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Kadoka Press, December 27, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 24
December 27, 2012
Kadoka Area middle and high school Christmas concert
drug prevention campaign reaches
more than 80 million people every
year. Students from throughout the
United States participated by dec-
orating their homes together with
their parents mailboxes, front
doors and fences. Parents uploaded
photos to RedRibbon.org, then
friends and family voted and the
entries with the most online votes
won (from ten regions across Amer-
ica that included every state).
"The contest helped us talk to
our children about drug preven-
tion,” said mom Kristie Stone.
"Kids in the neighborhood had lots
of questions and we explained why
we were decorating with the theme
for Red Ribbon Week."
School Superintendent Jamie
Hermann said, "We appreciate Red
Ribbon Week every year because it
brings focus to the issues facing
America’s youth. It gives us an op-
portunity to address a sensitive
subject in a time-frame where
everyone understands that it is OK
to talk about it. We are very excited
for the Stone family and the oppor-
tunity this will afford our school to
address concerns with drugs that
our youth are facing."
The National Family Partner-
ship (NFP) has announced the win-
ners of the 2012 National Red
Ribbon Photo Contest: “The Best
Me Is Drug Free.”
Tuesday afternoon the Stone
family was honored for being one of
10 contest winners across the U.S.
They won the midwestern region.
Over 140,000 votes were cast.
The recognition ceremony was
held at the auditorium with all of
the students from the Kadoka
School attending.
Master Sergeant Palmer with
the National Guard and Ron Deist,
a DEA agent out of Sioux Falls
gave the presentation.
Deist reminded students to
make wise choices and said, “you
are the future.”
He explained Red Ribbon Week
and how it began. In 1985 after the
murder of a DEA agent, parents,
youth and teachers in communities
across the country began wearing
Red Ribbons as a symbol of their
commitment to raise awareness of
the destruction caused by drugs.
This year, families got involved by
entering a contest to promote
awareness in their neighborhoods
and win a drug-prevention grant
for their schools.
Palmer asked students to take
the message home to their parents.
She said you can learn by watch-
ing. “If you are doing something
wrong, people are watching,” she
added. In addition, she said 50,000
people voted on Stone’s website and
she thanked them for spreading
the message.
At the end of the program, stu-
dents asked serveral drug-related
questions.
The nation’s oldest and largest
Stone family wins $1,000 drug-prevention
grant for school, iPad for their home
Red Ribbon Week photo … The three Stone sisters, Emma, Andi and Anna, stand in front of their
Red Ribbon Week display which earned the Kadoka Area School District a $1,000 check for drug prevention and
an iPad for their own personal use at home. The theme, posted on the red door in the middle reads: The Best Me
Is Drug Free.
Red Ribbon Week congratulations … The Stone family
accepted their $1,000 check for the school and a number of other items,
including National Guard back packs and dog tags Tuesday afternoon.
Pictured back row (L-R): DEA Agent Ron Deist, Kristie, Andi, Emma, Brad
and Anna Stone, Master Sgt. Palmer.
--photo by Ronda Dennis
In concert …The Kadoka Area middle and high school students performed their Christmas concert under the direction of Benjamin Latham Tuesday, December 18 at the Kadoka City Auditorium. Many of the pieces were
Latham’s original arrangements.
ture through the operation of their
successful agri-businesses includ-
ing the Crew Crop Insurance
Agency, the Badlands Trading Post
and now the Prairie Homestead.
Grady is the fourth generation
operator of Crew Ranch, Crew Cat-
tle Company, where he and Bernice
now raise Angus cows and Charo-
lais calves and grow wheat and
corn.
The Crews have been married
since 1978 and have two children.
Their son, Caleb, is at home and
helps run the ranch with them and
their daughter, Jamie, works as
Communications Officer for the
South Dakota Department of Agri-
culture.
Grady and Bernice have both
played important roles in their
community. Grady has served as
Secretary of Cenex Harvest State,
President of the White River Graz-
ing District, Director on the SD
Wheat Board, he was on the Jack-
son County Soil Conservation Dis-
trict Board and president of the
Kadoka School Board. Bernice is
currently a director on the Bad-
lands Natural History Association.
More than 600 people were present
at the Appreciation Banquet, were
South Dakota Secretary of Agricul-
ture Walt Bones gave the keynote
address.
On Thursday, December 6 at the
32nd Annual Ag Appreciation Ban-
quet hosted by the Ag & Natural
Resources Committee of the Rapid
City Area Chamber of Commerce,
Grady and Bernice Crew were hon-
ored with the Aggie of the Year
Award.
The Chamber’s Ag & Natural
Resources Committee established
this special award in 1981. The
award was created to honor indi-
viduals who provide leadership
that has benefited the local area
agriculture community over an ex-
tended period of time.
The Crews were honored for
their lifetime of service in agricul-
Crews honored as Aggie of the Year
Wishing you and your family a
happy, healty and prosperous new year!
Ravelette Publications
Don and Tami Ravelette and Employes
See the answers on the classified page
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Kadoka Press
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Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
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PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
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the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
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Church Page …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
For Sale:
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End Rolls
$5.00 each
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painting, drawing & more.
Kadoka Press
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837-2274
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Serving the community
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BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
E-mail your
news and
photos
to the
Kadoka Press:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
1 Samuel 18:1-3
All people long to be in genuine relationships. God
created us with this need, as we were not meant to live
in isolation.
Our world is so driven by technology that many peo-
ple today try to ease their loneliness through computer relationships. However, this can never satisfy or
compare to the human fellowship that the Creator designed. But healthy friendships don't just happen.
They require intentional effort.
When Looking to Jonathan and David for a biblical model of godly companions, we see how mutual re-
spect is vital in a healthy friendship. Now, let's look at two more aspects of their relationship. These two
men had an emotional love for one another; their hearts were knit together (1 Sam. 18:1). When one man
experienced joy or sadness, the other man felt it too.
They also had genuine devotion to each other, which is a type of commitment that involves giving: to
show loyalty, Jonathan gave his friend material items--his robe and weapon. But these two men also self-
lessly offered more: Jonathan even risked his life and future kingship in order to save David from execu-
tion. Notice, too, that Jonathan was often the initiator, and the one who gave more. He was a prince,
whereas David was a lowly shepherd. Social status shouldn't interfere with cultivating a true friendship.
We were designed for true companionship based on mutual respect, genuine love, and commitment.
This requires not only time and selfless devotion but also transparency--which means being real, even
about our faults. Taking such a risk requires trust. Such relationships are well worth the effort.
How to Foster True Friendships
Inspiration Point
News Briefs …
The annual meeting of the
Kadoka Nursing Home will be
held on Wednesday, January
23, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the
nursing home dining room.
Private Applicator Certi-
fication training will be held
on Friday, January 4, 2013 at
1:00 p.m. at the Bad River Sen-
ior Citizen’s Center, Philip.
Training will also be in Ben-
nett County at the Library
Learning Center, 101 Main St.,
Martin on January 11 at 1:00
p.m. Please bring a photo iden-
tification with you when you
attend the training.
New Years should be a time
of beginnings.
Unfortunately, for some,
it is the end of their life.
Every year on
New Year’s Eve,
people drink and drive …
and every year people
are seriously injured or die.
This is Trooper Jason Hamar
of the South Dakota
Highway Patrol.
If you’ve been drinking,
please don’t drive.
Have a happy and safe
New Year!
The University of South Dakota
awarded degrees to more than 560
graduates at the 37th Winter Com-
mencement Exercises on Saturday,
Dec. 15 at the DakotaDome.
Jessica Irene Graupmann,
Bachelor of Science, Social Work
was among those graduating.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
held commencement exercises on
Dec. 14 and 15 with 1,500 students
receiving degrees.
Zane Kenneth Lindquist re-
ceived a bachelor of arts from the
College of Arts and Sciences.
College News
The Presbyterian Church in
Kadoka and the Belvidere Commu-
nity Church will have a guest
speaker on Sunday, December 30.
Art Sartorius will speak at
Belvidere at the 9:30 a.m. worship
service and at Kadoka at the 11:00
a.m. worship service.
Rev. Art Sartorius is a teaching
elder serving as the pastor of Black
Hills Community Church in Rapid
City, South Dakota. He has served
in that position for approximately
five years. Black Hills Community
Church is a congregational of the
Presbyterian Church in America
(PCA).
Prior to his ordination as a
teaching elder and the acceptance
of his pastoral call, Mr. Sartorius
was a ruling elder at Christ Church
in Jacksonville, Florida, for approx-
imately eight years. He holds a
Bachelor of Journalism degree,
from the University of Missouri
(1976); a Juris Doctorate from the
University of Florida (1982); and a
Masters of Divinity from Reformed
Theological Seminary, Orlando
(2006).
