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Kadoka Press, February 28, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 32
February 28, 2013
Inside this week’s issue
Sports
Wrestling
Page 5
Public
Notices
Page 6
Local
News
Page 4
Legislative
Liz May &
Jim Bradford
Page 2
Classifieds
&
Thank Yous
Page 7
News Briefs …
Free Federal Tax return
preparation is available at the
Jackson County Library,
Kadoka. Returns for low and
middle income taxpayers of all
ages are prepared. Call Deb
Moor 837-2689 at the library
for an appointment, or Bob Mc-
Daniel 605-859-2227 (Philip)
for information.
Boys’ Basketball District
Tournament at Lyman, Feb-
ruary 28 and March 1. Kadoka
plays White River Thursday
night.
Jackson Kadoka Economic
Development Coorporation
monthly meeting will be
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Gateway Apartments Commu-
nity Room.
tioned for and been selected for
South Dakota All-State Orchestra
as both a freshman and a sopho-
more. She is currently taught by
Elizabeth Knowles. Mikayla has
received superior ratings for solos
performed in the Region 8 Orches-
tra Competition, both in violin and
piano, as the pianist for an orches-
tral trio and as the pianist as part
of the chamber orchestra’s large
group entry. Her favorite com-
posers are Fredric Chopin and
Sergei Rachmaninoff. She hopes to
study piano and music in college.
She is the granddaughter of Gay
Klima Tollefson of Philip.
Jessica Bachman started study-
ing cello at the age of eight, and is
the winner of this year’s Black
Hills Symphony Orchestra’s Young
Artist Competition. She has re-
ceived superior ratings in the Re-
gion 8 Orchestra Competition for
her solo, her piano trio, as member
of a quartet and as part of Central’s
chamber orchestra large group
entry. She has auditioned for and
been selected to the South Dakota
All-State Orchestra as both a fresh-
man and sophomore, and due to
her high chair placing was also se-
lected to South Dakota Honors Or-
chestra both years. Her favorite
composers are Dmitri Shostakovich
and Antonin Dvorak. She wants to
get a Ph.D in cello performance and
teach post-secondary music.
Ruby Sanftner has announced
this year’s entertainment for this
year’s Kadoka Nursing Home
Prime Rib Dinner. The event is
planned for Saturday, April 20. If
anyone is interested in hosting a
table for the dinner, contact Ruby
at the nursing home.
Tables will be set and ready for
viewing in the afternoon, the din-
ner will begin at 6:00, entertain-
ment at 7:00 and an auction will
follow. Sanftner said they are also
taking donations for the auction.
Mikayla Rogers and Jessica
Bachman are both sophomores at
Rapid City Central High School,
and are members of the prestigious
Central Chamber Orchestra, which
has been recognized as one of the
top high school chamber groups in
the nation.
Mikayla started playing the
piano when she was five years old
and has received instruction since
then from veteran teacher Deanna
Ziarko of Rapid City. She has re-
cently worked with renowned in-
ternational concert pianist Stephen
Swedish. She was a participant in
the 2013 Black Hills Symphony’s
Young Artist Competition. Addi-
tionally, Mikayla studies the violin,
having started in the fourth grade
along with many children in the
Rapid City public schools. She
started taking private instruction
in the seventh grade and has audi-
Entertainment is set
for prime rib dinner
To take center stage … Jessica Bachman (L) and Mikayla
Rogers will be this year’s featured entertainment at the Kadoka Nursing
Home Prime Rib Dinner on Saturday, April 20.
Legends by themselves, singing
everyone's Beatle favorites - She
Loves You, Love Me Do, I Get By
With A Little Help From My
Friends.
The second half of the perform-
ance will feature Kadoka’s very
own local music students backing
up the Beatles. This is an exciting
musical opportunity for the stu-
dents. Part of the proceeds from the
performance comes back to our
music department.
Ticket prices are: $25 - adult,
$15 - student/senior, children
under five years old free of charge
with paid adult admission.
Come support the music pro-
gram and enjoy a Magical Mystery
Tour -- right here in Kadoka!
On Sunday, March 17, the
Grammy award winning Beatles
tribute band, Liverpool Legends,
will be performing right here in
Kadoka!
The group, presented by Louise
Harrison, sister of Beatle George
Harrison, is a popular Branson,
MO group in the summer months.
During the school year, they travel
the United States performing con-
certs in communities large and
small, helping to raise money for
music education in local school dis-
tricts. The Kadoka Area School
District has the privilege of being
their 3rd South Dakota perform-
ance.
The first half of the of the per-
formance will feature Liverpool
Liverpool Legends to
perform in Kadoka
Petitions have been filed and
there will be an April 9th election.
The election will include seats
on the Kadoka Area School Board
and the Kadoka City Council.
The three-year terms of Ken
Lensegrav, Dawn Rasmussen and
Dan VanderMay were to expire on
the school board. All three of the in-
cumbents filed petitions.
In addition, Robert Fugate,
Jerome High Horse and Sam Stod-
dard have also filed petitions.
There will be three winners
voted in on the school board.
For the City of Kadoka, Mayor
Harry Weller was the only one to
file for the mayor’s position.
Dick Stolley did not file for his
position in Ward I. He will be re-
seated.
In Ward II there were no peti-
tions filed. One would have been
for a one-year term (vacant seat),
and the other for Kieth Prang.
The only election race for the
city will be in Ward III. Incumbent
Ryan Willert filed a petition, along
with Ben Latham.
In Belvidere, Rudy Reimann did
not file a petition. Therefore he will
be reseated.
John Rodger filed his petition for
a three-year term.
The Kadoka School and City of
Kadoka will be sharing a joint elec-
tion on Tuesday, April 9.
There will
be a joint
election
ported the bill as necessary for
teacher and student safety, and
those who feared the presence of
guns would most certainly end in
accidental shootings and unin-
tended deaths of those who were
meant to be protected.
Tieszen recounted instances from
the 1990s when he was a Rapid City
police commander in which an
armed student threatened fellow
students. Of 13 threats in Rapid
City following the Columbine school
shooting in 1999, Tieszen said, two
were credible and could have caused
harm if not stopped
“So, if we think we are immune
in South Dakota,” Tieszen said,
“think again.”
Rep. Scott Craig, R-Rapid City,
refuted the assumption that this bill
was in response to the Sandy Hook
Elementary School shooting re-
cently. He said he had presented his
concept to the Legislative Research
Council in December and the shoot-
ings took place two weeks later.
That, he said, “confirmed the
rightness of this bill.” Since then, he
said, there have been four more in-
cidents seen nationally.
Compelling opposition came from
New Underwood School Superin-
tendent Jeff Marlette, who is a re-
tired Brigadier General who saw
combat.
“Have we now reached a place
that our state has gotten so bad, so
unsafe,” Marlette asked, where
teachers need to carry guns? He
outlined the dangers of peripheral
damage that even trained law en-
forcement can inflict when trying to
bring down a gunman.
Rob Monson, State Association of
School Administrators, presented
an amendment that would have
changed the bill’s intent to an in-
terim study topic.
Tieszen later called the so-called
“hog house” of the bill an “ambush,”
noting he had seen the amendment
for “exactly 32 minutes” during the
meeting. He called the attempt “in-
tensely disrespectful.”
That amendment was defeated.
Sen. Larry Lucas, D-Mission,
said the sentinel bill was an impor-
tant issue, in fact, “this is THE issue
of the 2013 session.” He added,
“what we have in place is working,”
noting that boards could already
hire guards.
Chairman Larry Rhoden, R-
Union Center, said the bill’s intent
has been blown out of proportion.
He said it would allow the state’s
152 school districts to decide
whether to participate in a sentinel
program.
The bill now travels to the Senate
floor for final legislative considera-
tion.
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
The controversial “Sentinel” bill
which would allow local school
boards to put armed guards inside
schools passed out of the Senate
State Affairs Committee last week.
About 60 people were on hand at
the meeting, despite snow—and
limited travel--in much of the state.
Time constraints, however, limited
the number of people testifying, as
well as the length of their com-
ments.
The vote to send HB1087 to the
Senate floor as amended was 5-4.
This surprised many observers who
had expected the vote to swing the
other way.
The amendment removed an ad-
dition made by the House that al-
lowed school boards to discuss and
make a decision in executive session
to implement a sentinel program.
Sen. Mark Johnston, R-Sioux
Falls, noted that such action would
conflict with the existing open meet-
ing statutes.
Sen. Craig Tieszen, R-Rapid City,
agreed, noting that it must be a
publicly made decision, but after
that details could be handled in ex-
ecutive session as a personnel mat-
ter.
The lines were still drawn in the
testimony between those who sup-
Sentinel bill narrowly sent to Senate
floor amid several questions
Grapplers capture State B Wrestling Tournament runner-up spot
The Badlands Brawlers took the State B Wrestling Tournament by storm and brought back the runner-up trophy. The team took the
second place spot early during the first day of action and never looked back, but they might have been sweating it a little there at the end. The second
place finish wasn’t secured until the fourth to last match when a Canton wrestler, who was expected to win, failed to do so. Just four points separated
the second through fourth place teams. See more on page 5. --photo by Deb Smith
mentally ill residents to that data-
base.
•A bill to increase legislative pay
from $110 per official day of session
up to $123 squeaked through the
House 36-33 on Feb. 20. The follow-
ing day, the Senate referred the bill
to its State Affairs Committee. Law-
makers currently receive $6,000 per
session, an amount which hasn’t
been raised in 15 years.
•The Senate State Affairs Com-
mittee and the full Senate unani-
mously approved two veterans bills
last week. The first designates the
third Tuesday of September as
POW/MIA working holiday and the
second designates Aug. 7 as Purple
Heart recognition day, also a work-
ing holiday.
•A bill increasing certain video
lottery payouts to $1,000 passed
both the House Commerce Commit-
tee and the full House, 39-28, this
past week. SB52 now heads to the
governor for his consideration.
•A lively debate in the House on
Feb. 22 centered on the medical care
for certain unborn children. While
Rep. Bernie Hunhoff, D-Yankton,
urged passage to ensure pre-natal
care that would save money by pro-
ducing healthier babies, other law-
makers worried that those low
income mothers were illegal aliens.
Several amendments to that end
were defeated before final passage
of HB1214 by 39-28 was accom-
plished, sending it off to the Senate
for its consideration. The bill had
been forgiven the crossover deadline
because of a requested fiscal note
attached to it.
•SB27, which revises the design,
construction and equipping of a vet-
erans home near Hot Springs,
adding an additional 10,000 sq. ft.,
was approved by the House last
week and sent to the Governor for
his expected approval. The project
had been approved last year, but re-
visions were made to the $6 million
facility which needed approval.
By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
Here’s a brief review of some of
the S.D. Legislature’s recent action.
•The Senate approved two bans
on texting while driving Tuesday
and sent it on to the House. The
first bill, SB142, prohibits texting
while driving on South Dakota
roads, and the second, SB44, would
jeopardize the commercial license of
a driver caught texting anywhere in
the nation.
•The House Health and Human
Services Committee voted 7-5
against HB1188, a bill that would
have kept mentally ill people who
have been found to be a danger from
owning guns. Their names would
have been added to a national data-
base, which is checked prior to pur-
chase. Main sponsor Rep. Bernie
Hunhoff, D-Yankton, said the state
is one of about 19 states not submit-
ting information about dangerous
Short takes from the State Capitol
Kadoka Press
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Church Page …
February 28, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
2 Chronicles 20:1-13
The cultural emphasis on “self” has bred a prayer
crisis. Too many believers focus on a problem or its per-
ceived solution instead of making God the center of
their attention. Second Chronicles 20 shows us a better
way.
King Jehoshaphat faced a dire situation: “a great multitude” approaching quickly to overthrow him.
If he had wrung his hands and wailed instead of concentrating on God’s promises and past provision,
Jerusalem might have been wiped out as the Moabites and Ammonites intended.
The king magnified the Lord’s greatness, recalling for himself and his people many divine triumphs.
In that way, he was able to bolster the Israelites’ courage and prepare them for whatever solution God
proposed.
Through the words of his powerful entreaty, Jehoshaphat revealed his firm belief that no problem—
not even three fast-approaching murderous armies—is bigger than the Lord of the universe. The Israelite
army was powerless against such an onslaught, but the king refused to give in to his initial fear and de-
spair. “Our eyes are on You,” he pledged. In other words, “We know You have a plan, and we are waiting
to hear what to do.” Seeking the Lord’s will and His best way is a priority for those who want to solve
problems through prayer.
God doesn’t want us to pray casually, “Lord, please solve my problem. Amen!” and then rush into our
day, thinking we’ve done well to unload our difficulty onto Him. If He’s going to solve a problem, we should
have our ears and mind open to receive His answer—and our heart ready to obey.
Solving Problems through
Prayer
Inspiration Point
dress is school funding and the recent
attempts to transfer even more of
this responsibility towards the local
property taxpayer.
The number of opt-outs now in ef-
fect is alarming. That proves that the
state continues to push the obligation
to fund our public schools to local tax-
payers. This school year, 66 of our
151 public schools are currently in an
opt-out with many more districts
likely to try to pass one if the state
continues to underfund schools.
And now there’s Senate Bill 15
which passed on Feb. 20th and which
I strongly opposed. SB 15 will also
force schools to increase their levy for
special education costs. Much of the
cost increases in SB 15 are as a result
of the 2011 budget cuts when the
funding for students with disabilities
was also reduced. In the past, there
may have been adequate money in
the state's Extraordinary Cost Fund
to reimburse all schools that could
not pay all of their special education
bills. Today, however, that fund has
diminished and schools will need to
raise property taxes to cover their on-
going special education costs. Sen-
ate Bill 15 allows the mill levies to be
set higher to cover these costs.
All legislators say they support edu-
cation as a top priority, so it is puz-
zling why our local schools are
always left with scraps when the leg-
islature adjourns every March. I am
still hopeful that we can do better
this year.
The last two weeks of session are
when the revenue estimates are up-
dated and all of the bills which re-
quire appropriations will pass or fail.
We are at the proverbial tipping point
on school funding. Now is the time to
stop shifting that balance towards
the local taxpayer and for the state to
pick up a greater share of its respon-
sibility.
I invite you to contact me with
your questions and concerns on these
topics or any of interest to you. I may
be reached at 605-685-4241 or
Sen.Bradford@state.sd.us
On Wednesday, Feb. 20 there was
a joint hearing of both the House and
Senate Committees on Health and
Human Services to listen to testi-
mony on Medicaid Expansion. I serve
on this committee and was privileged
to receive this information
We heard from over 20 different
presenters from across the state.
They represented health care
providers from both large systems
and those who served rural areas.
Other testimonies were from AARP,
ministerial groups, the American
Cancer Society, the SD Medical Asso-
ciation and those who work in health
care in the criminal system. Finally
there were many individuals who
gave very compelling testimony
telling their own stories. When peo-
ple don’t have access to affordable
health insurance and their employer
doesn’t offer any health care benefits,
they are only one serious accident or
illness away from bankruptcy.
