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Kadoka Press, December 6, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 21
December 6, 2012
News Briefs …
KCBA meeting, will be
Thursday, December 6, 12:00
noon, at Jigger’s Restaurant.
A Blood Drive will be held at
the Kadoka Fire Hall on Tues-
day, December 18 from 2-5:30
p.m.
Jackson County Commis-
sioner’s meeting will meet
on Monday, December 10, 9:00
a.m. at the JC Courthouse.
Kadoka City Council will
meet on Monday, December
10, 7:00 p.m. city finance of-
fice.
Kadoka Area School Board
meeting will be Wednesday,
December 12, 6:00 p.m. at the
Kadoka School.
Pick up your book: We
Band of Angels, at the Jackson
County Library. Book discus-
sion, led by Dorothy Liegl, will
be held Sunday, January 6,
2013, 2:00 p.m. at the Library.
Bring a friend for this latest
discussion. Stop in the Jack-
son County Library to sign-up.
Call Deb Moor at 837-2689
with any questions.
first clue on it. Decipher the clue,
go to the businesses the clue leads
you to. There you can sign up for an
in-store drawing and receive your
next clue. Attach it to your clue
sheet and continue on until your
clue sheet is full.
You will have from Sunday, De-
cember 9 until 4:00 p.m. on Friday,
December 21 to get all of the clues
from participating businesses and
turn in your clue sheet.
When the clue sheet is full, turn
it in at the Jackson County Library
on Main Street where you will be
entered in a drawing for $100 in
KCBA Bucks (the treasure).
The rules are simple: Partici-
pants must be 18 years old or older,
one entry per person, you must
visit all of businesses and com-
pletely fill out your clue sheet to be
eligible for the final drawing.
Blank clue sheets may be picked
up at the Jackson County Library
or BankWest if you are unable to
attend the KCBA Country Christ-
man on December 9.
The Kadoka Community Better-
ment Association invites you to join
the fun and hunt for treasure all
over the City of Kadoka this
Christmas.
At the KCBA Country Christ-
mas on Sunday, December 9, you
will be given a clue sheet with the
Kadoka Community
Betterment Assoc.
Treasure Hunt
Harold G. Schnee was born on April 7, 1917 to Bob and Maggie (Illing-
worth) Schnee in Kadoka, South Dakota.
And to this family, Harold had two brothers, Milo and Linton, and one
sister, Ruth Solberg.
Harold went to grade school in Kadoka and graduated the salutato-
rian of his high school graduating class. He rode a horse six miles to
school for several years. “That was until I talked my parents into buying
me a bicycle, which was a big mistake,” Harold said with a laugh. How-
ever, he enjoyed driving his mother to church six miles with a single
horse buggy.
He married Mary J. Burton on August 19, 1967 and they made their
home in Kadoka.
Harold’s family is made up of four children: Clinton, Carol (Labau),
Caron (Mielke), and one stepdaughter, Teresa Burton (Smith).
He is also lucky to have five grandchildren living in Kadoka: Aubrey
Schnee and Ana, Molly, Kate and Max KcKeehan.
After serving in the United States Army from 1942-1945, he returned
to his hometown of Kadoka where he continues to live.
Some of the organizations Harold has belonged to include the Pres-
byterian Church in Kadoka where he served as a Deacon for 50 years. He
was also on the school board for 30 years and served as the president for
one year.
One of Harold’s favorite hobbies include 30 years of riding motorcy-
cles, including going to the rally in Sturgis. He started the first Family
Wagon Train in this area and the Badlands Wagon Train. He also spent
time breaking horses and mules to drive. Harold’s dad had the first mules
in the country so Harold grew up with them.
Other hobbies he’s enjoyed throughout the years are ballroom dancing
and square dancing.
For 36 years he ran a dairy; at one time he had one of the biggest grade
A dairies in the State of South Dakota. Harold served on the state dairy
board for several years and also was also on the Black Hills Milk Produc-
ers board. He sold the dairy in 1980 and went back to sheep. Bum lambs
put Harold through school.
And don’t forget the many times he was in the Days of 76 Parade in
Deadwood, both riding (playing the doctor) and driving a team and
wagon.
Harold has always been a big animal lover and had many excellent
working dog who would do anything for him.
He became a resident at the Kadoka Nursing Home on August 2, 2011
and he is also the second oldest resident at the home.
Kadoka Nursing Home
December Resident of the Month
The 15th Annual Pie Day will be
held on Saturday, December 8 from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the SD Capitol
building in Pierre.
The event will include free pie,
cookies, coffee and ice cream. This
event is free and the public is en-
couraged to stop by the Capitol and
enjoy.
Area talent will provide enter-
tainment throughout the day.
15th Annual Pie
Day, Dec 8th
Kadoka Area School presents: A Christmas Carol The Musical
The cast and crew from A Christmas Carol …Performances were held last Friday and Saturday night and again on Sunday.
--photos by Ronda Dennis
The Cratchit family … Pictured (L-R) Gracie Eisenbraun as
Bella Cratchit, Keena Byrd-Moro as Mrs. Cratchit, Aybree Pitman as
Martha Cratchit, Kate McKeehan as Tiny Tim and Dylan Moro as Mr.
Cratchit. In this scene, Tiny Tim and Mr. Cratchit are going to buy some
chicken for the Cratchit’s Christmas dinner.
Dealing with Scrooge … Foster Berry as Ebenezer Scrooge,
Racheal Shuck as the Lamplighter and Ghost of Christmas Past, Taylor
Merchen as the Sandwich Board and Ghost of Christmas Present, Ciara
Stoddard as the blind old lady and Ghost of Christmas Future – in this
scene, the three girls are trying to get Scrooge to see the error of his ways
and get him to turn around without the visits from them as ghosts.
In makeup …Benjamin Lathan helps with makeup before the open-
ing producation on Friday night.
KCBA Country Christmas
The KCBA Country Christmas will be held at the Kadoka City Audito-
rium on Sunday, December 9 starting at 2:30 p.m.
Expect to play free Bingo for prizes, Santa will be there to visit the little
ones, and a cake walk is being planned in the annex.
Business are reminded to take their donations to the auditorium before
2:30 Sunday afternoon.
Anyone wishing to help out with the cake walk ... donations of cakes,
cupcakes, bars and goodies will be appreciated.
The Kountry Kousins 4-H club will be raising money for their club and
will be serving chili and homemade cinnamon rolls following the KCBA
activities.
SDSU Extention …
One year later
This fall, many livestock produc-
ers veterinarian Jim Stangle works
with have to be creative when it
comes to finding forage for their
cattle.
The drought left them with re-
duced hay supplies and little to no
winter grazing. To help ensure that
the forages his clients find are safe
to feed, the Haakon County veteri-
narian tests samples of standing
forages for nitrates.
"Because of the drought we
knew nitrates would be a big prob-
lem this year. I took an SDSU Ex-
tension training course so I could
provide local testing to producers
in my area," said Stangle, who was
one of many South Dakota veteri-
narians to receive certification
from SDSU Extension this summer
on the Nitrate Quik test.
Along with getting their forages
tested for nitrates, Stangle says
that because many of his clients
have to purchase additional forages
or protein supplements, this year,
many cattle producers rely on
SDSU Extension to provide them
with unbiased information on af-
fordable options, as well as, cus-
tomized feed rations.
"Because they aren't selling a
product, producers know they can
trust SDSU Extension Field Spe-
cialists for unbiased recommenda-
tions," Stangle said.
Adele Harty is the SDSU Exten-
sion Cow/Calf Field Specialist
Stangle works with. She is one of
about 40 SDSU Extension Field
Specialists hired when a new
staffing model was put into place
Oct. 2011 as part of a complete
SDSU Extension reorganization,
implemented to comply with state
budget cuts.
Specialized, focused
and ready to serve
Harty has worked within SDSU
Extension since 2005. When she
was rehired in 2011 as an SDSU
Extension Field Specialist her job
description changed. Although she
continues to serve livestock produc-
ers, within the new staffing model,
Harty now focuses on working
specifically with cow/calf produc-
ers. And, instead of only serving
producers within a seven-county
area, she works with all South
Dakota cattle producers.
"I was raised on a cow/calf oper-
ation. My education is focused in
cow/calf nutrition. Before I was re-
hired, I worked with all livestock
producers. Now that I'm able to
focus on, and work with solely
cow/calf producers; I can utilize my
knowledge, experience and educa-
tion to help SD cow/calf producers
to become better at what they are
already good at," Harty said.
As a field specialist within
today's SDSU Extension staffing
model, Harty and her peers are ex-
pected to have their master's de-
gree. Also, instead of working out of
county offices, today field special-
ists office in one of eight regional
centers, but often travel through-
out the state.
"This provides a greater level of
expertise to the entire state," said
Rosie Nold, SDSU Extension Pro-
gram Director for Agriculture and
Natural Resources. "Instead of gen-
eralists in each county, we have
several specialized staff serving the
entire state. This allows SDSU Ex-
tension to provide a deeper level of
focus, expertise and research-based
information to help solve the chal-
lenging questions or issues South
Dakotans face."
Karla Trautman, Associate Di-
rector of SDSU Extension adds
that because Field Specialists serve
the entire state, there is an in-
creased focus on collaboration be-
tween SDSU Extension Field
Specialists, SDSU faculty and sup-
porters throughout the state.
"The synergies created today are
incredible," Trautman said.
Kiersta Machacek, principal of
Hayward Elementary in Sioux
Falls would agree. By working with
SDSU Extension, her students now
have a school garden.
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
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Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
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PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
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POSTMASTER:
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Church Page …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Letters Policy
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments on
any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the right to
edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space. We also re-
serve the right to reject any or all letters.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding Monday at
5:00 p.m.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper should
be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office. All letters must
bear the original signature, address and telephone number of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run the
two weeks prior to an election.
The “Letters” column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to express
their opinions. It is not meant to replace advertising as a means of reaching
people.
This publication’s goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of free
speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
Kadoka Press, PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 • 605-837-2259
Letter to
the Editor
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
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of the
This is Trooper Jason Hamar
of the South Dakota Highway
Patrol. When traveling on the
highways during the winter
season, drivers should take
a few extra precautions.”
• always have a winter sur-
vival kit in your vehicle
• pack a few extra warm
clothes or blankets
• allow yourself a little extra
time to get to your destination
• turn on our vehicle’s head-
lights during inclement weather
• always wear your seat belts.
Romans 8:32-39
We all experience hardship, and trials can shake us
unless we cling to truth. Let me share three assurances
to remember when troublesome circumstances arise.
First, God will always meet our needs. This doesn't
mean He provides everything we want. Instead, the Lord will bless us with all that is necessary to fulfill
His purpose for our lives. His goal is to sanctify us, not simply to satisfy each immediate desire.