Before his call to the ministry,
Mr. Sartorius worked as an attor-
ney for 26 years. As an attorney,
Mr. Sartorius litigated civil cases
on the trial court level in federal
and state court and argued some
cases on the appellate court level,
as well. He remains a member of
the Florida Bar Association and
has been admitted to practice in
the Federal Middle District Court
of Florida and the Eleventh Circuit
Court of Appeals.
As both a ruling and teaching
elder, Mr. Sartorius has been ac-
tively involved in the his denomi-
nation – serving the regional
governing body, Siouxlands Presby-
tery and the highest governing
body of the denomination, the PCA
General Assembly. He at presents
is the General Assembly’s Commit-
tee for Constitutional Business, a
Committee which gives advise on
the government of the Church.
Guest speaker at Belvidere and Kadoka
Presbyterian Churches December 30
There is an old German folk tale
about Ondine, a beautiful young
water nymph who fell in love with
a handsome mortal. Her lover
promised, “My every waking
breath is a testimony of my love,”
and yet later Ondine discovered
the mortal to be unfaithful. Her fa-
ther, the nymph king, then placed
a curse on the fickle lover making
his breathing a conscious and not
automatic process. Thus, if the
mortal should fall asleep, he would
forget to breath. Eventually On-
dine’s cursed lover succumbed to
complete exhaustion, fell asleep,
and died.
The name “Ondine’s Curse” was
first used in 1962 to describe three
brain surgery patients who died
resulting from the loss of the auto-
nomic drive to breath during sleep.
The name subsequently came to be
used to describe a rare congenital
syndrome in babies with a similar
inadequate breathing drive. More
recently experts advise the name
Ondine’s Curse be dropped since
the word “curse” implies wrongdo-
ing and guilt to the parents of
these unfortunate babies.
I think this story better relates
to the broad category of conditions
called sleep apnea, which involves
troubled breathing while asleep.
The word apnea actually means
“no breath” or “breathless.” Less
than one percent of patients with
sleep apnea is due to weakness of
the brain-controlled autonomic
drive to breath, called central
apnea; 85 percent is due to floppy-
fatty airways that obstruct breath-
ing, called obstructive apnea; and
the rest is due to a combination of
central and obstructive causes,
called complex apnea.
Whichever the type, sleep apnea
can be a dangerous, even deadly
condition, resulting in excessive
daytime sleepiness, depression,
anger and irritability, memory loss
and even strokes. What’s more,
prolonged low-oxygen causes in-
creased risk for high blood pres-
sure, congestive heart failure,
heart attack and sudden death.
Clues for this serious condition
include high blood pressure, morn-
ing headaches, sudden awakening
with shortness of breath, observed
spells of breathing cessation, espe-
cially in people who are obese, loud
snorers, smokers, or sedated by al-
cohol or sleeping meds. Then again
sometimes there is little warning
and sleep apnea is a silent killer.
If you or your spouse could have
sleep apnea, see your doctor. You
wouldn’t want to have Ondine’s
curse.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
Sleep Apnea
Kadoka Area News Briefs …
The annual meeting of the Kadoka Nursing Home will be held on
Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the nursing home dining
room.
Private Applicator Certification training will be held on Friday,
Jan. 4, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at the Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center.
Please bring a photo identification with you when you attend the train-
ing. Training will also be in Bennett County at the Library Learning
Center, 101 Main St., Martin on Jan. 11 at 1:00 p.m.
Santa donates … After a sleigh ride to Philip last week to visit residents at the Philip Nursing Home,
Santa came by Kadoka, stopped at the Kadoka Fire Hall and donated blood.
--photo by Ronda Dennis
Bel videre News …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 344-2547
Notice
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payments
PLEASE return
the entire pink
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with
your payment.
Stop by the Kadoka Press
for your office supplies.
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Happy New Year
Join us New Year’s Eve
We will be
OPEN
New Year’s Day
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
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Brent Peters
WBackhoe
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Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Beginnings are often better
than endings. Take the moon in its
cycle, for instance. It starts out as
a tiny crescent in the west just
after sunset and is really nifty
then. When I first notice it hang-
ing there, I often say something
like, “Welcome back, Moon. Nice to
see you again.” The moon doesn’t
reply, of course, but I say it any-
way.
From that thin crescent, then,
this second-brightest light in the
heavens keeps on growing from
night to night until it blossoms
into a big and pretty full moon. It
stays big for a few nights although
little chunks start disappearing
from it. Then by the fourth week of
the cycle, I seldom notice it much
since it comes up so late—just be-
fore sunrise. Finally, it disappears
altogether for a night before being
reincarnated as a thin fellow again
in the west. To me, the beginning
of the moon’s cycle is great, and
things stay interesting all the way
to the halfway point. From there
on it’s all downhill, as they say.
The life cycle of animals can be
similar. There is nothing much
cuter than a baby animal whether
it be a calf, pony, or puppy. The
cuteness tends to win your heart.
From there, critters continue to
grow into adults when they hope-
fully will become more useful, but
probably not as attractive. After
the midpoint of their lives, just like
the moon, things start to go down-
hill until that particular life is
over. The last part can even be sad.
Humans aren’t much different.
If a new baby appears in the com-
munity, the ladies are strongly
drawn to it. (Men, not so much.)
The gals, though, admire it, hold
it, and thoroughly enjoy it. Seeing
that baby grow and prosper is
pleasant as well. People in their
prime are fine too, but decline has
to eventually set in if life goes on
long enough. The final days of a
life can be hard indeed and diffi-
cult to see or deal with.
Then we come to marriages.
They usually start out with a great
deal of joy and happiness. Unfor-
tunately, in this day and age, it fre-
quently doesn’t last very long.
When I used to do wedding photog-
raphy, a few times I barely got the
wedding albums delivered before
things fell apart. I shouldn’t com-
plain because that meant income
from another wedding in a few
years, but the collapse is not fun to
watch. I have even had a part in
someone’s third wedding a few
times, but quite often the third
time is the charm and things actu-
ally hold together.
Some marriages, though, don’t
go into decline, even right up to the
point where one of the partners
dies. They may even continue to
strengthen. That’s nice to see.
Faith in God can strengthen and
grow right to the end of life as well
so not everything goes into decline,
I’m happy to say.
Years, however, follow the more-
normal cycle of good beginning and
strong midpoint, followed by disin-
tegration. I am always very glad to
start a new year with all the pos-
sibilities of interesting happenings
ahead. Sure, it can be chilly in
January, but at least the days are
getting longer and the tempera-
tures are getting warmer as the
days pass. By March and April
we’re apt to have some really nice
days. Spring, as I have probably
mentioned many times before, is
my absolute favorite with green
grass, flowers, baby animals and
so on. I think I could live in perpet-
ual spring.
From there we go to the most
productive part of the year with
growing crops and all that until we
get to fall. Although fall can be re-
ally pretty with the leaves chang-
ing color and putting on a show, it
also signals the closing of the year.
November and December are the
pits as far as I’m concerned with
short days, snow and cold. I some-
times think I really deserve to
have a few days of good old deep
depression about then, but luckily
I usually don’t have time for it
what with Thanksgiving and then
Christmas. By the time I recover
from those events, here it is the
first of the year and off we go
again.
Right now, as you know, we are
perched right at the beginning of a
fresh year with all the promise of
better days to come, neat new stuff
to try out, and old pursuits to enjoy
again. I’m ready for it. Let’s go.
Here’s wishing us all the greatest
of new years complete with exces-
sive productivity, joy and happi-
ness. May it be so. Have a very
happy New Year.
Beginnings
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
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Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
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J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
Success is not as much what we
have as it is what we are.
Monday, Sharon Allard and her
mother, Maxine, visited Fayola
Mansfield near Kadoka and en-
joyed lunch with her. The gals also
paid a visit to Geraldine Allen be-
fore journeying on to Spearfish for
overnight. Tuesday, Maxine kept
appointments and was thrilled to
find out it was a tiny break in her
hearing aide instead of her ears
that had the problem. So she is
thrilled to be a part of the hearing
world once again. Sharon and Max-
ine stopped to see Wanda at Coun-
try Pride. They found her just
swamped with orders for caramels
so helped her wrap caramels
awhile. The gals also visited with
Maxine’s sister, Helen, and hus-
band, John Colgon. Maxine’s
grandson, Patrick, brought her
back to Stan and Ivy’s in Rapid
City on Wednesday so she could
catch a ride home with Evan and
Dorothy Bligh.
Monday, Susan Taft and Saman-
tha were among the many folks
from this area enjoying the Christ-
mas program at White River High
School. Morgan Taft attends mid-
dle school in White River.
Sharon Ring accompanied Torey
and Linda Ring to the Christmas
concert in Kadoka on Tuesday
night. The beginner, middle school
and high school bands all had a
part.
Dave and Colleen Letellier and
family of Hulett, Wyoming, have
arrived at the Gale Letellier ranch
for the Christmas break.