The population affected by the ex-
pansion would be South Dakota’s
working poor who do not typically re-
ceive health insurance through their
employer. If states choose to expand
Medicaid, the federal government
will cover 100 percent of the costs
from 2014 to 2016. The feds' contri-
bution will begin to decrease in 2017,
but will never be less than 90 per-
cent, under the ACA. This expansion
would bring close to $200 million fed-
eral dollars to SD to care for those in
need, make our citizens healthier,
and keep them out of more expensive
emergency care.
Every day more states decide to
expand Medicaid. Minnesota’s legis-
lature made that decision this week
as did Florida. Bottom line, if we
don’t expand, we will have people
who need this benefit and will go
without it. While it is a difficult deci-
sion, let’s remember that failure to
act will only leave more South
Dakotans without medical coverage
and continue to drive them to emer-
gency care when they do need help.
The federal dollars we turn down will
only be distributed to other states,
not “saved” or applied to federal
spending more to our liking.
The next issue I would like to ad-
From Senator Jim Bradford
Monday, March 4
Fish portions, scalloped pota-
toes, glazed carrots, blueberry
muffin, and mandarin oranges and
bananas.
Tuesday, March 5
Barbecue pork, baked potato,
corn o’brien, bread, and baked ap-
ples.
Wednesday, March 6
Hamburger on a bun with let-
tuce, potato salad, baked beans,
and dessert.
Thursday, March 7
Roast turkey, mashed potatoes
and gravy, spinach with vinegar,
cranberry sauce, dinner roll, and
pumpkin bar.
Friday, March 8
Ham and beans or alternate
soup, tomato spoon salad, bread,
and peaches.
Meals for
the Elderly
such restrictions. Many cattle on the
East side of the state have ear tags.
I’d like to see the law changed so all
cattle in the state are branded.
Thieves can bring cattle to a sale-
barn and get paid for them in a mat-
ter of a few hours. They can give
whatever name you like, and there is
little chance to catch the rustlers.
Rustling is just one way livestock
crime occurs, there are a lot of ways.
Physically stealing them out of a pas-
ture, theft by embezzlement and cat-
tle cared for by people are taken.
Some people agree to watch cattle for
someone else and then sell the cattle
and pocket the money. Some thieves
double-mortgage cattle and commit
fraud in other ways.”
Also, co-owner of Mitchell Live-
stock Auction, told The Daily Repub-
lic that cattle rustling is still a
concern in the industry. Kimball
Livestock Exchange owner said as
the price of beef rises, so do concerns
about rustling. He also goes on to say
that cattle theft seems to be a bigger
problem than it was before.
In 2010, Joe Varner, a North
Dakota man who owned several sale
barns in the region, pleaded no con-
test to a charge of grand theft after
188 head of yearling heifers that
were under U.S. Bankruptcy Court
control went missing from Water-
town Livestock Auction in 2009.
Jerry Derr also served as Director
of Investigations for the South
Dakota State Brand Board for six
years. He was quoted as saying,”
South Dakota is unique because the
western part of the state requires
branding, while the eastern part does
not and that is where the loophole
lies. Let’s say we’re here in western
South Dakota, somebody could come
out here on the prairie and steal a
load of cattle. They could take them
to Sioux Falls and sell them because
they have nobody looking at the
brand to determine ownership.” Derr
also goes on to say, “The State Brand
Board was created in 1937 to provide
livestock owners with a system of an-
imal identification through brand
registration and to ensure proper
ownership of stock.” Derr believes
branding is the best method because
it can’t be ripped off or cut out like
ear tags can. Brands are permanent.
In 2004 Iowa Public Television in-
terviewed rancher, Ron Ragsdale
from Rapid City area. Mr. Ragsdale
explains, “You live in continual fear
that instead of one truckload being
stolen there may be four or five truck-
loads. And, you get to the point with
any operation where it’s not big
enough to support you and the
thieves both.” From 1999 to 2004 he
had been a target of cattle thieves,
costing him over $250,000.
And finally, we need to consider
the impact that cattle rustling has on
our local economies. Start with the
banks that are making the loans.
They have no reassurance that the
State has consistency in brand laws
that protects the interest of the bank.
We also have to consider the impact
that this might have on the ability for
young peple to obtain a loan. A local
sheriff said, “Most of the calls about
livestock theft come from the banks.”
We need to take into consideration
the implications of our vote on our
local economies, the young rancher
and the viability of our livestock in-
dustry.
Beef: In South Dakota there are
approximately 17,000 ranchers and
cattlemen that produce 3.7 million
head of cattle–we have more cattle
than people! In South Dakota, the
cattle industry is a family business
with nearly all of the cattle busi-
nesses having been in the same fam-
ilies for more than 25 years.
Today, there are more than 26,000
registered brands in the state.
The Brand and Mark Committee
was dissolved in 1925 and The State
Band Board was created in 1937.
The board operates entirely on
user fees generated from livestock
brand registration, renewals, trans-
fers and inspections. No general fund
money is used by the board.
I’m sorry to report that this bill
failed with a vote of 47 Nays, 22 Yeas
and 1 excused. Nine west river Rep-
resentative’s voted against this bill,
Rep. Cammack, Rep. Craig, Rep.
Dryden, Rep. Johns, Rep. Lust, Rep.
Schaefer, Rep. Sy, Rep. Wink and
Rep. Gosch. We saw strong lobbying
from SD Dept of Agriculture, NCBA,
Farm Bureau, SD Feedlots and SD
Livestock Markets all in opposition.
HB 1135 was the highly con-
tentious bill that caused a lot of de-
bate on the floor. I wrote about it in
my Feb. 11-15 column. It regulates
access to and use of non-meandered
waters on private property. If you
would like to see how this turned out
go to the following site. It will amaze
you to see how your State Govern-
ment works! It’s well worth the read.
http://www.capjournal.com/news/leg-
i sl at ors- f orce- t ruce- bet ween-
sportsmen-and-owners-on-use-of/arti
cl e_4132c37a- 7be4- 11e2- ae2b-
001a4bcf887a.html
As always you can contact me at
the House Chamber number 773-
3851. Leave a phone number and I’ll
call you back. The fax number is 773-
6806. If you send a fax, address it to
Rep. Elizabeth May. You can also
email me at rep.may@state.sd.us
during session or visit my web site
www.lizmaydistrict27.com. You can
keep track of bills and committee
meetings at this link:
http://legis.state.sd.us/ You can also
use this link to find the legislators,
see what committees they are on,
read all the bills and track the status
of each bill, listen to committee hear-
ings, and contact the legislators.
The Legislature was off Monday
for the President’s Day holiday, but
the House and Senate worked hard
Tuesday and Wednesday as they face
the deadline for getting bills out of
the chamber in which they origi-
nated. That deadline, called
crossover day, was Wednesday. All
Senate bills must be dealt with by the
Senate — either passed and sent to
the House or killed — and the House
must finish work on its own bills.
The school sentinels proposal
passed a key Senate committee 5-4
on Friday and needs only approval
from the Senate to head to Gov. Den-
nis Daugaard to be signed into law.
Under the proposal, school boards
could vote to arm sentinels provided
local law enforcement approved and
the sentinels underwent training
with the state. Rural schools, located
far from local law enforcement and
without police resource officers, want
the proposal’s flexibility. As I said
early, I support the bill because of
our neighbors to the north that are
seeing influx of oil drilling activity.
Across the boarder in Montana last
year two men that came from the oil
fields raped and murdered a teacher
on her way to school. Harding County
is the largest county in the state with
vast land and very few residents. My
concern is the school sets right on
HWY 85 which is the main through-
way for the oil boom. Harding County
itself takes in part of the Red River
Formation. Unlike our area they
have one sheriff and one deputy sher-
iff to cover 2600 square miles.
The South Dakota Legislature has
given final approval to a measure
that would allow 1-cent bets in video
lottery games. The House voted 39-28
Thursday to approve the measure,
which was passed earlier by the Sen-
ate. The bill, which was proposed by
the state Lottery Commission, now
goes to Gov. Dennis Daugaard for his
signature. The law currently allows a
minimum bet of five cents. The meas-
ure would allow players to bet as lit-
tle as one cent. Supporters say penny
bets are needed for new machines
that offer line-up games similar to
slot machines. They say the bill is
part of an effort to make the games
fresh and entertaining. I voted for the
bill reluctantly, but the fact is the
State of South Dakota and local
economies have become addicted to
gambling revenue. Until we find
other ways to curb that addition I’m
afraid we have limited alternatives.
HB 1204 An Act to require the
Board of Education to obtain legisla-
tive approval before adopting any
further Common Core standards, and
to repeal a provision requiring the
board to conduct certain public hear-
ings was brought to the floor by Rep.
Bolin. After considerable debate on
both sides the House of Representa-
tives passed HB 1204 with YEAS 36,
NAYS 32. Intent to reconsider after
the bill passed was brought by Rep.
Hajek. Several lobbying groups were
behind the scene’s encouraging the
intent to reconsider, but it failed 28-
41. It now goes to the Senate Ed.
Committee.
HB 1089 that would require a
statewide livestock ownership inspec-
tion reached the floor late Wednesday
night. Following is the floor speech I
delivered on behalf of HB 1089.
HB 1089 is long over due. In
March of 2012 the SD Ag. Connection
interviewed Mr. Zilverberg who is the
special assistant attorney general for
the South Dakota Division of Crimi-
nal Investigation regarding cattle
rustling in South Dakota. In the
1800′s, Mr. Zilverberg would have
been called a range detective.When
asked about cattle rustling he was
quoted as saying “It’s been steady.
Exact figures are difficult to deter-
mine, since reports of missing cattle
aren’t matched with notices that the
animals have been found or recov-
ered. Still, more than 1300 head of
cattle have been reported missing
from South Dakota ranches and
farms in the past years, according to
the South Dakota Brand Board.
Exact figures are difficult to deter-
mine, since reports of missing cattle
aren’t matched with notices that the
animals have been found or recov-
ered. “You don’t know if they’re stolen
or missing or running around,” said
Zilverberg, who has been an investi-
gator since 1990. But he said,
“There’s no doubt rustling still oc-
curs, and the losses run into the
thousands, even tens of thousands of
dollars. In most cases, thieves take
cattle from West River ranches and
bring them to sale barns in eastern
South Dakota and sell them accord-
ing. The main reason is that West
River cattle must be branded. On the
East side of the state there are no
From Representative Liz May
Continuing Saga …
The Continuing Saga been dormant for several years, however, the
saga will finish this week as I announce that after 23 years and 10
months I am going to retire from the newspaper business.
When I applied for a position at the Kadoka Press in May, 1989 I fig-
ured I had a shoe in as I had, at one time, worked at a printing business
in Nebraska and I had experience operating a Compugraphic machine,
which was used to set type and ads. I’ll admit that I needed a little re-
fresher course and thanks to Larry and Alvina Parkinson, they got me on
track. It was still easy to make mistakes with the settings on the machine.
Like the time I had two inches of space between each line of a Jackson
County legal. Yep, had to do it all over again! You never knew what the
finished product would look like until the film was processed. I don’t miss
that machine.
I do miss the dark room, except for some of my clothing that was dam-
aged due to a splash or spill of chemicals. D-76 developer and Dectol
were a little toxic and had the same effect on clothing as Clorox. I rolled
my own film and shot a lot of pictures, which was a must because, once
again, I never knew what I had until the film was developed.
Somewhere in this time we got our first Macintosh computer. Wow,
the screen must have been all of 6” by 10”, but it was leaps and bounds
better than what we had been using.
The entire newspaper was set up on the computer, however, there
was still the need to run the print copy through a wax machine so it would
stick to a page for layout. I was in charge of taking the pages to Philip
every Tuesday afternoon when the paper was done. There, a negative
was made of the pages and the pictures. Wednesday morning the neg-
atives were taken to Pierre and the paper was printed.
Hallelujah, we finally got the Internet. Our correspondents were able
to email their news; no more waiting for Tuesday morning’s mail to know
who would be sending news, press releases and advertising copy. Syd
wanted to set up Kate with a computer so she wouldn’t have to free-hand
her news, but she didn’t want to take that leap. Kate did master the fax
machine, which eliminated a drive into town.
Be darned if it didn’t get better when we continued to upgrade our
computers and programs. My weekly Tuesday trips to Philip (which I
called my thinking time) were replaced with simply sending the entire
paper via the Internet.
Since we moved to Belvidere I’ve had more on-the-road “thinking
time.” I’ve been “thinking” it’s nice to get off work at 4:30, but not so when
I’d have to wait until 7:00 for a sporting event to start or a city council
meeting to be called to order.
I’ve also been “thinking” that since the Belvidere Store has had much
overdue renovation work done and will be opening soon, it might be
smart to hang up the denim printer’s apron (which, by the way, I never
used in the dark room) and drive 5 miles to work instead of 18.
I want to thank Don and Tami for almost 24 years of employment, all
the co-workers from the other offices and Mary Poss, Korrie Wenzel,
Cindy Letellier and Robyn Jones for the good times at the Kadoka Press.
Also thank you to my husband for dealing with my, “I don’t know what
time the meeting will be over!” for all these years.
Who knows, maybe I’ll keep in touch through some other writing or
pictures for this newspaper. It’s been fun, but it’s time to step down and
let someone else with fresh ideas take over. I’m moving on to the next
chapter. Sometimes the spring
storms can be very
dangerous. The weather
can change abruptly to
very harsh conditions.
If you are planning to
travel please make sure
you are aware of the
weather forecasts. If you
must be on the road, make
sure that your
vehicle is equipped
properly and you have the
necessary supplies
in case you
are stranded.
Thank you,
Trooper Slade Ross,
SD Highway Patrol
The Dakota Discovery Museum
will be hosting the spring regional
Poetry for All People reading event
on Saturday, March 2 from 1:00
p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Three area poets, MJ McMillan
of Murdo, Kelly Henkel and Emily
Strong, both from Mitchell will be
featured at the event, reading se-
lections from their works.
MJ McMillan writes on his ob-
servations of the human condition
and everyday life experiences.
Through his work, MJ endeavors to
bring to readers a measure of peace
and tranquility. MJ will introduce
the release of his newest book,
Poems for the Common Man Vol. 3.
Kelly Henkel has spent most of
her life in South Dakota with stints
in Manchester, England and Den-
ver, Colorado. She began writing
poetry at fifteen and has received
several awards for her work.
Mitchell 7th grade student,
Emily Strong writes much more
than poetry and is currently work-
ing on a book. She has been writ-
ing for about three years and is
also an active member in the
Mitchell Camera Club.
Time will be available after the
featured poets for open mike read-
ings from the audience.
The event will be held at the
Dakota Discovery Museum located
at 1300 McGovern Avenue,
Mitchell, on the Dakota Wesleyan
University campus. The event is
free to the public and refreshments
will be provided. For more informa-
tion call 605-996-2122 or email
info@dakotadiscovery.com.
Dakota Discovery Museum to host “Poetry
for All People” poetry reading event
NOTICE
The advertising
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are provided
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Please,
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after use.
