferguson with 10. Marti Herber
put in 7 and Raven Jorgensen 5.
Katie Lensegrav and Shaley Her-
ber each made two buckets and
Tessa Stout shot a three pointer.
The girls were 10/19 from the free
throw line: Kwincy 2/6, Marti 2/3,
Taylor 3/4 and Raven 3/6.
Kadoka 10 16 24 32
Lyman 6 18 33 35
On Dec. 27, the Lyman Raiders
visited the Lady Kougars. The girls
played a good first quarter, keeping
Lady Kougars win three of five
Public Notices …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
Official Proceedings
REGULAR MEETING
Board of Jackson
County
Commissioners
December 10, 2012
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in regular session at 9:00
a.m., Monday, December 10, 2012 in the
Commissioner’s Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Jim Stil-
well called the meeting to order with
members Glen Bennett, Delores Bonen-
berger, Larry Denke and Ron Twiss pres-
ent. Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt., and
Larry Johnston were also present.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Bennett moved that minutes of the No-
vember meetings be approved. Denke
seconded motion.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. reported that
Western Construction has an estimated
17,000 ton of gravel crushed at the Har-
vey Pit, and they estimate an additional
5,000 to 7,000 ton to be left in the
stripped area once they have completed
the 20,000 ton project. They are willing
to crush and stockpile the additional
amount. Discussion was held on using
the stockpile at the Guptill Pit as base on
the road to T. K. Sampson’s, and using
the gravel from the Harvey Pit to finish
the project. Width of the road and
amount of gravel to be placed on the
road was calculated. Vicki Wilson, Audi-
tor, provided estimated budget balances
at the end of the year, and estimated
fund balances. Report was made that
Dustin Harvey is willing to allow addi-
tional gravel be taken from the pit. Fol-
lowing discussion Denke moved, Bennett
seconded, that Jackson County enter
into a contract with Western Construction
for an additional + / - 5,000 to 7,000 ton
of gravel to be crushed and stockpiled
under the November 2012 Jackson
County bid letting awarded to Western
Construction at $3.75 per ton.
The Auditor’s account with the County
Treasurer was approved as of November
30, 2012:
Total amount of
deposits in banks . . . . . . . . . .428.07
Total amount of
actual cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,146.25
Total amount of
actual cash
(Reg. of Deeds) . . . . . . . . . . .250.00
Total amount of checks . . . . .19,163.42
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
Returned checks . . . . . . . . . . .1,639.48
Money Market
Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . .869,293.42
Time Deposits . . . . . . . . . . .117,132.00
JCFSA Passbook
savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,387.14
Total Funds . . . . . . . . . . .1,028,318.27
TOTAL COUNTY
FUNDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .842,520.27
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .599,088.13
Road & Bridge . . . . . . . . . .107,508.67
CH & BR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,177.83
Secondary Road . . . . . . . . .106,419.41
911 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,966.99
Other Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,469.35
Emer. Disaster . . . . . . . . . .(
10,996.06)
Abuse Center . . . . . . . . . . . .11,937.98
Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116.66
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
L. E. S. T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,581.82
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . . . .321.00
TOTAL TRUST &
AGENCY FUNDS . . . . . .185,798.00
Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101,139.95
Townships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .340.32
Towns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25,372.17
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29,645.14
Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .772.03
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60.00
JCFSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,387.14
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25,081.25
Register of Deeds November collections:
$3,084.31.
The following bills from the files of the
County Auditor were presented, exam-
ined, allowed and ordered paid:
Salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31,360.41
BankWest, payroll tax . . . . . . .7,535.95
American Family Life
Ass’r. Co., ins. prem. . . . . . . . .889.00
Jackson Co. Flexible
Spending Acct.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .339.08
Valic, def. comp. ded. . . . . . . . . .30.00
Wellmark, ins. prem. . . . . . . . .7,786.79
S. D. Retirement,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,626.09
Credit Collection Bureau,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .700.54
Hauge Associates,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100.00
Boston Mutual Life,
ins. prem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$214.08
Colonial Life, ins. prem. . . . . . . . .25.56
Wage Works, FSA fee . . . . . . . . .50.00
S. D. Game, Fish & Parks,
game license fees . . . . . . . . . .639.00
S. D. State Treasurer,
11/12 Cash Rec. Trans. . . .31,650.14
To Whom It May Concern,
10/12 tax apport. . . . . . . .419,456.08
To Whom It May Concern,
11/12 tax apport. . . . . . . .127,475.20
Steve VanderMay,
M V refund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65.00
Hildebrand Steel &
Concrete, Comm.
Lic., Refund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .621.38
U. S. Postage Service,
box rent & postage . . . . . . . . .664.25
S. D. Municipal League,
workers comp coverage . . .12,357.00
Cindy Willert, medical reimb. . . .900.12
City of Kadoka, service . . . . . . . .95.35
Golden West, service . . . . . . .1,038.33
Lacreek Electric, service . . . . . . .72.73
Midwest Coop.,
gas & fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,210.42
Verizon Wireless, service . . . . . .185.21
West Central Electric,
service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .994.54
West River Electric, service . . . . .42.09
West River Lyman
Jones, service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.50
Kerri Enders, medical reimb. . . . .89.82
Brad Stone, medical reimb. . . . .644.22
Delores Bonenberger,
expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202.76
Glen Bennett, expenses . . . . . . .19.24
Larry Denke, expenses . . . . . . . .56.24
Ron Twiss, expenses . . . . . . . . . .66.60
Haakon County, Adm.
Asst. salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .494.83
Carrie Weller, expenses . . . . . . .179.17
Best Western Ramkota
Watertown, lodging . . . . . . . . .171.10
Bradley Borge, ct.
appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,089.00
Century Business Products,
copier rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63.36
Central S. D. Enhancement
District, 2013 dues . . . . . . . .6,104.88
Heidi Coller, B/A draws . . . . . . .100.00
Clay County Sheriff,
prisoner board . . . . . . . . . . . . .250.00
D-Ware, 2013
computer maint. . . . . . . . . . .1,470.00
Terry Deuter, expenses . . . . . . . .90.65
Discount Fuel, gas . . . . . . . . .1,175.06
Jamie Dolezal, expenses . . . . . . .36.00
Election Systems & Software,
coding & layout . . . . . . . . . .1,730.79
Kelly Fortune, expenses . . . . . .132.39
GenPro Power Systems,
generator insp. & rep. . . . . . . .535.97
G I S Workshop, 2013
program maint. . . . . . . . . . . .1,398.00
Grossenberg Impl., window
replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . .610.82
Hogen’s Hardware, parts,
supplies, tools . . . . . . . . . . . . .489.18
Double H Feed, antifreeze
& jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .475.50
Hometown Computer,
computer service . . . . . . . . . . .63.14
J & S Restore, service,
repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .281.80
Jackson Co. Conservation
Dist., ’12 approp. . . . . . . . . .1,500.00
Kadoka Ambulance Service,
½ ins. prem. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,428.50
Kadoka Care Center,
office rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500.00
Kadoka Gas & Go, gas . . . . . . . .35.91
Kadoka Press, publication . . .1,286.90
Kennedy Implement,
mower blades . . . . . . . . . . .1,376.01
Kemnitz Law Office,
office exp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .390.60
McLeod’s, supplies . . . . . . . . . . .33.83
Microfilm Imagining
Systems, scanner rent . . . . . . .75.00
Miller Garbage, service . . . . . . . .60.00
Modern Marketing,
drug test kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92.80
Morris Equipment,
screener rent . . . . . . . . . . . .7,686.00
Nat’l. Assoc. of Counties,
2013 dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .400.00
Neve’s Uniforms,
detection powder . . . . . . . . . . .40.46
Oien Implement, parts . . . . . . . .545.82
Joseph Parr, ct. appt. atty. . . . . .376.00
Jessica Paulsen, transcripts . . .855.00
Pennington Co. Sheriff,
prisoner transport . . . . . . . . . .105.60
People’s Market, supplies . . . . . .75.81
Philip Health Services,
B/A draw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.00
Philip Motor, repairs . . . . . . . . . .721.99
Reliable Office Supplies,
supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .322.42
Servall, rugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159.41
S. D. Assoc. of Assessing
Officers, 2013 dues . . . . . . . . .110.00
S. D. Assoc. of Co. Comm.,
10 & 11/12 Mod. &
Preserv. Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . .115.00
S. D. Assoc. of Co. Comm.,
2013 dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .924.34
S. D. Assoc. of County
Officials, 2013 dues . . . . . . . .737.17
S, D, Retailers, 2013 dues . . . . .150.00
S, D, Sheriff’s Assoc.,
2013 dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .440.93
S. D. Dept. of Health,
lab fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105.00
Jackie Stilwell, cell
phone costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00
West Central Electric,
move line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,814.89
West Publishing, law books . . . .174.00
Western Communications,
radio repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129.00
Winner Regional Healthcare,
prisoner medical . . . . . . . . . . .164.00
Winner Police Dept.,
prisoner bd. & trans. . . . . . .1,955.67
Golden West, 911 access . . . . .765.45
Kadoka Telephone,
911 access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160.43
Knology, 911 service line . . . . . . .50.86
Century Link, 911 access . . . . . .146.17
The S. D. Developmental Center, Red-
field, SD has billed Jackson County an
additional $60.00 for an accrued total of
$540.00 for client assessment. Jackson
County responded in June 2012 that
charges should be assessed to the ap-
propriate federal government agency as
per SDCL 27B-3-27. Bennett moved,
Stilwell seconded, that the billing be de-
nied.
Two notices of hospitalization were re-
ceived from Regional Behavior Health,
Rapid City. The board took no action at
this time.
S.D. Human Services Center re-billed for
admission cost in the amount of $600.00.
The original billing was denied at the No-
vember meeting.