Several folks from this area en-
joyed attending the Long Valley
School Christmas program on
Wednesday evening. It was a real
cute play (written by the teacher
Mrs. Weller) called “A Cowboy
Christmas”. In the play Santa was
just like anyone else and wanted
to be a cowboy. You should have
heard that version of the Twelve
Days of Christmas - with every-
thing from cows to bales of hay. The
band also played several Christ-
mas carols to entertain the crowd.
Jeremy Ring, Torey Rattling Leaf
and Stephanie Ring are our local
area band members.
Thursday, Heather Taft kept an
appointment in Rapid City.
Friday evening, Julie Letellier of
Kilgore, NE, accompanied her par-
ents, James and Marjorie Anne
Letellier, to Presho. They enjoyed
attending the Sunshine Bible Acad-
emy girls’ basketball game against
Lyman County. Sunshine Bible
came out the winners. Lyman
County had no idea that they were
playing against kids from Korea,
Ethiopia, Ukraine besides South
Dakota! Cassie Beckwith, the
Letellier’s granddaughter, is a
member of the team. Her parents,
Paul and LuAnne, of Pierre and
sister, Andee, of Norris were in at-
tendance. Sue Larson from Rapid
City also came and she and Julie
spent the night at the James Letel-
liers after the game.
Deb Ring of Spearfish came to
her parents, Robert and Sharon,
home on Friday for the long Christ-
mas weekend.
Susan and Samantha Taft went
to Pierre on Saturday.
Saturday, Marjorie Anne Letel-
lier accompanied Sue Larson and
Julie Letellier to Rapid City on Sat-
urday. They met up with Marjorie’s
sister, Karen Price, and daughter,
Trisha. I am so glad to report that
her son, Brett Price, is doing fine
after nerve replacement surgery in
his arm and tendon surgery at
Mayo on his hand. Brett suffered
injuries from a automobile accident
clear back in May. You may remem-
ber, Brett was a SD champion team
roper and many fundraisers have
been held for his benefit, which we
all are very grateful.
Saturday, Maxine was surprised
to see a “goody basket” had been
left at her house by her hunter
friend, Ken Koistenen.
Dan, Susan, Samantha and
Morgan Taft were all helping Cliff
Allard work cattle on Sunday.
Friday, Evan and Dorothy Bligh
traveled to Wessington and enjoyed
lunch in the Dale and Ruth Paul-
son home. Later they also visited
with the Joe and Tera Lopez family.
On the way home they visited
Evan's mother, Marjorie Bligh, at
Westkota Manor in Wessington
Springs.
The traffic sure picked up in
Norris this week with folks from
the whole area headed to the
Lakota Nation Invitational Tour-
ney and the many other activities
in Rapid City. Congratulations to
the White River Tigers for bringing
home the championship trophy
once again with a win over Red
Cloud. It is bound to happen some
day, and it did; Norris was caught
in the middle at that game because
Red Cloud’s coach Christian McGee
is married to our Maggie
Mousseau of Blackpipe. We also
have talented Blackpipe kids play-
ing at Todd County and St. Francis
as well. Can’t hardly keep up, I
don’t know, how Grandma Chris-
tine Dunham does it.
Here’s get well wishes to our
neighbor and White River player,
Tavis Burbank, who suffered a
sprained ankle in the third game.
Those kids love the game so much
they play hard and heal up later. If
the kids can play basketball at
midnight and win; I sure am going
to stay up and listen. We did, too.
Proud of all of you!
Happy New Year!
The Belvidere Church was full
for the Christmas Eve candlelight
service. No one had to stand, but it
was a near thing. Attendance was
close to a hundred people. As usual,
the last song was Silent Night dur-
ing which the lights were turned
out and everyone that wanted to lit
their candles. Before the service,
there was a live nativity at the
front of the church where kids and
some adults, dressed in costumes,
portrayed shepherds, angels, and
Mary and Joseph. The nativity was
originally planned for an outdoor
setting with live animals, but the
zero-degree temps moved it inside
minus the animals. After the serv-
ice, treats were served at the hall
which provided a time for visiting.
The Christmas Eve and Easter
services usually have the largest
attendances at the church during
the year, and this year Christmas
Eve was even larger than Easter.
There was snow in the area, but it
mostly stayed west and south so
the roads were fairly clear locally
for traveling.
Georgann and Jami Addison
flew to Florida to spend Christmas
with Georgann’s mom, Audrey Car-
ley, and Audrey’s husband, Jerry.
The trip had an unplanned 44-hour
stop in Iowa thanks to a blizzard
blowing through, but then the jour-
ney continued to the green grass
and warm temperatures of Clear-
water, Florida. Georgann’s son,
Matt, and his family were also
there in Florida. The trip home was
scheduled for Wednesday if more
bad weather didn’t interfere be-
tween there and here, and there
was some possibility of that. Jim,
meanwhile, stayed home to chop
ice and do the regular ranch work.
His son, Royal, came and they tried
some ice fishing. Despite chopping
through eight inches of ice on one
dam and twelve on another, the
fishing was to no avail. Jim has
been fighting a cough which seems
to be mostly a cough without a cold,
but it isn’t much fun anyway.
Chuck and Merry Willard had
all their children and grandchil-
dren home for Christmas. Casey
came from Nebraska with Faron
and Riley. Niki came from Hot
Springs with sons, Joshua and
Caleb. Coleen and her husband,
Billy, came from Pinedale, WY,
with their daughter, Frankie
Grace. There was a lot of eating
and visiting and no shortage of ac-
tion with five kids on hand. Chuck
had to leave for awhile to do his
medical work at Rosebud, but he
left word that Billy and Casey
could try out his new chain saw if
they wanted to. Unfortunately,
things stayed too busy for that so
Chuck will get to break it in him-
self. Chuck’s mom, Pat, didn’t want
to come for Christmas this year
since she had the flu a bit ago that
she is still recovering from. Every-
one was planning to leave on
Wednesday except Faron and Riley
who will stay on a few days.
Betty Kusick spent Christmas
day at Quinn with her daughter,
Loretta Schrieber, and her hus-
band, Lawrence, and family. Her
granddaughter, Misty Berg, and
husband, Mike, of Winner picked
Betty up and took her to
Schreiber’s. Daughter Kathy was
also there at Quinn with her hus-
band, Gary, from Rapid City. It was
a lively bunch with few dull mo-
ments, and they had a great time.
There was no shortage of food and
visiting. Last week, Joe Livermont
came to visit on Monday as did
Loretta and Lawrence. Kathy and
Jerry also stopped in on their way
to visit Misty. Betty attended
Christmas Eve services in
Belvidere and caught a ride to and
from with Dana Badure. Betty had
no plans for Wednesday and Thurs-
day and intended to stay home to
recover.
Kenny and Roxie Fox had all
three sons home for Christmas.
Jesse came from Wyoming, and
Shawn and his wife, Jodie, came
from Mobridge. Wade was already
there, but his daughter, Bodie,
joined him for Christmas Day and
the next. Kenny said there was
plenty of action, and they had a
wonderful Christmas. Kenny spent
quite a while on Christmas Day
playing with granddaughter, Bodie.
He is looking forward to having an-
other grandchild next Christmas
since Shawn and Jodie are expect-
ing an addition to their family
about March. On Wednesday,
Kenny was late to an appointment
at the garage in Murdo where his
pickup was due for some mainte-
nance. Unfortunately, in all the ex-
citement of Christmas, he forgot to
plug the pickup in overnight so it
refused to start in the below-zero
temps of Wednesday morning. The
appointment was rescheduled for
later in the day.
Mike and Marlene Perault did
not have quite as busy a Christmas
this year as some others. They did
have their daughter, Laney, and
family, and son, Bert, at home.
Lesa had to work both Christmas
Eve and Day and wasn’t there
much. Laney, however, has four
kids so there was still plenty of ac-
tivity. Bud and Valene Perault also
came over on Christmas Day as did
Marlene’s mom and brother, Lillian
and James Carlson. They took Lil-
lian to church on Christmas Eve
and enjoyed oyster stew with her.
The rest of the kids had been on
hand for Thanksgiving, but then
had to share time with spouses’
families on Christmas. On Wednes-
day, Marlene said the party was
apparently over since everyone was
headed back home and to work.
Howie and Cathy Ireland spent
both Christmas Eve and Day with
their son, Richard, and family in
Kadoka. Son Troy was there from
Pierre and son Ray and family from
Aberdeen. Sloan was there from
Rapid City as well. Howie said he
was pleased to get a twelve-volt air
compressor for Christmas to carry
in his pickup and use to inflate a
low tire if necessary. He said he
used to have one that came in
handy, but it had fallen apart some
time ago. It was back to work on
Wednesday with Cathy heading to
the nursing home in Kadoka and
Howie hauling mail over to Wan-
blee.
Locals …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Email news, classified ads or photos to:
press@kadokatelco.com
Buy • Rent • Sell
Get it done through the Classifieds
Call 837-2259
Email the
Kadoka Press
at:
press@kadokatelco.com
10 cheers for 10 cheers for our our customers customers
9 rounds of applause, 8 smiles of gratitude, 7 nods of appreciation...
