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Kadoka Press, February 21, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 31
February 21, 2013
The Kadoka Area School Board,
City of Kadoka, Town of Belvidere
and Interior have announced terms
which are soon to expire.
Kadoka Area School Board
All are 3-year terms
Ken Lensegrav
Dawn Rasmussen
Dan VanderMay
City of Kadoka
Mayor (2-year term)
Harry Weller
Ward I (2-year term)
Richard Stolley
Ward II (1-year term)
Vacant
(2-year term)
L. Kieth Prang
Ward III (2-year term)
Ryan Willert
Town of Belvidere
Rudy Reimann
2 years left of a 3-year term
John L. Rodgers
3-year term
Town of Interior
Sue Leach
Circulation of nominating peti-
tions began on January 25, 2013
and must be filed in the respective
offices between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m., mountain stan-
dard time, not later than the 22nd
day of February, 2013, at 5:00 p.m.,
or mailed by registered mail not
later than the 22nd day of Febru-
ary, 2013.
Nominating
petitions
News Briefs …
Free Federal Tax return
preparation is available at the
Jackson County Library,
Kadoka. Returns for low and
middle income taxpayers of all
ages are prepared. Call Deb
Moor 837-2689 at the library
for an appointment, or Bob Mc-
Daniel 605-859-2227 (Philip)
for information.
Girls’ Basketball District
Tournament championship
game will be held in Kadoka on
Thursday, February 21 at 6:00
p.m. The Regional Tournament
will be Tuesday, February 26,
TBA.
Boys’ Basketball District
Tournament at Lyman, Feb-
ruary 25, 29 and March 1.
Preschool students went to the post
office to mail their valentines to
their parents. Miss Nancy showed
them where their boxes were and
each student got to mail their own
valentine. Miss Nancy showed
them how to cancel the stamps,
looked at stamps and saw where
the mail comes in to the post office.
They took a picture with her inside
before checking the outside postal
box. Then they helped Miss Nancy
put up the American Flag.
Preschoolers mail valentines
officials, congressional staff & del-
egates, political groups
Built: telecommunications, util-
ities, industrial parks, businesses
Power vs. Interest
We should involve people with
varying levels of power and inter-
est. Three quadrants of this grid
are likely to yield productive new
members. Low power/low interest
is not worth the effort of recruit-
ment.
Power
High Power/Low Interest
High Power/High Interest
Interest
Low Power/High Interest
Group Formation Dynamic:
Not all groups are the same,
however, nearly all follow this pat-
tern. All of these phases are all nec-
essary and inevitable for the team
to grow, to face challenges, to tackle
problems, to find solutions, to plan
work and to deliver results. Per-
forming is the phase where groups
become confident, their energy is
channeled, they are comfortable
with new challenges, disputes are
handled easily resolved and goals
are achieved!
Small groups were formed by
connecting with people who had op-
posite interests than your own.
Those groups worked at communi-
cation skills while discussing a
meeting they attended where the
group appeared to be in the “storm-
ing” stage. The characteristics of a
great team were examined that
could lead to “norming” and “per-
forming.”
Overcoming Barriers
to Recruitment:
Small groups worked on answer-
ing questions about barriers, and
developing a call to action that a
team from Kadoka is putting to-
gether in a final product.
Develop a Call to Action:
Small groups came up with spe-
cific names of people to ask to be in-
volved in SET. They divided up the
names so each person had contacts
to make. Reasons for involvement
will be put into the call for action.
• Our region is facing declining
populations, fewer jobs, housing
shortages, aging residents, youth
outmigration and economic insta-
bility.
• We are coming together as a
part of the SET program to find so-
lutions to these issues. Our team
includes a diverse group of people
with access to many resources. But,
we also need the talents and net-
works others can bring to the table.
• We cannot continue to watch
these factors get worse. We must
act now for results in the next 1-5
years. Many impacts will last far
beyond 5 years.
• We believe our efforts will pos-
itively impact all residents of the
region; specifically small busi-
nesses. We also feel we can impact
our regions overall economic stabil-
ity and job growth which will en-
courage our population to live here,
work here, raise their family here
and retire here.
Horseshoe River Case Study
The group read through a case
study about a collaboration that
had some initial success, but began
to lose momentum. Small groups
came up with ways to avoid that
situation, and to manage the con-
cerns of multiple groups.
7 Habits of Effective
Regional Leadership:
1) Be proactive
2) Begin with the end in mind
3) Seek first to understand then
to be understood
4) Put first things first
5) Think win-win, be inclusive
6) Synergize
7) Sharpen the saw by measur-
ing performance (change the ap-
proach/sharpen the saw if
necessary)
Next Module: Developing Our
Vision and Goals
• March 12, 2013, Open Bible
Church, Midland, 4:45 p.m. tenta-
tive tour of Stroppel Inn and Bath-
house, followed by a light supper.
5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Session 4.
Homework Assignment:
• Kadoka team develops Call to
Action.
• Individual contacts made from
lists developed. Encourage new
people to attend Module 4.
• Give some thought to a re-
gional vision.
Badlands/Bad River Region
Module 3 Highlights: 2/12/13
SET Purpose & Need:
Help rural communities/coun-
ties to work together as a regional
team in developing and implement-
ing an economic development blue-
print that builds on the current
and emerging economic strengths
of their region. Creating, attracting
and retaining jobs as a single rural
county in isolation is becoming in-
creasing ineffective. Economic de-
velopment progress is more likely
to be realized when rural counties
work together as a region to assess,
design and implement plans that
build on their comparative eco-
nomic strengths.
Website for additional informa-
tion as well as curriculum:
http://srdc.msstate.edu/set/phase3.
html
Progress:
The program was launched in
2010 and thus far two phases have
been completed in 19 states and 40
regions. Phase III includes seven
additional states; Georgia, Nevada,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South
Carolina, Virginia and South
Dakota.
The SET program is ACTION
oriented. Each step in the process
increases the likelihood of ultimate
plan achievement.
Nine SET Modules:
Delivered Monthly
• SET Introduction-Completed
• Profiling Your Region-Com-
pleted
• Building A Strong Regional
Team
• Developing Your Vision &
Goals - TDB late February 2013
• Exploring Opportunities for a
Stronger Regional Economy
• Exploring Strategies for En-
hancing the Regional Economy
• Discovering Assets & Barriers
• Planning for Success
• Measuring Success
• *Optional Modules: Land Use
and Planning, Entrepreneurship,
Technology/Networking, others…
Attributes of A Strong
Regional Team:
• Prepares for obstacles
• Assess group composition
• Engages more partners
• Promotes action
• Advocates
Community Capitals:
Each of the capitals represents
assets within our region. We used
this framework to help us identify
people representing these capitals
who we should ask to be involved
in the SET process.
Financial: banks, endowments,
community funds, funding agencies
Natural: parks and recreation,
conservation groups, government
agencies, farmers and ranchers
Cultural: cultural & religious
groups, museums, historical soci-
eties
Human: facilitators, educators,
trainers, workforce groups, service
agencies, economic developers,
board members
Social: civic clubs & organiza-
tions, “people who know people”,
people with links to outside re-
sources
Political: elected & appointed
SET meeting  … Ryan Willert (L), Kent Buchholtz, Philip, and
Patty Groven working in a small group on communication issues.
SD - Stronger Economies Together (SET)
Badlands/Bad River Region
Joe Iwan is horseback. The guy on the fence is unknown.
In this week’s Lookin’ Around
writing them down so you can re-
view and reflect when you’re feel-
ing down and need to renew your
confidence.
6. Get the support you need to
succeed. Join a weight-loss support
group which can help you to stay
on track to accomplish your well-
ness goals. Fellow members will
help keep you motivated.
7. Make a list of your positive
qualities. Are you generous? Kind?
Write down at least ten positive
qualities about yourself and return
to this list as often as needed to
boost your morale.
8. Find something special in
each day. Even if it’s in a small way,
do something pleasant and reward-
ing, like catching up on your fa-
vorite television show, taking a
walk to the park, or indulging in a
bubble bath. Or treat yourself to
something small that isn’t a food or
beverage, like a manicure or a new
piece of costume jewelry.
9. Eat better. Pay attention to
your food choices and nourish your
body. Buy healthier foods and pre-
pare well-balanced meals that will
help give you energy and feel like
your best self – not sluggish and
overstuffed.
10. Explore a passion. Whether
it’s a side job, hobby, or as a volun-
teer, pursuing your passion in even
a small way can lead to a sense of
purpose and significantly improve
your overall happiness and quality
of life.
February is International Boost
Self-Esteem Month. Winter dol-
drums can get the best of anyone,
and this annual observation is a
timely opportunity to focus on cul-
tivating feelings of self-respect.
1. Stop comparing yourself to
others. Trying to live up to or ex-
ceed someone else’s personal best is
a losing game. As the saying goes,
“How boring would it be if we were
all the same?” Focus on being the
best you that you can be.
2. Compliment yourself regu-
larly, either by looking in the mir-
ror and saying something you like
about yourself or writing it in a
journal. Many times, we’re quick to
compliment others on their success
but hesitate to do the same for our-
selves.
3. Exercise consistently, at least
30 minutes of exercise several
times a week, to strengthen mus-
cles and to burn calories. Improve
your physical strength, and you
may feel a sense of empowerment
that can dramatically enhance
your self-esteem.
4. Simply smile. The mere act of
smiling changes blood flow to the
brain and can actually makes you
feel happier and relieve tension. A
smile sets off chemical and physical
reactions within your mind and
body, releasing endorphins that
boost your mood.
5. Focus on your accomplish-
ments. Forgive yourself for mis-
takes and focus on the positive by
celebrating your victories. Consider
Ten ways to boost
your self esteem
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
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and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
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South Dakota Newspaper Association
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Church Page …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
E-mail your
news and
photos
to the
Kadoka Press:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
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Kadoka Press, PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 • 605-837-2259
Joshua 1:8-9
The message of Joshua 1 was meant for all of God’s
children. Scripture’s timeless principles for spiritual
growth are as relevant to us as they were to the ancient
Jewish people. The Lord’s command to remain stead-
fast and courageous is still in effect, as is His promise to abide with us in all circumstances. Moreover, it
is still true that faith and courage develop in believers who meditate on God’s Word regularly.
Fear, the antithesis of courage, is born of disobedience to the Lord, unbelief in Him, and/or doubt about
His will or His ways. The weight and binding power of fear can drag a person down like shackles on a
prisoner. But Scripture contains truths, promises, and principles that break those chains.
Have you ever noticed how focusing your mind on the Word quiets your spirit? In that peaceful silence,
faith dissolves fear. God’s revelations about Himself in the Bible—namely, that He is good, sovereign,
and our loving Father—have a way of sharpening our perception about whatever we’re facing We can see
the true nature of a matter and it is not bigger than our God. As a result, we cast off the staggering weight
of our burdens and instead grow a deep-rooted confidence in the goodness and sovereignty of God. My
friends, that is the definition of courage.
God’s admonition to Joshua—“Be strong and courageous!” (Josh. 1:9)—is meant for modern believers
too. Like the Israelites, we battle strong enemies and face walls that must come down. Do not give in to
fear, but break its hold through the powerful words of Scripture, and live in confidence.
Where Courage Originates
Inspiration Point
Monday, February 25
Spaghetti with meatsauce,
green beans, tossed salad, french
bread, and mandarin oranges.
Tuesday, February 26
Roast beef with gravy, oven
roasted vegetables (potatoes, car-
rots, cabbage, etc.), bread and
peaches.
Wednesday, February 27
Ham and scalloped potatoes,
peas, vegetable gelatin salad, corn
bread, and orange sherbet.
Thursday, February 28
Oven fried chicken, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, harvard beets,
dinner roll, and apricots.
Friday, March 1
Chili, coleslaw, cinnamon roll,
and pears.
Meals for
the Elderly
prohibitive. After considerable de-
bate was heard it passed on to the
floor by a vote of 7 yeas and 6 nays.
I feel strongly that state wide
brand inspection would help with
the on going problem of livestock
being transported across the river
without proper documentation of
ownership and curb livestock
rustling. I argued that agriculture
is South Dakota’s number one in-
dustry and we need to look at all
possible steps to protect the live-
stock producer.
HB 1187 also was to provide al-
ternative brand inspection proce-
dures for certain rodeo livestock.
This bill was brought to the com-
mittee by Rep. Heinert. It would
put in place a permanent brand in-
spection for rodeo company’s that
are moving livestock to different
areas of the state on a regular
basis. It passed out of committee
with 13 yeas and 0 nays.
This week we were entertained
with a banquet by the Independent
Community Bankers of South
Dakota Association. I have to say
that the information I came away
with was enlightening to say the
least. I want to leave you with
some facts that I’m sure many peo-
ple are not aware off. Thirty-nine %
is the effective tax rate of most
South Dakota Banks, 2.32% is the
effective tax rate of Farm Credit
Services in South Dakota, 0.00% is
the effective tax rate of all SD Fed-
eral Credit Unions, $89,386,262 is
the total income of Credit Union’s
and Farm Credit Services in 2011,
$21,735,593 is what the SD Gen-
eral Fund did not receive over the
last 6 years from not collecting the
6% Bank Franchise Tax from
Credit Unions and Farm Credit
Services. As regulations bears
down on community banks and
small towns lose access to financial
services I have to wonder why Con-
gress continue’s to allow expansion
of tax exempt entities at the ex-
pense of the taxpayers. As these en-
tities expand tax revenue coming
into the state general fund will con-
tinue to decline which will directly
effect our schools, roads and gov-
ernment services.
As always you can contact me at
the House Chamber number 773-
3851. Leave a phone number and
I’ll call you back. The fax number
is 773-6806. If you send a fax, ad-
dress it to Rep. Elizabeth May. You
can also email me at
rep.may@state.sd.us during ses-
sion. You can keep track of bills and
committee meetings at this link:
http://legis.state.sd.us/ You can also
use this link to find the legislators,
see what committees they are on,
read all the bills and track the sta-
tus of each bill, listen to committee
hearings, and contact the legisla-
tors.
Well another busy week! Due to
the snow storm Monday session
was cancelled and we met on Fri-
day for a make-up day.