The following renewal wine license appli-
cation for the year 2013 were presented
to the board for approval:
Fresh Start Convenience Stores, Bad-
lands Travel Stop, S2S2NE4SE4,
SE4SE4 Ex. Hwy., Section 21, T 2 S, R
22 E, Jackson County, SD
Badlands Lodge, LLC, Cedar Pass
Lodge, NW4, Section 34, T 3 S, R 18 E,
Jackson County, SD
Bonenberger moved, Bennett seconded,
that the two renewal wine license appli-
cations be approved, signed, and for-
warded to the state for final approval.
The 2013 CHN contract was presented
to the board. Jackson County is to pro-
vide $4,120.00 in funding to the S. D.
Dept. of Health for nursing services.
Denke moved, Twiss seconded, that the
contract be approved and signed.
Al Haugen, Central S. D. Enhancement
District, gave a demonstration on the
new GIS software now installed on the
Director of Equalization computers.
A contract between Jackson County and
Western Construction to have +/- 5,000
to 7,000 ton of gravel crushed and stock-
piled at the Harvey Pit was presented to
the board. Bonenberger moved, Bennett
seconded, that the new contract with
Western Construction be approved and
signed.
An annual contact form received from the
U. S. Census Bureau was completed and
signed by Chairman Stilwell.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor, reported that
billings have been sent to Reno County,
Kansas and Minnehaha County, SD, re-
questing reimbursement of prisoner
courtesy hold costs totaling $750.00.
Report was made that Jackson County
received $250.00 from Claims Associ-
ates as subrogation received on loss in-
curred to the Sheriff’s pickup in 2011.
Notice was received from Claims Asso-
ciates that claims are closed on the
2011claim on the 2000 Ford pickup and
the 2012 claim on the 2013 Ford Ex-
plorer.
A billing from Pennington County Sheriff
for prisoner transport and transport of a
person to S. D. Human Services Center,
Yankton, was presented to the board.
Report was made that Jackson County
had no knowledge of the transport of a
person to S. D. Human Services Center.
Bennett moved, Twiss seconded, that the
$200.20 billed by Pennington County
Sheriff for transport of a person to S. D.
Human Center be denied, and that the
amount billed for prisoner transport in the
amount of $105.60 be authorized for
payment.
Sheriff Clements met with the board. Re-
port was made on Highway Safety grant
funds received during 2012, reimburse-
ment for a vest, and an insurance pay-
ment received on an auto damage claim.
Sheriff Clements reported that additional
grant funds should be received before
the end of December. It was decided to
wait until the year end meeting to supple-
ment the 2012 Sheriff’s budget.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor, presented the No-
vember financial report, and pointed out
that the Emergency and Disaster Fund is
overdrawn due to a general journal entry
made as recommended by the audit of
years 2010 / 2011. Bonenberger moved,
Denke seconded, that $14,376.73 be
transferred from General Fund to the
Emergency and Disaster Fund.
Sheriff Clements reported on audit rec-
ommendations presented to him during
the audit of years 2010 / 2011.
A report showing expenditures for bridge
replacement, gravel royalty, and gravel
crushing and stockpiling was presented
to the board. The 2011 and 2012 STP
funds received were used for payment
for these items. Due to these expendi-
tures, there are line items of the 2012
Highway Department budget which are
over expended, and it was planned to
supplement the 2012 Highway Depart-
ment budget with the STP revenue.
There are still billings for gravel crushing
and stockpiling expected to arrive by the
end of December. It was determined by
the board to wait until the year end meet-
ing to supplement the 2012 Highway De-
partment budget.
Cindy Willert, Treasurer, reported that the
fax machine has not been working. Bo-
nenberger moved, Denke seconded, that
a new fax machine be purchased.
A billing from GIS Workshop for the GIS
software maintenance, and the annual
maintenance agreement were presented
to the board. Twiss moved, Bennett sec-
onded that the software billing from GIS
Workshop in the amount of $1,398.00 be
paid, and that the annual maintenance
agreement be approved and signed.
The board recessed for lunch and recon-
vened at 1:00 p.m. with all members
present. Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt.,
Aaron Richardson and Kolette Struble
were also present.
Dwight Deaver presented employee
evaluation forms for the board’s ap-
proval. Discussion was held on the eval-
uation process. Twiss stated he would
like to see evaluations done every six
months. Following discussion, Denke
moved that the employee evaluation
forms be approved, that evaluations be
done at the end of the employee’s 90 day
probationary period, done annually in
2013, and then evaluations be done
every six months for future years.
Discussion was held on seeding the
right-of-way on the new section of CS 29
leading to the Prokop place on the river.
Report was made that West River Exca-
vation has gotten a seeder / spreader
from Bonenberger’s and Veryl Prokop
has purchased seed. Discussion was
held on paying West River Excavation for
doing the seeding and reimbursing Veryl
Prokop for the seed.
Sid Houdek, Butler Machinery, presented
information on Cat motor graders avail-
able under the Spink County bid. These
are 2013 motor graders being leased by
large cities in South Dakota for the win-
ter, and will be available in the spring of
2013. The base price of the awarded bid
is $258,240, with additional equipment
such as snow wing, lift package, and rip-
per being extra. Warranty is 100% for
seven years, and no mileage is charged
for service during the warranty period.
The board took no action at this time.
Dwight Deaver reported that the Cat 120
blade has metal fines in the oil, so should
be replaced. He also reported that there
are two trucks with trailers, the older
loader, and the dozer need to be re-
placed. Bennett reported that he had
found two Freightliners with pusher axles
for $40,000 each, with trailers cost would
be $50,000 each. No action was taken at
this time.
Twiss reported that Jay Vogelgesang
had requested gravel be placed on the
road leading to their place.
Twiss reported that a road in the area of
Joe Amiotte’s and Grady Brunch’s be
posted as “low maintenance road”.
Denke reported that Carl Bauman
thanked the county for work done on the
road in their area.
Dwight Deaver inquired as to whether
ment (WDM) programs. There has been
an increase in resource loss as a direct
result of decreased animal control serv-
ices. Bennett moved, Denke seconded,
that Jackson County send a letter of sup-
port to Governor Daugaard.
Information on an optional plan for cell
phone service through Verizon was pre-
sented to the board. No action was taken
at this time.
There being no further business to come
before the board, Denke moved, Twiss
seconded, that the meeting be ad-
journed. The board will meet in special
session at 11:00 a.m., December 28,
2012 to complete year end business, and
meet in regular session at 9:00 a.m.,
Monday, January 7, 2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
[Published January 17, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $221.36]
the county highway department could
obtain gas and fuel at the pumps, as bulk
price is higher than pump price. The
board informed him the bid letting and
contract for gas at the pumps was for
Sheriff, Director of Equalization and
Courthouse maintenance only.
Wade Iszler, RDO Equipment, presented
information on John Deere motor graders
available under the Hand County bid.
These are 2013 motor graders being
leased by large cities in South Dakota for
the winter, and will be available in the
spring of 2013. The base price of the
awarded bid is $245,000, with additional
equipment such as snow wing, lift pack-
age, and ripper being extra. Warranty is
for five years or 7,500 hours. Financing
options of five or seven years with a
down payment are available. The board
took no action at this time.
Safety Benefits notified counties of up-
coming MSHA trainings available to
county highway department personnel.
Twiss moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that Kelly Fortune be paid $12.50 per
hour for eleven hours time attending the
district Weed & Pest Conference in
Mitchell.
Jackson County was notified that Lyle
Klundt, Coroner, has completed the re-
quired Coroner’s training.
Report was made that an unemployment
claimed filed by a former Jackson County
employee has been denied by the S.D.
Department of Labor.
Jackson County was notified that ap-
pointment of Veteran Service Officer,
Terry Deuter is about to expire. The ap-
pointment will be addressed as the Jan-
uary 2013 meeting.
At 2:55 p.m., Twiss moved, Bonenberger
seconded, that the board go into execu-
tive session to discuss personnel mat-
ters. Dwight Deaver, Aaron Richardson
and Kolette Struble were present.
At 3:32 p.m., Twiss moved, Bonenberger
seconded, that the board come out of ex-
ecutive session.
Following executive session the following
three motions were made.
Denke moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that Dwight Deaver be authorized to con-
tact Josh Cadman and Ken Shaeffer and
offer them full time positions with the
Highway Department at $10.50 per hour
for a 90 day probationary period.
Bonenberger moved, Twiss seconded,
that hours worked by Kolette Struble be
increased to 30 to 40 hours per week.
Twiss moved, Bonenberger seconded,
that a position of Work Leader be estab-
lished, and that Aaron Richardson fill the
position at $14.50 per hour effective De-
cember 10, 2012.
Correspondence was received from the
S.D. Dept. of Transportation and pre-
sented to the board. The SDDOT will
allow counties to exchange the county
federal fund sub allocation (STP funds)
they would receive in 2013 for state high-
way funds to assist local entities with
their immediate highway and bridge re-
pair needs. Bennett moved, Stilwell sec-
onded, that the S.D. Dept. of
Transportation be notified that Jackson
County wishes to exchange the federal
funds for state funds, and receive the
2013 allocation as payment to Jackson
County.
Discussion resumed on CS 29 leading to
the Prokop place on the White River. Re-
port was made that Veryl Prokop paid
$1,407.44 to Jackson County for one-half
the cost for West Central Electric to move
the electric power line due to rerouting
the road.
A cattle guard permit was submitted by
Veryl Prokop for relocating the cattle
guard on CS 29. Bonenberger moved,
Denke seconded, that the permit be ap-
proved.
The cattle guard permit submitted by
Carl Bauman in November was com-
pleted and resubmitted to the board. The
cattle guard is to be placed on the east
section of Redstone Road (CS 80A)
leading to Gary Fredrickson’s. Bonen-
berger moved, Denke seconded, that the
permit be approved.