Bel videre News …
February 28, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
June Ring • 462-6328
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 381-2147
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Winter Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
All my friends and relatives
seem to be writing books. I hope it
isn’t contagious or I might find my-
self writing one too. That sounds
like a lot of work since any act of
creation, whether a book, painting,
or song, takes some doing. These
things don’t make themselves, and
the whole process puts you
through periods of self-doubt,
worry, and mental anxiety. It’s a
good feeling when you finally get
something produced, look at it,
and decide it isn’t half bad, but get-
ting to that point puts you through
the mill.
Friend Ruth, for instance, re-
cently wrote a book about her first
few years as a missionary in Hong
Kong. While she was writing it, I’d
get occasional E-mails expressing
her concerns about proof reading
or that she wasn’t adequately get-
ting across what she wanted to
say. Her creation, “Foreign Devil
Girl in Hong Kong” by Ruth Epp,
is however now available through
Amazon and is a good read. It has
insight, pathos and humor. She
also gives one a good idea of how
very difficult it is to learn the Can-
tonese Chinese dialect. Since I
have no talent whatsoever at
learning foreign languages, Can-
tonese is probably something I
shouldn’t even attempt. It’s fun,
though, to read about someone
else’s struggle in doing so. Ruth
lived and worked in Hong Kong
from 1959 until 2005 so there are
many more years to write about if
she gets up the nerve and ambition
to pull it off.
I should probably mention that,
before Ruth moved to the other
side of the world, she and her
friend, Darlene, came with Rev.
Knickle in the summers and
taught us Bible School for a week
at a local country schoolhouse.
They lived with us during those
weeks so we got to know them
pretty well, and we’ve kept in
touch ever since.
Then we come to Cousin Verna
(Heaton) Benham who recently
published her book, “Champagne
in a Paper Cup.” It is also available
through Amazon and recounts her
time as a Foreign Service em-
ployee in such places as Taiwan
and South America. In the latter,
she met and married a fellow who
was a foreign correspondent for
The Associated Press and the U. S.
News & World Report. All in all,
she has lived an extremely inter-
esting life and has done a good job
telling about it. I seem to have no
particular desire to go to Taiwan or
South America, but it is enjoyable
to visit there through Verna’s eyes
and pen.
Local friend, Joyce (Dolezal)
Wheeler has also written a couple
of books, (available at Amazon
again.) They are novels, which
means she had to make them up
instead of just writing about
things she has done. Sure, you
would probably base your charac-
ters on people you have known,
but you still have to deal with
characterization, plot and such. It
takes a lot of thinking. It is quite a
lot easier to read Joyce’s books
than to make one up yourself.
So, if you wanted to write a
book, how many words would you
have to come up with? A standard-
size novel, it seems, should proba-
bly be around 80,000 words. That’s
a lot. You might get by with 50,000,
but 80,000 would be better. If you
were Leo Tolstoy, you would have
to come up with over half-a-million
words for such tomes as his, “War
and Peace.” That would take
weeks to read much less write. As
a college kid assigned to read it,
you might be better off buying the
“Cliff Notes,” which is a little pub-
lication that allows you to know all
about a book without actually
reading it. I like the comment by
one of the characters on son
Chance’s Veggie Tales video where
he says he read War and Peace via
Cliff Notes and found it “riveting.”
He comments, “That’s three min-
utes of my life I’ll never get back.”
As we said, reading War and Peace
in full might take quite a lot longer
than three minutes since it runs to
something like 1,400 pages. Cliff
Notes might be the way to go in
this case.
I did start writing a mystery
novel over ten years ago and got
through the first two chapters be-
fore bogging down. Action on that
project has come to a standstill,
but, who knows, maybe I’ll drag it
back out some day and get going
again. I have enough things to do
at present without that, but only
writing a thousand words a week
would get a book written in a little
over a year. I currently write a lit-
tle less than that, maybe 850,
every week writing these things so
maybe I could double my produc-
tion. We’ll have to see.
Since I’ve been writing weekly
articles from 1986 to the present,
I’ve probably already used up well
over a million words. That’s double
what Tolstoy needed for War and
Peace, but my stuff, alas, isn’t ex-
actly in book form. I’m happy to re-
port that I can write much more
quickly and easily now than I
could back in ’86, but it is still
fairly hard work. Like I said, I
hope book-writing isn’t contagious
or I might contact that dreaded
disease. Everyone else is catching
it, but maybe it will pass me by.
Time will tell.
The Writing Game
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Francie Davis recently returned
from Phoenix, Arizona, where she
went to participate in an obstacle
race known as a “Spartan” run.
This involved navigating various
obstacles and trying to do it
quickly. The last 300 yards in-
volved crawling under barbed wire.
Francie said it was both awful and
wonderful. It was interesting
enough that she is already plan-
ning to do another one in Nebraska
this fall. She went with her friend,
Nancy, who had lived in the area a
while and knew people and places.
As a result, they attended a toast-
masters meeting, a book club meet-
ing and wandered down some
hiking trails. They also spent time
in Sedona. The Spartan run raises
money for wounded or disabled
vets. Training at home is now in
the works for other races such as
the 5K run at Philip on St.
Patrick’s Day. In June there is one
in the Hills on the Mickelson Trail.
Last week, Chad, Francie and boys
went to Sioux Falls to attend a re-
union on Chad’s side of the family.
Francie also mentioned that the
Rodeo Bible Camp fundraising auc-
tion will be held at the hall in
Belvidere at 4:00 p.m. on St.
Patrick’s Day. Donation of items to
be auctioned would be appreciated.
Betty Kusick was visited a week
ago Sunday by her daughter,
Loretta Schreiber, and her hus-
band, Lawrence, of Quinn. They
brought lunch and stayed long
enough to play some cards. A simi-
lar affair happened on Monday ex-
cept with other daughter, Kathy,
and her husband, Gary, from Rapid
City. Lunch and cards again. On
Saturday, Joe Livermont came to
visit but didn’t bring lunch. They
did play cards, however, namely
cribbage.
Jim, Georgann and Jami Addi-
son were in Philip on Saturday for
a seventh and eighth-grade basket-
ball tournament in which Jami
took part to the tune of four games.
It was rather a long day for her.
Back at home, a lady pulled in one
day and unloaded five horses. This
gave Jim pause until he realized
she was only leaving one with
Georgann and also taking one of
Georgann’s. There was no net gain
or loss.
Bonenbergers are mostly stay-
ing close to home to keep an eye on
calving which is now in full swing.
Bill and Norma Headlee are also
into calving since their heifers have
started. They are into calving at
the vet clinic as well with three
needing assistance on Sunday. One
of those involved a set of twins. On
Monday, plumbers are coming to
install a water heater and some
bathroom fixtures in a new bath-
room that was included in the re-
cent building of a detached garage.
Kenny and Roxie Fox went to
Mobridge on Saturday so Roxie
could attend a baby shower for her
daughter-in-law, Jodi. Jodi and her
husband, Shawn, are expecting an
addition to their family towards
the end of March. Jodi had quite a
few members of her family there
too including some from North
Dakota. Kenny and the other guys
attended a bull sale instead since
that happened to be going on in
town at the same time.
Chuck Willard is recovering
nicely from his recent hip-replace-
ment surgery. He hasn’t gone back
to his EMT work over at Rosebud
yet but may do so, at least part
time, in another month or so. Too
much activity is still tiring.
Bud and Valene Perault had
supper on Sunday evening over at
Mike and Marlene Perault’s. Last
weekend, daughter Laney and her
kids were at Mike and Marlene’s
overnight on Sunday. On Sunday,
Laney’s five-year-old son, Billy, was
in a wrestling meet in Kadoka. On
Monday, he was in another at
Philip. Laney’s husband, Joe Waln,
was along on Sunday but had to go
home on Monday to do chores. Mar-
lene said not many of her kids were
in sports while they were in school
except for Lesa who tended to be in
all of them.
“Love is that condition in which
the happiness of another person
is essential to your own.”
Robert A. Heinlein
News comes of former members
of the community, Gert Ring and
Erna Totton. Earlier this month,
Gert suffered a heart attack, and is
now in recovery in rehab, and hop-
ing things improve enough that she
will be able to return to her apart-
ment in McKinney, TX, in a couple
more weeks. Erna had some bleed-
ing in the brain last week and
ended up in the hospital in Sioux
Falls, where she is slowly recover-
ing.
Lenten services continue at St.
John Lutheran on Wednesdays,
with service at 6:00 p.m. and soup
supper following at 7:00. Soup
makers last week were Kenda
Huber and June Ring.
The Mellette County Historical
Society met at the museum last
week and elected Julie Brandis as
president.
The Mellette County Cattle-
women held their February meet-
ing at the museum in White River
Friday afternoon, February 22.
Amy Lehman was hostess and was
joined at the meeting by Rose West,
Donna Adrian and June Ring.
Blake and Amy Lehman stayed
in for the ball game that evening.
Karla Heyduk reported that the
silent auction and other activities
held to raise money for cancer vic-
tims was very successful. There is
to be a meeting Friday, March 1, at
the museum in White River; the
plan is to figure out a way to have
an organization that will be able to
distribute the funds locally for
those battling cancer.
Richard Krogman went to
Clarence’s Thursday, February 14,
to watch the White River Tigers
play James Valley Christian and
pull out an exciting victory. On the
16th, Richard and Noreen went to
Mission to watch the Tigers win
the game over the Todd County
Falcons. Sunday the 17th, they
watched a different sport in
Kadoka, where grandson Cayne
Krogman, son of Mark and Car-
olyn, was wrestling. They had time
to visit with the family afterwards.
Monday Richard was back in White
River for the boys’ basketball game
with Little Wound. Thursday the
cooking channel claimed their at-
tention. Noreen’s nephew, Jon Ga-
boric, was a contestant on “Chefs
Wanted.” They had to go through
three phases of the contest, and
Jon emerged the winner. Jon is
from Austin, Texas.
Friday Richard attended the
boys’ basketball game and parents
night in White River.
Last Tuesday and Friday,
Heather and Dan Taft were in Mar-
tin for physical therapy for Dan.
Wednesday Susan was in Wanblee
working at the post office there.
Friday Morgan stayed in after
school, and played in the band at
the boys’ basketball game. Susan
came in for the game, too.
Saturday Alvin and Judy Sim-
mons and Chris and Cindy Knecht
and sons came to help Tafts sort
cattle, getting ready for calving.
They were all supper guests.
Tuesday Torey Ring was among
the volunteers who showed up to
fight fire west of Merchens. A high
line broke and started the fire. The
propane truck driver noticed it and
alerted the Merchens, who sent out
a call for help. By the time Torey
arrived, the Merchens and the Nor-
ris fire truck had it nearly under
control and it was finished off with
help from fire trucks from Long
Valley and Parmelee.
Thursday the Torey Ring family
kept dental appointments in
Murdo. Myles Addison was also at
the dentist, so they had a chat with
him. Linda reports that they went
through various levels of snow both
on the way to Murdo and on the
way home.
Robert, Torey, Sharon and Bruce
Ring met with the banker on busi-
ness at Robert’s Wednesday after-
noon. That evening Robert and
Sharon attended Lenten service
and soup supper.
Bruce Ring received the call
from Jessie that Risa was being re-
leased from the hospital Tuesday,
and that he could pick them up at
Rob and Peggy’s home. (Peggy is a
pediatric nurse and had gone to get
them from the hospital when Risa
was cleared to go home.) Bruce left,
and June went over to the house to
be there when the Head Start bus
brought Riley home in the after-
noon, and then went to the bus stop
to meet the kids after school and
stay with them until their folks re-
turned home later that evening.
Friday Bruce took parts to Win-
ner for repair, and Stephanie and
Ryan rode along with them. Satur-
day Jessie took Stephanie to Mar-
tin for the birthday party for
classmate Tiaunna. When they re-
turned home, the rest of the family
was watching State A wrestling fi-
nals on PBS. Bruce’s college class-
mate, Joe Amo, had a son wrestling
in the 182 pounds class. Bruce let
June know, so she watched the
matches, also. It was a thrill to see
Aero Amo win and become state
champ.
James and Marjorie Letellier
were in White River last Monday
for the White River Tigers game
with Little Wound. Tuesday James
and Chris Letellier took the Norris
fire truck to help fight fire west of
Merchens’ place. Friday Andrea
Beckwith accompanied Jim and
Marjorie to the boys’ basketball
game in White River. Julie Letel-
lier of Kilgore visited Saturday.
Chris WoodenKnife hosted a
farewell meal for her daughter,
Roxie, at the Norris Hall Saturday.
Roxie is going into police training
at Artesian. Lorrain Waack and
some of her family were down for
the occasion.
Gary and Anne Heinert were
among those at the basketball
game with Lyman in White River
Friday night.
Anne reports that parent-
teacher conferences are from 4
until 8 p.m. Wednesday the 27th.
Evan and Dorothy Bligh joined
the Tiger fans at the ball game Fri-
day evening.
Dorothy Bligh was among those
attending a baby shower for Mesa
Jo, infant daughter of Ben and
Jenny Dimond, which was held at
the Methodist Church on Sunday
afternoon. It was hosted by Amy
Lehman and Linda Dimond.
June Ring stayed in town after
the Cattlewomen meeting and
went to visit Luree Wacek after-
ward. She attended the basketball
game after that.
Bobbi Kelley reported that the
Norris School gym is reserved for
the wake for Christine Dunham
Monday and Tuesday, with the fu-
neral there on Wednesday.
The entire area is saddened and
in shock of the sudden loss of
Christine Dunham, 83, of Norris on
Friday night. May the Lord Jesus
Christ wrap his everlasting arms
around each and everyone of her
dear family. It is certainly true
that Norris will not be the same.
Christine was affectionately
“Grandma” to all of us and we loved
her for it. What a grandma she
was, you didn’t have to know her
long before she would tell you she
had 163 grandchildren at last
count and so proud of each one, too.
Christine was a very strong sup-
porter of education, a Head Start
teacher and later in the Adopt a
Grandparent program at Norris
School. She was a Black Pipe tribal
council member of the Rosebud
Sioux Tribe for many years.
Life wasn’t easy for Christine,
but it never made her bitter.
Christine could use her great
sense of humor and sharp wit to get
any point across. Her boldness to
speak out for the right is to be ad-
mired by all of us. Christine spoke
words of wisdom at every opportu-
nity and lived by them, too.
Her family always came first
and if you needed a Grandma she
would adopt you, too. Christine
dearly loved the Lord and her
meaning of love was evident by
everything she did. Her best exam-
ple was by never missing a day of
visiting her dear husband, Bill, at
the nursing home in White River.
Christine Dunham will go down
in history as the “Best Fan” the
White River Tigers basketball
teams ever had! We could learn a
lot from her example and she never
missed a game. She even had
White River Tiger seat covers in
her car! She got the attention of the
press at the State B tournament in
Aberdeen last year with her big
purple and gold hat and sweatshirt
covered with photo buttons of her
grandchildren who were players.
Who could forget her little jingle, “I
was only foolin” at the welcome
home for the 2010 Basketball
Champions at White River? She
was so proud of all of them and
rightfully so. I believe with all my
heart, that as this years team pre-
pares for the tournaments again
that you don’t need to worry.