We’re
counting
down thanks
to all of the
great folks
we had the
privilege to
serve this
year.
We can’t
thank you
enough and
wish you a
wonderful
New Year.
West Central Electric
Cooperative, Inc.
A Touchstone Energy Cooperative
VA is a non-starter as meetings
with lower level individuals have
resulted in wasted time, energy,
and misunderstandings that can
only be avoided by dealing directly
with the Secretary who will ulti-
mately decide the outcome of the
Hot Springs facility. I hope that the
Secretary will reconsider his offer.”
“The Secretary’s response is not
good enough,” said Noem. “Eight
members of Congress requested
that the Secretary come to Hot
Springs to meet with our veterans
and the community. Deferring a
meeting to his Under Secretary in
Washington, D.C. is not a produc-
tive use of anyone’s time. I am dis-
appointed that the Secretary is
clearly not interested in taking a
leadership role to help find a solu-
tion for our veterans. I renew my
request for him to travel to South
Dakota to meet with the veterans,
the community and Members of
Congress to discuss the best way
forward.”
On December 12, 2011, the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs (VA)
announced a proposal to shutter
the Medical Center in Hot Springs.
The community immediately came
together in a united effort to save
the facility. The community sub-
mitted a counterproposal and the
delegation has worked hard to en-
sure the VA gives it serious consid-
eration. After negotiations between
the VA and the community broke
down in September, South Dakota’s
delegation and Members of Con-
gress from Wyoming and Nebraska
sent a letter to Secretary Shinseki
expressing concerns and request-
ing a meeting in Hot Springs. On
October 24th the South Dakota del-
egation followed-up with the Secre-
tary, reiterating its request for a
meeting in South Dakota and for-
mally opposing the VA’s proposal.
U.S. Senators Tim Johnson (D-
S.D.) and John Thune (R-S.D.) and
Representative Kristi Noem (R-
S.D.) announced on Wednesday,
December 12 that they received a
long-awaited response from Secre-
tary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shin-
seki regarding the VA Black Hills
Health Care System’s proposal to
shutter VA facilities in Hot
Springs. In October, the delegation
and Members of Congress from
Wyoming and Nebraska requested
a meeting with Secretary Shinseki
and members of the Save the VA
Committee in Hot Springs to help
determine the best way to ensure
area veterans have continued ac-
cess to high-quality health care. In
his response, Secretary Shinseki
deferred on offering to schedule a
meeting in South Dakota, but in-
vited members of the Save the VA
Committee to travel to Washing-
ton,D.C. to meet with an Under
Secretary.
“I am disappointed Secretary
Shinseki has denied our request to
meet with the delegation and mem-
bers of the Save the VA group. The
situation warrants more than a
meeting with Under Secretary Pet-
zel. I’ll continue working with Sec-
retary Shinseki to ensure the views
of affected veterans, area commu-
nities, and VA employees are
heard,” said Johnson.
“I am extremely disappointed by
Secretary Shinseki’s response to
our letter,” said Thune. “We asked
for the Secretary to meet with us in
Hot Springs because we believe he
is the only senior official at the VA
who can negotiate in good faith on
this matter, and because we believe
he should visit Hot Springs to see
for himself the importance of this
facility to our veterans and the pas-
sion of the Hot Springs community
for our veterans. The offer of meet-
ing with an Under Secretary of the
Delegation release on
Hot Springs VA facility
Correction to
Local News
The Kadoka Press would like to
apologize for the incorrect informa-
tion regarding Jackson County
States Attorney Daniel Van Gorp
last week.
It was stated that he was on the
heart transplant list.
Chip Kemnitz of Philip has
stated that Dan's prognosis is good
and he is NOT awaiting a heart
transplant.
Monday, December 31
CLOSED FOR
HOLIDAY.
Tuesday, January 1
CLOSED FOR
HOLIDAY.
Wednesday, January 2
Fish portions, scalloped pota-
toes, peas, fruit muffin, and apri-
cots.
Thursday, January 3
Barbecue pork, baked potato,
green beans, dinner roll, and trop-
ical fruit.
Friday, January 4
Homemade chicken and noodle
soup with vegetables, pacific mold
gelatin salad, juice, bread, and
mixed fruit.
Happy New Year
Meals for
the Elderly
Sports …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
THREE ROUNDS
OF CHEER
for our customers,
friends and
families. We had
a prosperous year
and we owe it all
to you.
Thanks so much
for your continued
support and have
a Happy New
Year.
MIDWEST
COOPERATIVES
PhiIip &
Kadoka
In their last game against the
Philip Scotties, the Kougars strug-
gled from start to finish, coming up
short, 32-89.
Effort and toughness in sports
are terms we use a lot, but our boys
are going to have to develop those
skills in order to change the course
we are on now. We also need time
on the practice floor putting in the
reps on the offensive and defensive
side of the ball. Basketball is a
game of fundamentals. We don’t
need to complicate the issue. If we
can sustain effort in our practices
and build on the fundamentals, we
will compete at a higher level. It is
going to take persistence from the
boys but if the team buys in to
what we are doing we will be com-
petitive as the season unfolds. “Big
changes don’t come quickly. They
require steady work and improve-
ment. But when they come they
last.” Keeping working hard boys
you will see results!
--by Coach Mark Reiman
The Kougar boys have had a
rough start to begin the basketball
season. Our schedule early on has
been very tough and I know that
each team we play is going to be a
battle. Even though the scores
have been lopsided, you can see a
glimpse of what this team can ac-
complish but it is going to take
time.
They opened their season with a
double header at Faith, coming
home with a 23-90 loss. Kenar Van-
derMay and Logan Christensen led
the Kougars with 7 and 5 points,
respectively.
From there they hosted Rapid
City Stevens JV and lost 36 to 62.
VanderMay and Christensen,
again led the team with 15 and 10
points. The team shot 9/20 from the
line.
The Kougars found themselves
up against a very tough Dupree
team and were handed another
loss. VanderMay contributed 17
points.
Kougars challenged in opening
four games of the season
True Buchholz goes for a
bucket against Dupree on Decem-
ber 14. He scored 4 points against
the Tigers. --courtesy photo
Jump shot …Chris Anderson #2 takes a shot and gets the bucket
against the Philip Scotties. --photo by Robyn Jones
Driving the lane …Katie Lensegrav drives the lane against the
Philip Scotties. --photo by Robyn Jones
Advertise in
our B&P for only
$31.50 every
three months.
A great way to keep the
focus on your business!
FULL COLOR
Copies Available
at the
Pioneer Review
Purchase your
Farm Tax Record
Books at the
Kadoka Press
Public Notices …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
Legal
Publications
Deadline
Friday at Noon
Town of Belvidere
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON AP-
PLICATION FOR SALE OF ALCOHOL
BEVERAGES FOR 2013 IN THE TOWN
OF BELVIDERE.
Notice is given that the Town Board of
Belvidere in the Town of Belvidere South
Dakota on the 7th day of January, 2013
at the hour of 7:30 p.m. local time in the
city office will meet in regular session to
consider the following application of Re-
tail (on and off sale) Malt Beverage Li-
cense to operate inside the municipality
for the last half of the 2013 licensing pe-
riod:
John L Rodgers, Belvidere Store: North
Belvidere Addition Lot C of Osborn’s
Sub-Division of Outlot A-4 Kimball’s Divi-
sion (.58 acres) and North Belvidere Ad-
dition Kimball’s Sub-Division No1 all of
Outlot A-3 (2.49 acres).
Notice is further given that any person(s)
or their attorney may appear and be
heard at said scheduled public hearing
that are interested in the approval or re-
jection of any such application.
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published December 27, 2012, &
Jaunuary 3, 2013 at the total approxi-
mate cost of $30.34]
FINANCIAL REPORT
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
FOR THE PERIOD
BEGINNING
NOVEMBER 1, 2012
ENDING
NOVEMBER 30, 2012
GENERAL FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 4,492.51; Transfer
into account: (from MMDA account)
150,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 153,468.14; Jones
Co.Treasurer, taxes 7,680.39; Haakon
Co. Treasurer, taxes 41,736.83; County
apportionment 5,643.17; BankWest, in-
terest 48.41; First National Midland, int.
162.48; State of SD, state aid
114,339.00; Student Activities 1,074.56;
Student Participation fees 10.00;
ASBSD, workers comp prem adj
1,522.00; Colby Shuck, return travel exp
50.00; State of SD, Title I 105,724.00;
State of SD, Title I, sch. Imp 1,584.00;
State of SD, FFV 2,052.54; State of SD,
REAP 16,888.00; Mid Central Coop, Col-
lege Access 200.76; Total receipts:
452,184.28; Transfers out: (to MMDA)
310,797.58; Disbursements: 294,003.53;
Ending balance, checking: 1,875.68;
Money Market Deposit Account:(BW)
277,000.94; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count:(MB) 158,833.84; Petty Cash:
130.00; Total Balance of Account:
437,840.46
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: Checking ac-
count balance, beginning: 1,113.31;
Transfer in: 0.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 76,308.48; Jones Co.