Discussion was held on the two motor
grader bids presented earlier today. Dis-
cussion was held on selling the older Cat
120 blade, and using the revenue from
the sale to increase the amount of a
down payment to purchase a new motor
grader. The board reviewed specifica-
tions and differences between the two
makes of motor graders. Denke moved,
Twiss seconded, that Jackson County
purchase a Cat 140 M motor grader
through Butler Machinery off the Spink
County bid, and that a 12 foot snow wing,
lift group, and ripper also be purchased.
Jackie Stilwell met with the board and re-
ported that the Haakon / Jackson 4-H
Leaders Council had met concerning the
4-H / Youth program through SDSU. She
presented a letter which was sent to
SDSU stating it is the concensus of
council to strongly encourage Haakon
and Jackson Counties to sign the Mem-
orandum of Understanding with SDSU
and continue the joint four county asso-
ciation with the current employees.
Chairman Stilwell reported that he had
spoken with a Mellette County represen-
tative and they have no problem with the
system as it has been set up. Jackie Stil-
well informed the board is not unhappy
with the system either. She stated she
feels there has been a lack of communi-
cation, and expectations need to be dis-
cussed. Suggestion was made that
quarterly leaders meetings be held. It is
the concensus of the Board of Jackson
County Commissioners to continue the
four county group and continue with the
Memorandum of Understanding with
SDSU.
Denke presented information from the
Sheep Growers Association. The Associ-
ation prepared a letter of support for
counties to use in urging the Governor to
investigate the Animal Damage Control
(ADC) and Wildlife Damage Manage-
Mark says it is critical for pro-
ducers to develop an enterprise
budget for their cow-calf operations
based on projected cattle prices and
expenses for 2013. Whether or not
to grow a herd this year will be de-
termined by the potential returns
available this year. Mark adds that
expenses are vary considerably
across different geographic areas
and amongst producers, but he pro-
vided some average costs in a re-
cent iGrow.org article; visit
iGrow.org/beef to review his budget
example.
"Interestingly, even in a year
like 2013 when we expect near-
record high feeder cattle prices, my
pro-forma cow-calf budget gener-
ated a sizeable loss when including
all fixed costs and opportunity
costs for labor and other non-cash
variable expenses. However, there
was more than a $50 per head re-
turn over cash costs including pas-
ture," Mark said. "So, some
producers may expand their herds
in 2013 based on covering their
cash costs."
Mark adds that his projections
suggest a limited number of pro-
ducers will find a profitable oppor-
tunity to expand - and even then
they have to have access to produc-
tive pasture and other feedstuffs
and capital."
But, the historically tight supply
of cattle suggests feeder cattle
prices should remain high for years
to come, and suggest a profit oppor-
tunity may exist over the next sev-
eral years for those that can make
the investment to grow their herd,"
he said. "In all likelihood, any ex-
pansion plans this year will be gov-
erned by the drought and when/if it
ends."
USDA estimated that there were
29.833 million beef cows in the
country on Jan. 1, 2012. The
USDA's annual cattle inventory re-
port, to be released on Feb. 1, will
provide this year's first official
count of the herd, but based on beef
cow slaughter and expected heifer
retention last year, beef cow num-
bers were likely 1 percent to 1.5
percent lower on Jan. 1, 2013, says
Darrell R. Mark, Adjunct Professor
of Economics at South Dakota
State University.
"There will be much discussion
throughout the year about the pos-
sibility of the beef cow herd begin-
ning expansion from its 50-year
low," Mark said. "While expected
record cattle prices point to growth
in beef cow numbers, the individ-
ual choice for a producer to expand
cow numbers is a complex, multi-
year decision made difficult by high
and volatile input prices."
Mark says a number of factors
will influence cow-calf producers'
decisions regarding herd expansion
in 2013: availability of pasture,
range and other feedstuffs; land
values and rental rates; expected
cattle prices for 2013 and beyond;
herd productivity; and lifestyle
choices.
"Ultimately, the decision to ex-
pand this year will be based on the
expected returns available this
year," he said. "While there are a
number of ways to increase cow
herd numbers, including retaining
additional heifers from the 2013
calf crop or breeding retained
heifers from last years' calf crop, at
this point in the yearly production
cycle, I think most producers would
concentrate on buying bred stock so
that a calf is available to be sold in
2013."
How likely is cow herd
expansion in 2013
rural communities. Strong schools,
housing, and healthcare are all
critical components of economic de-
velopment for local communities.
The State of the Judiciary
speech by Chief Justice Gilbertson
reminded many of us that we have
a shortage of lawyers in rural
areas, which is related to the over-
all need to attract more young fam-
ilies in rural communities. Chief
Justice Gilbertson also referenced
current drug and alcohol alterna-
tive courts and showed how they
assist in rehabilitation of troubled
citizens, and recommended our
state continue to expand their pres-
ence. Veterans’ needs are more im-
portant now than ever, and SD
Democrats join the bipartisan ef-
forts to expand services for our
Vets.
No other topic dominates the
agenda of Democratic legislators
more than providing adequate
funding to our public schools. I was
once a teacher myself and I know
that education is the key to eco-
nomic opportunity in the state of
South Dakota. The drastic cuts to
education passed by the 2011 Leg-
islature have left a huge hole to fill.
These cuts from the funding for-
mula have resulted in close to 500
South Dakota educators losing
their jobs. The result in District 27
schools, and all across the state,
was loss of electives and programs,
larger class sizes, and fewer key
support staff like teacher aids. Re-
pairing this damage will be my
highest priority.
On other important topics to
rural South Dakotans, Democratic
leadership is working on legislation
that came from the Regional Wa-
tershed Advisory Taskforce which
streamlines the process to estab-
lish local watershed districts. We
also have a strong interest in advo-
cating for changes to grain buyer
rules and regulations in light of the
recent failure of Anderson Seeds
sunflower operation. We must work
together to give preference to the
delivering producers/farmers when
insolvency happens in grain pur-
chasing facilities. Lastly we will
advocate for creative opportunities
to invest in research at our land
grant university along with pub-
lic/private partnerships to brand
our State as truly the most favor-
able research State in the Country!
I invite you to contact me with
your questions and concerns. I may
be reached at 605-685-4241 or
Sen.Bradford@state.sd.us
Greetings from start of the 88th
Session of the SD Legislature from
your District 27 Senator Jim Brad-
ford. Because of the redistricting
process, there are many of you vot-
ers who are new to this District. I’d
like to welcome you and encourage
you to contact me. For those of you
who I haven’t yet met, I’d like to in-
troduce myself in this message.
I’ve served in the SD Legislature
for a total of 12 years, 8 years in
the House and was recently was re-
elected to my third term in the Sen-
ate. District 27 is geographically
one of the largest in the state and
includes Bennett, Haakon, Jack-
son, Pennington and Shannon
counties. I recently served on the
Governor’s Criminal Justice Task
Initiative Task Force which will be
bringing forth legislation in this
Session to improve our justice sys-
tem by providing for increases in
drug and alcohol courts. The focus
here is to help people recover, not
put them in prison. This Session,
I’ll serve on both the Senate Health
and Judiciary Committees.
As a group, we legislators should
always be reminded that we serve
as citizen lawmakers and take
great pride in our accessibility to
all of you as constituents of our
state. Like you, our regular jobs
and involvement in local commu-
nity activities allows us to stay
grounded and held accountable. We
are the People’s Legislature.
This year the Governor's State
of the State provided a shared op-
timistic outlook on the current sta-
tus and future of our great state.
Stewardship is an understood con-
cept by all of us who know how to
pay our bills and be an asset to so-
ciety. The criminal justice reform
legislation will be a focal point for
this legislative session, and we look
forward to the potential this bill
has for an increased focus on alter-
native sentencing, mental health,
and integrating our prisoners back
into society. All of this will require
upfront investment of money and
people, but we can hopefully avoid
the need to build more prisons in
the near future. The Governor
chose to focus on the less confronta-
tional issues, but at the same time
avoided giving us his direction on
working with our partners includ-
ing schools and nursing homes.
Along with our partners, it is our
hope that we can find ways to cre-
ate true economic development
throughout all of South Dakota
with a strong focus of bringing
more young people back to our
From Senator Jim Bradford
Public Notices …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
SPECIAL MEETING
Board of Jackson
County
Commissioners
December 28, 2012
The Board of Jackson County Commis-
sioners met in special session at 1:00
p.m., Friday, December 28, 2012 in the
Commissioner’s Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Jim Stil-
well called the meeting to order with
members Glen Bennett, Larry Denke and
Ronnie Twiss present. Delores Bonen-
berger was absent. Dwight Deaver, Hwy.
Supt., Aaron Richardson, and Hwy. Dept.
Sec. Kolette Struble were present. Larry
Johnston was also present.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. reported that
mowing has come to a halt. He also re-
ported a clutch has gone out on one trac-
tor.
Discussion was held on leasing tractors
for mowing. The board informed Dwight
Deaver that it is planned to rotate each
year between Kennedy Implement and
Grossenberg Implement for leasing
mowing tractors.
Dwight Deaver reported that West River
Excavation has completed re-routing the
section of CS 29 leading to the Prokop
place on the White River. He reported
that there may be drainage problems in
the future, that the Highway Department
has placed gravel on the newly con-
structed section of road, and that base
course may need to be added later. Re-
port was made on concerns of Mr.
Prokop and others of the steep grade
going over the hill, and the possibility of
persons using the old section of road
which poses the hazard of caving off.
Twiss moved, Denke seconded, that the
old section of road on CS29 be closed.
Sheriff Clements met with the board.
Discussion was held on reports of speed-
ing on county roads and increased truck
traffic on county roads. Resolutions
adopted in prior years establishing
weight limits on CH 16 were reviewed.
Report was made that Haakon County
has established speed limits on their
county roads. It was consensus of the
board to have the States Attorney draw
up a resolution or ordinance establishing
speed limits on county roads.