Grandma will be watching every
practice, every play and every shot
you make; because you will have an
“Angel in the Audience.” May God
bless the memory of Christine Dun-
ham.
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
InterIor VoIunteer FIre Dept.'s AnnuaI
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Friday, March 1st
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(PIease turn In your raIIIe tIckets beIore S:30 p.m.)
"CROP INS\RANC£ SP£CIAIISTS SINC£ 19B4"
CR£W
AG£NCY, ITÐ.
OIIIC£: (605) 433-5411
TOII-IR££: 1-BBB-433-B?50
WE W1LL BE CLAD
TO D1SCUSS .
·1nourunce on Spring Cropo
(SIgn-uµ dondIIno Is Mnrch l5fh)
Coll ue for coteroge or o quo/e .
W1 I1PI1S1AT S1V1IAL COMPAA11S!
Back row (L-R): Rusty OIney, Maurice Handcock,
Heidi Porch, Tom Husband. Front row: Grady Crew,
Bernice Crew, Tanner Handcock.
Rem|nder:
L|vestock Pr|ce
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CR£W AG£NCY, ITÐ.
R\STY: 605-B3?-2B6B OR 4B4-251?
MA\RIC£: 605-B3?-2461 OR 391-2502
TANN£R: 605-2?9-2144 OR 605-641-1360
LOCATED O11 1-00 AT CACTUS 1LAT EX1T 131
Author visits Jackson County Library …C.M. Wendel-
boe, left, author of the "Spirit Road" Mysteries visited with several people
Tuesday afternoon, February 12 at Jackson County Library. He spent time
discussing the series, writing techniques, character development, how he
develops a plot and other various questions. Refreshments were served
after he signed a few of his books. He does attend the South Dakota Hu-
manities Festival of Books, which will be in Deadwood this fall, and prom-
ised to return to Kadoka for future events. --courtesy photo
Locals …
February 28, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
press@kadokatelco.com
Kadoka Nursing Home
Cathy Stone • 837-2270
Local News
Sydne Lenox
Chuck and Suzanne Parkinson
of Rapid City visited at the
parental Larry Parkinson home on
Sunday on their return from Ver-
million where they had gone to at-
tend the Strollers Show at USD.
Their daughter, Alex Parkinson,
had a major part in the Strollers
Show. They also visited with their
son, Sam, and Jeff Parkinson of
Rock Rapids, IA, and his daughter,
Jaime Parkinson, of South Sioux
City, NE, who were there to attend
the show.
Letoy Brown, and her grand-
daugher, Trina, and Bryan Buxcel
and children drove to Lander, WY,
on Friday, February 15 to visit Ellie
Bettelyoun and girls. Ellie is em-
ployed there and moved to Lander
last year. Letoy and the Buxcels re-
turned home on Monday, Feb. 18.
Dean and Mary Antonsen of
Rapid City stopped briefly in
Kadoka on Tuesday of last week
and had coffee with friends at Jig-
ger’s Restaurant. They had been to
Platte where they helped Ellen and
Paul Samuelson celebrate their
60th wedding anniversary. Ellen
and Mary are sisters. They also
stopped in Chamberlain to visit
family on their way home to Rapid
City.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Christine Dunham, 83,
who died Friday, Feb. 22, in Rapid
City Regional Hospital. She is the
wife of John Dunham. Services
were held in Norris on Wednesday
and burial took place at St. Thomas
Episcopal Cemetery in Corn Creek.
Save the Pearl members met at
the Gateway Apartments Commu-
nity Room on Tuesday evening,
Feb. 19. The spring plans for the
hotel include putting on the bal-
cony, which will be funded by a
grant from Deadwood and match-
ing funds from fund-raising efforts
by the committee members. It is
hoped it will be completed by
alumni weekend in June. The next
projects will include putting in a
furnace, plumbing, a bathroom and
painting of the sides of the hotel.
The next meeting will be March 18,
same meeting room at 6 p.m.
Rev. Gary and Ruth McCubbin
recently spent a week in Florida at
a family reunion. Ruth’s sister,
Betty, underwent brain surgery in
October and is doing well. The fam-
ily thought it was time to celebrate
her recovery at a family gathering.
The McCubbins left on February 9
and returned a week later.
Congratulations to the Philip
area wrestling team, which in-
cluded several wrestlers from
KAHS. The state tournament was
held in Aberdeen over the weekend
and Philip, Wall and Kadoka
wrestlers, as a team, took second
place behind Parkston.
Speaking of wrestling, my
grandson, Jack Lenox, is the Mis-
souri State AAU Wrestling Cham-
pion in the 85 pound bracket, as of
this past weekend. He lives in
Chesterfield, MO, and is 11 years
old. He will have a week off before
going on to further matches. He is
also a triple crown winner. As lots
of wrestlers, parents and grandpar-
ents in this area know, most week-
ends are spent participating in the
AAU competition.
If Congress doesn’t act in the
next week, America will be faced
with debilitating cuts to nearly
every non-defense discretionary
program at the federal level. But
these cuts are not sequestered to
the federal level alone – they will
cut into everything we do in our
county, city and school district.
At a Valentine’s Day Senate Ap-
propriations hearing on the “im-
pacts of the sequestration,”
Congress considered just what
kind of “love note” they would like
to extend to the American people.
Secretary of Education Arne
Duncan testified at that meeting
and here’s what he said about the
federal Impact Aid Program – a
program that helps educate more
than 350 students in Kadoka Area
School District:
“The across-the-board nature of
the cuts would focus an ill-advised
reduction on our grant programs
and the funds we need to adminis-
ter them,” referring to federally
connected schools. His testimony
referred to two of several schools
that could face over $1 million cuts
to Impact Aid because of sequestra-
tion.  Later in the hearing, Duncan
said “we would have to cut this
money [Impact Aid] right away. We
disproportionately fund those
areas because there’s a lack of
property taxes.”
Because Impact Aid, a federal
program that provides an “in-lieu
of tax” payment to school districts
impacted by a federal presence, is
the ONLY federal education pro-
gram that is current-year-funded
(meaning the funds authorized by
Congress in one year are for the
same school year), federally im-
pacted schools will feel the cuts the
day sequestration takes effect -
March 1, 2013 - should the U.S.
Congress fail to find an alternative
deficit-reduction solution. And
we’re not talking peanuts here.
Should Congress allow sequestra-
tion to trigger, federally impacted
schools would see an immediate cut
of up to 5.3-percent across-the-
board. That equates to about $70
million less for federally impacted
schools nationwide!
KADOKA AREA SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT is 50% percent federally im-
pacted and received $401,509.00 in
Impact Aid last year. A 5.3-percent
cut would mean we would have
$21,280.00 less with which to oper-
ate our district. And it’s not just
money we worry about. It’s jobs. If
sequestration occurs, our school
district could see a reduction in
services and programs that it is
currently able to provide.
Impact Aid helps fund school
districts nationwide affected by In-
dian Reservations, federal build-
ings, low-rent housing facilities,
National Parks and other federal
entities. More than 1,300 school
districts receive Impact Aid and it
affects more than 11 million school
children each year. Because they
are in-lieu of local tax revenue, Im-
pact Aid funds are “unrestricted,”
meaning they can be used in a
school district in virtually unlim-
ited ways – helping to pay for
added technology, special education
services, teacher salaries, new con-
struction – all of which help stu-
dents learn better and more
efficiently in their school setting.
Sequestration should be avoided
altogether for a balanced approach
to deficit reduction. Why?
1) Impact Aid is not a money
drain – it’s an investment in our fu-
ture. We should never forget that
by cutting education spending, we
are putting the future of our chil-
dren and our country at risk. Ac-
cording to the CIA’s World
Factbook, the United States spends
only 5.3-percent of its gross domes-
tic product on education – ranking
54th out of 182 countries surveyed.
Cutting Impact Aid and education
even further will not secure our
children’s futures, but guarantee
that our country will continue to
edge even further down the educa-
tion ladder. That’s not right.
2) Impact Aid is a federal part-
nership with localities, and cutting
or eliminating portions of it would
create an undue burden on local
taxpayers. Congress recognized
this fact way back in 1950 when
they created Impact Aid. They said,
“ …without continued federal help,
more than 1.8 million children in
these federally impacted areas
would not receive normal school
service… The U.S. has become an
industrialist, landlord or a busi-
nessman in many communities.”
However, since the land is tax ex-
empt, the federal government has
not accepted “the responsibility of
the normal citizen in a community”
to meet its financial obligation to
support public schools. By cutting
Impact Aid, Congress is shirking
its responsibility and shifting
school funding responsibilities onto
local taxpayers to the tune of $70
million. That’s not fair.
KADOKA AREA SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT urges you to speak out and
advocate on behalf of all federally
impacted schools in this country.
Additionally, our district relies
heavily on other federal programs
such as Title I, Title II, and IDEA
for special education. These pro-
grams directly impact students and
programs for reading and math in-
struction.
If Congress doesn’t act – on
March 1, 2013, what is not right,
not fair and inconceivable will be-
come inevitable.
Singled out for the wrong reason
Imagine traveling from Martin,
South Dakota, to Kansas City, Mis-
souri. Now imagine that trip by
foot, with a 40-pound backpack.
Now imagine that you don’t speak
the language and are dependent on
the hospitality of strangers.
Anthony Kathol, of Martin,
made such a journey, in his 565
mile pilgrimage across Spain. The
El Camino de Santiago, the way of
St. James, is a religious pilgrimage
which dates back to the time of the
Middle Ages.
His journey started at St. Jean
de Pied-Port, France, at the foot of
the Pyrannes Mountains, and con-
tinued to Santiago de Compostela,
Spain, ending at the Cathedral of
Santiago.
The inspiration for making the
pilgrimage came from watching a
movie, “The Way,” which is the
story of another man’s walk of the
pilgrimage.
“I had recently retired from my
job and this movie inspired me to
get away from the distractions of
the world in order for me to seek
out a new sense of purpose and di-
rection in my life,” he explained. “It
was a spiritual pilgrimage that I
will never forget.”
Along the way Kathol stayed at
many private, municipal and
parochial hostels. Some of the
challenges faced along the way in-
cluded “Not being sure if I was
going to make it within the allotted
time due to physical limitations. I
had one major blister on my right
heel which impaired me for two to
three days and I had to walk in my
sandals to not aggravate it. Many
more pilgrims had worse blisters.
Blisters are part of the walk and
you accept them with grace. Some-
one said that the number of blisters
you have on your feet is equivalent
to the number of sins you have.
Well, I had one major blister and
one minor blister on my right foot,
none on my left foot the entire
trip.”
Other physical obstacles in-
cluded having knees swell like
grapefruits about a week out from
Santiago as a result of all the
weight in my backpack carrying
over the mountains and the steep
decline and pounding that my legs
took when going downhill. I believe
it was God’s way of getting me to
slow down to hear his message.
Having a map helped, but
Kathol reported that it was impor-
tant to pay attention to where you
are going! “When hiking in the big
cities, one had to really pay close
attention where the yellow arrow
‘way marks’ were posted, as the
marks were in competition with all
the street and advertising signs
along the way. For example, a yel-
low arrow would be painted on the
back of a stop sign or a light pole.
If you weren’t paying attention,
you’d get lost quickly. This hap-
pened on occasion, but many locals
informed me right away that I was
not going the right way and got me
back on the path. That was com-
forting as the locals are used to the
pilgrims walking in their commu-
nities and welcome them.”
Forty-two days after taking the
first step, Kathol arrived at his des-
tination. Since his shoes were not
completely worn out yet, he contin-
ued three more days to walk to Fin-
isterre, Spain, to reach the shore of
the Atlantic Ocean. This is the
place where people thought that
ships fell off the edge of the earth,
when it was believed the world was
flat.
At the completion of the walk at
both Santiago and Finisterre,
Kathol received a compostela,
which is a certification of the com-
pletion of the pilgrimage. His name
is also included in the church reg-
istry for his accomplishment.
Prior to starting his journey,
Kathol visited the Basilica of Our
Lady of the Immaculate Concep-
tion where the Blessed Mother ap-
peared to St. Bernadette in
Lourdes, France. Kathol finished
his experience by giving thanks to
the Blessed Mother in Fatima, Por-
tugal.
The public is invited to follow in
Anthony’s footsteps as he presents
the story and photos of his journey
on Thursday, March 7, at 7 p.m. at
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Church basement in Mar-
tin. A potluck meal will be served
prior to the presentation.
By Marj Oleske
Bennett County Booster
“Walk 565 miles in my shoes”
Taking a break… Anthony Kathol rests during his pilgrimage
across Spain. He will present a program on his travels on Thursday, March
7, at 7 p.m. at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Martin.
--courtesy photo
Liverpool Legends
The complete Beatles experience!
Sponsored by the Kadoka Area School Music Department
Sunday, March 17 • 3 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
Tickets available at Kadoka Area Merchants or
email: Bandmanben@gmail.com
Adutls $25 • Students $15
Seniors $15 • Children under 5 free
First off, I would like to say wel-
come back to Lova, she is finally
feeling better after a long battle
with shingles and was able to come
play dice and visit with many of the
residents. She has been coming on
Saturday for many years. Welcome
back, Lova!
Dwight Louder was very popu-
lar this week with visits from his
wife, Dorothy, his son, Darin, and
Nelva and Janet Louder. It’s al-
ways so nice to go by a resident’s
room and see them enjoying family
time.
Jodie O’Bryan was in on Friday
and visited with her mother, Becky
Chapman.
Joy Parker had a good visit with
her nephew, Ron, and his wife, Re-
nate Carson. All of us want to wish
Wilma Carleton a speedy recovery,
we miss you!
Bonnie Madsen stopped by to
see several of the residents, it’s al-
ways nice to see her and catch up
on some of the gossip.
Micki Word had many of her
friends stop by and Bob looks in on
her and brings by the mail daily.
Kate DeVries attended church in
Belvidere on Sunday with Jim and
Robyn Jones. Phyllis Word talked
with Kate for a while on Monday.
Kate loves to have visitors!
Alice Wilmarth looks forward to
Rick stopping in every afternoon,
and enjoys the time she has with
her granddaughter, Tammy, while
she fixes her hair. Paulette also
stopped by.
Harriet Noteboom always has a
good visit her daughter, Clarice
Roghair. She loves it even more
when baby Jack comes to visit!
Lyle Klundt stops in to see Ruth
as often as he can, he also brings
her mail.
Here you go. Let me know if you
have questions. Just give me a call
at 837-2270.
Enjoy the comedy of
Jersey Steve
Saturday,
March 2
9 p.m.
G
r
e
a
t
E
ntertainm
ent!
Enjoy Our
Pri me Ri b
Speci al
& Salad Bar
Club 27
SD Hwy 248 • Kadoka
837-2241
Sports …
February 28, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
It came down to the wire, but the
Philip Area grapplers held on to
their second place standing which
they had posted after the first day
of action at the South Dakota State
B Wrestling Tournament in Ab-
erdeen, February 22-23.