Treasurer, taxes 4,626.23; Haakon Co.
Treasurer 23,084.56; First National, In-
terest 177.25; BankWest, interest 66.58;
Transfers out: 91,243.83; Disburse-
ments: 13,496.96; Ending balance,
checking: 635.62; Money Market Deposit
Account: 231,348.97; Money Market De-
posit Account:(MB) 161,516.64; Total
Balance of Account: 393,501.23
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: Checking
account balance, beginning: 1,402.86;
Transfer into account: from savings 0.00;
Receipts: Jackson Co. Treasurer, taxes
71,089.51; Jones Co. Treasurer, taxes
4,313.21; Haakon Co. Treasurer, taxes
21,523.39; First National, interest 59.08;
BankWest, interest 33.29; US Dept Ed,
Impact Aid 5,215.00; State of SD, IDEA
17,956.00; State of SD, state aid
2,493.00; Transfers out: 83,756.37; Dis-
bursements: 39,692.40; Ending balance,
checking: 636.57; Money Market Deposit
Account: (BW) 129,453.54; Money Mar-
ket Deposit Account: (MB) 49,534.99;
Total Balance of Account: 179,625.10
IMPACT AID FUND: Beginning balance,
checking: Receipts: Interest 1,358.88;
U.S. Dept of Ed, FY 2008 & 2013
95,729.91; Transfers out: capitol outlay
0.00; Transfers out: lunch fund 0.00;
Money Market Deposit Account
1,043,354.76; C.M.A. Account
1,013,992.90; Balance of account:
2,057,347.66
CAPITOL PROJECTS FUND: Beginning
balance, checking 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est BankWest, interest 47.56; Transfer to
MMDA 47.56; Disbursements 0.00;
Money Market Deposit Account
169,722.25; Balance of account:
169,722.25
FOOD SERVICE FUND: Beginning Bal-
ance: 3,688.66; Tranfer in (from Impact
Aid) 0.00; Receipts: Sales 7,035.23;
State of SD, reimbursement 11,124.89;
Avera, gains share program 0.00; Dis-
bursements 19,334.43; Total balance
checking account: 2,514.35; Cash
change 0.00; Total balance accounts:
2,514.35
TRUST & AGENCY FUND: Beginning
balance, checking: 30,190.65; Transfer
in: 0.00; Receipts: 53,042.73; Transfers
out: 43,982.58; Disbursements:
4,591.96; Balance, Checking: 34,658.84;
Cash Change: 500.00; Money Market
Deposit Acct: 33,742.13; Total balance of
account: 68,900.97
ALBIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Non ex-
pendable trust fund: Beginning balance:
0.01; Transfer in: Receipts: 132.50; Dis-
bursements: 0.00; Ending Balance
132.51.
/s/ Eileen C. Stolley
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
December 4, 2012
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OF THE REGULAR MEETING
OF THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION HELD
WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 12, 2012
AT THE KADOKA SCHOOL
AT 5:00 P.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Ross Block, Dale
Christensen, Mark Williams. Absent: Ken
Lensegrav, D.J. Addison.
Also present: Supt. Jamie Hermann;
Eileen Stolley, business manager; Jeff
Nemecek and George Seiler, principals.
Visitors present: Bob Fugate.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay.
The Consent Agenda included the follow-
ing items: to approve the agenda, to ap-
prove the minutes of the November 14,
2012 meeting; to approve the financial
report; to approve the bills as presented.
Dale Christensen moved to approve the
consent agenda. Motion was seconded
by Ross Block and carried.
GENERAL FUND: ASBSD, REG FEES
110.00; BJ'S INSTRUMENT REPAIR,
BAND HORN REPAIRS 180.00; BLACK
HILLS OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE,
BUS DRIVERS DRUG TESTS 78.00;
BLACK HILLS SPECIAL SERVICES, AL-
TERNATIVE INSTRUCTION 1,633.50;
BLOCK, AIMEE, LABOR & SUPPLIES
164.00; BROWN & SAENGER, SUP-
PLIES 116.80; CENTURY BUSINESS
PRODUCTS INC, COPIER MAINTE-
NANCE 1,246.46; CHILDREN'S CARE,
OT & PT SERVICES & MLG 50.00;
CHURCHILL MANOLIS FREEMAN,
LEGAL SERVICES 279.18; DAKTRON-
ICS, INC., TECHNICAL SERVICES-
SCOREBOARD 1,307.50; DELUXE
FOR BUSINESS, ENVELOPES 86.70;
DEVRIES, NICOLE, DRAMA COSTUME
MATERIAL 550.20; DIS-
COUNT FUEL , FUEL ACCTS
2,944.83; DRAMATIC PUBLISHING CO,
ONE ACT PLAY BOOKS 69.75; ED-
MENTUM, ONLINE READING LI-
CENSE 557.00; ERNIES BUILDING
CENTER, MID-SCH CUST SUPPLIES
535.14; FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OMAHA, ELEM AND DRAMA SUP-
PLIES 567.26; GOLDEN WEST TELE-
COM COOP., INC, K/I/LV/M
SCH-PHONE ACCTS 598.84; GROP-
PER, BRENDA, ELEC. ALLOWANCE
20.00; HAUFF MID-AMERICA SPORTS
INC, ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 61.20;
HEARTLAND WASTE MGT INC, MID-
LAND GARBAGE 90.00; HOBART
SALES & SERVICE, MIXER REPAIR
358.00; HOGEN'S HARDWARE, SUP-
PLIES/MATERIALS/REPAIRS 1,483.16;
HOLIDAY INN CITY CENTER, MUSIC
TRAVEL 500.00; HOLIDAY INN EX-
PRESS HOTEL & SUITES, FB TRAVEL
184.46; INTERNATIONAL FUN SHOP,
DRAMA SUPPLIES 283.45; JAYMAR
BUSINESS FORMS, INC., W-2'S & 1099
FORMS 75.32; JJ & ZAK, ICU BOOKS
770.00; KADOKA AREA SCHOOL
LUNCH, SUPPLIES FOR PARENT
CONF 23.90; KADOKA AREA SCHOOL
T&A, DCI B/G CHECKS 129.75; REG
FEES 50.00; N.HILLS HONORS & REG.