Second, we're never alone. God promised to be with us always (Heb. 13:5). Loneliness often accompa-
nies hardship, so we may feel deserted or opposed by family and friends. But our Father has sent His
Spirit to be with us and in us, until the day He brings us to heaven (John 14:16-17). He is all we need--
our advocate, guide, helper, and comforter. Recognizing His intimate presence gives us confidence in the
midst of trials.
Third, God's love is eternal. Regardless of our circumstances or poor decisions, His care is uncondi-
tional--even when He reprimands us. Loving parents allow disobedient children to experience the conse-
quences of wrong choices; they recognize the benefit of learning from mistakes. Of course, there are also
times when we are negatively affected by others' wrong actions. Even then, God is sovereign and allows
only what will bring good in His followers' lives.
In difficult times, we can remember that God will meet all of our needs, is always with us, and loves
us forever. Though Jesus said we would face troubles in this life, He offered encouragement: The ultimate
victory is His. So keep in mind that trials are fleeting, whereas our Father's love is forever.
Assurance in Trials
Inspiration Point
Monday, December 10
Fish portions, oven browned po-
tatoes, green beans, bread, and
tropical fruit.
Tuesday, December 11
Cider braised pork with vegeta-
bles (potatoes, carrots, celery,
onion, etc.), broccoli-cauliflower
salad, dinner roll, and baked ap-
ples slices.
Wednesday, December 12
Meatloaf, baked potato, creamed
peas, bread, and applesauce.
Thursday, December 13
Oven crisp chicken, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, harvard beets,
bread, and peaches.
Friday, December 14
Beef and noodles, seasoned
spinach, cranberry salad, bread,
and pears.
Meals for
the Elderly
Dear Editor,
The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien will
appear December 14 at the movie
theaters around the country. Many
people have already enjoyed the
movie version of The Lord of the
Rings which was also written by
Tolkien.
The Hobbit has been widely re-
spected as a children’s book but it
has often been ignored by adults.
Many of its themes are very rele-
vant to our modern world and
many of the ideas are the same as
Christian thought. Some of these
ideas include;
The struggle between good and
evil;
The good and bad use of power;
The corrupting power of greed
and selfishness;
The significance of human
choice and value of one committed
individual;
The idea of self-sacrifice.
These are all thoughts that per-
meate The Hobbit but are also
prevalent in the Gospel of Jesus
Christ.
I cannot recommend The Hobbit
movie since it has not yet appeared
but I recommend the book. On
these long winter nights let Bilbo
and Gandof, the wizard transport
you the world of Middle Earth.
Sincerely Yours,
/s/Gary McCubbin,
pastor at the
Presbyterian Church in Kadoka
and the Belvidere
Community Church
I was just turning 30 years old
when I first noticed blood in my
urine. I tried the time-honored
method of ignoring it for a bit hop-
ing it would go away, but it contin-
ued, and so I saw a doctor friend
who thought it might be a form of
kidney disease innocently called
“minimal-change disease.” He
said, “This means that it could be
up to ten years before your kidneys
would fail.” I think he was trying
to be reassuring, but it turned my
blood cold.
Making the story short, the
blood was not from the kidney,
came as a result of jogging, and
thankfully here I am 33 years later
with working kidneys. It made me
reflect not only on the direction of
my life, but also on the causes of
renal failure and kidney disease.
There are many inherited rea-
sons for the kidney to fail, the most
common of which is called polycys-
tic kidney disease where the kid-
neys become filled-in by cysts,
which choke off normal kidney
function. There is little any indi-
vidual can do to prevent something
like this since it happens by the
luck of a genetic coin toss.
Kidney disease can also be the
result of many acquired condi-
tions. Several are caused by the
immune system gone awry, which
follows infectious conditions such
as Hanta virus and certain strep-
tococcus bacterial infections. These
are simply the consequence of a
bad break being at the wrong place
at the wrong time.
What is most important to real-
ize, however, is that there are
many causes of kidney disease
that can be prevented. Of course
high blood pressure, obesity, and
diabetes all run in families but un-
like the polycystic type of condi-
tion, these can often be effectively
treated with appropriate medi-
cines and with a life-style change
of exercising more and eating less.
Sometimes kidney damage re-
sults from certain medicines, such
as a common Chinese herbal med-
icine or kidney toxicity from too
many pain relievers for too long.
You should know that daily doses
of Tylenol, Advil, and Aleve for
many months could actually harm
your kidneys.
It is 33 years after a big scare in
my life, and I do not take my
health and especially my kidneys
for granted. Neither should you.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Taking Kidneys for Granted
Thomas S. McDonnell_____________
Thomas S. “Tom” McDonnell,
age 101, of Wall, S.D., died Friday,
November 30, 2012, at the Philip
Nursing Home.
Thomas S. McDonnell was born,
along with his twin brother, Vern,
on May 15, 1911, on their parents’
homestead 10 miles north of
Quinn, the son of Frank and Ida
(Riesing) McDonnell.
They grew up on the homestead
and received their education at the
Huron Township rural school in
that area. As a young man, Tom
farmed in the Quinn area.
Tom was united in marriage to
Rose Melvin on December 24,
1945, at Cheyenne, Wyo. Tom and
Rose, along with his brother, Vern,
and Vern’s wife, Beulah, farmed on
the family homestead. Tom later
purchased a D-8 Cat scraper and
Dozer, and built dams and roads in
the Quinn area for over 10 years.
In 1972, Tom and Rose moved
into Wall, yet Tom returned to the
homestead daily. After Rose’s
death on October 12, 2001, Tom
continued to reside in Wall. In
2009, at the age of 98, he remained
active operating the D-7 Cat and
did a lot of dirt work for his
nephew Steve. In May 2010, Tom
moved into the Philip Nursing
Home where he joined his brother,
Vern.
Survivors include his twin
brother, Vern McDonnell of Philip;
his nephew, Steven McDonnell and
his wife, Terry, of Quinn, and his
niece, Lea Ymker, of Armour; 18
nieces and nephews; a sister-in-
law, Cecilia Melvin of Wall; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
In addition to his wife Rose, Tom
was preceded in death by his fa-
ther Frank in 1955, his mother Ida
in 1957; and a great-nephew
Travis McDonnell.
Graveside services were held
Tuesday, December 4, at the Wall
Cemetery, with Father Leo Haus-
mann officiating.
At Tom's request, in lieu of flow-
ers memorials are to be directed to
the Philip Nursing Home.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Robert John Reedy________________
Robert John Reedy, 67, Vale,
S.D., died Thursday, November 29,
2012, at his residence in Vale.
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated Monday, December 3,
2012, at St. Mary's Star of the Sea
Catholic Church in Newell with
Father Tyler Dennis officiating.
Burial was at the Vale Cemetery.
Robbie was born January 18,
1945, in Kadoka to John and Emi-
lie (Barcal) Reedy. He grew up in
a family of six children north of
Philip, near the Grindstone
Buttes. He graduated from Philip
High School in 1963. Robbie then
attended one year at the South
Dakota School of Mines & Technol-
ogy.
He joined the U.S. Navy and
served in Germany for two years
before being assigned to the U.S.
Embassy in Cyprus for another
two years. He was one of only two
who earned the rank of 2nd Class
Petty Officer in the entire U.S.
Navy that year.
Following his honorable dis-
charge, Robbie returned to Philip
after the death of his younger
brother to help run the family
ranch. He married Paula Weiss on
June 9, 1973, in Mondovi, Wisc.
They ranched in Philip until 1977
when they moved to Fairpoint,
where they ranched until 1988.
They then moved to Newell. Rob-
bie always said, "They were tough
but wonderful years." Robbie then
became a surveyor for the Bureau
of Reclamation. In 2001, he began
working at the Department of Vet-
erans Affairs, Fort Meade.
His family was Robbie's greatest
treasure. He loved to dance, was
a great storyteller, and was a good
friend to many. He loved his
friends, ranching, surveying, and
taking care of those in the nursing
home. Robbie was a member of St.
Mary's Star of the Sea Catholic
Church, the Vale Township Board,
the Knights of Columbus, and the
Philip American Legion and both
the Fairpoint and Vale fire depart-
ments.
He is survived by his wife,
Paula, Vale; his children, Julie
(Scott) Wheeler, Sundance, Wyo.,
Will (Misty) Reedy, Vale, Christy
(Darrin) Jons, Pierre, Mary Reedy,
Rapid City, Anna (Chris) Skeen,
Pine Haven, Wyo., Meghan Reedy,
Camp Crook, and Joseph Reedy,
Chadron, Neb.; his mother, Emilie
Reedy, Philip; two sisters, Mary
Kay Sandal and Joann (Lester)
Pearson of Philip; one brother,
Mike, of Colorado; and eight
grandchildren, Tori, Brit, Peter,
Josie, Emilie, Mathew, Bailey and
Cooper.
He was preceded in death by his
father, John, and two brothers,
Richard and Joseph Reedy.
Robbie was a wonderful hus-
band, father and friend. He will be
greatly missed.
Ruby Cadman __________________
Ruby Ann Cadman, age 75, of
Rapid City, formerly of Kadoka,
died Monday, December 3, 2012, at
the Rapid City Regional Hospital.
Survivors include a son, Don
Cadman, and his wife, Tammy, of
Holabird, S.D.; a daughter, Dixie
Cadman, of Box Elder, S.D.; one
grandson; a brother, Lewis Hook,
of Louisiana; and two sisters, Glo-
ria French and Cheryl Hook, both
of Missouri.
Ruby was preceded in death by
her husband, David Robin Cad-
man, on October 16, 1995, and a
son, David Cadman.
Graveside services will be held
1:00 p.m. Thursday, December 6,
2012 at the Black Hills National
Cemetery near Sturgis.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her guestbook is available at
www.rushfuneralhome.com
A full obituary will appear in
next week’s paper.
Bel videre News …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
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I’ve worked as a waiter. I can
carry full cups of coffee around at
a goodly rate of speed without
spilling them. Well, er, usually I
can. Sometimes I may slop a little
if I try to go through a door while
carrying something in addition to
the coffee. Going through both the
front door and the screen door can
be problematic as well. Still, I have
fairly good liquid-carrying skills.
As you go through life, if you
don’t watch out, you’re apt to gain
skills at this and that (like coffee-
carrying) from jobs or experiences
you happen to have. Take cooking,
for example. I’ve always cooked
some so as to avoid starvation
when left to my own devices. I
learned quite a bit more about it,
though, when I took up trying to
feed the wife, son and some ranch
guys in addition to myself. As it
happened, we decided many years
ago to home-school son Chance,
and wife Corinne wasn’t sure she
could both teach and cook. The
cooking was known to take quite a
bit of time, especially on those
days the men came for dinner
which they did fairly often. As a re-
sult, I volunteered for kitchen
duty. This was fine, but I had to
stretch my meager skills some-
what to avoid serving the same
fare every day and also to accom-
modate some food sensitivities
plus likes and dislikes. I basically
can and do eat almost everything
without much trouble, but this
doesn’t hold true for everyone.