Dwight Deaver reported that a gas pow-
ered jack hammer would cost $3,500.00.
He reported that the one he was looking
at had no hydraulic hoses. He plans to
get more price information.
Report was made of an inquiry as to
whether Jackson County has plans to im-
prove the north end of the Belvidere
Road. Haakon County has improved the
road further north in Haakon County.
Dwight Deaver informed the board he
would put the project on the county’s
schedule of work to be done.
Report was made of a complaint by Mike
Livermont on the location of the cattle
guard installed by Carl Bauman on Red-
stone Road. Dwight Deaver informed the
board that the cattle guard is installed
and that Carl Bauman did a very good
job with the installation.
A letter from Sage Information Services,
Glen Ellen, CA was presented to the
board. The company had made a re-
quest for assessment records in elec-
tronic format from the Director of
Equalization’s Office and has received no
response. Brad Stone, Director of Equal-
ization presented information on charges
imposed by other South Dakota counties
for records in electronic format. Jackson
County is not providing records in elec-
tronic format at this time.
Report was made that Western Con-
struction has signed and returned the
contract for additional gravel to be
crushed and stockpiled at the Harvey Pit.
They have completed the project, and
have billed the county for the entire
amount.
The 2013 Memorandum of Understand-
ing between SDSU Extension and coun-
ties for the 4-H / Youth Program was
reviewed. Jackson County is to pay
SDSU for partial salary support of the 4-
H Advisor position in the amount of
$4,187.50. Denke moved, Bennett sec-
onded, that the Memorandum of Under-
standing presented by SDSU Extension
be approved and signed.
Dwight Deaver inquired as to whether
the V plow would be sold with the 120
Cat motorgrader when it is sold. Aaron
Richardson reported that newer V plow
mounts do no interchange with the older
type mounts. The board informed the
Highway Superintendent that the 120
Cat with V plow would be declared sur-
plus at a later date. Discussion was held
on purchasing a V plow for the new 140
Cat motorgrader being acquired in 2013,
and that the county has all summer to ac-
quire one.
Twiss inquired as to why the 911 paging
system is not being utilized by the
Belvidere and Kadoka Fire Departments.
Larry Johnston reported that the
Belvidere Fire Department is now looking
into the paging system, and that the cur-
rent “fire-bar” phone system does not
work all the time. Discussion was held on
the 911 paging system. Discussion was
held on an occasion when 911 was not
called to report a fire in Kadoka. Sheriff
Clements reported that enhanced 911 is
coming, and all citizens need to use 911
so all responders are notified through the
paging system or by cell phone text mes-
sages.
Deputy States Attorney, Chip Kemnitz,
met with the board. He reported on the
health condition of States Attorney Dan
Van Gorp. Mr. Kemnitz presented a letter
to Jackson County stating he will perform
the duties of States Attorney at no charge
until Dan Van Gorp returns, and stated
that the county should continue to pay
Dan Van Gorp. Mr. Kemnitz informed the
board he can attend Commission meet-
ings if given at least thirty minutes to get
to Kadoka. Chairman Stilwell reported
that he had spoken with Judge Brown on
the phone, and that the Judge will keep
in contact with Deputy States Attorney
Kemnitz. Report was also made that the
oath of office of the States Attorney can
be postponed.
Holidays in 2013 were discussed. The
Fourth of July 2013, Christmas Day 2013
and New Years Day 2014 fall on Thurs-
days. Twiss moved, Denke seconded,
payday be set on July 3, 2013, that 4
hours of additional holiday be granted for
December 24, 2013, and that 4 hours of
additional holiday be granted for Decem-
ber 31, 2013.
At 2:48 p.m., Bennett moved, Twiss sec-
onded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor, and Larry Johnston
were present. Vicki Wilson came out of
executive session at 2:55 p.m.
At 3:13 p.m., Twiss moved, Bennett sec-
onded, that the board come out of exec-
utive session. The board took no action.
A notice of hospitalization was received
from Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux
Falls, SD. The patient is eligible for IHS
benefits.
The S. D. Developmental Center, Red-
field, SD has billed Jackson County an
additional $60.00 for an accrued total of
$600.00 for client assessment. Jackson
County responded in June 2012 that
charges should be assessed to the ap-
propriate federal government agency as
per SDCL 27B-3-27. Denke moved, Stil-
well seconded, that the billing be denied.
Three billings for mental illness costs
were received. Denke moved, Stilwell
seconded, that the following billings for
mental illness costs be denied as the
persons may be eligible for IHS benefits:
Audra Malcomb Consulting, mental ill-
ness costs, $133.29; Audra Malcomb
Consulting, mental illness costs,
$133.29; Audra Malcomb Consulting,
mental illness costs, $84.96.
Departmental budgets for 2012 were re-
viewed. Fund balances were reviewed.
Vicki Wilson, Auditor, reported that 2012
Highway project reports have not been
received. Discussion was held on expen-
ditures for the Prokop Road (CS 29) be
declared Secondary Road expenditures
and the amounts transferred from re-
stricted Secondary Road cash to County
Road and Bridge cash. Discussion was
also held on transferring cash from Gen-
eral Fund to County Road and Bridge,
and the motion made on December 10,
2012 to transfer funds from General to
Emergency Management needing to be
in resolution form. Denke moved, Ben-
nett seconded, that the following resolu-
tion be adopted transferring funds:
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2012 – 22
WHEREAS, County Highway
Project reports are used to
transferred restricted Second-
ary Road cash to County Road
and Bridge cash; and
WHEREAS, the Board of
Jackson County Commission-
ers hereby declare the expen-
ditures in relocating a section
of CS 29 as Secondary Road
expenditures;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, that the following
amount be transferred within
the County Road and Bridge
Fund:
Restricted Secondary Road
cash $27,813.89 to County
Road and Bridge cash
$27,813.89
WHEREAS, counties are al-
lowed to make operating
transfers from General Fund
to Special Revenue Funds:
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, that the following
amount be transferred from
General Fund to the follow
Special Revenue Funds:
County Road
and Bridge . . . . . . . 66,879.00
Emergency
and Disaster . . . . . . 14,376.73
Resolution adopted this 28th
day of December, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
Information was presented on Highway
Safety grant funding and FY 2011 and
FY 2012 swap of federal STP funds for
state funds for road purposes.
These revenues were not included in an-
nual budgets. Bennett moved, Denke
seconded, that the following expenditure
budgets be supplemented for the year
2012.
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2012 – 23
WHEREAS, Jackson County,
South Dakota, has received
unanticipated revenue in FY
2012 from Highway Safety
grant funds for the Highway
Safety Overtime Project;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED by the Jackson
County Board of Commission-
ers, that the 2012 Sheriff’s ex-
penditure budget be
supplemented by the following
amounts:
SHERIFF
Salaries. . . . . . . . . . . 6,533.77
FICA/Medicare/
SDRS/
Work. Comp. . . . . . . . 705.00
WHEREAS, Jackson County,
South Dakota, has received
unanticipated revenue in FY
2011 and FY 2012 from swap
of federal STP funds for state
funds for road purposes;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED by the Jackson
County Board of Commission-
ers, that the 2012 County
Road and Bridge expenditure
budget be supplemented by
the following amounts:
COUNTY ROAD & BRIDGE
Professional
Services. . . . . . . . . . 1,237.14
Gravel Royalty. . . . . 23,208.00
Gravel /
Oil Projects. . . . . . 217,511.00
CH&BR Bridge
Replacement. . . . . . 49,528.00
Resolution adopted this 28th day of De-
cember, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
Bennett moved, Twiss seconded, that
the following resolution be adopted trans-
ferring budget amounts from the Contin-
gency Budget to the various
departmental budgets:
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2012 – 24
WHEREAS, the Board of
Jackson County Commission-
ers designated a Contingency
Budget within the 2012 Jack-
son County Budget for the pur-
pose of supplementing other
departmental budgets should
unanticipated expenses arise
above budgeted amounts; and
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, that the following
amounts be transferred from
the 2012 Contingency Budget
to the following departmental
budgets:
Contingency. . . . . . 19,080.00
Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5,515.00
Sheriff. . . . . . . . . . . 13,425.00
Drug / Alcohol. . . . . . . 140.00
Resolution adopted this 28th
day of December, 2012.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
The S. D. Department of Legislative
Audit presented audit finding for the two
year period ending December 31, 2011.
A management representation letter was
presented to the board. Twiss moved,
Bennett seconded, that the letter be ap-
proved, signed, and returned to SD-
DOLA.
Discussion was held on the minutes of
the December 10, 2012 meeting. Denke
moved, Stilwell seconded, that the min-
utes be corrected to show that Aaron
Richardson pay as Work Leader is to be
$14.00 per hour, not $14.50 as stated in
the minutes of December 10, 2012 meet-
ing, and that the $14.00 per hour rate go
into effect at the beginning of the current
pay period.
Denke moved, Stilwell seconded, that
the minutes of the December 10, 2012
meeting be corrected to show that the
cost of trailers reported at that meeting
were $50,000 each, not truck with trailers
would be $50,000 each.
Denke moved, Stilwell seconded, that
the minutes of the December 10, 2012
meeting be approved as corrected.