HB 1151 extended the general
immunity from liability for direc-
tors and officers of certain non-
profit fire and ambulance
departments and to limit certain
actions for personal injury or
death. This bill will ensures our
local voluntary firemen and EMT
providers will not be held responsi-
ble for accidents going to emergen-
cies in private vehicle.
HB 1128 was brought to the
floor to allow home school students
the opportunity to participate in
the Opportunity Scholarship pro-
gram. After considerable debate on
the floor the bill did not pass with
a vote of 35 yeas and 35 nays.
South Dakota Non-Government
funded schools save taxpayers
$128,985,528 with 16,639 students
enrolled in over 97 non government
schools. The SD Dept of Education
expenditures per average daily
member, 2011-2012 school year
was a state-wide average cost per
student was $7,752 and this cost
does not include capital expendi-
tures and bond redemption. I voted
to pass HB 1128 feeling strongly
that all students are part of South
Dakota and saying other wise is
hypocritical.
HB 1135 was a highly con-
tentious bill that caused a lot of de-
bate on the floor. It regulates access
to and use of non-meandered wa-
ters on private property. SD Wild
Life Federation and the SD Game
Fish & Parks were highly opposed
to this bill. It is the result of flood-
ing in the Northeast part of the
state in the past few years. We
heard testimony from land owners
that corn fields were being dam-
aged by sportsmen and concerns
about the safety of their self and
private property was in question. I
confer with the V Amendment of
the US Constitution that reads,”
No person shall be deprived of life,
liberty, or property, without due
process of law; nor shall private
property be taken for public use,
without just compensation.” Had
the SD Wild Life Federaton or SD
Game Fish and Park asked for per-
mission to carry out hunting and
fishing on private property and al-
lowed compensation to the land
owner either through tax relief or
hunting fees I think this could of
been settled. The problem has been
on going for nine years with no ac-
tion. It passed the floor with a 37
yeas and 32 nays.
HB 1089 an act to require
statewide livestock ownership in-
spection was brought to the com-
mittee by Rep. Dean Schrempp. He
stated his ongoing concern with the
lack of inspections that are being
conducted. Currently there is no
brand inspection east river. Last
year there were only eleven inspec-
tions of livestock crossing the river
and eight inspections the year be-
fore. SD Dept of Agriculture,
NCBA, Farm Bureau and SD Live-
stock Markets all came out in oppo-
sition to this bill stating it was cost
From Representive Liz May
of our state, we have already seen
some of our best and brightest
teachers go there, whether they are
new college grads or experienced
teachers. Even the statistics gath-
ered which adjust for cost of living
differences still put SD at the very
bottom when compared to our
neighbors. As more of our teaching
workforce nears retirement, how
much longer can we really afford to
continue with business as usual?
Any piece of legislation which
requires an appropriation of funds
must go through the Appropria-
tions Committee. Issues may first
be heard for testimony and policy
considerations in another commit-
tee, but eventually makes their
way to Appropriations when any
tax dollars are attached. In the
case of school funding, often these
bills go to the House or Senate Ed-
ucation Committees and then are
referred to Appropriations. The day
I attended this committee, Feb.
13th, the Senate Appropriations
Committee listened to six different
school funding bills. All bills are
being deferred to a later date as
Appropriators await the revenue
estimates which are scheduled to
be presented by the SD Depart-
ment of Revenue during the last
week of February. Day after day,
the Appropriators hear requests for
money from the General Fund, and
must eventually make recommen-
dations to the House and Senate as
to where we place our priorities.
Every project in the state wants
money for a wide variety of proj-
ects. Will we put our schools first in
line or wait until the very end of
the line and give them the left-
overs? Let’s hope this session we
can start to make up for the big
cuts we’ve taken in the past and
have yet to make up, even in part.
I invite you to contact me with
your questions and concerns on
these topics or any of interest to
you. I may be reached at 605-685-
4241 or Sen.Bradford@state.sd.us
It’s hard to believe but week six
of the SD 2013 Legislature has
ended with 24 days out of 38 day
Session completed. February 20
marks the cross-over day which is
the point in time where all bills
must be completed in their House
of Origin and travel to the other
legislative body. We have very full
agendas both in committees and on
the floor as this deadline quickly
approaches.
I serve on the Senate Health and
Judiciary Committees but I also
spent most of one morning this
week listening to the Senate Appro-
priations Committee. They were
scheduled to hear a wide variety of
bills on school funding and I’m al-
ways interested in that discussion.
I thought I’d use this week’s col-
umn to share some information on
this vital topic.
The good news for SD schools is
that they continue to grow. This
school year, there were 1,700 more
students than last year. Next
school year (2013-14) we are pro-
jected to grow by another 1,600 stu-
dents. The challenge that growth
imposes affects both local school
districts and state government as
we attempt to direct resources to-
wards our schools. Some schools,
especially in more remote rural
areas, would love to have this
“problem” as they are more likely
to see declining enrollment.
School funding is certainly my
top priority as a legislator. Unfor-
tunately, this important decision is
typically made towards the very
end of the session. We know that
schools are struggling to make up
for the budget cuts of past years.
You’ve heard many of the numbers
before. We are dead last in average
teacher salary. Perhaps even worse
news is that the gap behind # 49
(North Dakota) continues to widen.
ND’s average teacher now makes
close to $7,000 more than the aver-
age SD teacher. Wyoming does
even better and in the western part
From Senator Jim Bradford
Hans E. Hanson_________________
Hans E. Hanson, age 91 of
Philip, S.D., died Friday, February
15, 2013, at the Philip Nursing
Home.
Hans E. Hanson was born No-
vember 17, 1921, in Mt. Vernon,
the son of Martin and Lizzie Han-
son. He grew up on a farm near
Mt. Vernon and attended rural
schools, prior to graduating from
Mt. Vernon High School in 1939.
Hans was united in marriage to
Velma P. Lorang on June 8, 1941,
in Las Vegas, Nev. They made
their home in Burbank, Calif.,
where their first child, Sharon,
was born. Later, Hans entered the
U. S. Army and served in the Pa-
cific during World War II. During
that period, Velma and Sharon
moved back to Mt. Vernon and
lived with Hans’ mother until his
discharge from the Army. In 1946,
the family moved to Madison
where a son, Michael, was born.
Later, they moved to Mitchell, and
Hans operated a Standard Oil
bulk agency.
In October 1950, the family
moved to Philip. Subsequently, a
third child, Steven, was born in
Kadoka. In 1953, Hans and Velma
purchased the Ned Ronning City
Meat Market and Locker Plant
and, in 1960, they built and oper-
ated Hanson’s Super Valu until
their retirement in 1986.
Throughout his life in Philip,
Hans was a leading businessman
and active promoter of the Philip
community. Among Hans’ many
contributions were his service as
both president of the Haakon
School Board and Chamber of
Commerce. He also was famous for
organizing large community-based
pit barbeques. Hans was proud of
having played for the Mitchell
Kernels, a semi-pro baseball team,
and most of all for being a military
veteran. Most recently, he played a
founding leadership role in the es-
tablishment of the Philip Veteran’s
Living Memorial. Second only to
his family, was his love of golf,
hunting and fishing. Hans and
Velma were long serving members
of the First Lutheran Church in
Philip.
Hans was grateful for having
shared his life with a daughter,
Sharon Johnson, of Shawnee,
Okla.; two sons, Michael and his
wife, Shizuko, of Fairfax, Va., and
Steve and his wife, Paulette, of
Nashville, Tenn. He also is sur-
vived by five grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
Hans was preceded in death by
his loving wife, Velma; his parents;
13 brothers and sisters; his son-in-
law, Orrin Johnson; and his grand-
daughter Carrie’s husband, Chad
McCoy.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorials be directed to
the Philip Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
Services were held Tuesday,
February 19, at the American Le-
gion Hall in Philip, with Pastor
Frezil Westerlund officiaing.
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frein, pianist, and Elvera
Moos, vocalist. Ushers were Quinn
McCoy and Seth Johnson.
Pallbearers were Scott, Matthew
and Craig Johnson, Mark Hanson
and Logan McCoy. Honorary pall-
bearers were Hans’ granddaugh-
ter, Carrie McCoy, and his 11
great-grandchildren.
Military graveside services were
Wednesday, February 20, at the
Black Hills National Cemetery
near Sturgis.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
The oldest known lens was
found in the ruins of Nineveh
made from polished rock crystal.
Aristophanes the Greek mentions
in one of his plays, the use of such
a lens to burn holes in parchment,
while Pliny the physician used a
lens to cauterize wounds.
A thousand years later monks
started using "reading stones",
which were sliced off sections of
polished quartz spheres, and
sometime in the later half of the
1200s the monks put these reading
stones up on their noses and called
them spectacles.
It is no surprise that it was in
Venice, Italy where glassmaking
was (and still is) an art, that con-
vex reading or magnifying glasses
were refined.
About three hundred years later,
concave lenses were found to help
the near-sighted Pope Leo the
10th, who wore such spectacles to
aid him while hunting. It took just
about three hundred more years
for bifocals to be invented by
America's own Benjamin Franklin.
It was in the mid 1800s that a
protective lens was made that fit
directly over the eyeball of a man
who had lost his eyelid from skin
cancer. This first "contact lens"
protected his eye from drying out
and resulting blindness.
Over the next 150 years contact
lenses came into commercial use
and moved from blown, to ground,
to molded glass, and then to a
whole variety of hard then soft
plastic lenses.
And now the knowledge of re-
fracting light with lenses has
brought us to computer guided,
surgically altering the shape of the
eyeball and cornea with scalpels of
laser beams. Where will we go
next?
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
On the History of the
Development of Glasses
Bel videre News …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 381-2147
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Winter Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
We recently got a blast from the
past in the form of a letter from a
German fellow who visited here
some fifty years ago. The following
is what he wrote to the “Dear Iwan
Family.”
Looking through boxes and bun-
dles of paper, I came across the en-
closed letter which actually should
have reached you some 50 years
ago. As you can see from the enve-
lope, it traveled quite a bit around
the world before its final dispatch
now. It probably contains some
photographs.
Let me give you some back-
ground information. In 1961-62, I
spent a year studying at Cornell
University. Before returning to
Germany, I decided to tour your
country and Mexico. I had $250 of
my own, and, according to the doc-
tors at Cornell, being able to stand
cottage cheese, a loaf of white
bread, and one or two pints of milk
every day for about 120 days
should guarantee a healthy surviv-
ing. I hit the road at the beginning
of June 1962. Hitchhiking was the
means of my moving.
On June 14, I asked the driver
who gave me a ride to stop and
drop me at the junction of the road
from North Platte to the north. He
asked whether I was sure because
there would be “pretty much of not
much.” When I told him I would
not mind and that I wanted to see
the Sandhills region, he mentioned
that in about three days’ time he
would return on the same route,
and, if I was still around, he would
pick me up again. This was not
necessary. After a few hours, a re-
ally old vehicle stopped, picked me
up, and gave me a lift. When they
had to turn off west, I was alone
again, surrounded by low sand
dunes. For the next hours, the
heads of cattle appeared, ruminat-
ing, looking at me for a few sec-
onds, and then “submerging”
again.
Finally a car approached,
stopped, and the driver bent over
and asked, “What dropped you
here, son? Where do you sleep?”
When I answered that I had a
sleeping bag and the roadside, he
just answered, “You might be in for
a surprise. This year we have un-
usual rainfall. You better jump in.
We will find you a roof.” And thus,
pretty near the middle of nowhere
as I started to feel after all the
hours of waiting and in a very
silent surrounding, I learned to
know Mr. Iwan, the driver. Driving
for miles, then at road 16 turning
to the west and leaving the high-
way at Stamford Store, entering a
gravel road towards the south, and
after another couple of miles turn-
ing around a corner, the day’s ride
ended at your ranch. I saw several
low houses and 10 or so men who,
if I am not mistaken, were all the
sons of the Iwan clan.
In the evening, they asked me
to join them for a beer. To my sur-
prise, this was 30 or more miles
away across the range. The next
morning (June 15) very early and
after a great breakfast in the dark-
ness, all drove to the center of the
ranch where I was “confronted”
with a horse. I had never been
near to such an animal and, after
a few moments, I was on top of it,
lifted up by two of the young men
who had stood right and left of me.
I followed their advice and stayed
atop. The day passed by rounding
up and branding cattle. I have to
confess, if you had to make a selec-
tion on this day about who was the
more useful farmhand, I myself
would have had to vote definitely
for the horse. It knew in advance
where to move to bring the cattle
together and just ignored my or-
ders at the reins. In the evening,
there was another beer, again
some 15 or so miles across the
ranch. This time it was towards
the west.
The next day I was not much
able to move, not so much from the
beer but from daylong range activ-
ities. On June 16, all went to a
rodeo in the Badlands, and I was
glad I didn’t have to join the per-
formance but could watch from be-
hind the fence. After these two
great days, I hit the road again—
Seattle, San Francisco, Los Ange-
les, Grand Canyon to name only
some of my stops, and then Mexico
and Yucatan. From there it was
back to New York to catch the ship
to Germany.
You may ask, “What about the
letter prepared for dispatch to you
in the Philippines?” In 1963 and
up to 1965, I went for research
work to the southern Philippines.
My base among the Muslims was
the Dansalan Junior College in
Marawi City. Somehow, the letter
slipped in a heap of paper and
turned up by chance just now. I do
not want to extend this letter, but
let me tell you. The stay at your
ranch definitely gave me a great
insight into life in the countryside,
and it impressed me deeply. I just
would like to thank you once more
very much after 50 years. With
best wishes, Klaus Hausherr.
The letter contained a picture of
the Stamford Store from a post-
card plus five photos of a branding
at our place. In one, I was holding
the back leg of a calf for branding.
I would have been between my
junior and senior years of high
school. Also in the photos were Ted
Vobr (who is still on the ranch,) my
cousin, Joe Iwan and Jim Srb. The
Mr. Iwan noted was my Uncle
Harold (1899-1979.) A blast from
the past indeed.
Blast from the Past
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Mark and Nicci DeVries and
sons have been busy with wrestling
again this week as usual. On Sat-
urday, the family was in Rapid City
where Gavin and Geoffrey took
part in the regional wrestling tour-
nament. Gavin placed third and
will proceed to the state tourna-
ment at Aberdeen next weekend.