Anyway, through doing it, I
learned to cook a varied menu.
What’s more, I tend to get carried
away with any project I take on so
I learned a lot more than strictly
necessary through my fondness for
experimentation. Some experi-
ments came out nicely and others
not so much. Scones were not a
major success. Even the dog
wouldn’t eat them. He buried them
instead. Tacos, on the other hand,
turned out well including making
the shells from scratch. We have
eaten a lot of those.
I have also invented various
menu items and desserts although
often from goofing up and trying to
correct matters. Take the chocolate
cherry meringue cake I came up
with through accidentally adding
too much sugar when trying to
make an angel-food cake. After
cogitating over that mistake a bit,
I decided to add some cocoa and
chopped cherries and see what
happened. It turned out very well
indeed, and I still make it from
time to time. I had to call it a
meringue cake because adding too
much sugar to egg whites gives
you meringue, not angel food, but
that’s no big deal.
The other day, though, I messed
up making that cake by setting the
oven to 275 degrees instead of 325.
I didn’t notice the error until after
I’d taken the pan out and turned it
upside down to cool. The cake then
fell out of the tin so something was
obviously wrong—namely it was
badly undercooked. Taking a hint
from how you warm up French
bread (according to the bread
wrapper,) I cranked the oven up to
400 degrees and threw the confec-
tion back in the oven for ten min-
utes although I wasn’t at all sure
how that would come out. Luckily
it worked, and the cake was saved.
Alas, the learning curve is
somewhat bent in areas where you
may have experience but little ap-
titude. Electrical, plumbing, and
mechanical matters pop to mind.
I’ve had to do some of all of those
through necessity, but I’m not a
fast learner. Basic stuff I can do
through hard work and sweat, but,
if things get complicated, I call for
help. Carpentry is a little easier
but still not my best suit.
Then, too, if you live long
enough, some of the things you’ve
learned become obsolete. Take car
engines, for example. I know a lit-
tle about carburetors but nothing
about fuel injection. Electrical sys-
tems on modern cars are com-
pletely beyond me. You have to
have complicated electronic gear to
figure out what is wrong, and I’m
not really interested in learning
that. Similarly, through great ef-
fort, I learned to develop photo-
graphic film and make both color
and black-and-white prints from
negatives. Now, thanks to the dig-
ital revolution, you can barely buy
film anymore. That’s okay, how-
ever. I don’t miss all those smelly
chemicals and the tedium involved
with using them. Digital cameras
are great and computer printing
just fine.
At the moment, though, I am a
little short on my coffee consump-
tion for the day. I’d better correct
that and maybe take some black
liquid out onto the deck to drink.
That is not a problem. I’m pretty
good at carrying coffee around.
Maybe, too, I’ll take my digital
camera along and try to capture
the sunset, which seems to be
shaping up nicely. Life goes on.
Live and learn.
(By the way, opinions vary.
Corinne has a lower opinion of my
coffee-carrying skills than I do.
Something about spots on the
floor.)
Learning Curve
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
John and Jo Rodgers have pur-
chased the Belvidere Store. They
hope to reopen it after the first of
the year and offer gas and some
groceries. They are working to get
things organized and set up. On
Sunday, Jo and Jory attended St.
Peter Lutheran Church north of
old Stamford and then stayed on
for Jory to attend confirmation
classes. Jo continues to float some
with her post office work and
worked a couple days in Belvidere
last week. Jory hurt his elbow so is
sidelined at the moment from
wrestling. He hopes to be back at it
later this week. John said the Na-
tional Final Rodeo starts on Thurs-
day, and they are planning to have
that on the TV at JR’s since a lot of
local folks like to keep close tabs on
that.
Mary Johnston helped with re-
lease time on Wednesday in
Kadoka. After that, she picked up
nursing home and the two went for
pie and coffee at Jigger’s. The bank
sends a gift certificate to each of
them on their birthdays every year
for pie and coffee, so, for many
years, Kate and Mary have saved
their certificates until they can go
out together to redeem them. After
having a good visit at the café, Kate
accompanied Mary to the grocery
store and found a few more people
to visit with there.
Glenn Freeman is just starting
to get recovered from knee-replace-
ment surgery earlier this year only
to find out his other knee needs
work. That one was replaced in the
mid-nineties, but an examination
showed something is coming loose
and needs repair. Glenn has some
of these medical exams and work
done through the VA.
Sarah DeVries of Rapid City vis-
ited her dad, Tom DeVries, in
Belvidere this weekend. On Satur-
day, the two attended the Christ-
mas musical in Kadoka, in part
because sister/daughter, Trisha
Bork, was accompanying that pro-
duction which lasted about an hour
and a half. It was apparently an
enjoyable performance. On Sunday,
they walked across the street for
church. Sarah does freelance writ-
ing in Rapid City which gives her
some flexibility as to time so she
can go places when she wants to.
Tojo Osborn has been spending
some time at Ocoma where he has
been helping Roland Hickey with
his well-drilling business. Since
Tojo is no longer tied to any one
business, he has been traveling
here and there staying with family
and visiting whenever he feels like
it. On Sunday, he was clearing
some of his things out of the
Belvidere Store since that has now
been sold to John and Jo Rodgers.
Nikki Bonenberger and kids,
MaKaylan and McCoy, drove to
Sioux Falls/Brandon on Friday.
They attended a basketball game
in which Nikki’s nephew, her sis-
ter’s son, took part. They also
watched a niece (Brett’s sister’s
daughter) doing some gymnastics,
cheerleading and dancing routines.
The kids had quite a good time al-
though it tired them out and they
were napping some on Sunday. The
Bonenbergers acquired a pet goose
named Goose-Goose recently from
a friend in Kadoka. This seems to
be a friendly fowl that the kids
enjoy. It hangs out with the ducks
but not so much with the chickens.
Nikki said they have enough chick-
ens to supply their own needs plus
a bit more. She made some pickled
eggs this week to use up some ex-
cess eggs. Nikki also mentioned
that they still have some goldfish
in their stock tanks although they
thought they didn’t for a while.
They just can sometimes be hard to
see.
Frank Carlson and Toni Romero
plus kids, Sage and Stetson, drove
to Nisland on Saturday to visit
Frank’s brother, Jesse, and family.
They got in quite a bit of roping
practice while they were there. On
the way home on Sunday, Frank
said the temperatures were a little
scary for December since they were
still about 65 degrees at 5:00 p.m.
He said he was enjoying the pleas-
ant weather but just found it un-
usual for this time of year.
Charlene Ceniceros and her
granddaughter, Charlene Romero,
with her husband, Daryl, and kids
went to Pierre the day before
Thanksgiving. They did some shop-
ping and eating. Thanksgiving was
enjoyed at home and was cooked by
the younger Charlene. Randy Pe-
ters and Tommy Anderson came
over to enjoy the meal with them.
Bunny Green continues to stay
with her granddaughter in Ft.
Pierre for now. According to Wally
Wells, she will celebrate her 93rd
birthday on Wednesday. Her ad-
dress is PO Box 81, Ft. Pierre, SD
57532.
There is no greater treasure
than a good friend.
Congratulations to Rebekkah
Kary who recently was among four
youth who represented Kadoka
Area High School at the Augustana
Band Festival held in Sioux Falls.
Rebeckkah was a member of the
gold band conducted by Dr. Paul
Schilf of Augustana College. Stu-
dents from North Dakota, Min-
nesota, Iowa, Nebraska and South
Dakota took part in the concert.
Rebeckkah is the daughter of Ace
and Edna Kary and the grand-
daughter of Jean Kary all of Nor-
ris.
Monday, Andrea Beckwith vis-
ited a bit with Maxine Allard.
June Ring and her son, Bruce
Ring, attended the memorial serv-
ices held for Pastor Bob Utecht in
Spearfish on Wednesday. “Pastor
Bob” was known best for his
Lutheran Puppet Place at the
South Dakota State Fair. He was a
firm believer that the Bible and
cookies should be given together.
Children of all ages loved him for
doing it too. May the Lord bless the
memory of Pastor Bob Utecht. Pas-
tor Bob Utecht is the father of Rev.
Andrew Utecht of Valentine, NE.
Dan Taft and Morgan helped
the Kary’s work cattle on Friday.
Friday evening, Marty and Sue
Larson of Rapid City and Julie
Letellier of Kilgore arrived at the
James Letellier home. Saturday
morning the group headed for the
annual benefit auction held at Sun-
shine Bible Academy near Miller.
Marty, Sue and Julie stopped at
the wrestling tourney held in Kim-
ball to cheer on their nephew, DJ
Beckwith, before coming on to the
auction. It is the biggest fundraiser
for the school and the Letelliers en-
joyed having all four of their girls
and families there. It is a real fun
time.
Dan and Susan Taft conducted
business in Martin on Saturday
and visited in the home of her par-
ents, Alvin and Judy Simmons.
School News:
Parent/Teacher conferences
were held last Wednesday.
On Monday the final class for
the DARE program was held, so
graduation will be held soon for the
students involved. DARE is the
Drug Abuse Resistance Education
program used in the schools.
The students are practicing for
the Christmas program which is
slated for December 13 at 2:00 p.m.
Everyone is invited to attend- come
and enjoy the afternoon.
~~~~~
June Ring was among the many
relatives and friends helping
Braedan Huber celebrate his sev-
enth birthday on Saturday. The
birthday party was held at his
home and hosted by his parents,
David and Nicole Huber.
The children have started prac-
ticing on Sunday for the Christmas
Eve program to be held at St. John
Lutheran Church. The Ladies Aid
Lutheran Women’s Missionary
League Christmas Tea will be held
at St. John Lutheran Church base-
ment on this Thursday, December
6. Singing, games, devotions and
tasting tea are planned for the day.
Come and start the Christmas sea-
son.
Sunday afternoon the Norris
Township Hall was the scene of a
Wopila (Thankful) dinner. The big
community feast was hosted by the
Oleta and Rodney Mednansky fam-
ily, Justin and Dena Mednansky
family, Richard Mednansky family,
John and Kris WoodenKnife family,
Leland and Iris Bear Heels family
and Verdell and Keith Horse Look-
ing family. The dinner was given to
show appreciation and thanks to
God for the many blessings they
enjoyed the past year.
The kids Bible Club will con-
tinue to meet at the Blackpipe
Community Building on Thursday
after school. Ken and Karen Toews
with American Missionary Fellow-
ship plan a lesson, craft, games and
treats each week. Everyone is wel-
come to come.
Susan Taft and Morgan went to
Philip on Sunday and enjoyed tak-
ing in the Marie Hansen sale. It
was a wonderful sale for collectors
of everything from dolls to dishes.