The following bills from the files of the
County Auditor were presented, exam-
ined, allowed and ordered paid:
Salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,673.13
BankWest, payroll tax . . . . . .3,998.23
American Family
Life Ass’r. Co.,
ins. prem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .444.50
Jackson Co. Flexible
Spending Acct.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .169.54
Valic, def. comp. ded. . . . . . . . . .15.00
Wellmark, ins. Prem. . . . . . . .8,325.06
S. D. Retirement,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . .2,472.81
Credit Collection Bureau,
payroll deduction . . . . . . . . .350.27
Hauge Assoc.,
payroll deduction . . . . . . . . . .50.00
Brad Stone, reimb.
med. exp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105.88
Vicki Wilson, reimb.
med. exp. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,517.49
Haakon County,
Adm. Asst. salary . . . . . . . .269.06
Sheryl Hansen, expenses . . . . . .8.14
Carrie Weller, expenses . . . . . . .98.12
A & H Truck
Salvage, rims . . . . . . . . . . .480.00
Access Elevator,
annual inspection . . . . . . . .620.00
Bradley Borge,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . . .728.00
Century Business
Products, copier rent . . . . . . .54.98
City /County Alcohol &
Drug, detox . . . . . . . . . . . . .140.00
Heidi Coller, B/A draws . . . . . .200.00
Dakota Business
Center, supplies . . . . . . . . .819.68
Dakota Transmission,
recond. transmission . . . .2,671.12
Dwight Deaver,
pictures developed . . . . . . . .11.20
Discount Fuel, gas . . . . . . . . . .970.89
Dustin Harvey,
gravel royalty . . . . . . . . .16,207.20
Hoag Diesel, repairs . . . . . . .1,521.09
Hogen’s Hardware,
supplies, parts . . . . . . . . . . .309.74
Hometown Computer Service,
computer service . . . . . . . . .130.25
General Store,
measuring wheel . . . . . . . . . .63.99
Rena Hymans,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . .3,172.95
J & S Restore, repairs . . . . . . .238.25
Kadoka Clinic,
employee physicals,
CDL testing . . . . . . . . . . . . .310.00
Kadoka Press, publication . . . .407.71
Konst Machine, steel . . . . . . . . .22.75
Lyle Klundt, Coroner,
expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .764.66
Kevin Lewis,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . .6,232.75
Todd Love, ct. appt. atty. . . . . .648.83
Midwest Coop,
gas & fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,389.26
Miller Garbage
Service, service . . . . . . . . . . .77.60
Oien Implement, parts . . . . . . .187.49
Parr Law Office,
ct. appt. atty. . . . . . . . . . . .6,048.69
Jessica Paulsen, transcript . . . .79.80
Pennington County 911,
surcharge remittance . . . .6,135.22
Pennington County Jail,
prisoner board . . . . . . . . . . .441.00
People’s Market, supplies . . . . .35.84
Pheasantland Industries,
M H decals . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46.58
Philip Body Shop, repairs . . . . .320.00
Philip Motor, altenator . . . . . . .221.54
Reliable Office
Supply, supplies . . . . . . . . . .56.65
Shad’s Towing, tow
Expedition . . . . . . . . . . . . . .350.75
S. D. Bureau of Info
& Tech., internet, e-mail . . . .90.00
S. D. Dept. of Health,
lab fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70.00
S. D. States Atty. Assoc.,
2013 dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . .681.00
S. D. Assoc. Co. Hwy.
Supt., 2013 dues . . . . . . . . .225.00
S. D. State Treasurer,
audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,404.00
S, D, Dept. of Health,
empl. Flu shots . . . . . . . . . .220.00
Servall, rugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93.40
True North Steel, culverts . . .6,757.73
W. W. Tire, tires . . . . . . . . . . .4,886.56
West River Electric, service . . . .42.33
Western Communications,
reprogram E M radio . . . . . .100.00
Western Construction,
crush / stockpile
gravel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101,295.00
West River Excavation,
build road CS29 . . . . . . .24,999.99
Winner Police Dept.,
prisoner bd. & trans. . . . . .2,225.21
Glen Bennett, expenses . . . . . . .19.24
Delores Bonenberger,
expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.88
Larry Denke, expenses . . . . . . .56.24
Ron Twiss, expenses . . . . . . . . .66.60
The board directed that a memo be sent
out with the next payroll instructing em-
ployees to adhere to the sick leave pol-
icy, and that a copy of the section of the
personnel policy on sick leave be at-
tached to the memo.
All departments are hereby notified that
inventories and fixed asset records are
to be filed in the Office of the County Au-
ditor no later than January 10, 2013.
There being no further business to come
before the board, Denke moved, Twiss
seconded, that the meeting be adjourned
and that the board meet in regular ses-
sion at 9:00 a.m., Monday, January 7,
2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
James A. Stilwell, Chairman
[Published January 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $235.66]
NOTICE OF
VACANCY
MUNICIPALITY OF
BELVIDERE
The following office will become vacant
due to the expiration of the present term
of office of the elective officer:
Rudy Reimann Trustee – two years
left of a three year term
John L Rodgers Trustee – three year
term
Circulation of nomination petitions may
begin on January 25, 2013 and petitions
may be filed in the office of the finance
officer located at 402 B Street no later
then 5:00 p.m. mountain time on Febru-
ary 22, 2013.
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $20.16]
NOTICE OF VACANCY
MUNICIPALITY OF KADOKA
The following offices will become vacant
due to the expiration of the present term
of office of the elective officer:
Mayor
(2-Year Term)
Harry Weller
Ward I
(2-Year Term)
Richard Stolley
Ward II
(1-Year Term)
Vacant
(2-Year Term)
L. Kieth Prang
Ward III
(2-Year Term)
Ryan Willert
Circulation of nominating petitions may
begin on January 25, 2013 and petitions
may be filed in the office of the finance
officer located at the Kadoka City Audito-
rium annex between the hours of 8:00
A.M. and 4:00 P.M., MST, not later than
5:00 P.M. on Friday, February 22, 2013.
[Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $19.50]
Notice of Public
Hearing
Land Use Zoning
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, the
City of Kadoka, South Dakota; Planning
& Zoning Commission will meet to hold a
public input meeting to receive com-
ments on potential City of Kadoka land
use zoning policies. The meeting will be
held on January 23th, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
in the Annex of the Kadoka Auditorium,
820 Chestnut Street, Kadoka, South
Dakota, at which time and place any per-
son interested may appear to give public
testimony. For more information please
contact Ken Wilmarth, Planning & Zoning
Commission Chairman, at either
wilmarth@gwtc.net or (605) 837-2287.
Dated this 11th day of January, 2013.
[Published January 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $9.03]
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
December 19, 2012
The regular meeting of the Town of Cot-
tonwood was held at Town Hall on
Wednesday evening, December 19,
2012 with the following present. JC
Heath, Jeffrey Heath, Dave Griffee and
Doug Hovland. The meeting was called
to order by JC Heath.
Old Business: None.
New Business: Jeffrey Heath was ap-
pointed as a Trustee.
The following bills were approved:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101.00
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,550.02
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,832.96
With there being no other bills presented
or other business to discuss, the meeting
was adjourned. The next regular meeting
will be held on January 16, 2013 – 7 PM
at Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published January 17, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $12.35]
News …
January 17, 2013 •Kadoka Press • Page 8
Farmers’
IncomeTax
Record Books
available
at the
Kadoka Press
Sometimes we wonder if that
cow rattling the chute is worth
keeping. Recent research suggests
maybe not, said Elaine Grings,
SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Man-
agement & Production Specialist.
Grings points to studies con-
ducted several years ago with
Brahman-crosses which found that
cows with excitable temperaments
had lower pregnancy rates than
their calmer herdmates. Re-
searchers at Oregon State Univer-
sity expanded the study to look at
the effect of cattle temperament
and acclimation to handling on re-
productive performance in Angus ×
Hereford cross cows. Their results
were reported in the October issue
of the Journal of Animal Science.
More than 400 spring-calving
range cows at two locations in east-
ern Oregon were tested for tem-
perament using both a chute score
and measurement of exit velocity
from a squeeze chute. The chute
score is a 5-point scale, 1 being as-
signed calm cattle which exhibited
no movement and a 5 assigned to
violent animals which exhibited
continuous struggling.
Exit velocity was also measured
with an infrared sensor and con-
verted to a 1-5 point scale - 1 given
to the slowest and 5 to the fastest.
The chute and exit scores were av-
eraged to give a temperament
score, animals with a score of less
than 3 received an adequate score
whereas, animals receiving a 3 or
greater received a temperament
score of aggressive. About 25 per-
cent of the cows were scored as ag-
gressive and these cows had lower
pregnancy rates of 89 percent com-
pared to the adequate tempera-
ment cows, which had a pregnancy
rate of 95 percent.
"At one location, cows were bred
by AI and then exposed to natural
service clean up bulls. The second
location used natural service mat-
ing only," Grings said. "The fact
that bulls were used indicates that
the lowered pregnancy rates in the
aggressive cows were not due only
to stress during handling at AI."
Cow body condition and calf
birth and weaning weights were
not different between the groups
and there were also no difference
between groups in pregnancy loss
or loss of calves from birth to wean-
ing. Decreased weight of calves
weaned per cow exposed in the ag-
gressive groups was related to the
effect on pregnancy rate alone.
"Based on this and other stud-
ies, the researchers suggest culling
on temperament or adapting cattle
to handling could help in maximiz-
ing reproductive performance in
beef cows," she said.
These researchers reported on a
second study on the effect of accli-
mating heifers to handling on re-
productive performance. After
weaning, they divided 6-month-old
heifers into two groups of about 44
heifers each. One group was
processed through a handling facil-
ity three times a week for four
weeks. Heifers receiving more fre-
quent handling reached puberty at
an earlier age than their herd-
mates, but pregnancy rates after AI
were not different. The more fre-
quently-handled heifers had lower
exit scores, but not chute scores
compared to those handled less fre-
quently.
"The researchers therefore sug-
gest that exposing heifers to han-
dling and human interaction may
improve reproduction," Grings
said. "They do caution that this
training needs to occur when ani-
mals are fairly young."
In a previous study, when they
attempted to acclimate mature
cows to handling, they were not
successful at improving pregnancy
rates. Grings says there are still
some questions left to be answered.
"We still need to determine,
what the minimum amount of han-
dling needed to train an animal
and what is the best age for train-
ing," she said.