MUSIC FEES 194.00; AUGUSTANA
HONORS BAND TRAVEL 318.00; ACA-
DEMIC CHALLENGE MEALS 58.30; FB
TRAVEL 110.00; KADOKA CITY
TRANSFER STATION, RUBBLE 4.80;
KADOKA GAS & GO, SUPPLIES 3.29;
KADOKA GYMNASTICS, TRAVEL SUP-
PORT 1,000.00; KADOKA PRESS, PUB-
LICATIONS 348.39; KASD T & A
STUDENT MUSIC, PARENT NIGHT RE-
FRESHMENTS 46.53; LONG VALLEY
BOOSTER CLUB, CUSTODIAL SERV-
ICES 200.00; MANLEY, LARRY, I-BUS
ELEC ALLOWANCE 20.00; MIDWEST
COOPERATIVES, PROPANE/BUS RT
FUEL 3,646.20; MILLER'S GARBAGE,
GARBAGE SERVICE 294.55; MISS
JEAN'S PIZZA, FINANCIAL AID NIGHT
151.85; MOSES BLDG CENTER, MUSI-
CAL SUPPLIES SETS 296.10; MUSIC
THEATRE INT, ROYALTIES, FEES,
BOOKS 910.00; NETWORK SERVICES
COMPANY, CUST SUPPLIES 289.41;
NORTHWEST EVAL ASSOC, ACA-
DEMIC PROGRESS SOFTWARE
3,625.00; OLSON'S PEST TECH, PEST
CONTROL 330.90; PEOPLE'S MAR-
KET, SUPPLIES 2,642.27; QUILL COR-
PORATION, SUPPLIES 414.60; RAPID
CITY JOURNAL, SUBSCRIPTION
83.36; RASMUSSEN MECHANICAL,
BOILER PARTS & REPAIRS 1,380.41;
SD DEPT OF HEALTH, HEALTH
NURSE SERVICE 260.00; SD DEPT OF
REVENUE, LV-WATER EVAL 104.00;
SDCTM, MATH & SCI WKSHP REG
570.00; SERVALL TOWEL & LINEN,
K/I/LV/M-DUSTMOP SERVICE 439.60;
SHUCK, COLBY, REIMBURSE SUP-
PLIES DRAMA 129.80; SHUCK,
THERESA, REIMBURSE POSTAGE
42.38; STATE SUPPLY COMPANY, K-
BOILER REPAIRS 1,224.86; VANWAY
TROPHY & AWARDS, FALL SPORTS
AWARDS 137.10; VERIZON WIRE-
LESS, BUS CELLPHONE SERVICE
17.58; WAGEWORKS, FEE 125.00;
WALKER REFUSE, I&LV-DUMP SERV-
ICE 271.65; WELLER, HARRY, REIM-
BURSE EXPENSE 13.29; WRIGHT
EXPRESS FSC, TRAVEL EXP 120.18;
TEACHER SALARIES, ELEMEMEN-
TARY 39,190.44; MILEAGE: NANCY
WELLER 118.83; MISTY HAMAR
104.15; RENEE SCHOFIELD 302.05;
VALERIE OHRTMAN 18.50; ROGER
DALE 38.48; SUB TEACHERS, ELE-
MENTARY 993.82; INDIAN EDUCA-
TION, INSTRUCTION 1,035.68;
TEACHER SALARIES, HIGH SCHOOL
16,465.51; SUB TEACHERS, HIGH
SCHOOL 463.54; PRE SCHOOL
SALARIES 1,060.30; TITLE II A
SALARIES 4,595.39; GUIDANCE
SALARY 1,789.50; TITLE I SALARIES
25,620.29; TITLE I SUB TEACHERS
226.44; TITLE I TUTORING 396.23;
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AC-
TIVITIES, SUB TEACHERS 448.23;
TITLE I SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT AC-
TIVITIES 144.52; OFFICES OF THE
SUPT., PRINCIPAL AND BUSINESS
MANAGER 22,164.05; TECHNOLOGY
3,568.59; LIBRARY 163.59; SUB LI-
BRARY 56.64; SCHOOL BOARD MEET-
INGS & MILEAGE 1,801.05; PUPIL
TRANSPORTATION 3,109.72; SUB
BUS DRIVERS: VELDON THAYER
68.75; MATTHEW VANDERMAY 40.61;
ACTIVITY BUS DRIVERS: ROGER
DALE 198.13; KENNETH GRAUPMANN
162.75; COLBY SHUCK, CHRISTMAS
MUSICAL 1,046.57; REFEREES,
SCOREKEEPERS, VB LINE JUDGES
159.38; OPERATION OF PLANT
SALARIES 5,450.24; SUB CUSTODIAL
548.83; BUS MONITOR 457.59; CO-
CURRICULAR SALARIES PRORATED
210.83; AMERICAN FAMILY LIFE AS-
SURANCE CO, CC/IC INS W/H
2,041.93; BREIT LAW OFFICES, W/H
100.00; WASHINGTON NATIONAL IN-
SURANCE CO, W/H 208.70; BENEFIT
MALL, SD, LIFE INS W/H 703.02; FAM-
ILY SUPPORT PAYMENT CENTER
100.00; MG TRUST COMPANY, 403(B)
W/H 1,800.00; CREDIT COLLECTION
BUREAU, W/H 38.96; DELTA DENTAL
INS., GROUP DENTAL 4,018.52;
KADOKA SCHOOL T&A INSURANCE
FUND 112.96; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A
CAFETERIA ACCT., PAYFLEX W/H
729.50; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A
FIT/FICA ACCT., TAX 40,985.78; SD RE-
TIREMENT SYSTEM, TR AND MATCH.
24,666.25; S.D. SCHOOL DISTRICT
BENEFIT FUND, GROUP HEALTH
41,268.34
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: BRANT'S
ELECTRIC, INSTALL WIRING FOR
KITCHEN MIXER 1,907.40; KADOKA
CITY AUDITORIUM, AUDITORIUM
RENT 3,900.00; KADOKA CITY WATER
DEPT., WATER/SEWER 5,937.08;
KADOKA OIL CO, HEAT & BUS FUEL
2,592.90; LACREEK ELECTRIC ASSN.,
INC., ELEC-LV SCHOOL 236.39; MID-
WEST COOPERATIVES,
PROPANE/BUS RT FUEL 1,562.97;
OIEN IMPLEMENT & SUPPLY INC,
BUS GARAGE RENT 600.00; SCHOOL
SPECIALTY, DESKS 2,375.52; TOWN
OF MIDLAND, MIDLAND SCH-WATER
32.00; WEST CENTRAL ELECTRIC
COOP, ELEC ACCOUNTS 3,335.33;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC ASSOC., IN-
TERIOR ELEC ACCT 397.20; WR/LJ
WATER SYSTEMS INC, I-SCH WATER
35.00
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: BLACK
HILLS SPECIAL SERVICES, OT & PT
SERVICES & MLG 877.60; CHIL-
DREN'S CARE, OT & PT SERVICES &
MLG 1,155.00; DISCOUNT FUEL, FUEL
ACCTS 192.45; FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OMAHA, TRAVEL 30.40;
GOLDEN WEST TELECOM COOP.,
INC, K/I/LV/M SCH-PHONE ACCTS
4.12; HOGEN'S HARDWARE, SUP-
PLIES/MATERIALS/REPAIRS 44.98;
PEOPLE'S MARKET, SUPPLIES 93.63;
WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT; SPEECH
SERVICES 2,529.96; REGULAR
SALARIES 16,361.23; SUBSTITUTE
SALARIES 190.73
FOOD SERVICE: BLOCK, AIMEE, MID-
LAND MEALS 1,049.70; CASH-WA DIS-
TRIBUTING, FOOD & SUPPLIES
1,775.01; CHILD & ADULT NUTRITION
SERVICE, COMMODITY PROCESSING
1,021.67; DEAN FOODS, DAIRY PROD-
UCTS 1,506.53; EARTHGRAINS CO,
K&I-BREAD PRODUCTS 251.25;
FARMER BROTHERS COMPANY, K-
FOODS 84.25; KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL T&A, LUNCHES 58.30;
MILLER'S GARBAGE, GARBAGE
SERVICE 178.80; PEOPLE'S MARKET,
SUPPLIES 370.53; US FOODSERVICE,
FOOD & SUPPLIES 4,166.73; REGU-
LAR SALARIES 3,882.59
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT: Mr.
Hermann reported that J&S Restore sub-
mitted the only bid on the two surplus
buses in the amount of $100.00 each.
The audit field work has been completed.
In prior years the school board has had
a school board inservice meeting with At-
torney Rodney Freeman. He will contact
Mr. Freeman as to available dates for this
year’s inservice.
Mr. Hermann reviewed the fire marshal’s
report.
PRINCIPALS’ REPORTS: Mr. Seiler re-
ported that he attended the KCBA meet-
ing regarding the proposal for the sports
complex scoreboard and advertising
sponsorship. They will consider paying
for one-fourth of it. The total cost is ap-
proximately $17,000.00; order to ship
time is eight weeks.
Mr. Seiler said that staff was surveyed as
to Common Core training done and/or
needed. All teachers will need some
training in the areas of Math and English.
Kadoka Area School District was se-
lected as a pilot site for ACT testing for
grades 3, 5, 6 & 7. As incentive for the
testing, the district will receive six Nooks.
The tests will be administered in January.
Mr. Seiler also reported that the Univer-
sity of Michigan has also requested the
district’s eighth graders to participate in
a survey based upon demographics. He
reviewed the types of questions that will
be included in the survey and that no in-
dividual school or student will be identi-
fied. Parents will be asked for permission
for their child to participate. The school
will receive $500.00 for its participation.
Mr. Nemecek presented handouts
demonstrating the type of data that he is
able to collect and utilize from the Power
Walk Through program that is being
used. He reported that the teachers are
using data driven instruction and the
focus is on the MAP test results and
using the results. On January 11 there
will be a voluntary data retreat for teacher
collaboration.
As an attendance incentive Mr. Nemecek
has challenged students to meet at least
94% attendance for December. If the stu-
dents meet the challenge, Mr. Nemecek
will be wearing a Mohawk.
Mr. Nemecek reported that Fresh Start
has selected the elementary school for a
sales incentive whereby 10% of the pro-
ceeds of their baked good sales for Jan-
uary – March of 2013 will be donated to
the elementary school. It has been deter-
mined that the funds will be used for a
Trust and Agency Technology fund to
purchase additional technology for the el-
ementary. It is intended that the funds will
be expended by the end of the fiscal
year.
BOARD COMMITTEE REPORTS: POL-
ICY COMMITTEE: Mr. Hermann re-
ported that the policy committee met.
The following items were presented for
First Reading: Under Board of Education
– meeting of the board, item d.) To expe-
dite the Board’s proceeding and provide
a framework for the orderly conduct of
business, non-action items on the
agenda will be heard but no action will be
taken at that particular meeting. The
board will determine the course of action
in regards to such items for a future
meeting.
Board of Education – Section3, page 25:
policy adoption: delete item 1 in this sec-
tion.
Chapter 11 – Support Staff: All support
staff employees are considered to be
employees at will in the Kadoka Area
School district. Upon receiving an initial
contract from the school district, employ-
ees will be subject to a probationary pe-
riod up to 90 days. Successful
completion of the probationary period will
be deemed by the administration and
salary adjustment may take place at this
time.