Everything exciting is happen-
ing at once around here. December
not only means Christmas is just
around the corner, but there’s pro-
grams, teas, reunions, craft shows,
etc. and all that goes with it. It also
means the beginning of basketball
season. We have open gym here in
Norris on the weekends. The guys
are working hard to be ready to de-
fend their 2012 State Champi-
onship title for White River. We,
the cheering crowd, can hardly
wait for the games to begin. Our
guys proved they are true athletes
by just completing a terrific football
season, too. They work real hard at
any game they play, but basketball
is not just a game here, it is a way
of life. We love it!
It is a real thrill to welcome Tim
and Tammy Merchen to the coun-
try. The Merchens have just moved
into the ranch house (where Tim
grew up), here at Norris over
Thanksgiving week. Young people
and their enthusiasm is what
keeps this country going. Anytime
a couple moves back home it is a
big step forward for our commu-
nity. Although, Tim, Tammy, Ty
and Taylor sold their home in
Kadoka to move to the ranch; the
kids will continue to attend
Kadoka Area High School and
Tammy is at the Main Street Salon
on Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day. It is so exciting to be able to
say; Ty and Taylor are the fourth
generation of Merchens to call Nor-
ris home.
Harry and Jeanne Merchen vis-
ited at the ranch last weekend to
see the changes that have been
made to the house, painting, etc.
The Merchens plan to leave on
Monday for Arizona for the winter.
house!” or “I bought a car!” She
speaks of her family very fondly.
Dorothy’s dad and brother decided
to build the very first housetop
Christmas decoration in Water-
town, which had reindeer and as
Dorothy says it, “Santee Claus”.
She said the people would drive by
car after car after car.
Also in history, Dorothy recalls
the end of World War I. They were
living in Moosejaw, Saskatchewan
and bells & whistles started to
blare out on the streets signifying
the war was over! People were
chanting, “The war is over! The
war is over!”
With only a few remaining rela-
tives, she and Stanley Beal, her
younger cousin, at the age of 92,
who lives in Minnesota still corre-
spond by mail.
Nearing the end of this inter-
view in her room at Jenkins Living
Center, Dorothy looked up and
said, “Every morning, I wake up
and think ‘I’m still here!’
The Century Club is a creation
of the South Dakota Health Care
Association and has recognized
over 1,000 South Dakotans since
its beginning in 1997. Century
Club sponsors created the Club to
recognize both the contributions
and the years of these special indi-
viduals. The Century Club is as its
name states…a Club. Therefore,
there may be older people in the
state that have not yet been in-
ducted by a family member or loved
one into the Century Club.
The Century Club is open to res-
idents of South Dakota upon the
celebration of his or her
100thbirthday. There are no dues
and every inductee receives a spe-
cially designed certificate and
membership card signed by spon-
sors. Once a year, the current old-
est living Century Club Member is
recognized as the “Centenarian of
the Year.” Submit names for the
Century Club by visiting
www.sdhca.org and downloading a
Century Club Application or call
LuAnn Severson, Century Club Co-
ordinator, at 1-800-952-3052.
The South Dakota Century Club
is honored to have just received an
application form Dorothy Antritter
of Watertown, age 108, which now
makes her the oldest resident in
the Club! After the recent an-
nouncement of Beryl Kapaun pass-
ing, who was the Century Club’s
oldest resident, friends stepped for-
ward and filed an application form
to induct Dorothy into the Club.
Dorothy, the daughter and last
surviving child of Charlie and
Louise (Pfefferle) Antritter, was
born November 25, 1904, in Round
Lake, Minnesota. Dorothy’s father
emigrated from Germany in 1885
when he was 8; her mother at the
age of 5. Dorothy remembers her
family singing German songs, some
of which Dorothy will still sing
when asked.
For six years, the Antritter Fam-
ily lived in Moose Jaw,
Saskatchewan. Dorothy said that
she had to take 2nd and 3rd grades
twice because the U.S. education
system was behind. But, she also
noted, that upon return to the
states, she skipped the eighth
grade! She says, “I never took 8th
grade!”
Dorothy was also on the Water-
town Arrow Basketball Team and
when asked if she was good she
replies, “Well, I was the tallest and
wore a size 11 shoe! They only
played against classes in their
school, seniors against juniors.”
Which meant she played against
her sister, Ruby, who was one year
older and passed away over a year
ago at 108. Remembering her
school days, Dorothy still recalls
the high school she attended being
across the street from where she
resides today.
Dorothy worked for Alan Austin
as a legal secretary for many, many
years and retired in 1967. In re-
sponse to how well she did her job.
Dorothy responded, “I was good! I
was the highest paid secretary in
the office! My paycheck was
$50/month.” When asked what she
did, “I pounded the typewriter just
like any other secretary, but I had
to do shorthand first.” She has
never used a computer but recalls
the first time she used an electric
typewriter - it scared her to death
because it went so fast and jumped
right out at her. Dorothy exclaims,
“I walked to work, back and forth
from lunch and home again, ten
blocks one way! Do you think any-
one does that today?”
Dorothy’s family was a very
close-knit unit. When a trip was to
be taken, they all went, Mom, Dad,
and all three kids. Sometimes they
were even gone for months at a
time. She has traveled to every
state with the exception of Hawaii
since she has never flown in her life
time. Looking off into the distance,
Dorothy said, “I wish I could travel
again. You see a lot of things when
you travel by bus.”
She recalls many occasions
where her dad would come home
one day and say, “I bought a
Century Club announces its
oldest living South Dakotan
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
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Brent Peters
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Located in
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Locals …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Local News
Sydne Lenox • Robyn Jones
Email the
Kadoka Press
at:
press@kadokatelco.com
2013 Quad County
Relay For Life
Team Meetings
Register your team, pick up a packet or find out what Relay for
Life is at a “come and go” meeting in the following communities:
Sunday, December 9th
Midland, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. MST, Fire Hall
Philip, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. MST, Senechal Lobby
Wall, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. MST, First Interstate Bank Basement
Saturday, December 15th
Kadoka, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. MST,
Annex of the City Auditorium
New Underwood, 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. MST,
New Underwood School Lunchroom
If you are unable to attend and are interested or have
questions, call Jody Bielmaier 605-279-2841.
Shirley and Orville Josserand
took Coleen and Matt McHolland
and Lindsey Davila to the airport
in Rapid City on Wednesday of last
week. They were traveling to Fall-
brook, CA, where Matt and Coleen
will spend a couple months before
returning to their home in South
Dakota and Lindsey will make her
home there during the winter
months.
Wilma Stout is still recouperat-
ing and doing therapy in Philip
after her hip replacement surgery
earlier in November. She was to see
her surgeon on Tuesday and hope-
fully can return home soon.
Larry and Rose Ann Jones of
North Valentine, SD, were Sunday
visitors of Jim, Robyn, Tyler and
Tanner Jones. Larry and Rose Ann
are Jim’s parents.
Beth Boersma and Marjorie Jef-
fords of Rapid City attended the fu-
neral of Polly Kujawa on
Wednesday of last week. They had
lunch with Wanda Swan before re-
turning home. On Saturday Wanda
accompanied Larry Miller to
Springview, NE, where she spent
the day with Buss and Shirley
Swan. Larry drove on to Ainsworth
and winterized his late mother’s
home, before he and Wanda re-
turned to Kadoka that evening.
Family and friends attended
Patti Patterson’s 80th birthday
party on Sunday at the community
room of the Gateway Apartments.
Her sister and brother-in-law from
Rapid City were among relatives at
the event.
Joe and Kathleen Leutenegger
and Shawna Bendt attended the
West River Trunk Show at the Ar-
mory in Sturgis on Sunday after-
noon. Miss South Dakota, Calista
Kirby, showed ten outfits that she
will be wearing in the Miss Amer-
ica Pageant next month in Las
Vegas. She gave both West River
and East River residents a sneak
peek at the pageant wardrobe at
two different events. Calista is the
granddaughter of the Leuteneggers
and Shawna’s niece.
Bruce and Virginia Conlee of
Black Hawk and Dean and Mary
Antonsen of Rapid City drove to
Kadoka on Wednesday of last week
to attend the funeral of Polly Ku-
jawa. Dean and Mary have recently
moved into an apartment in the
Fountain Springs Complex from
their home in Black Hawk.
Jerry Stilwell is scheduled to be
released from Rapid City Regional
Hospital this week. Jerry has been
hospitalized since October 4 and
will finish his recovery at home.
Kadoka and the State of South
Dakota has been enjoying warm
December weather. Sunday’s tem-
perature hit over 70 degrees in sev-
eral cities in the state. There has
been little moisture for months, but
maybe next week some snow will
be on the horizon. The nice weather
has been great for everyone who is
putting up Christmas decorations.
tail operations in South Dakota.
But if you buy your iPod from Ama-
zon.com, you don’t pay sales tax –
simply because Amazon has no
warehouse or other physical loca-
tion in South Dakota.
Here’s an even worse example:
A customer can walk into a South
Dakota business, browse the mer-
chandise, talk to the salesman,
then pull out his smartphone, scan
the barcode, and order the product
from an online retailer – while
standing in the store!
Like most South Dakotans, I do
not support raising tax rates. How-
ever, I do support equity and uni-
formity among those who make
sales to South Dakotans. If South
Dakota retailers have to pay sales
taxes, their competitors online
should as well. This is not a new
tax – it is asking online retailers to
pay the tax that is already legally
due on these sales.
We should be constantly striving
to add more taxpayers, not adding
more taxes or increasing tax rates.
Whether by adding online retailers
to the tax rolls, encouraging busi-
ness growth or getting unemployed
folks back to work, we should strive
to achieve a broad, stable tax base.
Online shopping has given every
South Dakotan access to more
goods and services than ever be-
fore, if they are willing to pay for
shipping. There is nothing wrong
with this. We should not, however,
disadvantage our local retailers or
our state budget by allowing out-of-
state online businesses to avoid
paying sales tax.
We need Congress to act, and I
support Congressional efforts to
simplify and standardize remit-
tance of sales taxes collected from
online purchases. It creates an
even playing field for our local busi-
nesses and increases tax revenues
the right way- by adding more tax-
payers, not more taxes or higher
rates.
The days following Thanksgiv-
ing are widely known for launching
the Christmas shopping season, as
retailer specials draw crowds of
shoppers. The shopping days have
become so ingrained in our Ameri-
can culture they have earned their
own nicknames: ‘Black Friday,’
‘Small Business Saturday,’ and
‘Cyber Monday.’
Cyber Monday (November 26)
was the date on which online re-
tailers offered large discounts and
dramatically boosted their sales.
Each year, Cyber Monday sets a
new record for money spent online
in a single day. This year was no
different, with some analysts esti-
mating more than $1.5 billion dol-
lars spent during the 24-hour
period. I expect the trend held true
in South Dakota as well. The 2012
Cyber Monday gift-buying binge
also likely broke another record:
most purchases made in South
Dakota without paying sales tax.