On Sunday, the family was in
Kadoka for an AAU meet in which
youngest son, Greyson, took part.
For that, Mark helped with the
meet, Nicci helped with the conces-
sion stand, and the older boys lent
a hand as necessary. Monday was
back to school again. After the
wrestling season, track and field is
on the horizon as a replacement.
Jodie O’Bryan is getting a lot of
beading and crafts done while she
waits for her ribs to heal after a
horse fell with her three weeks ago
during a barrel race. Jodie said the
ribs are better as gauged by the
fact that sneezing doesn’t hurt as
much now as it did. She figures
after more beading and whatnot
during this upcoming week which
is forecast to be cold anyway, she
should be out and about more. This
week, Scot and Jodie had visitors
from Ft. Yates, ND, who brought
some of their horses for shoeing
and training. They have been
bringing horses to the O’Bryans for
about thirty years now. Other visi-
tors included some folks from Har-
ford that Jodie grew up with.
John and Jamie Dolezal are not
taking part in the annual play at
Midland this year. This is quite a
change for both of them. They de-
cided they had other things they
should do at home instead. Having
a young son in the house can some-
times promote changes in lifestyle
and activities.
Wally and Cheryll Wells were
visited a couple mornings this
week by Betty Kusick who stopped
in for coffee. Wally doesn’t have to
tend cattle on a daily basis this
winter since his are currently near
Rapid City where his son keeps an
eye on them.
Dave and Jean Calhoon were
visited by their three grandchil-
dren on Saturday. They picked
them up at Murdo and brought
them to the ranch. James brought
a friend along as well. After a busy
day, their parents, Dixie and
Carston, picked them up and took
them back home to Vivian. James
is now a teenager, Carter is six and
Evan is two. Jean said the four
boys were active enough to add a
little brightness to life.
Larry and Jo Johnston also en-
tertained grandchildren on Sun-
day, namely Linay’s children, Alex
and Hallie. Hallie’s twin, however,
stayed home with the folks. Alex
and Hallie were picked up in
Kadoka at a wrestling meet that
Alex took part in. Another
wrestling meet in Philip on Mon-
day will serve as a kid-return vehi-
cle. Jo said they are still working
on basement renovation as they
have been for some time now. The
work is proceeding and should be
done before too much longer.
Rick and Ronda Dennis went to
Rapid City Thursday evening and
picked up their daughter, Bobbi, at
the airport. While in Rapid City
they were guests of Dana DeVries.
In addition to keep some appoint-
ments and doing some shopping,
they played several games of pitch.
Everyone returned home on Satur-
day morning.
Floyd and Jane Iwan attended a
gun show at the Ramkota in Pierre
on Sunday. Their son, Harold, was
also there so they got to visit with
him some at a café. Floyd said gun
prices have taken a jump, probably
due to all the talk about gun con-
trol. Sales are brisk. After visiting
Runnings and a few other places,
Floyd and Jane returned home.
Earlier in the week, Floyd had
some eye surgery in Rapid City to
reduce pressure in his eye. He is
scheduled to return for a checkup
later this week.
Syd Iwan went to Rapid City on
Saturday to get a new love seat for
son Chance. Half of the old one was
in a permanent state of recline.
Chance’s TV also gave out last
week so a new one of those was
found. Since winter coats were on
sale at greatly reduced prices, Syd
got one of those to replace his cur-
rent one that is starting to have
zipper problems.
“The quickest way to double
your money is to fold it and
put it back in your pocket.”
Will Rogers
Ed and Carol Ferguson went to
Rapid City on Tuesday for an eye
appointment. Their daughter, Cora
Brickman, met them for lunch.
Tuesday, the James Letelliers
were among several area folks who
attended the Logterman family
bull sale in Valentine, NE. They
met up with Rev. Don and Anna
May Letellier of Wood Lake and
Julie Letellier of Kilgore after the
sale and all enjoyed supper at
Pizza Hut.
Dan Taft has been making trips
to Martin for therapy on his shoul-
der. We are praying it will heal
properly for you, Dan.
The Wednesday night Lenten
Services are held at the St. John
Lutheran Church in Norris at 6:00
p.m. CST with soup supper follow-
ing at 7:00. Sharon Ring and Jessie
Ring provided the soup last week,
while others brought snacks and
dessert. Everyone is welcome to at-
tend.
Carol Ferguson worked in the
Norris Post Office on Thursday and
Friday in the absence of Susan
Taft. Susan was called to work at
the Wanblee Post Office on Friday
afternoon.
Thursday, James and Marjorie
Anne Letellier and Julie Letellier
of Kilgore enjoyed the Sunshine
Bible Academy girls’ basketball
games at Dakota Christian near
Platte. The games were fun, but
the roads weren’t; they were icy all
the way from Winner. The Letel-
lier’s granddaughter, Cassie, plays
for Sunshine Bible.
Andee Beckwith enjoyed taking
in the basketball game with her
parents, Paul and LuAnne, of
Pierre; White River vs. James Val-
ley Christian in Ft. Pierre on
Thursday evening. By all reports
that was one for the books and
White River came home to play two
more games back to back. White
River won all three games, too.
Proud doesn’t begin to describe our
feelings any more, those kids de-
serve every ounce of support we
can give them, because they all
work very hard to stay on top. The
fact that we have watched them
grow into talented, intelligent ath-
letes is a plus that only we home
town folks can enjoy. We are behind
you all the way, kids. Be sure and
attend the game against Lyman on
Friday night sponsored by the
White River Tigers.
Dan and Susan Taft kept an ap-
pointment for Dan in Rapid City on
Thursday and also they took time
out to visit Christine Dunham in
the hospital. The Tafts went out for
supper to celebrate Valentine’s Day,
too.
June Ring babysat for Bruce and
Jessie Ring on Valentine’s Day so
they could enjoy the Valentine sup-
per at the White River Museum
that evening. Friday, June was
busy watching kids again while
Bruce, Jessie and Stephanie kept
appointments in Valentine, NE.
Maxine has been busy writing
letters to her classmates. Leave it
to Maxine to find something to
keep herself busy. Maxine Allard’s
daughter, Sharon, from Spearfish
arrived on Friday and spent the
night. The gals invited June Ring
to join them for supper on Friday
evening.
Friday night, I think the whole
Blackpipe/Norris community
moved to White River for the girls’
basketball parents’ night with
games against New Underwood. It
was so nice to see them all there
supporting our kids. We are very
proud of all of them. Only missed
having Grandma Christine there,
but you can be sure she was think-
ing of them all. Christine has been
hospitalized in Rapid City for the
last couple weeks and the worse
part is it is during basketball sea-
son. Get well quick Christine so
you can be there when they need
you the most and that is at the
tournaments.
Friday night Samantha Taft
came home for the long weekend.
Alvin Simmons of Martin was a
dinner guest at the Dan Taft home
on Saturday. That afternoon the
Tafts visited at the Howard and
Nette Heinert home. Dan Taft’s
brother, Francis, of Pierre arrived
Sunday for the Monday holiday.
Jesse, Ed and Carol Ferguson
were in Valentine, NE, on Sunday
afternoon. They took Irene Kauf-
man out for dinner to celebrate her
birthday.
Over the weekend little Risa
was running a fever so in the mid-
dle of the night on Sunday, Jessie
Ring took her to the hospital at
Rosebud and the next thing they
knew; they were on a plane headed
for Rapid City. Here’s hoping that
little gal is on the mend soon. June
Ring and Bruce made a trip to
Valentine, NE, on Monday morning
to pickup the vehicle that Jessie
had driven there.
Have a great week!
Ted Vobr dehorning calf, Jim Srb helping or instructing, bare-chested fel-
low may be Lenny Addison.
Syd Iwan holding back leg of calf, Ted Vobr the front, and the dehorner is
unknown.
Joe Iwan
Jim Srb dehonring, Ted Vobr watching, and Joe Iwan holding calf.
Locals …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Kadoka Nursing Home
Cathy Stone • 837-2270
Local News
Sdyne Lenox
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USED VEHICLES!
This week we had several visi-
tors. Some of them included: Phyl-
lis Word, who has been stopping by
and visiting with many of the resi-
dents. Phyllis and Diane Lurz
dropped off some very special
Valentines to each resident, in
which we appreciate.
Mickie Word had visitors
throughout the week including:
Tori, Katy, Samantha, Jade, Jessie,
Mary Graupmann, Bonnie Mad-
sen, and Mickie’s husband, Bob,
who stops by daily.
Lola Joyce Riggins stopped by to
visit.
Dwight Louder enjoyed a good
visit with his wife, Dorothy, and his
son, Brad. I hope he had that spe-
cial Valentine made up for her!
Alice Wilmarth is blessed to get
to see her family on a daily basis.
She received several bouquets of
flowers making her room look and
smell like the florists! What a won-
derful Valentine’s Day she had.
Shorty Ireland had a visit from
his daughter and others
throughtout his birthday week. He
received so many cards and some of
them were really funny!
Reverend Ray and Colleen
Greenseth of Murdo stopped by to
see Mary Ellen Herbaugh and Mel
Koester.
I’ve got to tell you how over-
whelmed I felt this week by all the
flowers, cards, balloon bouquets,
candy, Valentine hugs and kisses
the residents received, it truly does
make their day!
Emergency Services Act that, if
passed, would allow eligible hospi-
tals in rural and medically under-
served areas to use interactive
telehealth programs that can con-
nect at any hour of the day to a
board-certified emergency physi-
cian to satisfy the federal emer-
gency room staffing requirements.
This use of emergency telehealth
technology in this capacity would
be permitted when an associate
provider, such as a physician assis-
tant or nurse practitioner, is al-
ready on site at the rural
emergency room.
Often, small rural hospitals are
not prepared to deal with complex
patients and will sometimes need
to transfer patients to larger, spe-
cialized hospitals. Immediate ac-
cess to a physician that specializes
in emergency medicine via tele-
health can help the rural hospital
determine whether a transfer is
necessary. This ensures that pre-
cious time is not lost waiting for
the on-call physician to arrive. It
also benefits the hospital ensuring
that, when appropriate, the patient
can remain at their local hospital to
receive care. This allows the small
rural hospital to be reimbursed for
services, making it easier for these
safety-net hospitals to keep their
doors open.
As a member of the Senate
Rural Health Caucus, I understand
the importance of access to fast, re-
liable emergency medicine in rural
hospitals and will continue to sup-
port initiatives, such as this, that
will strengthen our rural health
care infrastructure.
In a rural state like South
Dakota where access to specialized
medical care can be hours away,
residents depend on critical access
hospitals to help meet their health
care needs. However, an increasing
number of rural hospitals are find-
ing it difficult to recruit physicians
to these under-served areas of the
country. For small hospitals with
only a few physicians, current fed-
eral laws and regulations require
regular on-call shifts that prevent
a physician from leaving town.
This is a lifestyle that many
younger doctors are not interested
in pursuing when urban settings
can offer more flexible career op-
tions.
Federal regulations for some
rural hospitals currently require a
physician to be on-call and able to
arrive to the emergency depart-
ment within 30 minutes, even if an
associate provider, such as a nurse
practitioner or physician assistant,
is already covering the emergency
department. For physicians in
small hospitals who see patients all
day and then must be on call at
night, this creates a “24/7” work en-
vironment that can be unattractive
to physicians and unnecessarily
drives up the costs of health care.
However, by utilizing technology
that is already available in hospi-
tals across South Dakota and the
country, there is a solution that
both improves emergency care and
creates a work environment that
can make it easier to recruit physi-
cians to rural areas. I recently in-
troduced the bipartisan
Strengthening Rural Access to
Improving Emergency
Health Services in Rural Areas
By Senator John Thune
This week President Obama de-
livered what is often seen as the
most important speech of the year.
The State of the Union is delivered
to all three branches of assembled
government and to millions of
Americans at home throughout the
country. It is an opportunity to re-
flect, to cast a vision for the upcom-
ing year and to set a course for the
future of the country.
I came away from the State of
the Union disappointed in the tone
and substance of the President’s re-
marks and hearing the words of
Abraham Lincoln echo through my
mind. As portrayed in the recent
movie “Lincoln,” the embattled
president comments about know-
ing True North. He says that a
compass may point True North, but
what good is it if it can’t tell you
about the swamps and obstacles
along the way? In other words, it’s
one thing to know where you’d like
to go, it’s quite another to have the
wisdom to understand what it
takes to get there.
Whether the President knows
where he wants to take the country
or not, he fails to recognize the ob-
stacles that stand directly in our
way. He spoke of wanting new pro-
grams and greater federal involve-
ment in nearly every part of our
lives, but barely gave mention of
the fact that we have a giant
swamp called the national debt
blocking our path. Understanding
the direction is not enough, we
need true leadership to navigate
the treacherous and winding road
that will lead us there.
In a few weeks, across-the-board
cuts will begin to take $1.2 trillion
out of our national budget. The
President says that he wants to
find a better way, but has paid no
attention to the two pieces of legis-
lation that the House has submit-
ted to responsibly cut spending.
Now, after wandering through the
partisan forest, the President and
Senate Majority leader are at-
tempting, at the last minute, to
offer a map that not only tramples
any progress we’ve made, but
smashes the compass in the
process. That’s not leadership,
that’s politics.
In order to move ahead in a re-
sponsible manner, the President
must live up to his words in the
State of the Union speech to “set
party interests aside.” I, and my
colleagues in the House, are ready
to once again take up the issue and
work to find common ground. In
the words of Abraham Lincoln,
“You cannot escape the responsibil-
ity of tomorrow by evading it
today.”
I hope you reach out to my office
and share your thoughts with me.
I would love to hear from you. Con-
tact information for my South
Dakota and Washington, D.C. of-
fices is: Sioux Falls 605-275-2868;
Watertown 605-878-2868; Ab-
erdeen 605-262-2862; Rapid City
605-791-4673; Washington DC 202-
225-2801; Toll-Free 1-855-225-
2801.