Mr. Hermann reported that items in the
student handbook relative to ISS and
OSS and the grading percentage for eli-
gibility were also reviewed. Evaluations,
absences and wellness policies contain
areas that need to be adjusted. Changes
and/or clarifications will be proposed
prior to the next student handbook revi-
sion.
BUILDING COMMITTEE: Mr. Hermann
reported that the building committee has
been “on hold” for ESEA Reauthorization
and potential funding opportunities. He
has spoken with Scull Construction re-
garding the project.
Mark Williams was present at this time.
Dan VanderMay presented the evalua-
tion instruments which have been used
in the past for superintendent evaluation
and asked for board input for the type to
be used for the superintendent evalua-
tion next month. It was decided that the
job description will be used as the basis
for evaluation.
THE FIVE YEAR PLAN for Capital Out-
lay needs was presented and reviewed.
Bob Fugate was present. He addressed
the board regarding the sound system at
the auditorium and the need to improve
the sound quality for performances. He
has spoken with Mid States Audio and
presented information on the recommen-
dations to improve the sound quality.
Recommendations include addition of 3-
4 over the ear wireless mics @ $680.00
each and three wired boundary mics @
$255.00 each. Maintenance and adjust-
ment of the existing system and installa-
tion of new components would cost
$700.00 for a total of $4,135.
Mr. Fugate said that he has also dis-
cussed this with KCBA and Horizons and
has presented information to the City
Council. He asked that the school agree
to a cost sharing with the city for the
amount that would not be available from
other groups. After discussion and ques-
tions, it was agreed that Mr. Fugate will
contact Mid States Audio to come and
check and make adjustments to the sys-
tem before additional components are
purchased.
Dale Christensen moved to approve re-
quests for establishment of Trust and
Agency accounts for Kadoka Elementary
Technology and Kadoka Gymnastics.
Motion was seconded by Dawn Ras-
mussen and carried.
Ross Block moved to declare an old Dell
server, property tag # 14280, as surplus
property to be disposed (destroyed). Mo-
tion was seconded by Mark Williams and
carried.
Ross Block moved to approve commit-
ment for 2013-2014 Three Rivers Coop-
erative membership. Motion was
seconded by Dawn Rasmussen and car-
ried.
Dale Christensen moved to accept the
bid of J&S Restore for two surplus buses
@ $100.00 each. Motion was seconded
by Ross Block and carried.
A letter of resignation (retirement) from
Eileen Stolley was read. Dale Chris-
tensen moved to accept the resignation,
effective at the completion of the FY
2013 audit, with regret. Motion was sec-
onded by Ross Block and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to advertise
for the position of business manager.
Motion was seconded by Mark Williams
and carried.
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
November 15, 2012
CALL TO ORDER:
The West River Water Development Dis-
trict convened for their regular meeting at
Al’s Oasis in Oacoma, SD. Chairman
Joseph Hieb called the meeting to order
at 1:00 p.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Amy Kittelson, Office Man-
ager for WR/LJ; Dave Larson, Larson
Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
None
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the agenda. Mo-
tion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the October 11, 2012,
meeting were previously mailed to the
Board for their review.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the Octo-
ber minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Joseph Hieb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Marion Matt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Lorne Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . .51,000.00
Kadoka Press . . . .76.02Lyman County
Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66.50
Murdo Coyote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71.84
Pennington County
Courant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57.19
Pioneer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59.78
Todd County
Tribune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66.34
Postmaster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71.40
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the October Financial Report is on file
at the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the October Fi-
nancial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his No-
vember report to the Board.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the Man-
ager’s Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
SEPTEMBER BOARD MEETING:
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to hold the next monthly
board meeting via teleconference on
Thursday, September 20th, 2012, at 9:00
A.M. (CT). Motion carried unanimously.
USGS GAGING STATIONS:
Manager Fitzgerald received the pro-
posed joint funding agreement between
the District and USGS for monitoring and
operation of streamflow gages at White
River near Kadoka and White River near
White River. They are seeking funding in
the amount of $11,280 with USGS con-
tributing $9,270. The Board requested
Manager Fitzgerald invite Joyce
Williamson to a board meeting, so she
can give an update and answer any
questions the Board has before a deci-
sion is made.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Matt that this item be tabled.
Motion carried unanimously.
WR/LJ GRANT AGREEMENT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented to the
Board the yearly agreement that pro-
vides a grant of $50,000 to West
River/Lyman-Jones Rural Water Sys-
tems, Inc.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the grant
agreement for $50,000 to West
River/Lyman-Jones Rural Water Sys-
tems, Inc. Motion carried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 1:10 P.M.
(CT).
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
ATTEST:
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
[Published December 27, 2012 at the
total approximate cost of $47.12]
At 6:55 Ross Block moved to go into ex-
ecutive session for personnel per SDCL
1-25-2 (1). Motion was seconded by Mark
Williams and carried. The board came out
of executive session at 7:10.
Ross Block moved to amend Dave Ohrt-
man’s track contract from assistant track
coach to head track coach in the amount
of $3,000.00. Motion was seconded by
Mark Williams and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to approve
contracts for co-assistant girls’ basketball
coach to John Herber and Jake Vander
May @ $1,350.00 each. Motion was sec-
onded by Dale Christensen and carried.
Dale Christensen moved to approve a
contract to Brad Stone, 5th-6th boys bas-
ketball @ $600.00. Motion was seconded
by Mark Williams and carried.
The January board meeting will be held
at Long Valley School. Buildings and
grounds walk through will be at 3:00 p.m.
with business meeting to follow @ 4:00
p.m.
There being no further business, Dawn
Rasmussen moved that the meeting be
adjourned. Motion was seconded by
Ross Block and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
Eileen C. Stolley, Business Manager
[Published December 27, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $206.00]
24/7 program,’’ said Lee Axdahl, di-
rector of the state Office of High-
way Safety. “The latest evaluation
shows this program continues to
contribute greatly to safety on our
highways.’’
The program, which was estab-
lished in 2005 as a pilot program,
began with a twice-a-day prelimi-
nary breath test. Since 2005, 5.32
million preliminary breath tests
have been administered to 23,678
participants with a pass rate of
99.3 percent. In 2006, alcohol mon-
itoring bracelets were introduced,
4,815 participants have been mon-
itored for 706,468 days of which 77
% were compliant. Other testing
methods were introduced in 2007
including: (1) 68,412 urinalysis
tests administered to 2,632 partic-
ipants with a pass rate of 96.8 per-
cent; (2) and 1,447 drug patch tests
administered to 125 participants
with a pass rate of 89%. In June of
2012, the ignition interlock devices
for vehicles were added to the pro-
gram, but currently no statistical
data available.
You can find the Mountain
Plains Evaluation Report on our
website:
http://apps.sd.gov/atg/dui247/Anal
ysisSupplementalSD24.pdf
Attorney General Marty Jackley
and the Department of Public
Safety has announced that Moun-
tain Plains Evaluation’s Supple-
mental Findings Report on the 24/7
Sobriety Program has been com-
pleted. This Report is a follow-up to
Mountain Plains Evaluation’s
analysis of the 24/7 Program issued
in March of 2011.
The Supplemental Findings Re-
port includes an additional year of
participation level data and
demonstrates that the Program ef-
fectively continues to reduce the
likelihood that an individual con-
victed of DUI will reoffend. Specif-
ically, the twice daily preliminary
breath test result for DUI offenders
examined in this report reveals
that individuals are maintaining a
very high level of sobriety while on
the 24/7 Sobriety Program. With a
sample size of just over one million
recorded twice a day test results,
only 0.6% was recorded as a
“failed” test or as a “no show.” In
addition, over 53% of DUI partici-
pants did not fail a single breath
test, and only 9.4% had four or
more test marked as “failed” test or
“no show” during a testing period
that averaged approximately 120
days per participant.
“The new information in the
Mountain Plains report, in addition
to the recent release of the RAND
study, confirms and supports the
effectiveness of the 24/7 Sobriety
Program. Our 24/7 alcohol monitor-
ing program is a proven offender-
pay program that addresses
addiction head-on and improves
public safety,” said Jackley.
“Keeping repeat offenders off the
road is a huge component of the
24/7 sobriety program
findings released
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
SEEKING CLASS A CDL drivers to
run 14 central states. 2 years over
the road experience required. Excel-
lent benefit package. Call 701-221-
2465 or 877-472-9534.
www.pbtransportation.com.
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
VACATION/TIMESHARE
HART RANCH MEMBERSHIP For
Sale: Beautiful Hart Ranch Camping
Resort is located just outside of
Rapid City. Purchase NOW before
transfer fees increase! Call 605-939-
3112.
WANTED
ANTLERS, ELK IVORIES, pheasant
skins, rattlesnakes and porcupines.
Ph. 605-673-4345 or email at
clawantlerhide@hotmail.com.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
All others call . . . . . .911
KADOKA PRESS
Call 605-837-2259
to start your
subscription
today!
Read when you want!
Where you want!