As the final matches were taking
place Parkston was at 158 points,
Philip Area at 115, Wagner 111.5
and Canton 111. Philip Area had
completed their last match with
Canton having one more. Wagner
was done wrestling and would stay
at 111.5. Head Coach Matt Don-
nelly noted that 182 pound weight
class was the deciding factor. If the
Canton wrestler won by decision
Philip Area and Canton would tie
for second; if he won with a pin
which scores more points, Canton
would take second place. Philip
Area’s score held as the Canton
wrestler lost his bid for the cham-
pionship. Parkston finished the
tournament with 164 points.
Philip Area took nine wrestlers
to the tournament, eight of which
advanced to the second day of ac-
tion. Those eight all placed sixth or
higher. By comparison, Parkston
brought 12 wrestlers to Aberdeen
and with 10 finishing seventh or
higher.
Donnelly said the team had an
idea what they had going in to the
tournament. “We figured we had a
chance,” he said. “I’m proud of the
kids.” Logan Ammons was awarded
the Most Pins Award for his five
pins during the tournament.
Gavin DeVries’ loss in double
overtime was a tough one, said
Donnelly.
Team points were: Parkston
(164), Philip Area (115), Wagner
(111.5), Canton (111), Tri-Valley
(84), Bon Homme (83.5), Beresford
(74), Flandreau (73), Webster Area
(71.5), Winner (69), Howard (68),
Burke/Gregory (60), Groton Area
(47), Clark/Willow Lake and Kings-
bury County tied (43), Faulkton
Area (38), Garretson (38), Bennett
County (32), Harding County (31),
Custer and Hot Springs tied (28),
Stanley County (27.5), Elk
Point/Jefferson (27),
Lemmon/McIntosh (25), Aberdeen
Roncalli (23), McCook Central/
Montrose (22), Scotland (18),
Newell (16), Britton-Hecla and
Redfield/Doland tied (14), Mo-
bridge-Pollock and Potter County
tied (13), Kimball/White Lake/
Platte-Geddes (12), Parker (9),
Sully Buttes (7), Ipswich/Leola (6),
Mt. Vernon/Plankinton/Corsica,
Hill City, and St. Thomas More tied
(5), Deuel (4), Miller/Highmore-
Harrold (3.50), Andes Central,
Lyman and Sunshine Bible Acad-
emy tied (3). Other schools repre-
sented by wrestlers, but not scoring
were Sioux Valley, Tiospa Zina,
Warner/Northwestern, Alcester-
Hudson, Marion/Freeman, Crow
Creek, Wessington Springs/Woon-
socket/Wolsey - Wessington, and
Red Cloud.
106 lbs: Jed Brown 5th,
33-13 record
•Decisioned Logan Richie (WEB) 10-4
•Decisioned Nick Casperson (BER) 5-2
•Decisioned by Duncan Stoebner (BH) 3-7
•Decisioned by Richie (WEB) 2-6
•Decisioned Capserson (BER) 6-4
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 6th,
26-12 record
•Pinned Zach Stoltenburg (DEU) 3:10
•Tech. fall by Alex Caba (BH) 5-20
•Decisioned Jacob Fitzgerald (GAR) 9-2
•Major dec. Brady Hill (SB) 19-7
•Decisioned by Bailey Neises (HOW) 8-12
•Decisioned by Jared Lyle (BER) 5-6
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 6th,
34-12 record
•Decisioned by Austin Gilbertson (KC) 2-4
•Tech. fall over Zach Ayers (WIN) 3:40
•Decisioned Michael Weidenbach (MHH) 8-
6
•Decisioned Dawson Semmler (PKST) 5-0
•Decisioned by Oliver Aesoph (FAU) 4-6
•Decisioned by Nathan Jones (BRH) 1-3 OT
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 2nd,
32-4 record
•Decisioned Brady Soulek (WAG) 8-1
•Pinned Nick Weis (EPJ) 4:41
•Decisioned Kent Hall (FAU) 9-0
•Decisioned by Zach Schuman (TV) 4-13
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 2nd,
34-9 record
•Decisioned Ryan Yost (RED) 10-3
•Pinned Luke Warejcka (KWLPG) 5:49
•Decisioned Tyson Mitzel (AR) 12-11
•Decisioned by David Kocer (WAG) 0-3
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 6th,
35-11 record
•Pinned Cole Globke (M/F) 1:47
•Decisioned Blase Vanecek (BH) 13-8 OT
•Major dec. by Trevor Lensing (WAG) 6-15
•Decisioned by Kyle Scofield (FLA) 3-9
•Decisioned by Vanecek (BH) (4-7)
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 4th,
29-12 record
•Tech. fall over Dakota Zephier (WAG) 17-2
•Decisioned Evan Larsen (KC) 4-1
•Pinned by Kase Jacobs (CAN) 3:50
•Decisioned Tuner Blasius (KWLPG) 3-1 OT
•Major dec. by Dalton McCullam (BC) 2-10
195 lbs: Logan Ammons, 3rd,
27-11 record
•Decisioned by Cameron Kostal (MVPC) 1-5
•Pinned Brett Christman (RED) 3:43
•Pinned Witt Dobesh (STM) 3:36
•Pinned Caleb VanWyhe (CAN) 1:59
•Pinned C J Geary (EP/J) 2:29
•Pinned Andrew Semmler (PKST) 1:34
220 lbs: Gavin DeVries
21-19 record
•Decisioned Dowain Kerner (B/G) 8-5
•Pinned by Logan Tonak (CWL) 3:29
•Decisioned by Trenton Duncan (GRO) 3-4
double OT
Donnelly noted that Parkston
also attends a lot of tournaments
during the off season, which is one
reason for their success. He said to
stay competitive and to win those
championship titles, the kids have
to work at the sport year round.
That time spent in practice in the
off season really helps, he said.
He added that all the support
from parents and fans helps the
team too, and he is thankful for
that support.
Grapplers State B runner-up champions
Benefit Auction For
Rodeo Bible Camp
Badlands Chapter • Kadoka, SD
Sunday, March 17 • 4 p.m.
at the Belvidere Fellowship Hall
Benefit auction will begin at 4 p.m.
along with a soup and sandwich supper.
Auction Items:
Leather Items, Artwork,
Bull Certificates, Antiques, Gift
Baskets, Horse Tack, Baked &
Food Items & More
If you would like to donate items for
the auction, please contact
Francie Davis at 605-920-8484
or Chuck Willard 605-344-2576
Athletes of the Week
Chandlier Sudbeck
Wrestling
2nd Place at State
Chance Knutson
Wrestling
4th Place at State
Logan Ammons
Wrestling
3rd Place at State
Jed Brown
Wrestling
5th Place at State
Clint Stout
Wrestling
6th Place at State
Gavin DeVries
Wrestling
Sponsored by
Jackson County Title Company and Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543 • 605-837-2286
Clint Stout
Jed Brown
Logan Ammons received an award for the
most pins during the tournament.
Chandlier Sudbeck
Logan Ammons
Gavin DeVries
Chance Knutson
Public Notices …
February 28, 2013 •Kadoka Press • Page 6
Public
Notice
Publication
Deadline
is
Friday at
NOON!
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
for furnishing, laying and compacting ap-
proximately 425 tons of “Hot Mix” asphalt
concrete, with an additional 150 tons to
be used for patching at various locations,
will be received by the City of Kadoka,
South Dakota at the City Finance Office
until 4:00 p.m. (MDT) on March 11, 2013.
Envelope shall be marked “6th Avenue
Improvement Project”. The bids shall be
for two (2) items: mobilization (lump
sum) and “Hot Mix” Asphalt Concrete
(price per ton in place). Bids will be
opened and read aloud at 7:15 p.m.
(MDT) at the Kadoka City Council Meet-
ing on Monday, March 11, 2013, and
award made as soon as possible. The
City reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all bids and to waive any irregu-
larities therein and reserves the right to
award the contract to the lowest respon-
sible bidder as they so determine.
The “Hot Mix” shall be laid 4 inches thick
in 2 inch compacted lifts, with emulsified
asphalt tack applied under each lift. As-
phalt concrete shall meet South Dakota
specifications E1 P.G. 58-28 or E1 P.G.
64-22 or Q2R P.G. 58-34. The owner re-
serves the right to increase or de-
crease the quantities bid by up to 25%
for budget purposes with no change
in unit prices.
Payment for “Hot Mix” will be made to the
nearest one tenth (0.1) ton on weigh tick-
ets that accompany each delivered and
placed load on this project.
There must be enclosed with each bid a
draft, certified check or cashier’s check
certified or issued by a state or national
bank domiciled in South Dakota, payable
to the order of the City of Kadoka in the
amount of at least 5 percent or, in lieu
thereof, a bid bond of at least 10 percent
of the amount of the bid as a guarantee
that the bidder will enter into the pro-
posed contract and furnish the required
performance bonds.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tificate of insurance with minimum liability
coverage of One Million Dollars
($1,000,000.00).
Pursuant to State Law, a copy of the bid-
der’s sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder’s excise tax license as
issued by the State of South Dakota
must accompany the bid. In lieu of a copy
of the license, the bidder shall submit ap-
propriate evidence that the bidder and all
affiliates have the appropriate licenses.
The beginning date for this project will be
negotiable; however, all work on this proj-
ect must be completed before August 15,
2013. A penalty of $100.00 per day will
be assessed for each day past August
15, 2013, that the project remains incom-
plete. The City of Kadoka will be respon-
sible for traffic control on this project.
Questions regarding this project and bid
specification should be directed to:
Patrick Solon, City Street Superintendent
at 605-837-2140.
[Published February 21 & 28, March 7,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$97.47]
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
for milling of 1,574 sq. yards of city
streets will be received by the City of
Kadoka, South Dakota at the City Fi-
nance Office until 4:00 p.m. (MDT) on
March 11, 2013. The asphalt to be milled
is approximately 2 to 4 inches thick.
Milled material will be left in place. Enve-
lope shall be marked “6th Avenue Milling
Project”. The bids shall be for two (2)
items: mobilization (lump sum) and
milling (price per square yard). The City
of Kadoka will assist with traffic control.
Bids will be opened and read aloud at
7:15 p.m. (MDT) at the Kadoka City
Council Meeting on Monday, March 11,
2013, and award made as soon as pos-
sible. The City reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids and to waive
any irregularities therein and reserves
the right to award the contract to the low-
est responsible bidder as they so deter-
mine.
There must be enclosed with each bid a
draft, certified check or cashier’s check
certified or issued by a state or national
bank domiciled in South Dakota, payable
to the order of the City of Kadoka in the
amount of at least 5 percent or, in lieu
thereof, a bid bond of at least 10 percent
of the amount of the bid as a guarantee
that the bidder will enter into the pro-
posed contract and furnish the required
performance bonds.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tificate of insurance with minimum liability
coverage of One Million Dollars
($1,000,000.00).
Pursuant to State Law, a copy of the bid-
der’s sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder’s excise tax license as
issued by the State of South Dakota
must accompany the bid. In lieu of a copy
of the license, the bidder shall submit ap-
propriate evidence that the bidder and all
affiliates have the appropriate licenses.
The beginning and ending dates for this
project will be negotiable, to correlate
with the beginning date for the project by
the hot mix asphalt company. The City of
Kadoka will be responsible for traffic con-
trol on this project.
Questions regarding this project and bid
specification should be directed to:
Patrick Solon, City Street Superintendent
at 605-837-2140.
[Published February 21 & 28, March 7,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$75.81]
NOTICE OF
TAX SALE
CERTIFICATE
TO: Maggie Williams, deceased
AND THE UNKNOWN EXECUTORS,
ADMINISTRATORS, DEVICEES AND
LEGATEES OF
TO: Maggie Williams, Emil Williams,
Bee Huddleson, Connie Lehr,
Beberly Larson, and
Maggie Lou Heltzel
AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson
County is the lawful holder of a 2007 Tax
Sale Certificate, Number 178, purchased
by Jackson County at Kadoka, South
Dakota on the 15th day of December
2008, said real property described as fol-
lows:
Lot three (3), Block six (6),
Town of Wanblee, Jackson
County, South Dakota
as shown by the plat recorded in the Of-
fice of the Register of Deeds of Jackson
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that the right of re-
demption will expire and a Tax Deed for
the above described property shall be is-
sued to Jackson County (60) sixty days
from the date of completed service of this
Notice unless the property is redeemed
as permitted by law.
Dated at Kadoka, South Dakota the 11th
day of February, 2013.
Cindy Willert,
Jackson County Treasurer
[Published February 21 & 28, 2013 at the
total approximate cost of $35.38]
FINANCIAL REPORT
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
FOR THE PERIOD
BEGINNING
JANUARY 1, 2013
ENDING
JANUARY 31, 2013
GENERAL FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 1,368.33; Transfer
into account: (from MMDA account)
278,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 1,890.29; Jones
Co.Treasurer, taxes 0.00; Haakon Co.
Treasurer, taxes 414.52; County appor-
tionment 1,960.90; BankWest, interest
61.03; First National Midland, int. 84.13;
State of SD, state aid 100,475.00; Stu-
dent Activities 1,832.06; Student Partici-
pation fees 200.00; Sale of supplies
15.00; Presbyterian Church, bus use
600.00; US Dept of Ed, Indian Ed
1,661.06; Badland Nat. Park, trans, T&A
172.50; State of SD, Title I 50,708.00;
State of SD, FFV 1,458.82; State of SD,
REAP 13,167.00; Total receipts:
174,700.31; Transfers out: (to MMDA)
167,614.72; Disbursements: 275,722.88;
Ending balance, checking: 10,731.04;
Money Market Deposit Account: (BW)
176,399.64; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count: (MB) 159,086.05; Petty Cash:
130.00; Total Balance of Account:
346,346.73
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: Checking ac-
count balance, beginning: 3,881.31;
Transfer in: 15,100.00; Receipts: Jack-
son Co. Treasurer, taxes 802.58; Jones
Co. Treasurer, taxes 0.00; Haakon Co.