The Need for Leadership
By Rep. Kristi Noem
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
About a dozen people enjoyed a
visit with author C. M. Wendelboe
at the Jackson County Library on
Tuesday, Feb. 12. Mr. Wendelboe is
from Wyoming, but originally lived
in Mitchell. He is a former Viet
Nam/Marine veteran and was a
law enforcement officer for 38
years in several South Dakota
towns bordering Indian reserva-
tions. His books are mysteries in-
volving stories on the Pine Ridge
Reservation, and the Badlands. He
has written “Spirit Road” and
“Death Where the Bad Rocks Live'”
and the third in the series will be
out in June – “Death on the Greasy
Grass.” He and his wife stayed in
Kadoka Tuesday night and had a
stop in Wall the next day before re-
turning home to Wyoming.
Friends of Michael Murray, 66,
of Black Hawk were saddened to
hear of his death on February 10 as
a result of a stroke. Mike was the
son of the late Helen and Chet
Murray who lived in Kadoka for
many years. He spent most of his
childhood here before the Murrays
moved to Winner where he gradu-
ated in 1965. His burial took place
on Friday, Feb. 15.
Sydne Lenox visited with Pat
Willard in Philip on Sunday. Pat is
planning to move from the
Senechel Apartments to the Silver
Leaf Assisted Living Complex in
Philip before too long. She said to
tell her friends that she is still
kicking, but not too high.
Holly Plaggemeyer spent the
President’s Day weekend in
Kadoka with her family, Venessa
and Jim Plaggemeyer and Matt,
Teresa and son. She returned to
her studies at South Dakota State
University on Monday.
Larry Miller and Wanda Swan
drove to Springview, NE, on Satur-
day where they attended a 100th
birthday party for Blanche McCoy.
Blanche is Larry’s aunt and
Wanda’s sister-in-law’s sister.
Wanda had lunch at the home of
her brother-in-law and wife, Buss
and Shirley Swan, before going to
the birthday celebration. Also at-
tending were Lila Whidby of
Kadoka and her sister, Lois Lurz,
and Lois’ daughter, Barbara, of Hot
Springs.
Robyn Jones went to Valentine
on Friday evening to visit her par-
ents, Ray and Florence Osburn,
brother, Danny Osburn and
nephews, Trey and Trent Osburn.
On Saturday she took her father
and her aunt, Hazel Brown, to
Cairo, NE, where they spent the
day visiting her uncle, Dick Os-
burn, and family.
Lynda Vigus of Freeman under-
went emergency gall bladder sur-
gery on Tuesday, Feb. 12. She is the
daughter of Butch Parkinson and a
call to her said she was dismissed
just a few hours after the surgery
and she is sore but doing fine. Her
friends in the area will be happy to
hear that she is getting along great
with her prosthetic leg since her
amputation in November of 2011.
The Kadoka School alumni com-
mittee will be sending cards out in
a few weeks and are hoping if any
of the readers know of address
changes in the past year, please let
the committee know. Address
changes can be given to Nona
Prang, Sydne Lenox or Thesa Ire-
land.
Jeff Willert is participating in
the San Antonio Rodeo which is
being held February 7-23. He rode
in the fifth group – 1st round score
of 80 put him in second place with
a check of $1,474; 2nd round score
of 74 was fourth place and a check
of $491. He will ride on Monday,
Feb. 18 for his third round and
then with enough money winnings
will go on for more saddle bronc
rides. Next week’s news will have
final results, or they can be seen on
the San Antonio Rodeo web site. It
is a big rodeo with lots of competi-
tion and money to be won.
Increase Your Fruit &
Vegetable Consumption:
Drink Smoothies
Smoothies (also known as
smoothees) are popular as healthy
snacks, a mini-meal or as a
dessert. Smoothies similar to our
present day “smoothies” have been
around since the late 1930’s when
the blender was introduced. Con-
sumers were fascinated with
blending foods, including fruits
and vegetables. It was during this
time that recipes for smoothies
evolved and the word “smoothie”
was used to describe a drink.
The first smoothies were simply
fruit, fruit juice and ice. They
weren’t overly popular until the
natural food craze of the 1960’s
and 1970’s. Health food stores
were established during these
decades, often selling blended fruit
drinks. Smoothies are now widely
available at smoothie bars, restau-
rants, juice bars, health food stores
and pre-bottled in grocery stores.
Smoothies are known for their
milkshake-like consistency. The
thicker consistency is obtained by
blending in cubed or pureed frozen
fruit. Vegetables that are high in
fiber and water content are good
choices for smoothies. To lower the
fat and calorie content of smooth-
ies, use skim or soy milk, instead
of whole milk and unsweetened
fruit, instead of canned or sweet-
ened frozen fruit. If you choose to
use fresh fruit, use fruit at its peak
of ripeness to obtain the greatest
amount of natural sweetness. If
fruit is less than peak ripeness,
add up to one teaspoon of sweet-
ener (sugar or honey) or the equiv-
alent of a no-calorie sweetener.
Smoothies are quick and easy to
prepare at home. Common ingredi-
ents in smoothies can include fruit,
juice, yogurt and ice. But almost
anything can be made into a
smoothie. Some smoothies are pre-
pared with spinach or carrots to
add extra nutrients. Sometimes
supplemental powders are added
to smoothies to enhance certain
health qualities of the drinks, in-
cluding weight loss, protein and
multivitamin supplements.
Do you want to make a
smoothie? Here’s an easy Fruit
Smoothie recipe that serves 4 (1-
cup) servings and takes only 5
minutes to make. Pour 2 cups of
skim or 1% low-fat milk into a
blender. Add 3 cups of frozen
strawberries, 1 large banana and
1 cup low-fat yogurt. Blend until
smooth – about 30-45 seconds.
For additional information and
recipes about smoothies go to
http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/fa-
vorite-smoothie for the University
of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension’s
“Sumptuous Smoothies & Shakes”
publication.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Many states tax the sales of
goods. A few also tax services.
South Dakota has a broad-based,
four percent sales tax on nearly all
goods and services.
Because past legislators and
governors have maintained the
broadness of the tax, it is a steady,
reliable source of revenue, even in
times of economic distress.
Broadening this tax base helped
Gov. Janklow cut property taxes 30
percent. Taxing the sales of a broad
array of goods and services also
helps our state avoid an income
tax.
However, an ever-present temp-
tation exists to ask for exceptions.
Interest groups come to Pierre each
year to argue for a tax exemption
on their particular goods or serv-
ices. They are supported by their
lobbyists and members.
These exemptions do not have
policy goals, other than relieving a
particular group from paying sales
tax. They are not designed to at-
tract new economic activity or help
create jobs. Some interest groups
have better arguments than others,
but one fact is always true: Each
time an exemption is created, it
benefits a narrow group at the ex-
pense of all other South Dakota
taxpayers.
Even if some exemptions are
small, the principle of a broad-
based tax is violated.
Each time an exemption is
carved out, there is less revenue for
priorities like education, health-
care, or economic development. For
each exemption, we send a mes-
sage to the next interest group that
they also should try to avoid paying
sales tax.
I vetoed legislation last year
that would have exempted the
sales tax on hay for livestock bed-
ding. Several exemptions have
been proposed this year, including
certain coaching services, some
rodeo admissions, and sales of used
truck tires. Certainly these are
very small exemptions, proposed by
groups for whom I have empathy.
Still, I must oppose the erosion of
our broad sales tax base through
repeated, minor exemptions that
ignore our overarching policy goals.
I truly believe that we should
strive for more TAXPAYERS, not
more TAXES or higher rates.
Spreading the burden among many
makes each one's burden lighter.
We should not continue to chip
away at our steady, broad tax base.
It’s easy to agree with each group
and make an exception "just this
once." But we must be vigilant
against it.
Voters, taxpayers and the public
in general don’t have an associa-
tion, interest group or lobbyists. As
your Governor, I believe it’s my re-
sponsibility to speak for the people.
It’s my job to work on behalf of the
unorganized many against the in-
terests of the organized few. Let's
keep our tax rates low by asking
everyone to share in the responsi-
bility to pay.
Eroding Our Broad Tax Base
By Gov. Dennis Daugaard
Sports …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
Proud of our
Kougars!
Good Luck
Teams!
points, Kwincy and Katie 2, and
Tessa a bucket and a free throw.
The Kougars hustled and
worked hard the fourth quarter to
catch up. They were within three
points at one time, but turnovers
and fouls lengthened the Warrior's
lead. Bennet County was 10/18
from the line in the fourth quarter
to Kadoka's 4/7. Bennett County
pulled away at the end and de-
feated the Kougars 54-43. Marti
Herber led scoring with 10 points,
followed by Shaley Herber and
Tessa Stout with 8. Katie Lenseg-
rav and Raven Jorgensen added 6
points each, Kwincy Ferguson 4,
and Tori Letellier 1. The Kougars
were 7/17 from the line and ended
the game with 21 fouls.
District 13 Tournament started
Monday, Feb. 18, at Kadoka.
Lyman and Crazy Horse played in
the first round game. The winner of
that game played Jones County in
the first game on Tuesday, Feb. 19.
The second game was the Lady
Kougars playing the White River
Tigers. The winners of those games
will play in the championship game
on Thursday, Feb. 21 at 6:00 p.m.
MT.
Kadoka 22 44 51 57
Dupree 11 26 32 51
The Kadoka Lady Kougars trav-
elled to Dupree Tuesday, Feb. 12 to
take on the Lady Tigers.
The Kougars hit the floor run-
ning, playing tough defense, at-
tacking the basket, which resulted
in 22 first quarter points. Kwincy
Ferguson made 8 points off of
steals, Taylor Merchen hit a three
pointer and a bucket, Marti Herber
a three pointer and a free throw
and Tessa Stout a three pointer.
Raven Jorgensen also added a
bucket.
Kadoka continued the pressure
going into the second quarter. They
kept attacking the basket, fronting
and back side helping against
Dupree's big girls, ane making
good choices on the floor. Kwincy,
Tessa and Raven added 4 points
each, Marti and Taylor each hit an-
other three pointer as well as a free
throw for Marti. Shaley Herber hit
both her free throws and Katie
Lensegrav added one. The Kougars
headed to the locker room at half
time with an 18 point lead.
The Kougars and Tigers had a
sluggish third quarter. There was
not as much shooting as in the first
half and the intensity wasn't as
strong as the first half. Kwincy
made a basket and a free throw
and Marti and Raven each scored
two. The Tigers only made six
points in the third quarter and
they came from one player.
The Kougars still couldn't pick
up the pace in the fourth quarter.
They pretty much held thier own,
while the Tigers slowly began to
catch up. Dupree was able to hit
their big girl under the basket a
few times, as well as hitting a cou-
ple three pointers. They closed the
gap to within three points, but the
Kougars were able to hold them off
for the win. Kwincy led scoring
with 15 points, followed by Raven
with 12. Marti scored 10 points,
Taylor 8, Tessa 7, Tori Letellier and
Shaley 2 and Katie 1. The Kougars
were 8/15 from the line and ended
the game with 12 fouls.
Kadoka 9 20 31 43
Bennet Co. 13 27 38 54
The Lady Kougars final regular
season home game had them host-
ing the Bennett County Warriors.
The Kougars came off a win a
couple nights before, so they were
ready to finish their regular season
on a high note.
Both teams came out strong,
pressing each other on defense.
Bennett County hit two 3's in the
first quarter to give them a 13-9
lead after the first. Marti Herber,
Katie Lensegrav and Raven Jor-
gensen each made a basket and
Shaley Herber a basket and a free
throw.
The second quarter had them
playing the same. The girls worked
hard to keep the ball from Bennett
County's post girls, but they could-
n't keep up all the time. Marti and
Raven added 4 points, Katie 2, and
Tori Letellier a free throw. Bennett
County was up 27-20 going into
half time.
The Kougars were hoping to
come out playing stronger the sec-
ond half, but instead, played even
with Bennett County; each team
scoring 11 points. Shaley scored 4
Lady Kougars seal win over
Dupree, lose to Warriors
Philip Area Grapplers …brought back the Region 4B championship title last Saturday. Back row
(L-R): Brandy Knutson, Jed Brown, Geoffrey DeVries, Clint Stout, Chance Knutson, Rance Johnson, Cody Don-
nelly, Nick Donnelly, Bosten Morehart and Keven Morehart. Front row: student managers Kelsie Kroetch and
Madyson Morehart, Chandlier Sudbeck, Lane Blasius, Logan Ammons, Gavin DeVries, Raedon Anderson, and
head coach Matt Donnelly. --photo by Dayle Knutson
Philip Area wrestlers claims Region 4B title
It was a run-away for the Philip
Area grapplers as they claimed the
Region 4B title by more than 60
points, and garnering seven first
and second placings.
Head coach Matt Donnelly was
pleased for the team and the indi-
viduals as they wrestled well at the
tourney. The team took 10 kids and
placed nine. Four open slots in the
126, 132, 138, and 145 weight
classes were not good for the team
though, he said. Injuries and ill-
ness were the main reasons for the
openings.
Team standings following the
February 16 tournament were
Philip Area (181.5), Bennett
County (118.5), Stanley County
(112), Hot Springs (106.5), Potter
County (99), Custer (79.5), Lem-
mon/McIntosh (64), Mobridge-Pol-
lock (61), Hill City (56), Newell
(50), Sully Buttes (39), Harding
County (33), St. Thomas More (19),
Red Cloud (14).