Currently, only businesses with
a ‘substantial nexus’ or physical
presence in South Dakota must col-
lect sales tax on goods purchased
online. Out-of-state retailers, who
are not physically located in South
Dakota, have no such obligation.
The current system doesn’t make
sense, and it even discriminates
among online purchases. If you buy
a new iPod at your local retailer,
you pay the sales tax. If you buy it
online at BestBuy.com or Wal-
Mart.com, you pay the sales tax,
because those businesses have re-
More taxpayers, NOT more taxes
Gov. Dennis Daugaard
Be watching for some pink
flamingos wearing Santa hats to be
landing in a yard near you as the
Haakon/Jackson 4-H Jr. leader's
are helping out the Ronald McDon-
ald House in Sioux Falls.
They are asking for your help to
make a difference in the lives of
those families that are affected by
illness. The Ronald McDonald
House Program provides a "Home
Away From Home" for families
with sick and injured children re-
ceiving critical medical care. They
provide stability, support, a home
cooked meal, a place to stay at little
to no cost, and let the family focus
on getting their child healthy
again.
If you find a pink flamingo in
your yard, you can call the number
listed to have them moved. All we
ask is that you donate one or more
of the items on the Ronald McDon-
ald House Wish List. These items
can be dropped off at the Extension
office in either the Haakon or Jack-
son County Courthouses. Contact
Nicki Nelson at 308-862-1051 or
the Haakon County office at 859-
2840 for questions or more infor-
mation.
There are many items that they
need to keep helping families in-
cluding: food items – fruit cups,
granola bars and individual
wrapped snacks, snack sized cere-
als, chips, crackers, individual
sized Jello and pudding snack cups,
individual cans, bottles, or boxes of
fruit juice, chunky & hearty soup,
canned pasta and spaghettios,
sugar and artificial sweeteners, cof-
fee, coffee creamer, coffee regular
sized filters, fruit snacks and roll
ups, Hamburger Helper, ketchup,
mustard, mayonnaise and paper
plates; cleaning and sanitary
items – bathroom cleaning sup-
plies, Playtex rubber gloves, paper
towels, all sizes of Ziploc bags (es-
pecially gallon), plastic wrap, alu-
minum foil, dishwasher soap,
liquid laundry soap, Windex and
other multipurpose cleaners, disin-
fecting wipes, antibacterial soaps
and dry Swiffer pads; personal
items – toothpaste, toothbrushes,
travel sized deodorant, pillow pro-
tectors, towels (bath, hand and
washclothes), and deep pocket,
queen sized bedding.
This is being done in memory of
one of their own former 4-H Jr.
Leaders - Jennifer Nelson whose
family was helped by the Ronald
McDonald House Program. Please
help us help others! Thank you!
Pink flamingos to help raise funds
Helping others … The Haakon/Jackson 4-H Jr. leaders kicked off
their pink flamingo/Ronald McDonald House fundraiser during Philip’s
parade of lights. --courtesy photo
need to proceed with caution when
dealing with online retailers.
Online Shopping Tips:
Consumers using the internet to
find the perfect gift should avoid
using email links. These links can
appear to be from a known busi-
ness, when in fact they are coming
from a different company alto-
gether.
Use credit cards for online pur-
chases. If there is a problem with
the purchase it is much easier to
dispute the charges.
Be leery of businesses who are
offering deep discounts. If it sounds
too good to true, then it likely is, so
shop with reputable sellers.
If you have any additional ques-
tions, contact the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Consumer Protection Office
at 1-800-300-1986 or consumer-
help@state.sd.us.
Attorney General Marty Jackley
is encouraging South Dakota con-
sumers to shop with care this holi-
day season. Jackley warns that
during the busiest season of the
year it is especially important to be
watchful and avoid those common
shopping mistakes.
Tips on Holiday Shopping:
Check the refund and return
policies for restrictions and excep-
tions
When buying gift cards, check
for fees and expiration dates that
apply
Read the fine print
Double check delivery dates
Review warranties
Compare prices
Check shipping and handling
fees if shopping by mail or on the
internet
Along with those traditional
shopping methods consumers also
Attorney General Jackley
provides holiday shopping tips
Representative Kristi Noem is
accepting applications for spring
internships in her Washington,
D.C. office, as well as in her offices
in Sioux Falls, Rapid City and Wa-
tertown.
Student interns in Representa-
tive Noem’s office will assist staff
with various constituent service
and communications projects, as
well as assist with legislative re-
search.
Both South Dakota and Wash-
ington, D.C. internships are un-
paid, but provide students with
first-hand knowledge of the legisla-
tive process and the countless other
functions of a congressional office.
College students who are inter-
ested in interning in any of Repre-
sentative Noem’s offices should
submit a resume, cover letter and
references to
Peter.Eckrich@mail.house.gov by
December 5.
For more information, contact
Peter Eckrich at 202-225-2801.
Representative
Noem’s Office
accepting student
applications for
Spring Interns
Club 27
Hwy 284 • Kadoka • 837-2241
Dance to Westbound
Saturday,
Dec. 8
9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Friday &
Saturday Special
Prime Rib Steak
with salad bar
Stop by Thurs.,
Dec. 6, 3-6 p.m.
for our holiday
open house!
Sports …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
Kadoka Clinic Holiday Schedule
Chestnut Street • 837-2257
Kadoka Clinic will be CLOSED
on the following dates:
Closed on Dec. 24 and 25 for Christmas
Closed on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 for New Years
We will have the Digital Mammography
Unit here on December 13, 2012.
Unfortunately, this will be the last time they can
come here or to Philip due to the fact that they
will be discontinuing the traveling unit.
Please call Kadoka Clinic if you would like to be
put on the schedule in December.
It was close, but Philip Area
wrestlers brought home the team
title from the Kimball/White Lake/-
Platte-Geddes Invitational Wrest-
ling Tournament last weekend in
Kimball.
The Scotties won the tournament
by two points over Wagner – 245 to
243. Head coach Matt Donnelly
was pleased with how the team did,
but he said he noticed areas that
need improvement.
Donnelly noted the team’s
younger wrestlers are doing well,
but they need more mat time, more
experience.
Two Philip Area wrestlers were
also given individual awards –
Lane Blasius was named “Out-
standing Wrestler” and Paul Smi-
ley was given the “Pinner Award.”
Individually the wrestlers gar-
nered two first place wins, six sec-
ond place, three fifth place and one
each in the third, fourth and six
placings.
Other team standings were 3rd –
Winner (225.5), 4th – Mt. Vernon/
Plankinton/Corsica (101), 5th –
Miller/Highmore-Harrold (92),
6th – Sunshine Bible Academy (91),
7th – Kimball/ White Lake-Platte-
Geddes (64), 8th – Wessington
Springs/Woonsocket /Wolsey-Wess-
ington (45), 9th – Ipswich/Leola
(39), 10th – Scotland (36), 11th –
Marion Freeman (31.5), 12th –
Andes Central (29). Some teams
also had unattached wrestlers (-U
in stats).
106 lbs: Paul Smiley, 5th, 4-2 record
•Pinnd Wyatt Stevens (WSWWW) 3:03
•Pinned by Leo Hopkins (AC) 1:56
•Pinned Alex Daum (KWLPG) 5:21
•Pinned Jackson Nockels (KWLPG-U) 1:31
•Pinned by Marcus Urban (MVPC) 2:19
•Pinned Dawson Petrik (WAG-U) 4:08
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 2nd, 1-1 record
•Bye
•Bye
•Pinned Denver Paul (SBA) 1:48
•Pinned by Patrick Aeschbacher (WIN) 3:53
120 lbs: Jed Brown, 5th, 2-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned Cody Peterson (IPL) 1:55
•Decisioned by Israel Appel (SBA) 9-7 in OT
•Major decisioned by Zack Rucktaeschel
(WAG) 11-2
•Major decisioned Peterson 10-0
126 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 2nd, 2-1 record
•Bye
•Pinned Logan Wolter (WSWWW) 2:20
•Pinned Kruz Knudson (MVPC) 3:24
•Lost by default to Sage Zephier (WAG)
132 lbs: Grady Carley, 5th, 2-2 record
•Bye
•Forfeit (MVPC)
•Pinned by Nick Dion (WAG) 1:23
•Decisioned by Tayte Clark (SBA) 6-0
•Pinned Dominic Paulson (WIN-U) 3:50
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson, 6th,
1-3 record
•Bye
•Pinned Wesley York (M/F) 2:58
•Technical fall by Tyler Dion (WAG) 18-1
•Pinned by Trig Clark (SBA) 2:29
•Decisioned by Cole Johnson (KWLPG) 7-2
145 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st, 3-0 record
•Bye
•Pinned Mason Van Vuuren (MVPC) 3:54
•Decisioned Austin Soukup (WAG) 5-2
•Decisioned Paul Waring (MHH) 5-3
152 lbs: Paul Kary, (Unattached),
1-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Brian Vermeulen (MVPC) :22
•Pinned by Reed Johnson (PHIL) 1:43
152 lbs: Reed Johnson, 3rd, 4-1
•Decisioned by Brady Soulek (WAG) 5-2
•Bye
•Pinned Paul Kary (PHIL-U) 1:43
•Pinned Seth York (M/F) 2:01
•Pinned Andrew Bortle (MVPC-U) 3:56
•Forfeit by Vermeulen (MVPC)
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 2nd,
2-1 record
•Bye
•Pinned Cody Heezen (MVPC) 3:31
•Decisioned Luke Warejcka (KWLPC) 7-1
•Decisioned by David Kocer (WAG) 8-6
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 2nd, 2-1 record
•Bye
•Pinned Jed Vissia (MVPC-U) 3:45
•Decisioned Turner Blasius (KWLPG) 6-1
•Pinned by Trevor Lensing (WAG) 5:53
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 2nd,
2-1 record
•Bye
•Pinned Jimmy Sharkey (WIN-U) 1:45
•Major decisioned Cameron Kostal (MVPC)
15-2
•Decisioned by Tate Novotny (WIN) 7-1
195 lbs: Gavin DeVries, 2nd, 2-1 record
•Bye
•Forfeit (MHH)
•Pinned Nathaniel Schroeder (KWLPG) 2:48
•Pinned by Scott Assman (WIN) 3:11
220 lbs: Logan Ammons, 1st, 3-0 record
•Bye
•Pinned Austin Moore (WSWWW) :51
•Pinned Truman Ashes (WAG) 2:09
•Pinned Logan Boerner (WIN) :27
285 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries, 4th,
0-2 record
•Bye
•Bye
•Pinned by Colton Best (WIN) :44
•Bye
•Pinned by Trazen Doren (AC) 4:44
The team will be in Rapid City at
the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center
December 7 and 8 for the Rapid
City Invitational Wrestling Tourna-
ment. Friday’s matches begin at 2
p.m. and Saturday’s at 9 a.m.