Treasurer 79.03; First National, Interest
91.78; BankWest, interest 85.00; Trans-
fers out: 176.78; Disbursements:
19,046.95; Ending balance, checking:
815.97; Money Market Deposit Account:
226,921.55; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count: (MB) 161,791.77; Total Balance of
Account: 389,529.29
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: Checking
account balance, beginning: 591.07;
Transfer into account: from savings
35,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 740.76; Jones Co. Treasurer,
taxes 0.00; Haakon Co. Treasurer, taxes
73.69; First National, interest 30.59;
BankWest, interest 42.50; State of SD,
IDEA 13,330.00; State of SD, state aid
1,692.00; Transfers out: 15,095.09; Dis-
bursements: 35,408.01; Ending balance,
checking: 997.51; Money Market Deposit
Account: (BW) 125,403.57; Money Mar-
ket Deposit Account: (MB) 49,626.70;
Total Balance of Account: 176,027.78
IMPACT AID FUND: Beginning balance,
checking; Receipts: Interest 916.53;
Money Market Deposit Account
1,048,387.34; C.M.A. Account
1,015,666.62; Balance of account:
2,064,053.96
CAPITOL PROJECTS FUND: Beginning
balance, checking 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est BankWest, interest 60.71; Transfer to
MMDA 60.71; Disbursements 0.00;
Money Market Deposit Account
169,845.52; Balance of account:
169,845.52
FOOD SERVICE FUND: Beginning Bal-
ance: -1,687.29; Tranfer in (from Impact
Aid) 0.00; Receipts: Sales 8,010.20;
State of SD, reimbursement 7,935.97;
Disbursements 13,958.99; Total balance
checking account: 299.89; Cash change
0.00; Total balance accounts: 299.89
TRUST & AGENCY FUND: Beginning
balance, checking: 42,219.54; Transfer
in: 0.00; Receipts: 65,512.78; Transfers
out: 41,921.61; Disbursements:
16,660.28; Balance, Checking:
49,150.43; Cash Change: 500.00;
Money Market Deposit Acct: 33,747.86;
Total balance of account: 83,398.29
ALBIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Non ex-
pendable trust fund: Beginning balance:
397.01; Transfer in: Receipts: 0.00; Dis-
bursements: 0.00; Ending Balance
397.01
/s/ Eileen C. Stolley
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
February 5, 2013
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OF THE REGULAR MEETING
OF THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION HELD
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13,
2013 AT THE INTERIOR
SCHOOL AT 4:00 P.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Ross Block, Dale
Christensen, Mark Williams, Ken
Lensegrav. Absent: D.J. Addison.
Also present: Supt. Jamie Hermann;
Eileen Stolley, business manager; Jeff
Nemecek and George Seiler, principals.
Visitors present: Colby and Teresa
Shuck.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay.
The Consent Agenda included the follow-
ing items: to approve the agenda, to ap-
prove the minutes of the January 9,
January 26 and January 30, 2013 meet-
ings; to approve the financial report; to
approve the bills as presented.
Dale Christensen moved to approve the
consent agenda. Motion was seconded
by Mark Williams and carried.
GENERAL FUND: AMERICAS BEST
VALUE INN, BULLY WORKSHOP 50.00;
AMICK SOUND INC, SERVICE FIRE
ALARM 2,598.56; BADLANDS GRO-
CERY, I-FOODS & SUPPLIES 207.46;
BJ'S INSTRUMENT REPAIR, BAND
HORN REPAIRS 96.00; BLOCK, AIMEE,
MIDLAND LUNCHES 85.00; BRANT'S
ELECTRIC, THERMOSTAT REPLACED
91.39; BUTLER MACHINERY, BUS RE-
PAIR 2,322.29; CENTURY BUSINESS
PRODUCTS INC, COPIER MAINTE-
NANCE 918.70; CHADRON STATE
COLLEGE, TEACHER FAIR 25.00;
CHILDREN'S CARE, OT & PT SERV-
ICES & MLG 100.00; CROSSROADS
CONVENTION CNTR, ROOMS-MATH &
SCIENCE CONF 303.96; DISCOUNT
FUEL, FUEL ACCTS 3,703.38; ERNIES
BUILDING CENTER, MID-SCH CUST
SUPPLIES 198.96; FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OMAHA, POSTAGE, SUPPLIES,
TRAVEL 3,734.89; GRAHAM TIRE,
TIRES 295.36; GROPPER, BRENDA,
ELEC. ALLOWANCE 20.00; HAAKON
SCHOOL DISTRICT, ONE ACT PLAY
ENTRY FEE 201.17; HASLER,
POSTAGE METER 133.50; HAUFF
MID-AMERICA SPORTS INC, ATH-
LETIC SUPPLIES 547.25; HEARTLAND
WASTE MGT INC, MIDLAND
GARBAGE 120.00; HILLS TIRE & SUP-
PLY INC, ALIGNMENT 49.95; HOGEN'S
HARDWARE, SUPPLIES/MATERI-
ALS/REPAIRS 1,209.67; HOUCHEN
BINDERY, BINDING MINUTE BOOKS
310.00; J & S RESTORE, REPAIRS
2,000.72; J.W. PEPPER & SON, INC.,
MUSIC 67.49; KADOKA AREA SCHOOL
LUNCH, SCHOOL BOARD INSVS - ALA
CARTE 24.00; KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL T&A, REFEREES - GBB
1,173.15; REFEREES - BBB 726.21;
COUNSELORS CONFERENCE FEES
310.00; CPR CERTIFICATION CARDS
60.00; QTR 2 PAYROLL CORRECTION
-SSA 99.75; KADOKA CITY TRANSFER
STATION, RUBBLE 22.60; KADOKA
CLINIC, BUS DRIVER PHYSICAL
300.00; KADOKA COMMUNITY BET-
TERMENT ASSOCIATION, DUES
200.00; KADOKA PRESS, PUBLICA-
TIONS 265.86; LONG VALLEY
BOOSTER CLUB; CUSTODIAL SERV-
ICES 200.00; MANLEY, LARRY, I-BUS
ELEC ALLOWANCE 20.00; McREL,
POWER WALK THROUGH 1,295.00;
MID CENTRAL EDUCATIONAL COOP,
DIAL CLASSES AND SUPPLIES 680.00;
MIDWEST COOPERATIVES,
PROPANE/BUS RT FUEL 1,552.44;
MILLER'S GARBAGE, GARBAGE
SERVICE 269.20; MOSES BLDG CEN-
TER, SUPPLIES & MATERIALS 15.69;
NETWORK SERVICES COMPANY,
CUST SUPPLIES 520.71; PEOPLE'S
MARKET, SUPPLIES 1,431.38; PETTY
CASH-EILEEN STOLLEY,
POSTAGE/UPS 55.37; PRICHARD,
LAURIE, REIMBUSE SUPPLIES 70.85;
QUILL CORPORATION, SUPPLIES
70.08; RAPID CITY JOURNAL, SUB-
SCRIPTION 132.30; RASMUSSEN ME-
CHANICAL, LV FURNACE REPAIRS
1,839.17; REGION VII, CONTEST FEES
238.00; SD DEPT OF LABOR, UNEM-
PLOYMENT 496.00; SD DEPT OF REV-
ENUE, LV-WATER EVAL 39.00; SD
INTERSCHO ATH ADMIN ASSOC,
CONF REG & DUES 180.00; SDASSP,
PRIN SPRING CONF REG 125.00;
SERVALL TOWEL & LINEN, K/I/LV/M-
DUSTMOP SERVICE 407.34; SHAN-
NON, SONJA, CONTRACT SERVICES
LEAP 600.00; SOUTH DAKOTA ASSN
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS,
CONFERENCE DUES/FEES 200.00;
SOUTH DAKOTA RETIREMENT SYS-
TEM, REPORT CORRECTION 90.00;
SWARTZ, BRUCE, TUNE PIANOS
170.00; TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION
IN EDUCATION, LEAP DATA RETREAT
750; TIGERDIRECT INC. 188.17; VERI-
ZON WIRELESS, CELL SERVICE
15.38; VOLLMER JR., REUBEN B.,
SNOW REMOVAL 175.00; WAGE-
WORKS, ADMIN. FEES 125.00;
WALKER REFUSE, I & LV - DUMP
SERVICE 281.30; WEST RIVER EXCA-
VATION LLC, SNOW REMOVAL 432.86;
WRIGHT EXPRESS FSC, TRAVEL EXP
4.00; TEACHER SALARIES, ELEME-
MENTARY 39,457.71; MILEAGE:
NANCY WELLER 203.04; RENEE
SCHOFIELD 358.47; MISTY HAMAR
217.06; ROGER DALE 134.68; SUB
TEACHERS, ELEMENTARY 903.74; IN-
DIAN EDUCATION, INSTRUCTION
1,178.64; TEACHER SALARIES, HIGH
SCHOOL 18,945.85; SUB TEACHERS,
HIGH SCHOOL 2,063.11; PRE SCHOOL
SALARIES 1,111.75; TITLE II A
SALARIES 4,488.09; GUIDANCE
SALARY 1,789.50; TITLE I SALARIES
23,665.95; TITLE I SUB TEACHERS
736.04; TITLE I TUTORING 334.09;
TITLE I SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT AC-
TIVITIES 198.96; OFFICES OF THE
SUPT., PRINCIPAL AND BUSINESS
MANAGER 20,653.86; TECHNOLOGY
3,484.91; LIBRARY 208.01; OPERA-
TION OF PLANT SALARIES 5,088.88;
SUB CUSTODIAL 657.85; PUPIL
TRANSPORTATION 3,031.44; SUB
BUS DRIVERS: BRENDA GROPPER
45.78; ACTIVITY BUS DRIVERS:
ROGER DALE 457.13; REFEREES,
SCOREKEEPERS 163.34; KEENA
BYRD-MORO, GRADE BB COACH
947.67; GEORGE SEILER, GRADE BB
COACH 858.80; COLBY SCHUCK, PEP
BAND 888.44; TERESA SHUCK, ONE
ACT PLAY 494.50; ROGER DALE,
GRADE BB COACH 277.05; BUS MON-
ITOR 760.27; CO-CURRICULAR
SALARIES PRORATED 205.81; AMER-
ICAN FAMILY LIFE ASSURANCE CO,
CC/IC INS W/H 1,969.00; BREIT LAW
OFFICES, W/H 100.00; WASHINGTON
NATIONAL INSURANCE CO, W/H
208.70; BENEFIT MALL, SD, LIFE INS
W/H 683.77; MG TRUST COMPANY,
403(B) W/H 2,000.00; CREDIT COL-
LECTION BUREAU, W/H 38.96; DELTA
DENTAL INS., GROUP DENTAL
3,980.52; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A
CAFETERIA ACCT., PAYFLEX W/H
729.50; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A
FIT/FICA ACCT., TAX 46,218.02; SD RE-
TIREMENT SYSTEM, TR AND MATCH.
25,231.38; S.D. SCHOOL DISTRICT
BENEFIT FUND, GROUP HEALTH
39,542.23
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: KADOKA
CITY AUDITORIUM, AUDITORIUM
RENT 3,900.00; KADOKA CITY WATER
DEPT., WATER/SEWER 92.10;
KADOKA OIL CO, HEAT & BUS FUEL
6,733.80; LACREEK ELECTRIC ASSN.,
INC., ELEC-LV SCHOOL 219.11; MID-
WEST COOPERATIVES, HEATING
FUEL 2,260.47; OIEN IMPLEMENT &
SUPPLY INC, BUS GARAGE RENT
600.00; TOWN OF MIDLAND, MIDLAND
SCH-WATER 22.00; WEST CENTRAL
ELECTRIC COOP, ELEC ACCOUNTS
4,130.40; WEST RIVER ELECTRIC
ASSOC., INTERIOR ELEC ACCT
361.09; WR/LJ WATER SYSTEMS INC,
I-SCH WATER 32.50
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: BAD-
LANDS GROCERY, I-FOODS & SUP-
PLIES 19.78; BLACK HILLS SPECIAL
SERVICES, OT & PT SERVICES & MLG
2,253.80; CHILDREN'S CARE, OT & PT
SERVICES & MLG 415.00; DISCOUNT
FUEL, FUEL ACCTS 147.40; PEOPLE'S
MARKET, SUPPLIES 57.30; PETTY
CASH-EILEEN STOLLEY,
POSTAGE/UPS 5.59; PARENT, TRANS-
PORTATION MLG 899.84; WALL
SCHOOL DISTRICT, SPEECH SERV-
ICES 1,993.86; REGULAR SALARIES
15,124.03; SUBSTITUTE SALARIES
651.80
FOOD SERVICE: BADLANDS GRO-
CERY, I-FOODS & SUPPLIES 320.95;
BLOCK, AIMEE, MIDLAND LUNCHES
1,052.30; CASH-WA DISTRIBUTING,
FOOD & SUPPLIES 1,997.84; CHILD &
ADULT NUTRITION SERVICE, COM-
MODITY PROCESSING 560.09; DEAN
FOODS, DAIRY PRODUCTS 1,514.70;
EARTHGRAINS CO, K&I-BREAD
PRODUCTS 269.15; FARMER BROTH-
ERS COMPANY, K-FOODS 78.80;
HOGEN'S HARDWARE,
SUPPLI ES/ MATERI ALS/ REPAI RS
67.05; MILLER'S GARBAGE,
GARBAGE SERVICE 188.00; PEO-
PLE'S MARKET, SUPPLIES 249.31; US
FOODSERVICE, FOOD & SUPPLIES
3,086.70; REGULAR SALARIES
4,484.58; SUBSTITUTE SALARIES
34.61
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT: Mr.
Hermann reviewed education legislative
issues. He reported that the operation of
the track concessions will be advertised
until the end of the month.
PRINCIPALS’ REPORTS: Mr. Seiler pre-
sented his recommendations for new
staffing positions for next year including
a high school counselor and a foreign
language teacher. He listed duties that
would be included in a high school guid-
ance/counselor position and stated that
DDN for foreign language is not as effec-
tive as having a classroom teacher. Mr.
Hermann noted that he has contacted
area schools to determine if there is an
interest in sharing a foreign language
teacher.
Mr. Seiler reported that the scoreboard
committee met with businesses that are
interested in sponsorship of the score-
board. Cost of a scoreboard with a mes-
saging center add-on would be
approximately $29,000.00 plus installa-
tion costs. BankWest will be primary
sponsor of the scoreboard with their busi-
ness at the top of the board. Discount
Fuel, Kadoka Oil, People’s Market and
Grant Patterson will be scoreboard spon-
sors with their businesses on the bottom
section of the scoreboard. The addition
of a messaging center was also dis-
cussed and to add that option would be
school district responsibility in the
amount of approximately $13,000. The
plan is that the messaging center would
be moved to the front of the school prop-
erty after football season and back to the
sports complex for track season. Adver-
tising on the messaging center could be
sold with that revenue to go back to the
sports complex reserve.
Mr. Nemecek explained IXL Math and its
use as intervention for students. He also
reported on sessions attended at the
Principals’ Joint Conference.
BOARD COMMITTEE REPORTS: NE-
GOTIATIONS COMMITTEE: Dan Van-
derMay noted that the board members
should review the negotiated agreement.
It was decided that a working lunch time
for negotiations planning and review be
done at the February 15th special meet-
ing.
TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE: Mr.
Hermann reported that the transportation
committee met; inventory of buses and
vehicles was reviewed with mileage on
each. The recommendation for pur-
chases next year is for a suburban and a
van or car. The plan would be to budget
for the vehicles and to purchase when a
federal surplus property vehicle is avail-
able.
RESIGNATIONS: A letter of resignation
from Abby Carlson, effective after her two
week notice starting January 24, 2013,
was read. Mark Williams moved to ac-
cept the resignation. Motion was sec-
onded by Dale Christensen and carried.
A letter of resignation from Sandra Short
Bull, effective at the end of the school
year, was read. Ken Lensegrav moved to
accept the resignation with regret. Motion
was seconded by Ross Block and car-
ried.