In summary:
Pregnancy rates were improved
in groups of cows with less aggres-
sive temperaments. Heifers accli-
mated to handling at about 6
months of age reached puberty at
an earlier age and had lower chute
exit scores than heifers handled
less frequently. Acclimating young
animals to handling and culling on
temperament may have beneficial
effects on reproduction in beef cat-
tle.
To learn more about this and
other cattle-related studies, visit
iGrow.org.
Research shows
cow temperament
affects reproduction
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
EMPLOYMENT
BUILDING MAINTENANCE SPE-
CIALIST/Plumbing, Job Id #739,
Pierre, SD: Position is open until
filled. For more information and to
apply, go to http://bhr.sd.gov/work-
forus.
HOVEN CO-OP SERVICE COM-
PANY in Hoven, SD is seeking a
General Manager. Generous benefit
package, competitive salary. For
more information or application ma-
terials, call (605)948-2222.
FINANCE OFFICER: The City of
Miller is accepting applications for a
City Finance Officer. Position respon-
sibilities include finance office admin-
istration and management, human
resource management and other du-
ties. Salary DOE, plus benefits. Ap-
plications and/or more information
available at the City of Miller, 120
West 2nd Street, Miller, SD 57362 or
by calling 605-853-2705. Deadline
for application submittal is 5:00 p.m.
on February 1, 2013. EOE.
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/MAINTE-
NANCE WORKER: Haakon County
Highway Department. Must have a
commercial driver’s license or be
able to obtain one within three
months of hire date. Benefits pack-
age offered. Open until filled. Apply:
HC Highway Department, 22260
Lake Waggoner Road, Philip, SD
57567. 605/859-2472. Haakon
County is an EOE.
COMMUNICATIONS OPERATOR,
$16.14-$19.64/hr. Visit: www.cityof-
brookings.org. Submit
application/resume to City of Brook-
ings, PO Box 270, Brookings, SD
57006-0270, dlangland@cityof-
brookings.org.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competi-
tive wages, benefits, training, profit
sharing, opportunities for growth,
great culture and innovation. $1,500
Sign on Bonus available for Service
Technicians. To browse opportuni-
ties go to www.rdoequipment.com.
Must apply online. EEO.
E-mail your
news,
stories or
photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Tag Board • Envelopes
Rubber & Self-inking Stamps
Stamp Pads & Ink • Paper
Check with
us first
Let us give you
all your price
quotes
Ravellette
Publications does
ALL types of
printing jobs!
Call the Kadoka Press
for more info at
837-2259
or 859-2516
GRAIN FARM HELP. Onida, SD.
Full-time. Operating large farm
equipment, trucks, tractors, sprayers
& planting equipment. Good driving
record. General maintenance.
Salary/hourly DOE. 605-280-7038.
FOR SALE
INSULATED CONCRETE TIRE
TANK LIDS for rubber tire tanks.
Custom made, 4’-12’ width. Center
float hole and drinking holes. Perma-
nent lids. Hildebrand Steel 1-877-
867-1485.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00.
Make & save money with your own
bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension.
In stock ready to ship. FREE
I n f o / D V D :
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-
578-1363 Ext.300N.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery. 50x80,
62x100, 68x120, 68x200, 100x200.
Take advantage of tax deductions.
Limited Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-
7040.
ADVERTISE HERE
EVERYONE IN THE
STATE WILL READ IT
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
NOTICE OF
VACANCY ON
SCHOOL BOARD
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
35-2
The following school board positions will
become vacant due the expiration of the
present terms of office of the following
school board members:
Ken Lensegrav– three year term
Dawn Rasmussen - three year term
Dan Vander May- three year term
Circulation of nominating petitions may
begin on January 25, 2013 and may be
filed in the office of the business man-
ager located at the Kadoka School be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., mountain standard time, not later
than the 22nd day of February, 2013, at
5:00 p.m., or mailed by registered mail
not later than the 22nd day of February,
2013.
Eileen C. Stolley
Business Manager
Kadoka School District
[Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $24.70]
Athletes
of the
Week
Kenar VanderMay
Boys Basketball
Over the Jones County tournament
Kenar averaged 14.7 points and 7
rebounds a game. He is a great
team player who works extremely
hard in practice and games.
Taylor Merchen
Girls Basketball
Taylor played very tough defense in
both our games against New Un-
derwood and Philip. She is an
aggessive defender, making our
opponents turn over the ball to us.
She has a good work ethic and
goes hard in both practice and
games. She has a positive attitude
and shows good leadership out on
the court.
Sponsored by
Jackson County
Title Company
and
Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2286
HORSE TRAINING/BREAKING: All
horses, prices vary. Call for details
515-3952. K27-3tp
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge
construction/maintenance preferred.
CDL Pre-employment drug and al-
cohol screening required. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted.
Information (605) 837-2410 or (605)
837-2422 Fax (605) 837-2447.
K27-5tc
HELP WANTED: Janitor for the
Kadoka Area School District. Appli-
cations available on the website
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or may be
picked up at the school. Open until
filled. Contact Jamie Hermann at
837-2174, ext. 100. EOE.
KP27-2tc
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
HELP WANTED: Business manager
for the Kadoka Area School District.
Applications available on the web-
site www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or may
be picked up at the school. Wage
DOE and qualifications. Open until
filled. Contact Jamie Hermann at
837-2174, ext. 100. EOE.
KP24-4tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
I’d like to thank the Kadoka Pres-
byterian Deacons for their generous
gift and to all those that have prayed
for Bodee and I.
Wade & Bodee Fox
Secret Santa you are the great-
est! We really appreciated it, thank
you.
Dale & Cindy O’Connell
We would like to thank everyone
for all your kindness and prayers
after the loss of our beloved mother.
Special thanks for all the food, flow-
ers, music and memorial money.
Thanks to the Kadoka Nursing
Home staff for your loving care.
Thank you to Jack, Gayle, and DJ
Rush fo all your help. You are a
blessing to our community. Thank
you to Pastor Gary and Ruth for all
you did.
The Winona Carson Family
Ronnie, Renate & family
Oliver, Gayle & family
Wilma, Melvin & family
Thank you to all the generous
and loving friends and family who
sent cards, offered sympathy and
condolences, sent flowers and
plants, attended the funeral and
gave memorial gifts after the death
of our mother, grandmother, and
great grandmother, Jane Kampfe.
Thank you to Pastor John Klatt
for your comforting words, the pall-
bearers for your assistance, Good
Shepherd Women’s Fellowship
Group for serving the luncheon fol-
lowing the services, and to Osheim
& Schmidt Funeral Home for your
assistance and support in making
funeral arrangements.
We are also grateful to the doc-
tors, nurses, and other caregivers at
Golden Living Center Meadowbrook
for their compassion in caring for
Jane in the final months of her life.
The kindness of all of you is a
comforting blessing to us.
The Family of Jane Kampfe
Gregory & Nancy Kampfe
& family
Garland & Kathy Kampfe
& family
Thank Yous
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers..........................................5-3
Handrahan Const .........................5-3
Shad’s Towing ...............................4-4
Badland’s Auto..............................4-4
Dakota Bar....................................4-4
Petersen’s ......................................2-6
Hightlights:
Gail Reutter ..........................204/474
Jerry Mooney...............214 clean/554
Marlis Petersen.....................192/502
Matt Reckling..............200 clean/552
Jackie Shull...........................181/473
Trina Brown..........................178/484
Neal Petersen.....................5-10 split
Jason Petersen..................2-5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ......................3-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Peoples Market .........................38-14
Kennedy Impl .....................31.5-20.5
George’s Welding ......................29-23
Philip Motor..............................27-25
G&A Trenching...................22.5-29.5
Kadoka Tree Service...........22.5-29.5
Bear Auto ..................................19-33
PHS .....................................18.5-33.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd......................227, 236/651
Alvin Pearson........................213/591
Wendell Buxcel .............213, 201/582
Fred Foland...........................201/543
Earl Park......................................530
Norm Buxcel........3-10 split; 206/528
James Mansfield..........................506
Matt Schofield ....................3-10 split
Johnny Wilson...................2-5-7 split
Curtis Bitting .....................5-10 split
Ronnie Williams ...................2-7 split
Jerry Iron Moccasin ...........3-10 split
Dane Hellekson ....................2-7 split
Todd Radway ........................2-7 split
Terry Wentz ........................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Bowling Belles ..............................9-3
State Farm....................................8-4
Invisibles.......................................8-4
Cutting Edge Salon ......................7-5
Jolly Ranchers.............................1-11
Highlights:
Debbie Gartner ............................165
Donna Newman ...........................160
Sandra O’Connor ..................158/449
Christy Park..........................158/430
Shirley O’Connor .........................157
Wednesday Night Early
Morrison’s Haying ........................4-0
Dakota Bar....................................3-1
Just Tammy’s................................3-1
Dorothy’s Catering........................3-1
Hildebrand Concrete ....................1-3
Wall Food Center ..........................1-3
First National Bank .....................1-3
Chiefie’s Chicks.............................0-4
Highlights:
Laniece Sawvell ....................201/445
MaryLynn Crary ..4-5 & 2-7-8 splits;
...............................................155/404
Annette Hand...............................175
Kalie Kjerstad..............................315
Marlis Petersen.....2-7 split; 175/496
Cristi Ferguson ...3-10 split; 173/496
Val Schulz.....................................172
Debbie Gartner...................3-10 split
Linda Stangle..................5-8-10 split
Emily Kroetch ......................5-7 split
Thursday Men
O’Connell Const ............................4-0
The Steakhouse ............................4-0
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................3-1
A&M Laundry...............................2-2
McDonnell Farms .........................2-2
WEE BADD...................................1-3
Dakota Bar....................................0-4
West River Pioneer Tanks............0-4
Highlights:
Ronnie Coyle .........................224/550
Harlan Moos..........................214/559
Fred Foland...........................200/563
Doug Hauk ............................213/552
Andrew Reckling...................210/540
Haven Hildebrand .......................210
Wendell Buxcel................4-7-10 split
Greg Arthur.......................4-7-9 split
Ky Bowen..............................5-7 split
Alvin Pearson .......................5-7 split
Steve McDonnell ................3-10 split
Agricul ture …
January 17, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12 P.M.