Donnelly noted that 35 teams
particpate in this tournament so
the wrestlers will gain experience
with different techniques from the
various schools.
Philip Area scores team win at Kimball
Logan Ammons
Gavin DeVries
Chandlier Sudbeck
Chance Knutson
Clint Stout
Geoffrey DeVries
Paul Smiley
Jed Brown
News …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
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TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
vehicle maintenance!
Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
Mechanic
Shop!
J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
and surrender the entire carcasses
within five days of harvest to GFP
personnel for registration and tag-
ging. Once the season is closed, an
individual has 24 hours to notify
GFP personnel of any untagged
bobcats harvested during the sea-
son. No person may possess, pur-
chase, or sell raw bobcat pelts that
are not legally tagged.
GFP, in conjunction with South
Dakota State University, is con-
ducting research on bobcat car-
casses to obtain important
population and biological informa-
tion.
“GFP is researching bobcats in
several areas of South Dakota,”
said Wildlife Damage Program Ad-
ministrator Keith Fisk. “We’ll be
evaluating reproduction, body con-
dition, and stomach content of all
harvested bobcats. As a result, car-
casses – minus the lower jaw --
may not be returned to hunters or
trappers for several months.”
The evaluation project is ex-
pected to last the entire season.
“This information is necessary
for managing bobcats and will as-
sist us in future management di-
rection in South Dakota,” Fisk
said.
For more information on the
complete set of rules associated
with trapping and shooting bob-
cats, visit the GFP website
http://gfp.sd.gov/hunting/trap-
ping/default.aspx or contact a local
wildlife conservation officer,
wildlife damage specialist, or GFP
Division of Wildlife office.
With the 2012-13 bobcat season
beginning on Dec. 8, Game, Fish
and Parks officials remind hunters
and trappers of several new re-
quirements and opportunities.
The first-ever bobcat season east
of the Missouri River will run from
Dec. 8 through Dec. 30. Only the
counties of Buffalo, Brule, Charles
Mix, Bon Homme, and Yankton are
open. Hunters and trappers are re-
stricted to one bobcat per person in
those open counties.
The bobcat season in all counties
west of the Missouri River will
open Dec. 8, 2012, and close on Feb.
15, 2013. There is no limit on bob-
cats in West River counties. A
South Dakota Furbearer License is
required to hunt or trap bobcats
and all bobcats must be checked
and tagged by GFP personnel.
All hunters and trappers who
take bobcats are required to re-
move the pelts from the carcasses
GFP on upcoming bobcat season, requirements
4-H …These are the youth who participated in the Haakon/Jackson 4-H Youth-In-Action Day on November
16 at Philip. The 4-H members gave presentations, judged 4-H FCS Classes and then worked on a Visual Arts
Project for Christmas. Pictured, back row (L-R): Tate DeJong, Seth Haigh, Peyton DeJong, Savannah Solon,
Shaina Solon, McKenzie Stilwell, Elle Moon. Front row: Trew DeJong, Mark Stangle, Hudson Johnson, Abby
Moon, Riley Schofield, Gage Weller, Tagg Weller, Quinn Moon, Josie Rush. Not pictured, but giving a presenta-
tion, was Katie Haigh. --courtesy photo
NOTICE:
Please
remember to
mail the
entire pink card
back to the
Kadoka Press
when renewing
your subscription.
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Kadoka Press
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
POLICY
Please read your
classified ad the first
week it runs.
If you see an error,
we will gladly rerun
your ad correctly.
We accept
responsibility
for the first
incorrect
insertion only.
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
requests that all
classifieds and cards
of thanks be paid
for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge
will be added if ad is
not paid at the time
the order is place.
Payment by cash,
check or credit card
is accepted.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
EMPLOYMENT
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUN-
SELOR: McLaughlin, SD - Three
Rivers Mental Health and Chemical
Dependency Center has an immedi-
ate opening for a South Dakota Cer-
tified Chemical Dependency
Counselor. Salary DOQ with full ben-
efit package. Call 605-374-3862 or e-
mail threerivers@sdplains.com for
an application and job description.
PIERRE SCHOOL DISTRICT is
seeking a Technology Administrator.
Apply online at
www.pierre.k12.sd.us/employment
<http://www.pierre.k12.sd.us/em-
ployment> or contact the Pierre
School District at 605-773-7300 for
more information. EOE.
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUN-
SELOR: Lemmon, SD - Three Rivers
Mental Health and Chemical De-
pendency Center has an immediate
opening for a South Dakota Certified
Chemical Dependency Counselor.
Salary DOQ with full benefit pack-
age. Call 605-374-3862 or e-mail
threerivers@sdplains.com for an ap-
plication and job description.
MENTAL HEALTH POSITIONS:
McLaughlin, SD - Three Rivers Men-
tal Health and Chemical Depend-
ency Center has immediate
openings for a full time Masters level
Therapist (Licensed preferred) and a
Bachelors level Case Manager.
Salary DOQ with full benefit pack-
age. Call 605-374-3862 or e-mail
threerivers@sdplains.com for an ap-
plication and job description.
SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLO-
GIST ASSISTANT: immediate open-
ing in NW SD, great benefits and
educational cost reimbursement:
contact Cris Owens, Northwest Area
Schools (605)466-2206
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us
MENTAL HEALTH POSITION: Lem-
mon, SD - Three Rivers Mental
Health and Chemical Dependency
Center has an immediate opening for
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
a full time Masters level Therapist
(Licensed preferred). Salary DOQ
with full benefit package. Call 605-
374-3862 or e-mail threerivers@sd-
plains.com for an application and job
description.
REPORTER & FARMER, an award
winning weekly newspaper in the
heart of the Glacial Lakes area,
seeks full-time news/sports reporter
and photographer. Send resume and
clips to Reporter & Farmer, PO Box
30, Webster, SD 57274 or email
suhrs@reporterandfarmer.com
DRIVERS: OWNER OPERATORS
NEEDED Refrigerated Division, join
our experienced team of seasoned
professionals. Terminals in KS, SD,
TN, NM. 2 years OTR experience.
Call 800-796-8200 x103.
FOR SALE
PHEASANTS FOR SALE: Roosters
and hens. Ph: (605) 835-8129.
PETS
CHESAPEAKE PUPPIES: In Time
For Christmas!!! Champion Blood-
lines! Excellent Hunters! Great Per-
sonalities! 605-730-2088.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
STATE BIRTH RECORDS
ACCESSIBLE THROUGH COUNTY
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Certified copies of birth records from across the state are avail-
able in Jackson County, according to Mitzi Mitchell, Register of
Deeds. The office has access to computerized birth records
statewide and can issue a certified copy of any South Dakota
birth. In the past, birth records were only available from the county
where the birth occurred or from the South Dakota Department of
Health, Vital Records Program.
Birth records are available from 1905 on.
As earlier years are entered in the computerized system,
records from those years will also become available.
The cost for a certified copy of a birth record is $15.00 as of
July 1, 2012.
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Shad’s Towing ...........................35-17
Rockers................................29.5-22.5
Petersen’s ..................................26-26
Handrahan Const .....................24-28
Dakota Bar................................21-31
Badland’s Auto....................20.5-31.5
Highlights:
Ronnie Coyle........223, 188 clean/611
Trina Brown..........................219/591
Clyde Schlim.................5-6 split; 525
Kim Petersen ...............................183
Jenny Reckling.............................130
Jerry Mooney...............223 clean/595
Cory Boyd ....................213 clean/587
Bryan Buxcel......4-5-7 split; 215/575
Marlis Petersen.....................196/540
Vickie Petersen .....................171/481
Tena Slovek...........................174/475
Maralynn Burns...........................175
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt................................31-5
Kennedy Imp.......................21.5-14.5
Philip Motor..............................21-15
George’s Welding ......................18-18
Kadoka Tree Service...........14.5-21.5
G&A Trenching...................13.5-22.5
Philip Health Service .........12.5-23.5
Bear Auto ..................................12-24
Highlights:
Cory Boyd......................237, 236/666
Terry Wentz...................227, 212/622
Alvin Pearson........................217/585
Randy Boyd...........................246/573
Earl Park......................................569
Wendell Buxcel...4-7-9 split; 218/552
Tony Gould ............................201/549
Dane Hellekson............................522
Fred Foland..................................522
Eliel Poor Bear ......................210/511
Jim Larson..................3-10 split; 511
Ronnie Williams .........9-10 split; 505
Norm Buxcel .........................212/504
Dakota Alfery ....5-8-10 & 3-10 splits
Bill Bainbridge ...................3-10 split
Matt Schofield ......................2-7 split
Gene Jones ......................2-3-10 split
Johnny Wilson......................5-7 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
Cutting Edge.......................41.5-10.5
Invisibles...................................32-20
Bowling Belles ..........................30-22
State Farm..........................28.5-23.5
Jolly Ranchers ..........................21-31
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........214, 195, 180/589
Cindy Wilmarth ...........................178
Shirley O’Connor ..................169/454
Judy Papousek ......5-7 split; 166/416
Audrey Jones.........................162/416
Deb Neville...................................157
Deanna Fees.......................3-10 split
Shirley Parsons ..................3-10 split
Jennifer Schriever..............3-10 split
Donna King.........................3-10 split
Debbie Gartner.....................4-5 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................28-16
Wall Food Center ......................25-19
Chiefie’s Chicks...................24.5-19.5
Morrison’s Haying ..............23.5-20.5
Just Tammy’s......................19.5-24.5
Dorothy’s Catering....................19-25
Hildebrand Concrete ..........18.5-25.5
First National Bank .................18-26
Highlights:
Lindsey Hildebrand..............207/491
Amy Morrison.....2-7-8 split; 180/504
Shar Moses...................................181
Cindy VanderMay........................173
Debbie Gartner ............................173
Sandee Gittings ...........................171
Val Schulz.....................................171
Jessica Wagner...................2-10 split
Brenda Grenz .....................5-10 split
Brittney Drury ...................3-10 split
Carrie Buchholz .................3-10 split
Jackie Shull ..........................5-6 split
Thursday Men’s
A&M Laundry.............................24-8
Dakota Bar................................19-13
WEE BADD...............................16-16
Coyle’s SuperValu.....................15-17
McDonnell Farms .....................15-17
O’Connell Construction............15-17
West River Pioneer Tanks........13-19
The Steakhouse.........................11-21
Highlights:
Don Weller...................243 clean/600
Harlan Moos..........................226/555
Doug Hauk.............5-7 split; 236/590
Jan Bielmaier......222, 213 clean/623
Rick Coyle....................223 clean/607
Brian Pearson......3-10 split; 212/598
Jason Petersen........3-6-7-10 & 4-10
splits; 224/585
Cory Boyd..............................224/585
Matt Schofield.......................213/581
Fred Foland .....5-7 split x 2; 206/562
Nathan Kjerstad ................206 clean
Matt Reckling........................211/544
Bryan Buxcel ...................6-7-10 split
Mike Moses........................5-7-9 split
Jack Heinz ..........................3-10 split
John Heltzel .......................3-10 split
Ronnie Coyle.......................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew ...............................40-8
King Pins.............................30.5-17.5
Randy’s Spray Serv...................26-22
Roy’s Repair ........................20.5-27.5
Lee & the Ladies.......................20-28
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Randy Boyd...........................257/656
Dorothy Hansen....................209/493
Cory Boyd..............................211/554
Duane Hand ................211 clean/549
John Heltzel .................3-7 split; 543
Brian Pearson.....................3-10 split
PUBLIC
NOTICE
NOTICE FOR BIDS
CITY OF KADOKA
The City of Kadoka is accepting sealed
bids to pull the Solid Waste Trailer from
the Kadoka Transfer Station to the Pierre
Landfill, Pierre, SD for the year of 2013.