SCOREBOARD: Dawn Rasmussen
moved to accept with appreciation dona-
tions from sponsors BankWest, Discount
Fuel, Kadoka Oil and Grant Patterson for
purchase of a scoreboard and to author-
ize a purchase order for the scoreboard
and messaging board with the difference
to be funded by the Reserve for Sports
Complex. Motion was seconded by Ross
Block and carried.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK EMERGENCY
EVACUATION PLAN: Ross Block moved
to grant First National Bank, Midland, use
of the Midland gym and access to phone
lines, for temporary office space for their
day to day operations in case of an emer-
gency in which their building would need
to be evacuated. Motion was seconded
by Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
Ken Lensegrav moved to authorize offer-
ing a contract to James Plaggemeyer,
sports complex maintenance, with hourly
rate to be determined. Motion was sec-
onded by Mark Williams and carried.
ADMINISTRATIVE CONTRACTS: Ken
Lensegrav moved to offer a 2013-2014
contract to Jamie Hermann, superintend-
ent, with contract amount to be deter-
mined. Motion was seconded by Dawn
Rasmussen and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to offer a
2013-2014 contract to George Seiler,
middle school/high school principal, with
contract amount to be determined. Mo-
tion was seconded by Dale Christensen
and carried.
Ken Lensegrav moved to offer a 2013-
2014 contract to Jeff Nemecek, elemen-
tary principal, with contract amount to be
determined. Motion was seconded by
Ross Block and carried.
Mark Williams moved to offer a 2013-
2014 contract to Chad Eisenbraun, tech-
nology director, with contract amount to
be determined. Motion was seconded by
Ross Block and carried.
CUSTODIAL CONTRACTS: Dawn Ras-
mussen moved to offer a custodial con-
tract to Polly Brown @ $9.00 per hour
per district policy and probationary pe-
riod. Motion was seconded by Mark
Williams and carried.
Ross Block moved to offer a custodial
contract to Mathew Plaggemeyer @
$9.00 per hour per district policy and pro-
bationary period. Motion was seconded
by Ken Lensegrav and carried.
SUPPLEMENT BUDGET: Ken Lenseg-
rav moved to adopt Resolution #42-01-
0213 LEAP 1003a) as follows:
LET IT BE RESOLVED, that
the school board of the
Kadoka Area School District,
in accordance with SDCL 13-
11-3.2, and after duly consid-
ering the proposed
supplemental budget, hereby
approves and adopts the fol-
lowing supplemental budget in
total:
For Long Valley School LEAP,
1003a, school improvement.
GENERAL FUND:
APPROPRIATIONS:
GENERAL FUND:
10 2214 128 100 300
salaries, Teachers
& subs . . . . . . . . . . 3,160.00
10 2214 128 200 300
FICA and TR . . . . . . . 393.00
10 2214 128 319
Purchased services,
coordinator
Data retreat facilitator,
LEAP coach . . . . . . . 9,000.00
10 2214 128 334
Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . .138.00
Indirect Cost . . . . . . . . 341.00
Total: . . . . . . . . . . . 13,032.00
REVENUE:
10-4158-128 . . . . . 13,032.00
Motion was seconded by Dale Chris-
tensen and carried.
KAEA: Dale Christensen moved to rec-
ognize KAEA as the bargaining unit for
the school district certified staff. Motion
was seconded by Dawn Rasmussen and
carried.
CALENDAR: Supt. Hermann requested
that calendar adoption be tabled to allow
time for one more committee meeting.
Ross Block moved to table adoption of
the calendar. Motion was seconded by
Dale Christensen and carried.
LEAP CONSULTING CONTRACT: Mark
Williams moved to approve a consulting
contract with Sonja Shannon for Longval-
ley focus/priority school as required by
SD Dept of Ed for focus/priority school
requirements @ one training day @
$67.00 and six days consult @ $600.00
per day. Motion was seconded by Dale
Christensen and carried.
At 5:45 Dale Christensen moved to go
into executive session for personnel mat-
ters per SDCL 1-25-2(1). Motion was
seconded by Ken Lensegrav and carried.
The board came out of executive session
at 6:46.
The March regular meeting will be held
at Kadoka. The tribal parent input meet-
ing will be held at 5:30 with business
meeting at 6:00 p.m.
There being no further business, Ross
Block moved that the meeting be ad-
journed. Motion was seconded by Ken
Lensegrav and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
Eileen C. Stolley, Business Manager
[Published February 28, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $198.19]
UNAPPROVED
MINUTES OF THE
SPECIAL MEETING
OF THE KADOKA
AREA SCHOOL
BOARD MEETING
HELD FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 15, 2013
AT THE KADOKA
SCHOOL AT 8:00
A.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Ross Block, Dale
Christensen, Ken Lensegrav, Mark
Williams. Absent: D.J. Addison.
Also present: Supt. Jamie Hermann;
Eileen Stolley, business manager
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The purpose of the special meeting is for
personnel matters.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay.
Ken Lensegrav moved to adopt the
agenda. Motion was seconded by Dale
Christensen and carried.
At 8:03 a.m. Ross Block moved to go into
executive session for the purpose of per-
sonnel matters – interviews with candi-
dates for the position of business
manager. Motion was seconded by Dale
Christensen and carried.
Mark Williams joined the meeting at 9:00
a.m.; Ken Lensegrav left the meeting at
9:30.
At 12:00 the meeting recessed for lunch
and reconvened at 12:30.
The board came out of executive session
at 3:20 p.m.
Ross Block moved that the meeting be
adjourned. Motion was seconded by
Dawn Rasmussen and carried
Dan VanderMay, President
ATTEST:
Eileen C. Stolley
Business Manager
[Published Febraury 28, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $23.08]
UNAPPROVED
MINUTES OF THE
SPECIAL MEETING
OF THE KADOKA
AREA SCHOOL
BOARD MEETING
HELD FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 22, 2013
AT THE KADOKA
SCHOOL AT
10:00 A.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Ross Block, Dale
Christensen, Mark Williams.
Absent: D.J. Addison, Ken Lensegrav.
Also present: Supt. Jamie Hermann;
Eileen Stolley, business manager.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The purpose of the special meeting is for
personnel matters.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay. Dawn Rasmussen
moved to adopt the agenda. Motion was
seconded by Ross Block and carried.
At 10:01 a.m. Mark Williams moved to go
into executive session for the purpose of
personnel matters – interviews with can-
didates for the position of business man-
ager. Motion was seconded by Dawn
Rasmussen and carried.
Dale Christensen joined the meeting at
11:10 a.m.
The board came out of executive session
at 12:25 p.m.
Dale Christensen moved that the meet-
ing be adjourned. Motion was seconded
by Ross Block and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
ATTEST:
Eileen C. Stolley
Business Manager
[Published February 28, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $21.13]
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
February 28, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Kadoka Press
CLASSIFIED
AD POLICY
Please read your
classified ad the first
week it runs.
If you see an error,
we will gladly rerun
your ad correctly.
We accept responsibility
for the first incorrect
insertion only.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
requests that all
classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid
for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is not
paid at the time the
order is place.
Payment by cash,
check or credit card
is accepted.
AUCTIONS
ESTATE ABSOLUTE REAL ESTATE
AUCTION: 2005 tillable & 4669 pas-
ture, contiguous, offered in tracts,
north of Faith SD, Hunting, March
25, www.PiroutekAuction.com, 605-
544-3316.
EMPLOYMENT
Mobridge Police Department has
opening for a FT E1911. Application
may be requested or picked up at
Mobridge Police Department or on-
line at www.mobridgepolice.org. Ap-
plication Deadline is Friday, March
8th, 2013.
COORDINATOR P/T: Locate and
screen host families, provide support
and activities for exchange students.
Make friends worldwide! www.as-
pectfoundation.org.
JD PRORATE AND BOOKKEEPING
is looking for a CPA. We specialize in
transportation and oil field related
services. Salary $65-4110k DOQ.
605-553-2080 applicant@jdfinan-
cials.com.
CENEX OF ELLENDALE, ND is
seeking a qualified CEO / General
Manager. This is an agronomy, en-
ergy, and auto parts operation with
sales of $20 Million. A strong back-
ground in finance, communication,
and personnel management is de-
sired. Ag Business degree and or ag
business management experience
preferred Send, email, or fax (888-
653-5527) resume to: Larry Fuller,
5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND
58503, larry.fuller@chsinc.com.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
Custer Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care in beautiful Custer, SD,
have full time and PRN (as-needed)
RN, LPN and Licensed Medical As-
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
sistant positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome!
Please contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for more in-
formation or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
OIL FIELD GENERAL LABORER
$15-$22 hourly. Double your current
paycheck! We will train you and
place you. sd@armcorp.biz 605/906-
0544.
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST OPEN-
ING for Northwest Area Schools Ed-
ucation Cooperative in NW South
Dakota. Competitive wage, excellent
benefits, vehicle provided. Contact
Cris Owens at 605-466-2206 or
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
WANTED: FULL TIME WAITRESS
for busy little cafe in Faith, SD, Ex-
perience preferred. Call Branding
Iron Inn 605-967-2662, ask for Tim
or Deb.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
DRIVERS $1000 SIGN-ON BONUS.
New Pay Program! *Earn up to 50
CPM *Home Weekly *Excellent
miles, $50 tarp pay. Must be Cana-
dian eligible (888) 691-5705.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery. 50x80,
62x100, 68x120, 68x200, 100x200.
Take advantage of tax deductions.
Limited Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-
7040.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
March 1-2-3-4:
Warm Bodies
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
March 8-9-10-11:
Identity Thief (R)
RELP WAN1E0
1here wì|| be an openìng at our
KA00KA PPL55 offìce
for a permanent part-tìme
posìtìon. 0utìes wì|| vary.
Ior app|ìcatìon, ca|| 859-2516
or send resumé to:
don©pìoneer-revìew.com
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
vehicle maintenance!
Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
Mechanic
Shop!
J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
Kt-ta|e t 0¿ea h|: N|¿\t
F-|tes
laaá
laa!!
Saturday, March 2nd
9 p.m. to Closing
0ame test yaa- »a:t| :\a-ás!
ksrsts|st far
la|tr|sr
äart ||t 0a|t: lsaa¡ |ar|ssa Mtmsr|a| lss|
Isaraamta|, äa|ar1a¡, 1çr|| ä||
HELP WANTED: Head housekeep-
ing, full time position. Flexible hours,
competative wages, available imme-
diately. See Ken or Cindy at Rode-
way Inn, Kadoka. 837-2287.
KP33-2tc
WANTED: Photos, information, fam-
ily stories of people/places, 1900-
2000, for book about Weta
community. Contact Mary Lewis,
993-6152; e-mail: lewis@gwtc.net
K33-2tp
FOR SALE: 7 bedrooms, 3 bath,
large basement, 2 fireplaces, at-
tached garage. Could be separated
and used as a 2 bed, 1 bath rental.
$56,000 firm. Kadoka. 605-488-
0846. KP32-3tp
OPEN POSITION: Kadoka Area
School District is looking for a full-
time Special Education Paraprofes-
sional. Non-certified applications
can be obtained from the school or
on the school district’s website;
kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please feel free
to contact the school with further
questions about this position. Com-
pleted applications may be dropped
off at the school or send it to: Attn:
Jeffery M. Nemecek, Elementary
Principal, PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD
57543 or call 1-605-837-2175. EOE
KP32-3tc
NEED A PLUMBER? Call Dale at
605-441-1053 or leave a message
at home 605-837-0112. K31-4tp
PASTURE WANTED: Summer
pasture for 100-250 cow/calf pairs
preferably in the Jackson/Haakon
/Jones county area, but would con-
sider other areas. With full mainte-
nance. Call 605-843-2869.
KP29-tfn
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................23-9
Shad’s Towing...............................NA
Dakota Bar................................20-12
Petersen’s......................................NA
Badland’s Auto..........................10-18
Rockers........................................9-23
Hightlights:
Carl Brown.3-10 split; 220 clean/551
Gail Reutter ..........................208/534
Jerry Mooney ........................217/550
Matt Reckling...............................213
Marlis Petersen.....................197/520
Trina Brown..........................181/503
Wendell Buxcel ......2-7 & 4-5-7 splits
Tena Slovek ..........................5-7 split
Jason Petersen ....................4-9 splilt
Connie Schlim......................2-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ......................9-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor................................22-2
Peoples Market ...........................17-7
G&A Trenching.........................12-12
Kennedy Impl............................11-13
Bear Auto ..................................11-13
Philip Health Service ...............10-14
George’s Welding ........................8-16
Kadoka Tree Service...................5-19
Highlights:
Ronnie Williams ..8-9 split; 215, 211,
...............................................201/627
Bryan Buxcel.........................213/573
Randy Boyd...........................206/554
Ryan Seager.......................3-10 split;
.....................................208 clean/546
Cory Boyd.....................................533
Tyler Hauk ............................202/531
Todd Radway................................531
Earl Park......................................523
Coddy Gartner ......................252/517
Steve Varner.................................511
Alvin Pearson...............................508
Bill Bainbridge.............................506
Ed Morrison........................3-10 split
Pat Berkimer...................6-7-10 split
Wendell Buxcel ...................3-10 split
Jim Larson..........................3-10 split
Jason Sampson..................5-7-9 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
(standing at the end of week 24)
Invisibles.............................25.5-10.5
Cutting Edge Salon...................25-11
State Farm..........................22.5-13.5
Bowling Belles ....................15.5-20.5
Jolly Ranchers.....................11.5-24.5
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........190, 183, 153/526
Dody Weller...........181, 178, 150/509
Charlene Kjerstad.................169/449
Sandra O’Connor ..................182/425
Judy Papousek ...................3-10 split
Joy Neville............................7-2 split
Cindy Wilmarth............5-10 split x 2
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................23-5
Morrison’s Haying ....................18-10
Hildebrand Concrete ................15-13
Wall Food Center ......................14-14
Dorothy’s Catering....................13-15
Just Tammy’s ............................11-17
Chiefie’s Chicks...........................9-19
First National Bank ...................9-19
Highlights:
Marlis Petersen...202, 227 clean/566
Brenda Grenz........................190/537
Amy Morrison .......................191/492
Kathy Arthur.........................190/513
Emily Kroetch .................3-5-10 split
Karen Iwan...........................5-7 split
Thursday Men’s
The Steakhouse ..........................23-5
O’Connell Const ..........................19-9
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................18-10
WEE BADD...............................13-15
Dakota Bar................................11-17
West River Pioneer Tanks ........11-17
A&M Laundry...........................10-18
McDonnell Farms .......................7-21
Highlights:
Doug Hauk ..................3-6-7-10 split;
.......................................211, 209/616
Ronnie Williams....................201/512
J.J. Walker............................2-7 split
Matt Schofield ............6-7-10, 5-10 &
.........................................5-6-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service................24-8
Lee & the Ladies.......................20-12
Cristi’s Crew .............................18-14
Roy’s Repair ..............................17-15
King Pins...................................14-18
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Randy Boyd...........................198/553
Cory Boyd..............................195/487
Alvin Pearson ........3-10 & 3-7 splits;
...............................................191/533
Annette Hand........................169/425
Roy Miller .............................3-7 split
Angel Nemec...........5-10 & 5-7 splits
Dorothy Hansen ...................2-7 split
Agricul ture …
February 28, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12.00 P.M.