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
BRED HEIFERS:
RON MAHAFFY - 210 FANCY DLK ANC HFFS; DFED. LDW SONS OF
PFIMETIME & INFOCUS; CLV. 3-1 FOF 15 DAYS
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - 110 FANCY DLK HFFS; DFED. PFOVEN
LDW FINAL ANSWEF & IN FOCUS SONS; CLV. 3/1 & 4/1 (SPLIT INTO TWO
CLC PEFIODS}
LYNN MILLER - 60 DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 3-10 FOF 60
DAYS
SHAWN FUGIER - 32 HOME FAISED DLK HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK ANC;
CLV. 3-4 FOF 60 DAYS
JOHN RITTBERGER - 5 DLK HFFS; AI DFED. DLK; CLEAN UP 70 DAYS;
CLV. 2-8
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
CHARLES BELTCH - 40 DLK 6 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. FEDLAND ANC; CLV. 3-20 FOF 60 DAYS
LYNN MILLER - 35 DLK 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; YOUNC
COWS DFED. DLK; DFOKEN MOUTH COWS DFED. CHAF; CLV. 4-1
JOHN RITTBERGER - 25 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-4 FOF 60 DAYS
GARY NIXON - 9 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25
FOF 50 DAYS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC
THE CATTLE SALE.
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
"The Next Cenerat|on of L|vestock Product|on"
Event: Thursday, January 24, at ô:30 p.m. at
Ph|||p L|vestock Auct|on
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M.
MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC
DULL SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND SELLING
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, AT 12:00 P.M. (MT)
RH CATTLE
CATTL£ R£PORT:
TU£SDAY, JANUARY JS, 2DJS
We Þod o b1g run ]or our ]1rs1 Spe-
o1o1 Feeder Co111e So1e o] 2DJS. Quo111g
uos ou1s1ond1ng o11 dog 1ong. B1g
oroud o] peop1e, bo1Þ bugers ond se11ers.
MorKe1 uneven. B1g S1ooK Cou & He1]er
So1e Þere ne×1 ueeK, o1ong u11Þ o Horse
So1e.
CALVES:
BRUCH RANCH - STURGIS
137............................DLK STFS 479= ..........$192.75
137............................DLK STFS 409= ..........$204.00
DUSTMAN RANCH - CAPUTA
100 .................DLK & DWF STFS 601= ..........$172.25
11 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 491= ..........$184.50
65...................DLK & DWF HFFS 548= ..........$160.50
8.....................DLK & DWF HFFS 439= ..........$169.00
JEFF & DONNA JENSEN - NEWELL
101 .................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ..........$185.75
99...................DLK & DWF HFFS 486= ..........$165.50
HAMMERSTROM RANCH - STURGIS
85..............................DLK STFS 605= ..........$169.00
95..............................DLK STFS 521= ..........$187.00
24..............................DLK STFS 383= ..........$200.00
WHEELER RANCH - PHILIP
84 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 632= ..........$168.00
24 .............................DLK HFFS 560= ..........$146.00
RICK KING & SONS - PHILIP
79 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 743= ..........$151.50
85....................FED & DLK STFS 654= ..........$162.75
85....................FED & DLK STFS 671= ..........$158.75
71....................FED & DLK STFS 682= ..........$157.75
57..............................DLK STFS 665= ..........$161.50
83....................FED & DLK STFS 591= ..........$166.75
292 .................FED & DLK HFFS 618= ..........$147.75
90...................FED & DLK HFFS 674= ..........$144.25
73...................FED & DLK HFFS 562= ..........$149.75
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - UNION CENTER
223.................DLK & DWF HFFS 613= ..........$152.25
47...................DLK & DWF HFFS 545= ..........$156.00
35 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 605= ..........$169.50
12..............................DLK STFS 512= ..........$184.00
ALLEN & FLOY OLSON - BOX ELDER
82....................FED & DLK STFS 513= ..........$183.75
17....................FED & DLK STFS 400= ..........$198.00
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
65...................DLK & DWF HFFS 514= ..........$160.25
STEVE & VICKI KNUTSON - PHILIP
106............................DLK STFS 543= ..........$181.25
34..............................DLK STFS 429= ..........$189.50
84 .............................DLK HFFS 499= ..........$162.00
19 .............................DLK HFFS 395= ..........$170.00
EVAN DEUTSCHER - WALL
36 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 533= ..........$180.00
23 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 463= ..........$187.00
14...................DLK & DWF HFFS 493= ..........$160.75
9.....................DLK & DWF HFFS 418= ..........$166.00
MIKE & JODY LEHRAMP - CAPUTA
42 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 616= ..........$165.00
23 .............................DLK HFFS 594= ..........$154.25
POSS RANCH INC - STURGIS
87 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 703= ..........$153.75
50 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 639= ..........$159.75
31...................DLK & DWF HFFS 567= ..........$150.00
GENE FORTUNE - INTERIOR
89..............................DLK STFS 675= ..........$154.00
MIKE AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
74..............................DLK STFS 697= ..........$153.75
9................................DLK STFS 592= ..........$164.50
50 .............................DLK HFFS 642= ..........$143.00
8 ...............................DLK HFFS 513= ..........$158.00
KENNETH BARTLETT - INTERIOR
48 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 696= ..........$154.25
6 .....................DLK & DWF STFS 579= ..........$175.50
56 .............................DLK HFFS 658= ..........$146.50
NORMAN AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
56..............................DLK STFS 682= ..........$154.50
5 ...............................FED STFS 562= ..........$170.00
64...................DLK & DWF HFFS 640= ..........$146.25
7 ...............................DLK HFFS 550= ..........$148.00
BRET HANSON - FAITH
57 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 671= ..........$155.00
31............................HEFF STFS 645= ..........$149.00
30.............................DWF HFFS 643= ..........$155.00
11 .............................DLK HFFS 650= ..........$141.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
41.............................FED HFFS 646= ..........$143.00
12.............................FED HFFS 545= ..........$148.00
RUDY ROTH - PHILIP
20..............................DLK STFS 672= ..........$157.00
8................................DLK STFS 484= ..........$186.00
22 .............................DLK HFFS 605= ..........$150.00
6 ...............................DLK HFFS 428= ..........$158.00
DENNIS HULM - MEADOW
16..................CHAF & DLK STFS 778= ..........$142.50
19..................CHAF & DLK STFS 644= ..........$155.50
29 ...........................CHAF HFFS 672= ..........$139.00
12..........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 755= ..........$134.00
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
63 .............................FED STFS 801= ..........$143.75
HARLAN & LINDA EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
8................................DLK STFS 575= ..........$176.00
21..............................DLK STFS 516= ..........$177.50
DIANNE GREGG - FT PIERRE
12 .............................DLK HFFS 470= ..........$166.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
10 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 507= ..........$183.00
11..............................DLK STFS 387= ..........$191.00
6 ...............................DLK HFFS 391= ..........$170.00
ROY & JOSH SIGMAN - VALE
51..............................DLK STFS 716= ..........$152.25
5 .....................DLK & DWF STFS 604= ..........$150.00
46 .............................DLK HFFS 665= ..........$145.50
7.....................DLK & DWF HFFS 564= ..........$146.50
BROCK SMITH - PHILIP
33 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 780= ..........$144.50
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS - VALE
21 ...........................HEFF HFFS 742= ..........$134.00
10.............................DWF HFFS 645= ..........$150.50
7.....................FED & DLK HFFS 681= ..........$141.00
5 ....................FWF & DWF HFFS 634= ..........$135.50
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
80 .............................DLK HFFS 610= ..........$152.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
12 .............................DLK HFFS 554= ..........$153.25
MIKE RICHTER - WHITEWOOD
29..............................DLK STFS 709= ..........$150.50
40 .............................DLK HFFS 656= ..........$142.50
RUSTY & ANGELA LYTLE - WALL
68 .............................FED STFS 627= ..........$158.50
16 .............................FED STFS 518= ..........$169.00
49.............................FED HFFS 564= ..........$146.00
12.............................FED HFFS 475= ..........$160.00
KURT KETELSEN - BOX ELDER
64 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 552= ..........$179.00
7................................DLK STFS 460= ..........$182.50
46...................DLK & DWF HFFS 518= ..........$161.00
9.....................DLK & DWF HFFS 426= ..........$168.50
MATT ARTHUR - MILESVILLE
40..............................DLK STFS 543= ..........$178.50
11..............................DLK STFS 439= ..........$194.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
11..........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 638= ..........$160.00
16 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 501= ..........$183.50
KALVIN EISENBRAUN - PHILIP
22 .............................DLK HFFS 566= ..........$143.00
JAMES TIMMONS - WHITE OWL
20....................FED & DLK STFS 506= ..........$170.50
ROBERT BARRY - NEW UNDERWOOD
43...................FED & DLK HFFS 560= ..........$150.00
12..............................DLK STFS 489= ..........$158.00
CARLSON & ROMERO - BELVIDERE
19...................DLK & DWF HFFS 505= ..........$158.75
WILL ANDERS - MILESVILLE
31....................FED & DLK STFS 741= ..........$146.75
JOSH FERGUSON - LONG VALLEY
30..........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 645= ..........$144.00
CHARLES & JEFF STABEN - MILESVILLE
13 ...................DLK & DWF STFS 688= ..........$143.00
7 .....................DLK & DWF STFS 569= ..........$164.50
15...................DLK & DWF HFFS 685= ..........$135.50
TUCKY TIFFT - WASTA
12....................FED & DLK STFS 588= ..........$166.00