The bids should be submitted to reflect
prices by the trip, by the mile or by the
loaded mile. Transportation equipment
requires a “wet kit”. Bids must be sub-
mitted to the City Finance Office, PO Box
58, Kadoka, SD 57543, by 4:00 p.m.,
Monday, December 10, 2012, sealed
and marked “BID TO PULL SOLID
WASTE TRAILER.”
Bids will be opened and read at the
Kadoka City Council Meeting on Monday,
December 10, 2012 at 7:15 p.m. The city
reserves the right to accept or reject any
part or all of the bid(s)
[Published November 29 & December 6,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$18.78]
HOUSEKEEPING POSITION open
at the Kadoka Nursing Home. Duties
are cleaning of residents room and
common areas. If interested call
605-837-2270 for Ruby or stop and
fill out an application. KP21-1tc
WE HAVE THE PERFECT GIFT for
everyone on your holiday list. Del’s
I-90 Exit 63, Box Elder 605-390-
9810. K21-3tp
NEED A PLUMBER? Call Dale at
605-441-1053 or leave a message
at home 605-837-0112. K21-4tp
GIFT WRAPPING at the Jackson
County Library during the KCBA
Open House, Thursday, Dec. 6 from
3-6. We will wrap your Christmas
gifts, for a donation to “Friends-of-
the-Library”! K20-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge
construction/maintenance preferred.
CDL Pre-employment drug and al-
cohol screening required. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted.
Information (605) 837-2410 or (605)
837-2422, fax (605) 837-2447.
KP20-3tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Agricul ture …
December 6, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. WELLER RANCH: 1 P.M. BRED CATTLE TO FOL-
LOW. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
WELLER RANCH 32ND ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE - 50 DLACK
ANCUS 2 YF OLD DULLS; 4 FED ANCUS DULLS; 40 HOMES FAISED HFFS;
AI DFED TO SITZ DULL DUFHAM 9935; 100 YOUNC PUFEDFED ANCUS
COWS; DFED. WELLEF ANC; CLV. MAF & APF (ALL FEMALES WILL DE UL-
TFASOUND TESTED & DFOKE INTO SHOFT ALVINC CFOUPS.}
DISPERSIONS.
MYRON & MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-5 FOF 60 DAYS
WILMA & TRENT TOPE - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 70 DLK
MOSTLY 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20; 10 FED SOLID TO
DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.DLK; CLV. 3-20
BRED HEIFERS:
MONTY WILLIAMS - 120 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK;
CLV. 3-10 (SOFTED INTO TWO 20 DAY CLVC PEFIODS}
JOHN & MAGGIE AYER - 75 HEFF HFFS (1065=} (STUDEF DFEEDINC};
DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS (90% WILL CLV IN 21 DAYS}; 40
DLK HFFS (1100=}; DFED. LDW DLK; CLV. 2-15 FOF 60 DAYS
CLAYTON SANDER & ESTEL DEAN - 25 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-1 FOF 35 DAYS
TUCKER HUDSON - 14 DLK ULTFASOUND HFFS; DFED. LDW MILLAF
ANC DULLS; CLV. 3-25 FOF 45 DAYS (SOFTED INTO SHOFT CLVC PEFI-
ODS}
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
JASON HAMILL - 50 DLK & DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAMSEY & RAMSEY - 45 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-15 FOF 45 DAYS
NEWTON BROWN - 45 FED & FWF 3 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. FED ANC; CLV.4-5
CHUCK SPRING - 40 DLK SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 60 DAYS
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - 30 DLK SOLID TO DFOIEN MOUTH
COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 5-1 FOF 30 DAYS
HERB SIELER - 30 DLK 2 TO 5 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-6
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - 30 DLK 8 TO 9 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-28 FOF 45 DAYS
PAUL FANNING - 25 DLK 4 YF OLD TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 4-10
ARLEN CARMICHAEL - 16 DLK 4 TO 5 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-20 FOF 30 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 16 DLK HFF TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
CLAYTON SANDER - 15 DLK, FED, CHAF, & HEFF FUNNINC ACE
COWS; FED & HEFF DFED.DLK; DLK & CHAF DFED. HEFF; CLV. 3-1 FOF
60 DAYS
JIGGS O'CONNELL - 15 DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-28
JOHNSON BAR S RANCH - 14 DLK 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS; DFED.DLK;
CLV.3-18 FOF 50 DAYS
TUCKER HUDSON - 12 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
3-25 FOF 60 DAYS
BART CARMICHAEL - 10 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 4-15 FOF 45 DAYS
RICHARD PAPOUSEK - 9 DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-1
ANDREW RABA - 9 HEFF 4 TO 6 HYF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
10 FOF 60 DAYS
JERRY BOEDING - 5 DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-
25
EXPOSED COWS:
BRUCE SIMMONS - 25 LH COWS. DFED. HOFNED HEFF; CLV. 4-15
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & SPECIAL
STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
CATTL£ R£PORT : TU£S., D£C. 4, 2DJ2
We so1d ?,DS? Þeod on our Speo1o1 Weoned
& Preoond111oned So1e. Buger 1n1eres1 on
1Þese ueoned oo1ves uos os good os ue Þove
seen. Mong neu bugers on 1Þe seo1s. A b1g
oroud Þere o11 dog u11Þ 9S oons1gnors.
Some d1]]erenoes 1n ]1esÞ re]1eo1ed 1n 1Þe
pr1oes. A verg s1rong so1e!!
FEEDER CATTLE:
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
86..........................DLK & DWF STFS 510=......$182.00
28..........................DLK & DWF STFS 412=......$199.00
42 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 401=......$170.00
BUTCH & NEAL LIVERMONT - INTERIOR
93 ....................................DLK STFS 506=......$180.50
104..................................DLK HFFS 465=......$170.25
BART & KATHY KISSACK - GILLETTE, WY
118 ..................................DLK STFS 529=......$180.50
75 ....................................DLK STFS 464=......$189.25
SHAW RANCH INC. - WHITE OWL
95 ....................................DLK STFS 620=......$168.50
104 ..................................DLK STFS 563=......$170.50
40 ....................................DLK STFS 511=......$176.00
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
105........................DLK & DWF STFS 608=......$169.00
120........................DLK & DWF STFS 522=......$179.75
83 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 478=......$163.75
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS - VALE
74..........................DLK & DWF STFS 772=......$151.00
78..........................DLK & DWF STFS 701=......$159.00
27.........................FWF & DWF STFS 636=......$163.00
FINN FARMS - MIDLAND
64....................................FED STFS 805=......$150.25
HOSTUTLER RANCH INC. - MIDLAND
100 ................................CHAF STFS 621=......$166.50
102 ......................CHAF & DLK STFS 578=......$166.25
82 ..................................CHAF STFS 692=......$157.25
EMMIT DICKSCHAT - HERMOSA
98 ....................................DLK STFS 600=......$168.25
44 ....................................DLK STFS 539=......$170.50
HERBER RANCH - KADOKA
92..........................DLK & DWF STFS 603=......$166.00
94..........................DLK & DWF STFS 518=......$177.25
LYNN DENKE - CREIGHTON
89 ....................................DLK STFS 555=......$172.50
56....................................DLK HFFS 516=......$158.00
LARRY SWIFT - PHILIP
21 ....................................DLK STFS 552=......$170.00
25 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 532=......$157.00
DENNIS BOOMSMA - BOX ELDER
25..........................DLK & DWF STFS 539=......$170.00
CHUCK & TOBY KROETCH - PHILIP
92 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 612=......$165.00
18..........................DLK & DWF STFS 522=......$173.00
86................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 584=......$150.00
RANDY & RHONDA VALLERY - NISLAND
35 ....................................DLK STFS 500=......$177.50
23 ....................................DLK STFS 393=......$195.50
23....................................DLK HFFS 427=......$169.00
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
75 ....................................DLK STFS 565=......$169.50
BONENBERGER RANCH INC - BELVIDERE
69....................................DLK HFFS 655=......$151.00
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
85 ..................................CHAF STFS 667=......$158.75
80 .......................CHAF & FED HFFS 603=......$149.50
GARY JORGENSEN - MEADOW
63 .........................FED & FWF STFS 713=......$153.00
PATTERSON CATTLE - KADOKA
41 ....................................DLK STFS 563=......$167.75
28 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 532=......$154.50
MORTENSON CATTLE COMPANY - HAYES
31..........................DLK & DWF STFS 560=......$166.50
CHRIS & LEO GRUBL - STURGIS
36..........................FED & DLK STFS 558=......$164.25
50 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 510=......$154.25
NICK UHERKA - STURGIS
26 ....................................DLK STFS 673=......$154.50
22....................................DLK HFFS 597=......$145.00
MARVIN COLEMAN - QUINN
21 ....................................DLK STFS 553=......$165.00
10 ....................................DLK STFS 738=......$150.25
24....................................DLK HFFS 573=......$146.00
10....................................DLK HFFS 401=......$171.00
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
85..........................DLK & DWF STFS 658=......$156.00
87 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 574=......$162.25
MERLE & LINDA STILWELL - KADOKA
26 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 644=......$149.00
54................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 641=......$135.50
DAN PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
60 ..................................CHAF STFS 629=......$162.00
39..................................CHAF HFFS 581=......$143.75
KIM COE - NEWELL
24..........................FED & DLK STFS 624=......$160.25
39....................................DLK HFFS 587=......$146.00
DOUG THORSON - QUINN
38..........................DLK & DWF STFS 567=......$168.00
DAVID JOHANNESEN - QUINN
32..........................DLK & DWF STFS 621=......$157.50
MARVIN & CHASE SMITH - STURGIS
33 ....................................DLK STFS 611=......$162.75
34....................................DLK HFFS 554=......$144.00
22....................................DLK HFFS 442=......$156.50
GREG SHEARER - WALL
89 ....................................DLK STFS 639=......$159.00
47 ....................................DLK STFS 549=......$162.50
DAN GRUBL - STURGIS
22................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 588=......$143.25
TODD TRASK - WASTA
46 ....................................DLK STFS 587=......$166.00
DAN STARR - BOX ELDER
33..........................FED & DLK STFS 583=......$163.00
HEINRICH RANCH INC.- CAPUTA
24 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 574=......$146.00
CASEY & SHIRLEY TRASK - CREIGHTON
60 ....................................DLK STFS 572=......$167.25
JOHN LONG - UNION CENTER
9 ......................................DLK STFS 669=......$154.00
20....................................DLK HFFS 675=......$140.50
CLAYTON & TIM SANDER - CUSTER
52 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 593=......$165.00
21....................................DWF STFS 515=......$172.50
36 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 556=......$152.00
JOEL DEERING - WASTA
52..................................CHAF HFFS 567=......$144.00
TOM CLEMENTS - PHILIP
31....................................DLK HFFS 536=......$155.00
JOHN CAPP RANCH - FAITH
76..........................FED & DLK STFS 519=......$170.25
20..........................FED & DLK STFS 433=......$185.00
GARY CAMMACK - UNION CENTER
47 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 513=......$156.75
25 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 410=......$171.00
MIKE HENRY - EDGEMONT
15 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 520=......$160.00
2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
20 ...................................FED HFFS 501=......$157.00
MICHELE SMITH - NEWCASTLE, WY
42 .........................DLK & DWF HFFS 497=......$157.00
DILLON & JEREMIAH WHITCHER - RAPID CITY
37 ....................................DLK STFS 488=......$180.00
TRIPLE T RANCH - RAPID CITY
33....................................DLK HFFS 485=......$156.50
21 .........................FED & DLK HFFS 408=......$164.00
HARLEY ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
41 ....................................DLK STFS 471=......$176.50
JERRY MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
41....................................DLK HFFS 468=......$166.50
JIM BOB & KAYLA EYMER - MILESVILLE
52..........................FED & DLK STFS 460=......$177.75
20....................................FED STFS 378=......$194.50
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
53....................................DLK HFFS 458=......$169.75
JOHN BRENNAN - MUD BUTTE
20..........................DLK & DWF STFS 430=......$191.00
25....................................DLK HFFS 454=......$162.00
PETE REINERT - HOWES
20....................................DLK HFFS 381=......$174.00
HENRY BRUCH - STURGIS
10 ....................................DLK STFS 334=......$195.00
14....................................DLK HFFS 331=......$176.00
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND
SELLING TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 11,
AT 12:00 MT
RH CATTLE
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: WELLEF ANCUS, 1.00 P.M.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: MCPHEFSON ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFD 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC
DULL SALE 12.00 MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS 12.00MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS 1.00MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS 12.00MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Healthier Holiday Eating
There are many temptations re-
lated to the holidays including
overspending, overscheduling our
time and unfortunately, overeat-
ing. Consuming too much sugar,
fat and calories can happen effort-
lessly during the last two months
of the year. It begins with consum-
ing Halloween candy and finishes
with eggnog and fruitcake.