(MT}
STOCK COWS:
BROST RANCH - 60 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20
HAROLD MILLER - 25 DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. CHAF; CLV. 4-1 FOF 60 DAYS
NURSE COW:
MARTHA HALL - 1 HOLST JEFSEY X 1ST CLF HFF; DFED.
HEFF; CLV. 3-5
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FE-
PLACEMENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CE-
NETIC DULL SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M.
MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00
P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: F£B. J9, 2DJS
B1g run o] oo111e ]or our Speo1o1 So1e.
Huge oroud o] peop1e. Feeders s1rong,
1o1s o] bugers. We1gÞ-up oo111e Þ1gÞer.
DEEP CREEK ANGUS - MIDLAND
34...................................................YFLCS ¸ $6294
4 ..............................................2 YF OLDS ¸ $4938
38 ..............................................OVEFALL ¸ $6151
MILLAR ANGUS - STURGIS
78...................................................YFLCS ¸ $5308
10 ............................................2 YF OLDS ¸ $5350
88 ..............................................OVEFALL ¸ $5313
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIUS - VALE
79 .........................DWF FEPL HFFS 781= .$1275/HD
48..........................DLK FEPL HFFS 803= .$1100/HD
JUDY & STEVE DALY - MIDLAND
70..........................DLK FEPL HFFS 662= .$1075/HD
FEEDER CATTLE:
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
75 ............................FED HFFS 783=...........$155.00
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
39............................DWF HFFS 694=...........$150.00
16...........................HEFF HFFS 563=...........$158.00
JERRY LANE JOHNSTON- INTERIOR
42...................FED & DLK STFS 558=...........$160.00
9 ....................DLK & DWF STFS 486=...........$177.00
38.............................DLK HFFS 539=...........$157.25
6 ..............................DLK HFFS 525=...........$152.00
HJORT & BRUCH - RAPID CITY
104................DLK & DWF HFFS 553=...........$153.75
15.............................DLK HFFS 456=...........$163.00
MARK & KAREN FOLAND - MIDLAND
34..................DLK & DWF HFFS 572=...........$148.00
26..................DLK & DWF HFFS 468=...........$162.50
HORTON RANCH - WALL
58.............................DLK STFS 710=...........$145.00
73.............................DLK STFS 779=...........$138.00
50.............................DLK HFFS 694=...........$140.25
NIXON RANCH - PHILIP
35..................DLK & DWF HFFS 552=...........$152.25
KARL SCHUL2 - PHILIP
94..................DLK & DWF HFFS 607=...........$144.00
9....................DLK & DWF HFFS 478=...........$158.00
BYRON & MONTE DENKE - QUINN
60.............................DLK HFFS 709=...........$140.50
DIAMOND S LLC - UNION CENTER
43 ..................DLK & DWF STFS 622=...........$159.75
55..................DLK & DWF HFFS 564=...........$151.00
12 ..................FED & DLK HFFS 504=...........$157.00
SHAW RANCH INC. - WHITE OWL
84.............................DLK HFFS 622=...........$140.75
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
66.............................DLK STFS 878=...........$131.25
MARTY WILLIAMS - WALL
125...........................DLK STFS 947=...........$128.75
62.............................DLK STFS 959=...........$129.00
62.............................DLK STFS 910=...........$129.00
36.............................DLK STFS 960=...........$128.00
70.............................DLK HFFS 875=...........$125.25
74.............................DLK HFFS 789=...........$126.50
C & T CATTLE - MIDLAND
19.............................DLK HFFS 808=...........$126.85
LLOYD FREIN - PHILIP
43 .........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 953=...........$127.85
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
92..................DLK & DWF HFFS 650=...........$137.50
16.............................DLK HFFS 605=...........$142.50
A CONSIGNMENT -
75.............................DLK HFFS 633=...........$141.00
MINT2LAFF RANCH - HERMOSA
30.............................DLK STFS 610=...........$160.00
82.............................DLK STFS 724=...........$146.75
81.............................DLK HFFS 655=...........$138.50
GENE FORTUNE - INTERIOR
39.............................DLK STFS 638=...........$151.50
73.............................DLK HFFS 648=...........$136.25
DARRELL ENNEN - RAPID CITY
76.............................DLK HFFS 712=...........$134.75
MARLIN & LINDA BRINK - UNION CENTER
57.............................DLK HFFS 698=...........$134.00
5 ..............................DLK HFFS 587=...........$146.00
JAMES GOOD - MARTIN
54..................DLK & DWF HFFS 645=...........$136.00
TOM WILLIAMS - PHILIP
35 ..................DLK & DWF STFS 738=...........$139.00
BURT DARTT - WALL
10.............................DLK HFFS 767=...........$131.00
NICK CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
14..................DLK & DWF HFFS 653=...........$133.50
18..................DLK & DWF HFFS 551=...........$147.00
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO - PHILIP
39 ..................DLK & DWF STFS 696=...........$133.00
10 .........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 701=...........$129.25
25 .........DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 565=...........$155.00
45.........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 598=...........$141.25
9...........DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 479=...........$148.00
BEARPAW RANCH - FT. PIERRE
85 ..................FED & DLK HFFS 717=...........$131.75
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
37.............................FED STFS 566=...........$159.50
6...............................FED STFS 488=...........$172.00
6..............................FED HFFS 483=...........$154.00
DEVRIES & PROKOP - KADOKA
27..................DLK & DWF HFFS 507=...........$157.00
6 ..............................DLK HFFS 460=...........$157.50
LYNN MILLER - FAITH
27.................CHAF & DLK STFS 675=...........$140.00
7...............................DLK STFS 580=...........$156.00
56.................CHAF & DLK HFFS 640=...........$136.75
5 ..................CHAF & DLK HFFS 503=...........$143.00
TRAVIS & TY THOMPSON - WANBLEE
9...............................DLK STFS 628=...........$152.50
2...............................DLK STFS 455=...........$177.00
3 ..............................DLK HFFS 418=...........$157.50
LIVERMONT BROTHERS - WANBLEE
11.............................DLK STFS 463=...........$181.00
11.............................DLK HFFS 575=...........$149.00
REX GILLES - RED OWL
6...............................DLK STFS 628=...........$150.50
3 ..............................DLK HFFS 563=...........$149.50
JOEL KAMMERER - PHILIP
7 ....................DLK & DWF STFS 721=...........$139.50
BROOK LOOBEY - WHITEWOOD
12 ............................FED HFFS 693=...........$136.50
MIKE HENRY - EDGEMONT
6....................DLK & DWF HFFS 631=...........$140.00
ROGER LARSON - MURDO
13 ..................DLK & DWF STFS 635=...........$141.00
JAN BIELMAIER - WALL
11.............................DLK STFS 739=...........$134.25
WEIGH-UPS:
KADE BONENBERGER - KADOKA
1 ...............................DLK COW 1360=...........$89.50
BART & JANICE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 ..............................FED DULL 1785=.........$109.00
2..............................DLK COWS 1303=...........$84.25
MARC SCARBOROUGH - HAYES
1..........................X DFED COW 1380=...........$88.00
1 .............................CHAF COW 1430=...........$87.00
1..........................X DFED COW 1475=...........$85.00
1 .............................CHAF COW 1400=...........$84.50
1 ...............................DLK COW 1375=...........$83.00
8 .......................DLK COWETTES 1063=...........$92.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1...............................DLK DULL 2060=.........$108.00
FORREST STEWART - CODY, NE
1 ...............................DLK COW 1235=...........$86.50
COREY SMITH - MILESVILLE
1...............................FED COW 1415=...........$85.50
3 ...................FED & DLK COWS 1148=...........$82.75
MARK & KAREN FOLAND - MIDLAND
1 ...............................DLK COW 1625=...........$85.00
ROBERT YOUNG, SR. - UNION CENTER
1...............................FWF COW 1395=...........$84.50
EARL PARSONS - MILESVILLE
1 ..............................FED DULL 1785=.........$109.00
1 ...............................DLK COW 1665=...........$80.50
BRUCE JENSEN - OWANKA
1 ...............................DLK COW 1130=...........$84.00
1...............................DWF COW 1415=...........$81.00
1 ...............................DLK COW 1480=...........$78.00
JERRY HAMMERQUIST - CAPUTA
1.........................DLK COWETTE 1190=...........$91.00
2..............................DLK COWS 1698=...........$81.00
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
1...............................DLK DULL 1730=.........$106.00
2 .............................DLK DULLS 2010=.........$103.00
BRETT & NIKKI BONENBERGER - BELVIDERE
1...............................DWF COW 1125=...........$84.00
ROBERT THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
3..............................DLK COWS 1288=...........$83.75
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO - PHILIP
2..............................DLK COWS 1345=...........$83.50
1...............................DWF COW 1150=...........$81.00
VANCE MARTIN - MIDLAND
1 ...............................DLK COW 1635=...........$83.00
MIKE LEHRKAMP - CAPUTA
1...............................DLK DULL 2200=.........$104.50
1 ...............................DLK COW 1225=...........$82.50
DALE JARMAN - MIDLAND
3 ...................FED & DLK COWS 1347=...........$82.00
BEN & WANDA KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
1 ...............................DLK COW 1295=...........$82.00
3..............................DLK COWS 1643=...........$81.75
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
1...............................DLK DULL 2190=.........$103.00
TYSON GUNN - WASTA
1...............................DLK DULL 1985=.........$102.50
SHAWN FREELAND - CAPUTA
2...............................FED COW 1280=...........$81.75
1...............................DWF COW 1530=...........$81.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
1 ...............................DLK COW 1425=...........$81.50
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
2.............................DLK HFFTS 920=...........$105.00
KIETH SMITH - QUINN
1...............................DWF COW 1375=...........$81.50
WILSON BROTHERS - ELM SPRINGS
1 ...............................DLK COW 1295=...........$81.50
JW CATTLE CO. - BELVIDERE
1 ...............................DLK COW 1525=...........$81.00
W O WELLER - KADOKA
1 ...............................DLK COW 1465=...........$81.00
AUDREY WIESER - WASTA
1 ...............................DLK COW 1385=...........$81.00
1 ..............................DLK HFFT 905=...........$102.00
BILL SLOVEK - PHILIP
6..............................DLK COWS 1628=...........$80.00
JOE STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ...............................DLK COW 1720=...........$79.00
DON & DELORIS POSS - PHILIP
1 ...............................DLK COW 1460=...........$78.50
KEITH HAM - CAPUTA
2.......................FED COWETTES 1078=...........$92.00
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
RH CATTLE
SELLING
TUESDAY,
MARCH 12
AT 12:00 P.M.
(MT)
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Evaluating Your
Winter Wheat Stand
There has been considerable in-
terest in the condition of the win-
ter wheat crop in South Dakota
during this winter of 2012-13.
Much of the crop was planted into
dry soil, and a substantial percent-
age didn’t germinate before cold
weather arrived, with even less
emerging. Winter wheat plants
that sprout and do not establish a
crown and two to three tillers will
not be as winter hardy as plants
that did. However, it is not well
known how much less winter
hardy they are.
With adequate moisture, wheat
seeds germinate (and winter
wheat plants break dormancy) at
temperatures of 39 degrees F or
higher. With soil temperatures at
the 2” and 4” depth hovering at or
near 32 degrees F at most of the
South Dakota Automatic Weather
Data Network (AWDN) stations, it
may be a few weeks before produc-
ers will be able to accurately as-
sess winter wheat survival.
Historically, soil temperatures at
most AWDN stations don’t reach
temperatures in the upper 30’s
until mid to late March.
If interested, producers can run
the “bag test”, explained on page
40 of Chapter 4, “Winter Wheat
Planting Guide” of “iGrow Wheat:
Best Management Practices for
Wheat Production:
http://igrow.org/up/resources/05-
1001-04-2012.pdf to provide an
early indication of winter survival.
As the chapter states, “If informa-
tion is not required immediately,
the best way to assess winterkill is
to wait until plant growth com-
mences. It is quite difficult to get a
“field wide” picture of winter
wheat survival by running the
“bag test” as you are only evaluat-
ing a small sample.
Once you are able to accurately
assess winter survival, or what
kind of stand you have remaining
in the spring, you will need to de-
cide whether to leave the stand or
destroy it and plant another crop.
There are three components of
yield; number of heads per unit
area, kernels per head, and kernel
weight. The dominant component
in less than optimum stands is
number of heads per unit area.
The plant population needed to op-
timize yields for most conditions in
South Dakota is considered to be
about 14-15 plants/sq ft. Lower
populations can be managed to
produce profitable yields if the
stand is relatively uniform across
the field. Stands as low as 5
plants/sq ft can produce nearly
70% of maximum yield, and some
areas of the field may have higher
densities, increasing the potential.
Before destroying a winter wheat
field, contact your crop insurance
agent. A field must be released be-
fore pursuing other cropping op-
tions or crop insurance coverage
would be voided.
Producers should not inter-seed
spring wheat into winter wheat as
this would result in mixed wheat
at harvest and result in marketing
problems and almost certain price
reduction.
If producers determine that
they have an adequate winter
wheat stand to keep, but less than
ideal, they should apply nitrogen
early to enhance tillering. Nitro-
gen should be applied as soon as
the plants break dormancy, or as
soon as the soil is not frozen. It is
also important to pay close atten-
tion to weed management as
weeds will be more competitive in
a thin stand.
Calendar
3/1/2013: Crop & Livestock
Workshop, 1:00 p.m., Jones
County Courthouse, Murdo, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
The South Dakota Department
of Agriculture is seeking nomina-
tions for the South Dakota Gover-
nor’s Ag Ambassador Award.
Nominees should be those who
have continually worked to pro-
mote agriculture in South Dakota.
The individual or organization
nominated must possess:
•Strong ties to agriculture in
South Dakota
•Leadership skills in agricul-
ture
•An emphasis on education
through campaigns or programs,
and
•Focus on pro-active agriculture
policies and practices
Nominations are due to SDDA
by April 1 and can be found at
http://sdda.sd.gov/education-out-
reach/ag-ambassador-award/ . The
award will be presented during the
Governor’s Ag Development Sum-
mit in Pierre on June 26.
The 2012 Governor’s Ag Ambas-
sador was Jim Woster of Sioux
Falls. For years, Woster has been a
cattleman, media personality, phi-
lanthropist and spokesman for
agricultural interests.
Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, generating over $21
billion in annual economic activity
and employing more than 122,000
South Dakotans. The South
Dakota Department of Agricul-
ture's mission is to promote, pro-
tect, preserve and improve this
industry for today and tomorrow.
Visit us online at http://sdda.sd.gov
or find us on Facebook and Twitter.
Ag Ambassador
nominations sought
This is Trooper
Jason Hamar
with the
South Dakota
Highway Patrol
reminding you that
seat belts and
child safety restraints
save lives and
prevent injuries.
That’s why it’s
important to buckle up
little ones every time
you travel.
And be sure you
are buckled up too.
Let’s
Buckle
up
America!

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