106 lbs: Jed Brown 4th, 30-11 record
•Bye
•Pinned Stone Durham (STM), 2:25
•Decisioned by Dirk Wolf (L/M) 12-14
•Pinned Kalel Worisheck (HC) 1:42
•Decisioned by Daniel Slama (SC) 5-8
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 1st,
23-9 record
•Major dec. Bray Harrison (MP) 13-2
•Pinned Tomo Shirataki (RC) 2:35
•Pinned Brady Hill (SB) 3:52
•Major dec. Joshua Simunek (HS) 13-4
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 2nd,
31-9 record
•Pinned Ryan Krump (STM) 1:28
•Pinned Westly Greenough (HS) 3:55
•Pinned Garrett Rausch (PC), 1:08
•Decisioned by Dominick Schooler (HC) 1-5
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st,
29--3 record
•Bye
•Pinned Tristan Madsen (HS) 1:08
•Won by default Jace Anderson (SB)
•Decisioned Dylan Severyn (CUS) 6-5
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 1st,
31-8 record
•Bye
•Tech. fall over Brett Scott, (CUS) 18-2
•Pinned Brad Hahn (BC) 5:03
•Pinned Austin Haberer (PC) 4:45
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 1st, 33-8 record
•Bye
•Pinned Jason Van Vugt (MP) 3:44
•Pinned Joe Merrival (BC) 3:26
•Decisioned Clayton Wahlstrom (CUS) 7-6
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 2nd,
26-9 record
•Bye
•Bye
•Pinned Reece Jensen (HC) 3:01
•Decisioned by Dalton McCullam (BC) 2-12
195 lbs: Logan Ammons, 2nd,
22-10 record
•Bye
•Pinned Marcus Heath (BC) 3:26
•Pinned Chase Schoenhard (MP) 1:29
•Decsioned by Clay Siedler (CUS) 3-5
220 lbs: Gavin DeVries, 3rd,
20-17 record
•Pinned Carrell Haines (HS) 2:35
•Pinned Todd VanderMay (BC) 3:02
•Pinned by Brady Spiry (MP) 5:56
•Pinned Mike Murray (CUS) 4:45
•Pinned John Jung (RC) 1:58
285 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries, 3-20 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Cade Larson (SC) :39
•Bye
•Pinned by Garrett Clark (L/M) 1:34
Donnelly noted that while Geof-
frey DeVries did not place at the re-
gion tournment he has been
learning at every tournament. De-
Vries, Donnelly noted, is at the
light end of the heavy weight divi-
sion and is just an eighth grader
wrestling older, heavier opponents.
Up next for the Badlands
Brawlers is the State B tourna-
ment in Aberdeen, Febraury 22
and 23. Donnelly is excited about
Philip’s prospects at the tourna-
ment, but noted it will be tough.
“Anyone can beat anyone,” he said.
“They are there for a reason.”
State team rankings heading
into State B are Parkston (144),
Canton (100), Wagner (98), Howard
(90), Beresford (88), Tri-Valley (87),
Philip (77), Flandreau (72.5), Bon
Homme (71) and Webster (70).
Individual rankings have Brown
in sixth, Johnson ninth, Donnelly
eighth, Blasius second, Sudbeck
third, Stout sixth, Knutson fifth
and Ammons eighth.
Crop & Livestock Workshop
Just a reminder of the Crop and
Livestock Workshop at the Jones
County Courthouse in Murdo, be-
ginning at 1:00 p.m., Friday,
March 1, 2013. In addition to the
topics mentioned in last weeks’ col-
umn, plans are to also address
management strategies to deal
with cropland that has been dam-
aged by fire. Call Bob Fanning at
842-1267 for more information.
Fungicide Seed Treatments
for Spring Wheat
Fungicide seed treatments are
used when planting many agricul-
tural crops and are helpful in pro-
moting stand establishment and
seedling vigor. Seed treatments
also help preserve yield potential
and prevent quality losses in grain
by preventing certain seed and
soil-borne diseases.
There are many pathogens
found in the soil which cause
seedling diseases and contribute to
the root/crown rot complex in
wheat. The root/crown rot complex
can include one or more of the dis-
eases, Common Root Rot, Fusar-
ium Root Rot, Take-All,
Rhizoctonia Root Rot, and
Pythium Root Rot. These
pathogens are always present in
the soil at some level, waiting to
take advantage of slow germina-
tion, slow early development, and
unfavorable environment for
wheat seedlings. These pathogens
have similar symptoms and can
cause poor overall health and vigor
of the plant. These diseases often
result in thin, uneven stands,
spindly stalks, small spikes,
empty/white heads, stunted
plants, weak early growth, yellow-
ing of foliage, and reduced yield
and quality.
The primary recommendation
to avoid the effects of the
root/crown rot complex is a diverse
crop rotation which includes one or
more broadleaf crops. The proper
choice of fungicide seed treatments
can also help protect the young
seedlings and get them off to a
good start.
Loose Smut and Common Bunt
(also known as stinking smut) ap-
pear in some wheat fields every
year. These are two pathogens for
which proper fungicide seed treat-
ments are very effective. It is
strongly believed that Loose Smut
and Common Bunt could be virtu-
ally eliminated if all wheat produc-
ers used recommended seed
treatments.
In general, seed treatments: aid in
managing the biotic stresses, are
effective only days to weeks (al-
though new chemistry is promis-
ing longer periods of protection),
are used as the principal insurance
against pests, and help the seed
and seedlings make it to the stage
when they can make their own en-
ergy (get the seed up and out of the
ground).
Utilizing a seed treatment
builds the foundation for a healthy
plant. Healthy roots are the first
step to building the yield potential
you desire. Without that strong
base, your yield potential is lim-
ited from the start and all other in-
puts become less valuable.
Healthy seedling development pro-
motes good stands and greater
yield potential.
Seed treatment has been and
continues to be a very economic
and effective disease management
tool in South Dakota wheat pro-
duction. To see the complete list of
Seed Treatment products available
check out “Managing Crop Dis-
eases with Seed Treatments”:
http://igrow.org/up/resources/03-
3001-2012.pdf. “Seed Treatment
Fungicide Options for Wheat In
South Dakota”:
http://pubstorage.sdstate.edu/AgBi
o_Publications/articles/FS965.pdf.
Calendar
•2/27/2013: Managing Drought
Risk on the Ranch Webinar, 10:00
a.m., SD Regional Extension Cen-
ters
•3/1/2013: Crop & Livestock Work-
shop, 1:00 p.m., Jones County
Courthouse, Murdo, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Kadoka 6 12 23 29
RC Christian 13 26 38 44
The Kadoka Kougars traveled to
Rapid City on Friday, February 8 to
take on the Rapid City Christian
team. The team returned home
with a 29-44 loss.
With only three of the starting
five players for the Kougars scor-
ing, True Buchholz led the team
with 16 points and was 2/4 from
the line. Lane Patterson put up 9
points, including one three-pointer.
Aage Ceplecha had four points and
was 2/2 from the line.
No other stats were available.
Kadoka 4 10 16 19
Lyman 24 39 52 65
The Kougars were on the road
again Friday, February 15 when
they headed to Presho to play the
Lyman Raiders.
In the first quarter Lyman got
off to a 20-point lead and went on
to set the tone for the game.
Buchholz led the Kougars with 7
points, Patterson added 5, Brenden
Porch put in 3, Ryder Sanftner 2
and Ceplecha and Dillon Riggins
were good for a free throw apiece.
The Kougars were 5/12 from the
free-throw line and had 20 team
fouls with Ceplicha checking out
before the final buzzer.
The Raiders were 5/20 from the
line and committed 15 team fouls.
Kougars drop a
pair on the road
Game, Fish and Parks' The
Outdoor Campus-West is going to
the birds on Saturday, February
23, for Bald Eagle Awareness
Days.The Outdoor Campus-West
Goes to the Birds Throughout the
day, Outdoor Campus staff and vol-
unteers will provide a variety of
hands-on activities for the whole
family to enjoy.
“This is a free event with a ton
of great activities, craft projects
and other learning opportunities
for little kids through adults,” said
Chad Tussing, director of The Out-
door Campus-West. “Plus we’ll
have our friends from the Black
Hills Raptor Center here with some
avian ambassadors to teach about
these amazing creatures.”
The event will run from 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m. on Saturday, February
23. The Black Hills Raptor Center
will hold a presentation with live
birds of prey at 1 p.m.
Bald Eagle Awareness Days is
an annual, statewide event in-
tended to raise awareness about
eagles and other birds of prey. More
information about the statewide
activities can be found online at
ht t p : / / g f p . s d . g o v / o ut d o o r -
learning/bald-eagle-awareness-
days/default.aspx
The Outdoor Campus-West, lo-
cated at 4130 Adventure Trail, is
open to the public seven days a
week and has no admission fee.
For more information about The
Outdoor Campus-West go to
www.outdoorcampus.org and click
on 'Rapid City.' Or call The Outdoor
Campus-West at 394-2310.
The Outdoor
Campus-West
goes to the birds
Athletes
of the
Week
Aage Ceplecha
Boys Basketball
Aage has led the team in rebounds
over the last couple of weeks and
has earned a starting spot on var-
sity. He has really improved
throughout the season.
Raven Jorgensen
Girls Basketball
Raven played good defense during
the Dupree and Bennett County
games. Dupree had a couple big
post girls and Raven did a good job
fronting them and denying them the
ball. She also did a good job
against Bennett County's post girls.
It's alot of work playing under the
basket. Raven did a nice job for us.
Keep up the hard work.
Sponsored by
Jackson County
Title Company
and
Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2286
Good Luck Wrestlers …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
Philip - Kadoka - Wall
Wrestling Team at State
February 22 & 23 at Aberdeen
Clint Stout, 170 lbs.
1st place at regions, record 31-8
Chance Knutson, 183 lbs.
2nd place at regions, record 26-9
Gavin DeVries, 220 lbs.
3rd place at regions, record 20-17
Chandlier Sudbeck, 160 lbs.
1st place at regions, record 31-8
Logan Ammons, 195 lbs.
2nd place at regions, record 22-10
Jed Brown, 106 lbs.
4th place at regions, record 30-11
H & H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287
BankWest
Gene Christensen: 837-2281
BankWest Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Midwest Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600
Kadoka Clinic
837-2257
Discount Fuel
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Phone: 837-2271
People’s Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697
J&S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376
Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston:
837-2241
Hogen’s Hardware
Don & Randi Oyan: 837-2274
Double H Feed
& Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976
Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Kadoka Booster Club
Promoting Spirit
State Farm Insurance
Jan Hewitt: 859-2559
Headlee Vet Clinic
Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee
Kadoka: 837-2431
Philip: 859-2610
Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350
Kadoka Press
Ronda & Robyn: 837-2259
Midland Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen:
843-2536
West River Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Peters Excavation
Brent Peters: 837-2945
Groven’s Chemical
Rick Groven: 837-2550
Stadium Sports
Mission, SD: 1-888-502-3066
Good Luck Kougars … February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Good Luck Kougars!
Class B • District 13
Feb. 25 & 28, Mar. 1
Games will be held at Presho
Good Luck Kougars!
Class B • District 13
Feb. 25 & 28, Mar. 1
Games will be held at Presho
Back row: Head Coach Mark Rieman, Ryder Sanftner, Brendon Porch, Kahler Addison.
Aage Ceplecha, True Buchholz, Yumi Hotsumi and Asst. Coach Dylan Moro.
Front row: Kenar VanderMay, Lane Patterson, Shane Ring, Logan Christensen
Chris Anderson and Aaron Janis.
Midwest
Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr: 837-2600
Kadoka Clinic
Phone: 837-2257
America’s Best
Value Inn
Phone: 837-2188
Discount Fuel
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Phone: 837-2271
People’s Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt: 837-2232
Stadium
Sports
Shelly Young • Mission, SD
1-888-502-3066
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch: 837-2697
Groven’s Chemical
Rick: 837-2550
Hogen’s
Hardware
Don & Randi Oyan: 837-2274
Rush Funeral Home
Philip • Wall • Kadoka
Jack & DJ Rush: 859-2400
Double H Feed
& Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks: 837-2976
Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621 • Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Kadoka Press
Ronda & Robyn: 837-2259
Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston:
837-2241
Kadoka Booster Club
Promoting Spirit
State Farm
Insurance
Jan Hewitt: 859-2559
Headlee Vet Clinic
Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee
Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859-2610
Ernie’s
Building Center
Midland: 843-2871
Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350
West River
Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller: 837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Badlands Petrified
Gardens
Bill Fugate: 837-2448
Peters
Excavation
Brent Peters: 837-2945
Midland
Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen:
843-2536
Farmer’s Union Ins.
Donna Enders: 837-2144
J& S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser: 837-2376
H & H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth: 837-2287
Miller’s Garbage &
Laundromat
Larry & Jan Miller: 837-2698
Badlands
Beauty Salon
Jan Miller: 390-4591
BankWest
Gene Christensen: 837-2281
BankWest
Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Jigger’s
Restaurant
Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell: 837-2000
District 13 Teams
Kadoka Area • Lyman County • Jones County
White River • Crazy Horse
Public Notices …
February 21, 2013 •Kadoka Press • Page 8
This Ad
will vanish
in seconds
if we put
it on the
radio.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
with offices
located in:
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Philip
605-859-2516
Wall
605-279-2565
Murdo
605-669-2271
Public Notice
Publication
Deadline
is
Friday at
NOON!
NOTICE OF
TAX SALE
CERTIFICATE
TO: Maggie Williams, deceased
AND THE UNKNOWN EXECUTORS,
ADMINISTRATORS, DEVICEES AND
LEGATEES OF
TO: Maggie Williams, Emil Williams,
Bee Huddleson, Connie Lehr,
Beberly Larson, and
Maggie Lou Heltzel
AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson
County is the lawful holder of a 2007 Tax
Sale Certificate, Number 178, purchased
by Jackson County at Kadoka, South
Dakota on the 15th day of December
2008, said real property described as fol-
lows:
Lot three (3), Block six (6),
Town of Wanblee, Jackson
County, South Dakota
as shown by the plat recorded in the Of-
fice of the Register of Deeds of Jackson
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that the right of re-
demption will expire and a Tax Deed for
the above described property shall be is-
sued to Jackson County (60) sixty days
from the date of completed service of this
Notice unless the property is redeemed
as permitted by law.
Dated at Kadoka, South Dakota the 11th
day of February, 2013.
Cindy Willert,
Jackson County Treasurer
[Published February 21 & 28, 2013 at the
total approximate cost of $35.38]
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
Unapproved Minutes
Kadoka City Council
REGULAR MEETING
FEBRUARY 11, 2013
7:00 P.M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert, Kieth Prang, Colby
Shuck and Brad Jorgensen. Member ab-
sent: Dick Stolley. Others present: Patty
Ulmen, Finance Officer; Forrest Davis;
Ronda Dennis; Jackie Stilwell; Patrick
Solon; Ben Latham; and JoBeth Uhlir.
Willert made Motion 13-02-1:9 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of January 14, 2013. The motion was
seconded by Jorgensen, with all mem-
bers voting yes and the motion carried 4-
0.
The bills were presented for approval.