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
23............................HEFF STFS 581= ..........$161.00
12...................FWF & DWF STFS 726= ..........$141.00
HERBER RANCH - KADOKA
32............................HEFF STFS 570= ..........$155.50
10............................HEFF STFS 481= ..........$161.00
LYLE DLEBRIDGE - UNION CENTER
7................................DLK STFS 626= ..........$154.25
JIM SILBERNAGEL - BOX ELDER
19....................FED & DLK STFS 641= ..........$151.00
7 .....................FED & DLK STFS 499= ..........$153.00
10...................FED & DLK HFFS 624= ..........$139.50
8.....................FED & DLK HFFS 503= ..........$153.00
RICHARD KIEFFER - STURGIS
24..........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 613= ..........$158.00
13....................FED & DLK STFS 533= ..........$164.00
43..........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 584= ..........$143.00
GRANT PATTERSON - KADOKA
12............................CHAF STFS 635= ..........$150.50
13..........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 583= ..........$144.00
FERGUSON & WEST - LONG VALLEY
23...................FED & DLK HFFS 536= ..........$146.50
TRAVIS DEJONG - PHILIP
17...................DLK & DWF HFFS 626= ..........$144.50
MARTY NIEDERWERDER - NEW UNDERWOOD
11 .............................DLK HFFS 582= ..........$148.50
GARY KRELL - FOUR CORNERS, WY
10..............................DLK STFS 440= ..........$186.00
MIKE PERAULT - BELVIDERE
12 .............................FWF STFS 521= ..........$170.50
PAUL SLOVEK - PHILIP
12...................FED & DLK HFFS 527= ..........$146.00
DONALD THORSON - KEYSTONE
7.....................FWF & DWF STFS 616= ..........$147.00
BILL MUNROE - UNION CENTER
11...................DLK & DWF HFFS 432= ..........$167.50
WEIGH-UPS:
PAT & ROSE TRASK - WASTA
29............................DLK HFFTS 934= ..........$124.50
2 ........................DLK COWETTES 1043= ..........$92.00
11 ......................DLK COWETTES 1132= ..........$85.00
NORMAN DELBRIDGE - FAITH
1 ................................DLK COW 1340= ..........$78.00
1................................FED COW 1245= ..........$76.50
1 ................................DLK COW 1365= ..........$73.00
1..........................DLK COWETTE 1075= ..........$96.00
2 ........................DLK COWETTES 1203= ..........$86.00
LEROY BESSETTE - SCENIC
1 ...............................DWF COW 1600= ..........$77.50
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
1 ................................DLK COW 1405= ..........$77.00
1 ................................DLK COW 1580= ..........$76.00
DAVE STOVER - OWANKA
1 ................................DLK COW 1460= ..........$76.50
1 ................................DLK COW 1145= ..........$75.00
1 ................................DLK COW 1350= ..........$74.00
1 ................................DLK COW 1345= ..........$73.50
1 ...............................DWF COW 1320= ..........$72.50
2 ........................DLK COWETTES 1065= ..........$91.00
SCHULTES RANCH LLC - HOWES
5...............................DLK COWS 1437= ..........$76.25
1 ................................DLK COW 1225= ..........$74.00
15 .................DLK & DWF HFFTS 920= ............$94.00
SID FAIRBANKS - PHILIP
3....................DLK & DWF COWS 1520= ..........$76.00
1 ...............................DWF COW 1380= ..........$76.00
BO SLOVEK - PHILIP
1................................DLK DULL 1805= ..........$94.50
BILL KOPP - BOX ELDER
1 ...............................DWF COW 1225= ..........$76.00
1 ...............................FWF COW 1435= ..........$74.50
1 ................................DLK COW 1230= ..........$72.00
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
4.............................HEFF COWS 1463= ..........$73.50
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1..........................DLK COWETTE 855= ............$93.00
BRENNAN DALY - MIDLAND
1 .........................DWF COWETTE 1305= ..........$82.50
1 .........................FED COWETTE 1145= ..........$80.50
GARY KRELL - FOUR CORNERS, WY
11 ...................FED & DLK HFTS 860= ..........$116.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Buy • Rent • Sell
Get it done through the Classifieds
Call 837-2259
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
Wheat is a Staple Crop
In 2012, South Dakota farmers
planted the lowest number of
spring wheat acres since 1885.
When one considers the demand
for corn by the ethanol industry,
positively impacting the price of
corn, and the dramatic improve-
ments in corn genetics and subse-
quent yield improvements, it’s not
surprising that corn is surpassing
wheat in planted acres.
Wheat is still an important crop
however, not only for the flour and
the many products generated from
it, but for the inherent benefits it
provides. Wheat and other small
grains is the ultimate “high
residue” crop, offering significant
benefits to any crop rotation, par-
ticularly land under no-till man-
agement.
Although farmers often curse
the residue generated by a bounti-
ful wheat crop from the previous
year when planting a spring crop,
a mat of residue is considered one
of the keys to successful no-till
farming. The mat of residue that a
good wheat crop produces may be
most valuable in the heat of the
summer, when it helps to shade
the soil, keeping it cooler than bare
ground, and reducing evaporation.
Wheat is better at generating this
mat of residue than many other
crops.
Anyone who has heard Dwayne
Beck talk in the past several years
has certainly heard about the
amazing difference in wheat yields
in two very similar crop rotations
at the Dakota Lakes Research
Farm. The “high residue” rotation
consists of two years of “high
residue” crops, corn and wheat,
with the other year being field
peas. The “low residue” rotation
consists of two “high residue”
crops, corn and wheat, and two
“low residue” crops, soybeans and
field peas, both broadleaves. The
“high residue” rotation produces
better wheat yields than the “low
residue” rotation, but the big dif-
ference shows up in dry years, like
2002 and 2006, where the “high
residue” rotation produced right at
60 Bu/A, and the “low residue” ro-
tation less than 30 Bu/A. The
amazing thing is that the previous
two crops were the same, corn and
then field peas.
Kansas State University re-
search estimates that residue left
on the field vs. removing it can
save as much as 2” of water. Under
the right conditions, this 2” could
produce an additional 34 Bu/A of
corn and 12 Bu/A of wheat. Re-
search also indicates that 100 lbs
of dry soil containing 4-5% organic
matter can hold 165–195 lbs of
water, whereas 100 lbs of dry soil
containing 1.5–2% organic matter
can only hold 35–45 lbs of water.
Once again, wheat and other small
grains are “king” when it comes to
generating residue and organic
matter.
A presenter recently said farm-
ers should raise field peas because
the best way to raise a good corn
crop is to raise a good wheat crop
to plant into. That speaks well for
both field peas and wheat in a crop
rotation. The wisdom of planting
corn into wheat residue certainly
showed in the summer of 2012.
Particularly winter wheat has
also shown to be highly beneficial
to at least two populations of
wildlife; ducks and pheasants. Be-
cause they are seeded in the fall,
winter wheat fields remain rela-
tively undisturbed throughout the
nesting season the following year.
Consider maintaining or including
wheat in your crop rotation; it can
pay.
Calendar
1/16/2013: Ranchers Workshop,
9:30 a.m. CST, SDSU Regional Ex-
tension Center, Winner
1/28/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. CST,
Burke Civic Center, Burke
1/31/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST,
Pennington County Extension
Center, Rapid City
2/12/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST,
Mueller Civic Center, Hot Springs
2/19/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. CST,
Winner Regional Extension Cen-
ter, Winner
2/20/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST,
Wall Community Center, Wall
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Wintertime Fruits
& Vegetables
MyPlate (http://www.choosemy-
plate.gov/) developed by the USDA
recommends filling half your plate
with colorful fruit and vegetables
at every meal. This is a tough chal-
lenge for most Americans during
the winter months since fresh pro-
duce is considered offseason. Ac-
quaint yourself with wintertime
fruits and vegetables to maintain
your grocery budget and keep your
plate healthy.
Wintertime fruits and vegeta-
bles actually include a large vari-
ety. Wintertime fruits include:
clementines, pears, oranges, cran-
berries, bananas, red grapes,
grapefruits, kiwi and pomegran-
ates. Citrus fruits such as kiwi,
clementines and oranges, are high
in vitamin C. They are a great
choice to consume during winter
months to strengthen the immune
system for fighting off viruses.
Enjoy a banana with your lunch or
as a snack. They are inexpensive,
portable and available year round.
They are cholesterol free, and high
in potassium, vitamins’ A and C.
Vegetables that you can access
easily during the winter months
are: Brussels sprouts, cauliflower,
sweet potatoes, snow peas, carrots,
artichokes, broccoli and winter
squash. Popular varieties of winter
squash are pumpkin, butternut,
acorn and spaghetti squash. They
are easy to cook and are high in vi-
tamins’ A and C. In addition, they
are free of cholesterol, fat and
sodium. Broccoli is a popular win-
tertime vegetable; it has as much
calcium per ounce as milk. It is
also a good source of folate, iron,
fiber and vitamins’ A and C.
Consider purchasing fresh fruit
and vegetable produce items when
they are in season and freeze them
to have on hand for winter months.
Another option is to purchase
frozen fruits and vegetables when
they are on sale. The nutrients are
locked in, since they are picked at
their peak of ripeness.
During the winter, we can also
rely on canned fruits and vegeta-
bles. For canned items, choose
fruit canned in 100% fruit juice
and vegetables with “no salt
added” or “low sodium” on the
label.
Try making a breakfast
smoothie for a meal or a quick,
healthy snack using frozen fruit to
cheer you up on a cold winter day.
It will thicken the beverage with-
out diluting the flavor. The recipe
is provided courtesy of University
of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension,
Lancaster County at
http://bit.ly/13f5dFE.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!

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