Studies show an average weight
gain during the holidays of about
1 pound. Studies also show that
people who are already overweight
are more likely to gain five pounds
or more during the holidays. It is
possible to avoid adding extra
pounds during the holiday season.
You can enjoy special holiday foods
without gaining the traditional
holiday weight by making some
simple changes.
Balance what you eat with phys-
ical activity to avoid gaining
weight. You will gain weight if you
eat more calories than you burn.
Physical activity helps boost your
energy level so you can be more
productive during the holidays. It
also helps you to obtain a better
quality of sleep and releases emo-
tional tension. One hour of walk-
ing at a moderate pace can burn
about 225 calories. Consider doing
some type of aerobic exercise every
day to get your metabolism going
and elevated for up to 24 hours.
Holiday stress leaves many of us
reaching for our favorite home-
made goodies. Chemical reactions
take place when we are stressed
that cause us to want to eat. The
result is a temporary feeling of
comfort and joy that makes us
want to eat more. Another item
that is also consumed during
stressful times is caffeine. It pro-
vides short term energy, but too
much may prevent good sleep and
without proper rest it’s hard to ac-
complish everything we need to
and the stress continues.
Here are some helpful tips for
eating sensibly at holiday parties
and gatherings. •Never go to a
party hungry. •Stick to a regular
eating schedule. Skipping meals
lowers blood sugar levels and
causes you to overeat the rest of
the day to make up for missed
calories. •Take your own low-calo-
rie food to the party to replace
high-fat items like cheese and
crackers. Good choices include
bite-size fruit or veggies and a low-
calorie dip. •Use a small plate so
that it looks full. Fill up on
healthy calories first. •Fill half
your plate with fruit and vegeta-
bles, one quarter of your plate with
protein and one quarter with car-
bohydrates. Choose complex carbo-
hydrates such as whole grains,
whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal,
legumes and sweet potatoes.
They help you maintain a steady
metabolism without the highs and
lows of blood sugar swings. •Be-
fore going back for seconds, wait
20 minutes—it takes that long for
your stomach to tell your brain
that you’re full.
Don’t drink your calories. Con-
sume alcohol in moderation and
keep in mind that it can increase
your appetite. Eggnog is a holiday
favorite but a non-alcoholic, 8-
ounce serving made with whole
milk has 342 calories and 19
grams of fat. Add alcohol to the
eggnog and the calories increase to
nearly 450 calories.
Modify the recipes of some of
your favorite holiday foods to re-
duce the fat, sugar and salt and
add fiber. Generally the total fat in
recipes can be reduced by one-
third. For recipes such as brown-
ies, cakes and baked breads that
call for 1 cup of oil, you can replace
1/2 cup of the oil with 1/2 cup of
unsweetened applesauce.
How many calories do you think
you consume by taking only a few
tastes through the day? Here are a
few examples: Can’t pass up the
eggnog so you decide to have only
a 1/2 of a cup (4 ounces)? That
equals 200 calories. Can’t pass up
the candy tray at church and de-
cide on a chocolate-covered cherry?
That equals 60 calories. Decide to
eat less than half of the cookie that
you “accidently” broke when re-
moving it from the baking sheet?
That equals 30 calories. Choose to
eat one more dipped chip before
moving away from the buffet
table? That equals 75 calories. You
can have a one-pound weight gain
every time you consume 3,500
calories above what your body
needs.
Avoid overeating during the hol-
iday to elude that promise that
you’ll go on a diet after the New
Year. Enjoy modified recipes and
healthy holiday eating tips cour-
tesy of Utah State University Ex-
tension by going to
http://bit.ly/TvOvhD.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Condition of the Winter
Wheat Crop
The fall of 2012 has been a chal-
lenge for South Dakota’s winter
wheat producers as they faced very
dry soil conditions to plant into.
During the week of November 25,
2012, 64 percent of winter wheat
in South Dakota was rated in poor
or very poor condition. This rating
was the worst of any state in the
primary winter wheat growing re-
gion.
The quick development of se-
vere to exceptional drought, ac-
cording to the U.S. Drought
M o n i t o r
(http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/),
has affected much of the wheat
producing areas of the US. The
winter wheat crop conditions in
the central US has affected the na-
tional rating, which is now at its
lowest level since records of this
type began in 1986.
The South Dakota Weekly Crop
Weather Report, published by the
National Agricultural Statistics
Service puts the hard red winter
wheat of South Dakota at 60 per-
cent emerged as of 25 November.
Other states have significantly
better ratings, both in condition
and percent emerged. Some people
believe the report of 60 percent of
winter wheat emerged seems high.
The NASS crop progress estimates
are based on a subjective opinion
survey of county officials, which
are not claimed to be statistically
accurate. The important fact is
that even if the figure is high, 60%
is the lowest percent of winter
wheat emerged by late November
in South Dakota since at least
1990. One other fall that stands
out with a low percentage of win-
ter wheat emergence in South
Dakota was 2000, when 74% of the
crop was reported emerged in No-
vember. The statewide average
yield in 2001 was 32 Bu/acre,
which tied for the 2nd and 3rd low-
est yield since 1990. It is not advis-
able to make yield predictions for
the 2013 cropping season based on
this however.
Many areas where winter
wheat was planted into dry soil
have received small amounts of
moisture via rain and/or snow.
This limited moisture has caused
some of the wheat to sprout, but
little has actually emerged to a sig-
nificant degree. These seedlings
have used energy reserves from
the seed, and have not been able to
generate photosynthetic activity
and develop crowns to store energy
for winter survival. Without addi-
tional moisture, the sprouted
seedlings may dry out and die.
Dry soil cools off more quickly
and will get colder than soil with
adequate moisture, if low air tem-
peratures occur without snow for
insulation. This potential exposure
to low temperatures could con-
tribute to significant winterkill for
a crop in marginal condition. Mois-
ture in the form of either rain or
snow would improve the condition
of the crop and chances for its sur-
vival. However prospects for mois-
ture don’t look good.
Producers may want to wait be-
fore making decisions such as fer-
tilizing until they have a better
handle on the potential of the crop.
As spring approaches, winter
wheat growers will want to assess
the condition of the crop. If the
crop is insured, producers should
contact their crop insurance agent
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
before taking steps to terminate
the crop and initiate alternative
plans.
The good news is that if the crop
survives, it is almost certain that
the plants will vernalize and pro-
duce a seed head. All that is neces-
sary for the winter wheat plants to
vernalize is for the kernel to take
on moisture and swell, and go
through a period of about 3 weeks
at about 40 degrees or lower. It is
almost unheard of for winter wheat
planted in the fall in South Dakota
to not complete that process. It is
well known among producers that
wheat, particularly winter wheat,
is a tough crop and can surprise
you with its resiliency.
For more information, visit
http://igrow.org/agronomy/wheat/.
Calendar
•12/11/2012: Soil Health Info
Day- Davison County Extension
Complex, Mitchell, SD
The South Dakota Game, Fish
and Parks Commission has pro-
posed a slight reduction in licenses
for the 2013 Spring Prairie Turkey
Season.
The commission has recom-
mended a reduction in one-tag
“male” turkey licenses by 105 and
reduce the two-tag “any turkey” li-
censes by 200 compared to 2012.
The commission also is propos-
ing 10 resident archery turkey li-
censees for the Blood Run Nature
Area and 10 resident archery li-
censees to hunt at the Adams
Homestead and Nature Preserve
through the issuance of “access per-
mits” via a lottery drawing.
A modification of the spring unit
boundaries for the Black Hills and
49A to be consistent with the fall
turkey unit boundaries was also
proposed.
The proposals will be finalized
at the Dec. 6-7 GFP meeting at the
Pierre Ramkota.
To comment, email
wild.info@state.sd.us with your
name and city. You can also com-
ment in person at the December
meeting. Proposals will begin at 2
p.m., CST on Thursday, Dec. 6.
For view the full proposals, visit
http://www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/com-
mission/proposals.aspx
Game, Fish and Parks
Commission proposes
spring turkey season
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911

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