Jorgensen made Motion 13-02-11:10 to
approve the bills as submitted. The mo-
tion was seconded by Prang. A roll call
vote was taken, with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
FEBRUARY 11, 2013 MEETING
AFLAC, Monthly Premium 85.82; Delta
Dental, Monthly Premium 575.50; SD
One Call, Message Fees 30.03; SD Re-
tirement, Monthly Contribution 2,351.60;
TruGreen, Prepay Annual Weed Spray-
ing 3,716.32; Verizon Wireless, Cell
Phone 78.14; Bank West, Annual Box
Rent 27.00; Dakota Business, Supplies
8.40; Dakota Supply Group, Supplies
48.01; Davis, Forrest, Reimburse/Com-
puter Supplies 39.99; Ecolab, Pest Con-
trol 192.42; Golden West,
Telephone/Cable 705.61; Heartland
Paper, Supplies 314.58; Hogen's Hard-
ware, Supplies/Repairs 265.44; J & S
Restore, Repairs 199.41; John Deere
Credit, Monthly Payment/Front End
Loader 2,023.03; John Deere Financial,
Supplies 724.88; Kadoka Area School,
Sound System Inspection 200.00;
Kadoka Oil, LLC, Heating/Vehicle/Equip-
ment Fuel 5,659.00; Kadoka Press, Pub-
lishing 149.92; KCBA,
Reimburse/Expenses 1,844.74; Miss
Jeans Pizza, Supplies 37.41; Neve's,
Supplies 150.00; Northwest Pipe, Sup-
plies 745.06; Oien Implement, Supplies
113.99; Pahlke, Alvin, Legal Services
150.00; Peoples Market, Supplies
242.76; Peter's Excavation, Backhoe
223.21; Pierre Landfill, Tipping Fees
433.37; Quill, Supplies 785.36; SD Dept.
of Health, Lab Samples 13.00; SD Dept.
of Revenue, Sales Tax 1,320.57; Servall,
Laundry 250.64; Stilwell, Jackie, Reim-
burse/Dues 10.00; United States Postal
Service, Postage 67.34; West Central
Electric, Electricity 5,683.19; West Plains
Engineering, Fire Alarm System/Audito-
rium 800.00; West River Excavation,
Solid Waste Transporation/Backhoe
957.90; West River Lyman Jones, Water
Payment 4,527.50; Chamberlain Whole-
sale, Liquor Supplies 1,590.81; Dakota
Toms, Liquor Supplies 79.14; Eagle
Sales, Liquor Supplies 9,039.22; Jerome
Beverage, Liquor Supplies 1,658.90;
Johnson Western Wholesale, Liquor
Supplies 2,478.09; Republic, Liquor Sup-
plies 2,424.34; ACH Withdrawal for
Taxes, Federal Employment Taxes
4,445.92; ACH Withdrawal for Dakota
Care, Health Insurance Premium
6,922.03; Total Bills Presented:
64,389.59
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of January was distributed. After
a review of the information, Willert made
Motion 13-02-11:11 to approve the finan-
cial report. The motion was seconded by
Jorgensen. A roll call vote was taken,
with all members voting yes and the mo-
tion carried 4-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 1-31-13:
Revenue: General Fund - $32,679.83; 3
B’s Fund - $2,798.30; Street Fund -
$3.85; Liquor Fund - $30,211.33; Water
Fund - $8,121.90; Sewer Fund -
$2,192.71; Solid Waste Fund -
$3,554.61.
Expense: General Fund - $33,503.43;
3B’s Fund - $878.20; Liquor Fund -
$24,647.26; Water Fund - $9,531.63;
Sewer Fund - $3,125.54; Solid Waste
Fund - $3,327.39.
Payroll: Administration - $3,057.00;
Streets - $2,672.43; Police - $3,285.58;
Auditorium/Parks - $2,379.20; Liquor -
$4,973.19; Water/Sewer – $3,211.51;
Solid Waste - $708.12; Group
Health/Dental - $7,497.53; Retirement -
$2,351.60; Social Security/Medicare -
$4,445.92.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$829,225.52; ATM Account - $2,986.74;
Certificates of Deposit - $769,463.97.
Open Bids – Auditorium Fire Alarm Sys-
tem: Sealed bids for the installation of a
fire alarm system for the auditorium were
opened and presented to the council.
There were two bids received for consid-
eration. The bids were as follows: Muth
Electric -$47,192.00; and Swiftec, Inc. -
$60,278.00. Discussion was held regard-
ing the bids and concerns were raised
about the amount budgeted for the proj-
ect and bid amounts received. At the
conclusion of discussion, Prang made
Motion 13-02-11:12 to table the bids. The
motion was seconded by Shuck. A roll
call vote was taken, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Citizen Input: No one was present to ad-
dress the council.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. Tent for Reunion Weekend: There was
money budgeted for the rental of the tent
for reunion weekend and Jackie Stilwell
has been in contact with T & K Rentals,
who will be sending a contract for the
rental agreement. No action was taken;
the council wanted to wait until the con-
tract has been received.
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: no report.
B. Streets: Proposed ads for improve-
ments on 6th Avenue (west side of the
Kadoka Care Center) were presented for
approval. One ad is for bids to mill the
road section and one ad is for bids for
“hot mix” asphalt. After review, Willert
made Motion 13-02-11:13 to approve the
ads as presented. The motion was sec-
onded by Jorgensen. A roll call vote was
taken, with all members voting yes and
the motion carried 4-0.
C. Solid Waste: no report.
D. Liquor: Uhlir stated that she is consid-
ering having karaoke on March 16, 2013.
E. Auditorium/Park: The council agreed
to allow free swimming for the partici-
pants of Rangeland Days on June 25,
2013. Mid-States Audio will be here on
February 12, 2013 to inspect the sound
system.
F. Public Safety: monthly report was dis-
tributed.
G. Mayor’s Report: The mayor presented
a letter of resignation from Cindy Vander-
May, who submitted her resignation from
the planning and zoning committee.
Willert made Motion 13-02-11:14 to ac-
cept the resignation. The motion was
seconded by Prang, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-02-11:15 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Willert, with all members voting yes and
the meeting was adjourned at 7:40 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $72.14]
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
for furnishing, laying and compacting ap-
proximately 425 tons of “Hot Mix” asphalt
concrete, with an additional 150 tons to
be used for patching at various locations,
will be received by the City of Kadoka,
South Dakota at the City Finance Office
until 4:00 p.m. (MDT) on March 11, 2013.
Envelope shall be marked “6th Avenue
Improvement Project”. The bids shall be
for two (2) items: mobilization (lump
sum) and “Hot Mix” Asphalt Concrete
(price per ton in place). Bids will be
opened and read aloud at 7:15 p.m.
(MDT) at the Kadoka City Council Meet-
ing on Monday, March 11, 2013, and
award made as soon as possible. The
City reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all bids and to waive any irregu-
larities therein and reserves the right to
award the contract to the lowest respon-
sible bidder as they so determine.
The “Hot Mix” shall be laid 4 inches thick
in 2 inch compacted lifts, with emulsified
asphalt tack applied under each lift. As-
phalt concrete shall meet South Dakota
specifications E1 P.G. 58-28 or E1 P.G.
64-22 or Q2R P.G. 58-34. The owner re-
serves the right to increase or de-
crease the quantities bid by up to 25%
for budget purposes with no change
in unit prices.
Payment for “Hot Mix” will be made to the
nearest one tenth (0.1) ton on weigh tick-
ets that accompany each delivered and
placed load on this project.
There must be enclosed with each bid a
draft, certified check or cashier’s check
certified or issued by a state or national
bank domiciled in South Dakota, payable
to the order of the City of Kadoka in the
amount of at least 5 percent or, in lieu
thereof, a bid bond of at least 10 percent
of the amount of the bid as a guarantee
that the bidder will enter into the pro-
posed contract and furnish the required
performance bonds.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tificate of insurance with minimum liability
coverage of One Million Dollars
($1,000,000.00).
Pursuant to State Law, a copy of the bid-
der’s sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder’s excise tax license as
issued by the State of South Dakota
must accompany the bid. In lieu of a copy
of the license, the bidder shall submit ap-
propriate evidence that the bidder and all
affiliates have the appropriate licenses.
The beginning date for this project will be
negotiable; however, all work on this proj-
ect must be completed before August 15,
2013. A penalty of $100.00 per day will
be assessed for each day past August
15, 2013, that the project remains incom-
plete. The City of Kadoka will be respon-
sible for traffic control on this project.
Questions regarding this project and bid
specification should be directed to:
Patrick Solon, City Street Superintendent
at 605-837-2140.
[Published February 21 & 28, March 7,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$97.47]
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
for milling of 1,574 sq. yards of city
streets will be received by the City of
Kadoka, South Dakota at the City Fi-
nance Office until 4:00 p.m. (MDT) on
March 11, 2013. The asphalt to be milled
is approximately 2 to 4 inches thick.
Milled material will be left in place. Enve-
lope shall be marked “6th Avenue Milling
Project”. The bids shall be for two (2)
items: mobilization (lump sum) and
milling (price per square yard). The City
of Kadoka will assist with traffic control.
Bids will be opened and read aloud at
7:15 p.m. (MDT) at the Kadoka City
Council Meeting on Monday, March 11,
2013, and award made as soon as pos-
sible. The City reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids and to waive
any irregularities therein and reserves
the right to award the contract to the low-
est responsible bidder as they so deter-
mine.
There must be enclosed with each bid a
draft, certified check or cashier’s check
certified or issued by a state or national
bank domiciled in South Dakota, payable
to the order of the City of Kadoka in the
amount of at least 5 percent or, in lieu
thereof, a bid bond of at least 10 percent
of the amount of the bid as a guarantee
that the bidder will enter into the pro-
posed contract and furnish the required
performance bonds.
Each bid must be accompanied by a cer-
tificate of insurance with minimum liability
coverage of One Million Dollars
($1,000,000.00).
Pursuant to State Law, a copy of the bid-
der’s sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder’s excise tax license as
issued by the State of South Dakota
must accompany the bid. In lieu of a copy
of the license, the bidder shall submit ap-
propriate evidence that the bidder and all
affiliates have the appropriate licenses.
The beginning and ending dates for this
project will be negotiable, to correlate
with the beginning date for the project by
the hot mix asphalt company. The City of
Kadoka will be responsible for traffic con-
trol on this project.
Questions regarding this project and bid
specification should be directed to:
Patrick Solon, City Street Superintendent
at 605-837-2140.
[Published February 21 & 28, March 7,
2013, at the total approximate cost of
$75.81]
NOTICE
TOWN OF INTERIOR
The Town Board of Interior will meet at
7:00 p.m. on February 27th at Cowboy
Corner to consider the following One Day
Temporary On Sale Malt Beverage Li-
cense:
Interior Volunteer Fire Department, Valid
March 1, 2013 for a special event.
Any person(s) or his/her attorney, inter-
ested in the approval or rejection of any
license, may appear and be heard at the
above meeting.
Finance Officer
Linda Livermont
[Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $8.67]
NOTICE OF
VACANCY
MUNICIPALITY
OF INTERIOR
Notice is given that the position of trustee
held by Sue Leach will be vacant. Any-
one wishing to serve may pick up a nom-
inating petition from Linda Livermont.
Circulation of the nominating petitions
may begin on Februaury 22, 2013 and
petitions may be filed with the Finance
Officer at the Livermont home between
the hours of 5:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m.,
MST, but no later than 5:00 p.m. on
March 29th.
Linda Livermont, Finance Officer
Town of Interior
[Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $9.03]
TOWN OF INTERIOR
APPROVED
REGULAR MEETING
MINUTES
NOVEMBER 14, 2012
The Town Board of Interior met on No-
vember 14, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at Cowboy
Corner. Board Members present were
Allen Grimes and Sue Leach. Kelly For-
tune was absent. Also present were
Chris Haines from SPN, Lance Eberly,
Ron Twiss and Linda Livermont.
Minutes for the 10/10 regular meeting
were approved as read.
OLD BUSINESS: Chris gave an update
on the lagoon project. Pay Request #3
has been sent out. The next pay request
will include a change order for the extra
fence and mobilization for $982.73 and
an additional day added to purchase
fence supplies. A pump test was done
today. There is a chain left to install, but
other than that, the project is substan-
tially complete. The final contract date
and final completion date will be the
same. Today will be used as the date of
substantial completion. There is a pick
list of 5 items in the pump controls, but
that is all. Motion by Sue to approve pay
request #3, seconded by Allen. Motion
passed. Copies of Pay Request #3 will
be sent to CSDED, SPN and RCS, with
one copy for the town. Ron asked about
grass seeding on the rodeo club
grounds. Chris stated that western wheat
grass will be used with a cover crop of
winter wheat. It will be drilled with mulch
on top. If there are problems with the
grass not coming up in the spring, it is
warrantied. Resolution 12-01 to approve
the surveyor’s certificate for the land
where the lagoon is was read. Motion by
Allen to approve the Resolution, sec-
onded by Sue. Motion passed. Linda will
get a deed from Dan VanGorp for the
land we are exchanging to Perry and will
get the plat signed.
A-1 sewer used a camera to look at the
sewer line from Woodenknife’s to Myers
and found it in bad shape. It could be
lined to fix it, they will send an estimate.
They said it would be approximately 25%
of the cost of replacing the line with new
sewer line. The rest of the sewer lines
are in good shape for now. Wood-
enKnife's sewer line has settled and will
need dug up, it was approved to have it
fixed when Charlie does the dirt work for
the fire hall. We still need 6 culverts (18”
x 20’) and 3 bands and bolts to replace
culverts in town. Allen will call the County.
We could have them installed while Char-
lie has his backhoe in town.
NEW BUSINESS: The Fire Department
has accepted the town’s offer to pur-
chase the old fire hall and garage for
$20,000. Motion by Sue to approve pur-
chasing the fire hall and garage for
$20,000, seconded by Allen. Kelly had
expressed opposition to the purchase.
Motion passed with a vote of 2 for and 1
against. The sander has been installed
on the pickup and works well. It was
agreed to pay for the water line installa-
tion on the new Fire Hall and to pay the
monthly water charge as in the past.
Line installation will cost around $2,900.
Linda will look into terminating the 99
year lease once the Fire Department
moves to its new building.
Motion made by Allen, seconded by
Sue to pay the following bills:
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .608.52
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .712.80
WRLJ – Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42.50
Cowboy Corner, fuel . . . . . . . . .132.20
Stan Houston, line locator . . . . .759.23
Firestone, pickup tires . . . . . . . .419.80
Kadoka Press, subscription . . . . .35.00
SPN, project supervision . . .29,383.63
Wendell Buxcell,
outhouse rental . . . . . . . . . . . .900.00
SD Municipal League,
2013 Dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52.14
A-1 Sewer & Drain,
clean/camera sewer . . . . . . .1,520.92
Black Truck & Trailer,
sander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,590.92
SDML Workers Comp
Fund Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . .576.00
RCS Construction,
sewer project payment . . .127,345.76
Galen Livermont, wages . . . . . .221.16
Mitch Means, wages . . . . . . . . .216.44
Linda Livermont, wages . . . . . . .273.05
Total Expenses . . . . . . . . . .170,789.15
Motion by Sue, seconded by Allen to ad-
journ the meeting. Meeting adjourned at
7:20 p.m. The next regular meeting will
be held December 12th at Cowboy Cor-
ner. Liquor licenses will be reviewed at
that time.
Linda Livermont, Finance Officer
Town of Interior
[Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $42.24]
TOWN OF INTERIOR
APPROVED
REGULAR MEETING
MINUTES
DECEMBER 12, 2012
The Town Board of Interior met on De-
cember 12, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. at Cowboy
Corner. Board Members present were
Allen Grimes, Kelly Fortune and Sue
Leach. Also present were Galen Liver-
mont and Linda Livermont.
Minutes for the 11/14/2012 regular meet-
ing were approved as read.
OLD BUSINESS: The sewer lagoon proj-
ect is mostly complete. Board members
looked at the pictures from A-1 Sewer &
Drain that were taken on 6th Avenue.
The WoodenKnife’s hookup will need
dug up. An estimate for relining the
sewer pipe from WoodenKnife’s to Myers
will be obtained. Payment # 4 was re-
viewed with Chris Haines on Monday.
Motion by Sue, seconded by Allen to ap-
prove Payment #4 to RCS Construction.
Linda will check with Kemnitz on the war-
ranty deed for the old dump site and what
to do about the 99 year land lease with
the IVFD where the current fire hall sits
once the IVFD moves to their new build-
ing.
NEW BUSINESS: No skunks have been
trapped for the last two weeks, so Mitch
will pull out the traps and store them for
the winter. The following Liquor Licenses
were reviewed: Wagon Wheel, LLC, dba
Wagon Wheel Bar, Lots 9 & 10, Block 5,
Original Town of Interior, on-sale retail
liquor and off-sale package liquor; Terry
and Shirley Gartner dba Badlands Gro-
cery, Lot 7, Block 2, Original Town of In-
terior, off-sale package liquor; and
Charles Carlson dba Horseshoe Bar,
Lots 5 & 6, Block 12, Original Town of In-
terior, on-sale retail liquor. Motion by
Allen, seconded by Sue to approve the
licenses. Motion passed.
Motion made by Kelly, seconded by Sue
to pay the following bills:
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .567.71
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .712.80
WRLJ Rural Water . . . . . . . . . . . .60.00
Kieffer Sanitation,
Lg Dumpster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .746.32
WRLJ Rural Water,
Fire Hall hookup . . . . . . . . . .3,218.54
SPN, Project supervision . . . .6,813.20
DENR 2013 Fees . . . . . . . . . . . .50.00
Mastercard, Lights and Fuel . . .135.07
Linda Livermont,
postage reimbursement . . . . . . .10.18
Allen Grimes ¼ Wages . . . . . . . .94.35
Sue Leach ¼ Wages . . . . . . . . . .94.35
Kelly Fortune ¼ Wages . . . . . . . .94.35
Galen Livermont, wages . . . . . .112.65
Mitch Means, wages . . . . . . . . .386.84
Linda Livermont, wages . . . . . . .273.05
Total Expenses . . . . . . . . . . .13,369.41
Motion by Kelly, seconded by Sue to ad-
journ the meeting. Meeting adjourned at
TOWN OF INTERIOR
APPROVED
REGULAR MEETING
MINUTES
JANUARY 9, 2013
The Town Board of Interior met on Janu-
ary 9, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at Cowboy Cor-
ner. Board Members present were Allen
Grimes and Sue Leach. Kelly Fortune
was absent. Also present were Galen
Livermont and Linda Livermont.
Minutes for the 12/12/2012 meeting were
approved as read.
OLD BUSINESS: The lagoon project is
complete. Sue made a motion, seconded
by Allen to accept the completed lagoon
project. Motion passed. Linda will look
into how to get rid of junk buildings in
town per the ordinances. Garbage collec-
tion has gone up to $15.65 per resi-
dence. It was agreed to raise the charge
to $17 per month, Linda will look into
whether we have to change the ordi-
nance or not.
NEW BUSINESS: The following wages
were approved by a motion by Allen, sec-
onded by Sue: Board President and
Trustees $400 per year; Finance Officer
$300 per month; and Maintenance
Worker $10.00 per hour. Ralph Kemnitz
was appointed as town lawyer. The
trustee position currently held by Sue
Leach will expire this year. Notices will be
published in the paper.
Motion made by Allen, seconded by Sue
to pay the following bills:
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .623.03
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .712.80
WRLJ Rural Water . . . . . . . . . . . .60.00
Kadoka Press,
publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94.22
Dept. of Revenue,
transfer fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75.00
SPN, project supervision . . . .2,413.55
IRS, 4th Qtr. taxes . . . . . . . . . . .448.08
RCS Construction,
Pymt #4 final . . . . . . . . . . . .72,941.04
CSDED, 2013 membership . . . .200.00
Galen Livermont, wages . . . . . .165.47
Linda Livermont, wages . . . . . . .273.05
Total Expenses . . . . . . . . . . 78,006.24
Motion by Sue, seconded by Allen to ad-
journ the meeting. Meeting adjourned at
7:55 p.m. The next regular meeting will
be held February 13, 2013 at Cowboy
Corner.
Linda Livermont, Finance Officer
Town of Interior
[Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $23.08]
7:50 p.m. The next regular meeting will be
held January 9, 2013 at Cowboy Corner.
Finance Officer
Linda Livermont
[Published February 21, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $28.60]
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
EMPLOYMENT
FULL-TIME DEPUTY SHERIFF,
Hyde County, Highmore, SD: Must
be certified in law enforcement or
willing to be trained and certified
within one year of hire date. Applica-
tion available from Hyde County Au-
ditor’s Office, 605-852-2519, or Box
379, Highmore, SD 57345. Closing
date: March 1, 2013. Hyde County is
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
BELLE FOURCHE, a growing South
Dakota community of 6,500, seeks
Economic Development Executive
Director. Excellent wages and bene-
fits. Full job description and applica-
tion at www.bellefourche.org .
Closing date: March 1, 2013.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
Custer Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care in beautiful Custer, SD,
have full time and PRN (as-needed)
RN, LPN and Licensed Medical As-
sistant positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome!
Please contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for more in-
formation or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
PERKINS COUNTY HIGHWAY
DEPT. has opening for
Mechanic/Operator. Good Benefits.
Applications are available at Court-
house in Bison, SD or call 605-244-
5629.
PATROL OFFICER – Hourly pay
range: $20.14-$24.50/hr. Visit:
www.cityofbrookings.org Return ap-
plication w/resume to PO Box 270,
Brookings, SD 57006-0270. dlang-
land@cityofbrookings.org.
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST OPEN-
ING for Northwest Area Schools Ed-
ucation Cooperative in NW South
Dakota. Competitive wage, excellent
benefits, vehicle provided. Contact
Cris Owens at 605-466-2206 or
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Tag Board • Envelopes
Rubber & Self-inking Stamps
Stamp Pads & Ink • Paper
Check with
us first
Let us give you
all your price
quotes
Ravellette
Publications does
ALL types of
printing jobs!
Call the Kadoka Press
for more info at
837-2259
or 859-2516
LAND FOR SALE
LARAMIE RIVER RANCH - Limited
Parcels Left! 35 acre ranches from
$695 per acre. Magnificent water
and mountain views. Low down -
Guaranteed financing. Call Today!
1-888-411-7050 www.RanchLand-
Wyoming.com.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
SD HORSE FAIR March 15-17 Fair-
grounds, Sioux Falls. Dana Hokana
Clinics. Ranch Rodeo, Horseman’s
Challenge, Trade Show, Sandy
Jirkovsky, Breed & Driving demos,
Youth Events, Cowboy Church. LIKE
us on facebook! www.SDHORSE-
FAIR.com.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery. 50x80,
62x100, 68x120, 68x200, 100x200.
Take advantage of tax deductions.
Limited Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-
7040.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
NOTICE
The advertising signs for Main Street are
provided by KCBA.
Please, remember to remove them from the street
and take the posters off the boards after use.
Buy • Rent
Sell • Trade
or Giveaway
Classifieds Work!!
Kadoka Press • 605-837-2259
press@kadokatelco.com
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
After 30 years of batching redi-
mix, I have sold my plants in
Kadoka, Wall, and Murdo, but not
the concrete construction end of
my business. We are still here to
serve all your concrete jobs.
Richard, Kadoka
Haven, Wall • Jerry, Murdo
Just give us a call at for a quote
on any concrete construction jobs.
Thank you for your years of support,
Richard & Colleen Hildebrand
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
People’s Market • Kadoka Gas & Go
Sundowner Motel • Rush Funeral Home
BankWest • Headlee Enterprise
Midwest Coop • Petrified Gardens
Discount Fuel • America’s Best Valu Inn
West Central Electric • Silver Court
Crew Agency • West River Excavation
Badlands National Park • Kadoka Press
Community growth through active support …
2013 KCBA Members
KCBA meets the first Thursday of the
every month. Meetings are open to the public,
so be an active member
in your community by attending a meeting!
FOR SALE: 7 bedrooms, 3 bath,
large basement, 2 fireplaces, at-
tached garage. Could be separated
and used as a 2 bed, 1 bath rental.
$56,000 firm. Kadoka. 605-488-
0846. KP32-3tp
OPEN POSITION: Kadoka Area
School District is looking for a full-
time Special Education Paraprofes-
sional. Non-certified applications
can be obtained from the school or
on the school district’s website;
kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please feel free
to contact the school with further
questions about this position. Com-
pleted applications may be dropped
off at the school or send it to: Attn:
Jeffery M. Nemecek, Elementary
Principal, PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD
57543 or call 1-605-837-2175. EOE
KP32-3tc
NEED A PLUMBER? Call Dale at
605-441-1053 or leave a message
at home 605-837-0112. K31-4tp
PASTURE WANTED: Summer
pasture for 100-250 cow/calf pairs
preferably in the Jackson/Haakon
/Jones county area, but would con-
sider other areas. With full mainte-
nance. Call 605-843-2869.
KP29-tfn
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thank you to all of those who
took the time to vote for me in the
Rising Star of the West competition.
It didn’t turn out in my favor, but I had
a blast and it was amazing to see
how many people care in our small
community and surrounding towns.
Thanks again everyone!
Tessa Stout
Thank You
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Handrahan Const .......................20-8
Shad’s Towing ...........................18-10
Dakota Bar................................16-12
Petersen’s ..................................12-16
Badland’s Auto..........................10-14
Rockers........................................8-20
Hightlights:
Jerry Mooney.........2-7 split; 196/555
Carl Brown ..................203 clean/533
Bryan Buxcel ...............187 clean/495
Connie Schlim......................5-7 split
Matt Reckling.......................5-7 split
Jackie Schull ......................3-10 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor................................18-2
Peoples Market ...........................13-7
G&A Trenching...........................12-8
Philip Health Service ...............10-10
Kennedy Impl ...........................10-10
Bear Auto ....................................7-13
George’s Welding ........................5-15
Kadoka Tree Service...................5-15
Highlights:
Earl Park.......................218, 224/611
Tony Gould ............................210/575
Cory Boyd..............................207/539
Steve Varner.................................537
James Mansfield..........................523
Fred Foland..................................520
Tyler Gartner ........................200/516
Norm Buxcel .......................5-10 split
Johnny Wilson....................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
(standing at the end of week 23)
Invisibles...............................24.5-7.5
Cutting Edge Salon ..................22-10
State Farm..........................19.5-12.5
Bowling Belles ....................13.5-18.5
Jolly Ranchers ......................9.5-22.5
Highlights:
Vonda Hamill ........................167/430
Debbie Gartner ............................162
Charlene Kjerstad........................155
Karen Foland........................5-6 split
Kay Kroetch..........................4-5 split
Jen Schriever........................4-5 split
Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................19-5
Morrison’s Haying ....................14-10
Wall Food Center ......................13-11
Dorothy’s Catering....................13-11
Hildebrand Concrete ................12-12
Just Tammy’s ............................11-13
First National Bank ...................9-15
Chiefie’s Chicks...........................5-19
Highlights:
Rachel Kjerstad.....................194/490
Jessica Wagner.............................130
Marlis Petersen.....5-7 split; 186/488
Lois Porch.....................................489
Amy Morrison ..............................181
Kathy Arthur................................171
Tena Slovek ..........................2-7 split
MaryLynn Crary ..................4-5 split
Sandee Gittings..................3-10 split
Shar Moses .........................3-10 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ..........................20-4
Coyle’s SuperValu.......................16-8
O’Connell Const ..........................15-9
WEE BADD...............................12-12
A&M Laundry.............................9-15
West River Pioneer Tanks..........9-15
Dakota Bar..................................8-16
McDonnell Farms .......................7-17
Highlights:
Jay McDonnell .............................211
Neal Petersen..................203 x 2/561
Jan Bielmaier...............................548
Andrew Reckling................203 clean
Rick Coyle...........................192 clean
Doug Hauk ........................4-7-9 split
Randy Boyd .......................2-5-7 split
John Heltzel ......................4-5-7 split
Alvin Pearson .....................3-10 split
Scott Brech ...........................2-7 split
Matt Reckling.......................2-7 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service................20-8
Lee & the Ladies.........................19-9
Roy’s Repair ..............................17-11
Cristi’s Crew .............................15-13
King Pins...................................10-18
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Aaron Richardson .................190/546
Alvin Pearson........................195/498
Kelly Fees..............................174/496
Theresa Miller.......................176/479
Cory Boyd..............................204/481
Roy Miller.....................................188
Angel Nemec .........................163/422
Tanner Norman..................5-10 split
Agricul ture …
February 21, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE,
FEATUFINC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS, FECULAF
CATTLE SALE, & DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS
DULL SALES. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. DEEP CREEK & MIL-
LAR ANGUS: 12 P.M. (MT}. FEEDER CATTLE TO FOLLOW.
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTING 4UUU HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
WILLIAMS RN - 350 FANCY DLK CLVS; FS, ASV (2OO STFS ¸
875, 150 HF DLK FEPLC.HFFS ¸750-850} CFEEN....750-875=
FITCH FAMILY FMS - 300 DLK STFS; FS......................700-800=
HORTON RANCH.... - 215 DLK & A FEW FED CLVS (135 STFS &
80 DV FEPLC. HFFS}; FS,NI ........................................700-750=
RADWAY - 215 DLK CLVS (140 HFFS & 75 STFS};
FS,NI...........................................................................750-800=
MINT2LAFF RANCH - 200 DLK STFS & DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS ...............................................................................600-700=
TRASK FAMILY - 200 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......600-650=
KIRK - 150 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI..............................650=
TENNIS - 130 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .......750-800=
FORTUNE - 130 DLK CLVS; FS......................................550-650=
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - 130 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. ........
HFFS; FS,NI,PFECUAFD SHOT..........................................650=
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO - 120 DLK CLVS; FS,NI,HOME FAISED,
ALL HFFS IN TOWN ....................................................650-750=
DIAMOND S RANCH - 110 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS;
FS ...............................................................................500-600=
HJORT RANCH - 110 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .............500-600=
FINN FARMS - 100 FED ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (ALL
HFFS IN TOWN} ..........................................................750-800=
SCHUL2 - 100 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI ........................550-650=
DALY & DALY - 100 FANCY DLK ANC DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI ..................................................................................700=
SHAW RANCH - 100 DLK HFFS; FS,NI..................................550=
MILLER - 95 DLK & A FEW CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI...........550-650=
ENNEN - 90 FANCY DLK & A FEW DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................650-675=
STOUT - 75 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI, HOME FAISED
(FFONT END IN TOWN} ......................................................725=
BEARPAW RANCH - 70 DLK & FED HFFS; FS...............650-700=
DARTT ANGUS - 70 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .........650-700=
GOOD - 65 DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......................600-700=
DENKE - 60 FANCY DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .........650-750=
BRINK - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......................600-700=
FOLAND RANCH - 60 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI...........................................................................550-650=
PETERSON - 55 DWF FIFST X & A FEW HEFF DV FEPLC. HFFS;
FS,NI (ALL DWF HFFS IN TOWN} ........................................700=
FREIN - 40 DLK & A FEW FED STFS; FS.......................800-900=
PROKOP & DEVRIES - 40 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI
(FFONT END} ..............................................................600-650=
NIXON - 35 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ......................550-575=
WILLIAMS - 35 DLK & DWF STFS; FS............................600-700=
KRUET2 - 30 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .................................500=
DOOLITTLE - 25 FANCY DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ..750-800=
CASPERS - 17 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI..................680-700=
LARSEN - 15 DLK & DWF DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI ........500-550=
14 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS.............................................600-650=
DARTT - 10 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI.............................700=
HENRY - 10 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI .....................600-700=
KALTENBACH - 10 DLK CLVS; FS,NI .............................400-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FE-
PLACEMENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUF-
INC DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF &
PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED
HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOL-
LOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: F£B. J9, 2DJS
L1gÞ1 run o] bred o] oous & o good run o] ue1gÞ-ups.
4,DDD Feeders & Rep1ooemen1 He1]ers ne×1 ueeK.
BRED CATTLE:
BRET HANSON - FAITH
20........................................DLK 3 YF OLD COWS 1220=..........$1,470.00
20......................................................DLK HFFS 1019=..........$1,275.00
DON & VI MOODY - PHILIP
15 .....................................................DWF HFFS 1063=..........$1,360.00
14.......................DLK & DWF 3 & 4 YF OLD COWS 1313=..........$1,275.00
20.......................DLK & DWF 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 1408=..........$1,250.00
34.......................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1451=..........$1,120.00
10 ...............HEFF SOLID & DFOKEM MOUTH COWS 1387=..........$1,070.00
30..................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUFTH COWS 1364=..........$1,040.00
LOWELL BADER - VALENTINE, NE
11 ...........................................DLK & DWF HFFS 1109=..........$1,300.00
JERRY WALKER ESTATE - TUTHILL
54......................................................DLK HFFS 1014=..........$1,200.00
MONTY WILLIAMS - BOX ELDER
23.......................DLK & DWF SOLID MOUTH COWS 1306=..........$1,190.00
18....................DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1327=..........$1,090.00
WEIGH-UPS:
SCARBOROUGH RANCH - HAYES
1 .........................FWF COW 1580= ............$86.50
1 .........................FWF COW 1375= ............$86.00
1........................CHAF COW 1515= ............$85.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1380= ............$84.50
1........................CHAF COW 1500= ............$84.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1470= ............$83.50
2 ............CHAF & FED COWS 1635= ............$82.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1535= ............$82.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1320= ............$81.00
1 .........................DWF COW 1615= ............$80.00
1........................CHAF COW 1580= ............$79.50
1....................DLK COWETTE 1150= ............$91.00
1..........................DLK DULL 1775= ..........$105.00
2........................DLK DULLS 2070= ..........$104.00
WAYNE HUETHER - INTERIOR
6 ........................FED COWS 1248= ............$84.25
CRAIG REINDL - CUSTER
1........................CHAF COW 1290= ............$83.50
SCOTT HUETHER - INTERIOR
1..........................FED COW 1225= ............$83.00
15................FED COWETTES 1156= ............$84.00
CHARLES MAUDE - CAPUTA
1 ..........................DLK COW 1490= ............$82.00
KELLY ESCOTT - FAITH
1..........................DLK DULL 1800= ..........$105.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1440= ............$78.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1565= ............$77.50
REINDL LIVESTOCK - CUSTER
1 ..........................DLK COW 1340= ............$82.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1105= ............$77.50
3 ..................DLK COWETTES 1107= ............$81.00
DON & VI MOODY - PHILIP
1 ..........................DLK COW 1275= ............$82.50
6.........................DLK COWS 1221= ............$78.25
12......................FWF COWS 1348= ............$77.75
1 ..........................DLK COW 1270= ............$77.50
1....................DLK COWETTE 960=..............$98.00
1....................DLK COWETTE 1060= ............$86.00
1 .........................DLK HFFT 1075= ..........$108.00
PAUL VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1 ..........................DLK COW 1105= ............$82.00
1 ..........................DLK COW 1630= ............$79.00
DARREL & CONNIE MICKELSON - ENNING
1....................DLK COWETTE 1110= ............$90.00
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
1..........................FED COW 1200= ............$81.50
JERRY HICKS - NORRIS
1........................CHAF COW 1475= ............$80.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1460= ............$78.50
4........................DLK HFFTS 1175= ............$86.00
BROST RANCH - MURDO
1 ..........................DLK COW 1235= ............$80.50
1..........................DLK DULL 1625= ............$96.00
KEVIN REINDL - CUSTER
1 ..........................DLK COW 1420= ............$80.00
1..........................DLK DULL 1695= ............$96.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE COMPANY - QUINN
2........................DLK DULLS 1713= ..........$103.50
2........................DLK DULLS 1655= ..........$103.00
2........................DLK DULLS 1605= ..........$102.00
2........................DLK DULLS 1988= ..........$101.75
1..........................DLK DULL 2050= ..........$101.00
2........................DLK DULLS 1735= ..........$100.50
2........................DLK DULLS 1920= ..........$100.00
BRYCE VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1 ..........................DLK COW 1795= ............$79.50
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
1 ..........................DLK COW 1245= ............$79.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1380= ............$77.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1445= ............$76.50
LAVERNE KOCH - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ..........................DLK COW 1310= ............$79.00
RODNEY RAYHILL - MARTIN
1 ..........................DLK COW 1240= ............$78.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1155= ............$77.50
1 ..........................DLK COW 1325= ............$76.50
LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
1....................DLK COWETTE 1045= ............$93.00
HORTON RANCH - WALL
1..........................DLK DULL 1845= ..........$102.00
1..........................DLK DULL 2020= ............$99.00
CHUCK ENDERS - KADOKA
1 ..........................DLK COW 1350= ............$78.00
GERALD RISSE - MARTIN
2.........................DLK COWS 1505= ............$77.00
1....................DLK COWETTE 1030= ............$86.00
DEAN & DONNA KLAPPERICH - RAPID CITY
1 ..........................DLK COW 1525= ............$76.50
EARL BRUNSON - FAIRBURN
1 ..........................DLK COW 1260= ............$76.50
1....................DLK COWETTE 1050= ............$86.50
STOUT CHAROLAIS - KADOKA ...41 AVG. $3,31S.00
HORSE REPORT:
GOOD HORSES FROM..........................$10 - $20JCWT
SADDLE PROSPECTS .......................$42S - $S2SJCWT
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
RH CATTLE
SELLING
TUESDAY,
MARCH 12
AT 12:00 P.M.
(MT)
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . . . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . . . . . .344-2500
All others call . . . . . . . . . .911
                JC Ponds Project
A program providing cost share
is available to producers for the
purpose of creating new ponds or
for the repair of existing ponds.
The program will end on December
31, 2013. Producer share is 1/3 of
the cost with the grant funding the
remaining 2/3 of the cost. A graz-
ing plan assigning a stocking rate
and grazing period will be required
for acceptance. Please contact the
Conservation District for addi-
tional information.
2013 Tree Planting Season
Trees, shrubs, native and peren-
nial plants will be arriving mid to
latter part of April. Check your
tree belts for those needed replace-
ments which will help to provide a
much more effective barrier in the
protection of your livestock, fields
and home. It is also a good time to
check your weed barrier fabric to
assure that the fabric is not up
against your tree trunks therefore,
possibly causing girdling of the
tree which will result in the death
of the tree. There is also still
time to place an order,
whether it be for urban or
rural use.
52nd Annual Resource
Conservation Speech Contest
$2,300 in scholarships available
to any high school student in
South Dakota. The theme for this
year’s contest is “The Economic
Impact of Conservation on
America”. The deadline for com-
pletion of the local contest is
March 23rd. Contact your local
speech instructor or the Conserva-
tion District.
Karst Memorial Scholarship
Requirements:
•Current year graduate of a SD
High School
•Upper 50% of the class
•Going into an agricultural re-
lated field
Three (3) $500 scholarships of-
fered. Paid to recipient upon com-
pletion of 2nd semester
registration. May be used for buy-
ing books or any other college use.
Contact your local guidance coun-
selor or the Conservation District.
Application deadline is March 31,
2013.
SD Arbor Day Poster Contest
•Theme - “Trees are Terrific .
. . In Cities and Towns!”
•Open to all fifth grade students
Local selection to be completed
prior to the state entry deadline of
March 22, 2013. Information being
sent out to all fifth grade classes.
You may also contact the Conser-
vation District to participate.
2013 Arbor Day Essay/Poem
Contest
•Open to all 5th and 6th grade
students from South Dakota
•Theme based on importance of
Arbor Day and trees, using per-
sonal experience, why we celebrate
Arbor Day and the planting and
care of trees across the state.
•Local participants will receive
a free tree seedling to take home
and plant.
•Monetary awards and other
gifts awarded at the State level
contest.
•Local entry deadline is March
22, 2013.
ARBOR DAY
is Friday, April 26, 2013
For additional information on
the above programs and contests –
please contact the Jackson County
Conservation District at 837-2242
#3, mayola.horst@sd.nacdnet.net
or stop by the USDA Service Cen-
ter at 805 Main Street, Kadoka.
JC Conservation District
Mayola Horst, District Manager
A series of forums which began
in mid-January across the state
hosted by the South Dakota De-
partment of Agriculture (SDDA)
and SDSU Extension will continue
thru March 21. The remaining 18
sessions will be held at area live-
stock markets statewide to discuss
South Dakota's vision for livestock
production.
"Agriculture is South Dakota's
No. 1 industry, with the total eco-
nomic impact of the ag sector of $21
Billion in 2010. Livestock is a
major contributor to the agricul-
tural economy with the total value
of livestock alone being $3 billion.
Revenue generated from livestock
and jobs that are created in pro-
cessing and manufacturing of the
livestock industry impact the over-
all infrastructure and the economic
health of the state," said B. Lynn
Gordon, Cow/Calf Extension Field
Specialist.
Gordon adds that South Dakota
is fortunate to have access to the
resources needed for livestock pro-
duction, such as access to land,
water and feed resources as well as
progressive, entrepreneurial people
interested in raising and develop-
ing livestock.
"By combining these resources
along with relevant research from
the land grant University of SDSU,
South Dakota has the ability to
produce food for demands of the do-
mestic and international markets,"
Gordon said.
Agricultural producers are in-
vited to attend these forums to join
SDDA and SDSU Extension in a
conversation about the opportuni-
ties and challenges in livestock pro-
duction and the impact of
agriculture to rural communities
and statewide revenues and infra-
structure. These meetings will
allow a dialogue about the next
generation of farmers and ranch-
ers.
Remaining sessions and their lo-
cations are:
Feb. 25 - Platte Livestock
Mar. 5 - Mitchell Livestock
Mar. 11 - Belle Fourche Livestock
Mar. 12 - St. Onge Livestock
Mar. 13 - Faith Livestock
Mar. 14 - Lemmon Livestock
Mar. 18 - Miller Livestock
Mar. 19 - Presho Livestock
Mar. 20 - Winner Livestock
Mar. 21 - Chamberlin Livestock
All sessions will take place at
6:30 p.m. local time.
For more information contact
Sarah Caslin, SDDA Livestock De-
velopment Specialist at 605-773-
3549; sarah.caslin@state.sd.us or
B. Lynn Gordon, Cow/Calf Exten-
sion Field Specialist at 605-782-
3290, lynn.gordon@sdstate.edu.
Next generation of
livestock production
forums to continue
through March

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