Catch up on the
local happenings,
any place or any
time with an
on-line edition
of the
January 4-5-6-7:
Life of Pi (PG)
January 11-12-13-14:
The Hobbitt (PG-13)
January 18-19-20-21:
Jack Kreacher (PG-13)
January 25-26-27-28:
This Is 40 (R)
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
December 28-29-30-31
Playing For Keeps (PG13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
1st Ever Crippled Coyote
Calling Contest
Horseshoe Bar • Interior
$50 Team Entry Fee
$25 Big Dog & Little Dog
$50 Jackpot
Sign in by 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 28
Check in by 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 29
Call 433-5304 or 441-0156
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
Kadoka Clinic Holiday Schedule
Chestnut Street • 837-2257
Kadoka Clinic will be
CLOSED
on the following dates:
Closed on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 for New Years
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
PROFIT DEADLINE:
NOON on Thursday, Dec. 27th
for the January 1st issue
Call your local paper office
to place your ad
or call 859-2516 (Philip)
RaveIIette PubIications Offices
WILL BE CLOSED
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 31 &Jan. 1
DEADLINE for the January 3rd
issue is
NOON on Friday, Dec. 28th!
HELP WANTED: Business manager
for the Kadoka Area School District.
Applications available on the web-
site www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or may
be picked up at the school. Wage
DOE and qualifications. Open until
filled. Contact Jamie Hermann at
837-2174, ext. 100. EOE.
KP24-4tc
HELP WANTED: Farm/Ranch in
west central SD looking for experi-
enced full time help. Duties include
night calving heifers, calving cows,
fencing, building maintenance, oper-
ating and maintaining haying, feed-
ing, and farming equipment. Horse
experience not necessary. We use
atv’s. Housing and beef furnished.
References required. Salary DOE.
Call (605)843-2869 for interview ap-
pointment or email resume to
pjbork@gwtc.net.
KP22-tfn
NEED A PLUMBER? Call Dale at
605-441-1053 or leave a message
at home 605-837-0112. K21-4tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
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SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thank you to my “Secret Santa”
for the gift certificated to People’s
Market.
Susan Davidson
We’re going to try this again. We
want to thank Penny and family,
Brad and family, Becky and family
for the amazing 40th anniversary
party. (There is no Moon family -
only a syntax error in last thank you.)
Thanks to all who came, sent us well
wishes, and those who ignored the
“no gifts please”. After the eight of us
opened cards the next morning
there was some cash on the floor, so
if you sent some in a card and didn’t
get a personal thank you, here it is,
“thank you”. You could call us so we
could apologize. Mel and I enjoyed
eating out and saw a couple of
movies. We usually wait until they
are on TV. Thanks again for a super
duper day.
Melvin & Marilyn Jorgensen
Thank you to the Long Valley Lil’
Rascals 4-H Club and the ladies
who came caroling at our house on
December 21. It was a lovely ges-
ture and much enjoyed by us. The
treats were delicious as well. We
wish you a blessed Christmas sea-
son to all of you.
Love,
Francis and Norma VanderMay
Thank Yous
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Tuesday Nite Men’s Early
People’s Mkt..............................35-13
Kennedy Imp.......................28.5-19.5
George’s Welding ......................26-22
Philip Motor..............................26-22
G&A Trenching...................22.5-25.5
Kadoka Tree Service...........18.5-29.5
Bear Auto ..................................18-30
Philip Health Service .........17.5-30.5
Highlights:
Cory Boyd ............5-7 split; 201, 238,
...............................................200/639
Matt Schofield.......................204/578
Bill Bainbridge ......8-9 & 3-10 splits;
.....................................223 clean/564
Tony Gould ...................................559
Ronnie Williams....................202/550
Alvin Pearson........................212/537
Jerry Iron Moccasin .....3-7 split; 537
Todd Radway.........................232/533
Terry Wentz..................................522
Wendell Buxcel.............................512
James Mansfield ........3-10 split; 507
Earl Park......................................506
Ed Morrison .................................504
Jim Larson..........................3-10 split
Colt Terkildsen.....................2-7 split
Steve Varner.........................4-9 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm....................................4-0
Bowling Belles ..............................3-1
Invisibles.......................................3-1
Jolly Ranchers ..............................1-3
Cutting Edge Salon ......................0-4
Highlights:
Karen Foland ........................182/472
Shirley Parsons.....................176/423
Deb Neville............................167/397
Donna King ...........................164/453
Debbie Gartner....9-10 split; 161/416
Joyce Hicks ........4-5 x 2, & 2-7 splits
Christmas party at the
Kadoka Nursing Home
Christmas party … The Kadoka Nursing Home recently held
their resident Christmas party, complete with a meal and gift exchange.
Employee Nikki Bonenberger (R) takes time out for a Kodak moment with
Winona Carson.
--courtesy photo
Agricul ture …
December 27, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Notice:
When sending
subscription
payments
PLEASE return
the entire pink
postcard
with the payment.
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 1: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 9 A.M. BRED CAT-
TLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
FEEDER CATTLE: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
TRIPLE T RANCH - 75 DLK HFFS; FS, NI............................................500=
SIMON - 25 HEFF FED ANC X CLVS; FS,NI..................................400-600=
BRED HEIFERS:
RICHARD PAPOUSEK - 350 FANCY DLK & 1ST X DWF HFFS; DLKS ALL
HOME FAISED OF OFICINATED OFF THE CILDEFT ANCUS FN; 1ST X DWF
ALL OFICINATED OFF THE PEFAULT FN; ALL DFED PFOVEN LDW DLK
ANCUS DULLS; STAFT CALVINC MAFCH 13 & SPLIT INTO 10 DAY PEFI-
ODS.
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - 110 FANCY DLK ANCUS HFFS; A.I.
DFED ONE DAY TO DAF EXT TFAVELEF; ALL SAFE WITH DULL CALVES; 2-
22 CALVINC
EDGAR SIMON - 22 HEFF FED ANC X HFFS; DFED. POLLED HEFF;
CLV. 3-16
STOCK COWS & BROKEN MOUTH COWS:
EDGAR SIMON - 30 HEFF FED ANC X MIXED ACE COWS; DFED. HEFF;
CLV. 3-21
LYNN FIELDS - 20 FED DFOKEN MOUTH COWS; DFED. CHAF; CLV. 3-
25 FOF 60 DAYS
RAY MANSFIELD - 15 DLK HFFS TO 8 YF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
5-1 TO 5-30
JESSE MORELAND - 15 DWF FIFST CFOSS 7 YF OLD COWS; DFED.
DLK; CLV. 3-20
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 1S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12
P.M. (MT}. EAFLY CONSICNMENTS. EXPECTINC 4000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUFAL,
ASV÷ACE & SOUFCE VEFIFIED
RICK KING & SONS - 900 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED CLVS; FS.....600-750=
KNUTSON - 250 DLK CLVS; FS.....................................................500-600=
TRIPLE S LAND & CATTLE - 250 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI .........500-600=
KEHN RANCH - 400 DLK CLVS; FS ..............................................500-650=
FORTUNE - 150 DLK STFS; FS.....................................................650-750=
AMIOTTE - 150 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI .....................................500-600=
HANSON - 140 HEFF & DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS.........................650=
AMIOTTE - 124 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ........................................................700=
WHEELER RANCH - 120 DLK & DWF MOSTLY STFS; FS,NI ................625=
BARTLETT - 110 DLK CLVS; FS,NI......................................................700=
SIGMAN & SIGMAN - 100 DLK CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV.................700-800=
OLSON - 90 DLK & FED ANC STFS; FS,AN...................................550-650=
WILLIAMS - 90 DLK HFFS; FS.............................................................550=
LEHRKAMP - 80 DLK CLVS; FS....................................................600-650=
BARRY - 80 DLK & DWF MOSTLY HFFS; FS,NI ............................600-650=
FERGUSON - 60 DLK & DWF HFFS; FS,NI....................................500-600=
HERBER RANCH - 50 HEFF CLVS; FS................................................600=
GROPPER - 50 FED ANC FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI,ALL HFFS IN TOWN600-
700=
ARTHUR - 50 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
SILBERNAGEL - 43 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI ...............................600-650=
STABEN - 36 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS..............................................650-700=
SMITH - 36 DLK STFS; FS............................................................800-850=
PETERSON - 35 HEFF STFS; FS ..................................................650-700=
ANDERS - 35 DLK STFS; FS.........................................................600-650=
DEJONG - 20 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ...........................................................600=
WILLERT - 9 DLK CLVS; FS..........................................................550-600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAFLINC & FALL CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, JAN. 22: MCPHEFSON ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. S: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
WEDNESDAY, APR. 10: TFASK & PETEFSON ANCUS, 1.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
South Dakota Brand
seIIing on
Tuesday, Jan. 8,
at 12:00 p.m.
press@kadokatelco.com
This Ad
will
vanish
in
seconds
if we put
it on
the radio.
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
with offices at:
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Philip
605-859-2516
Wall
605-279-2565
Faith
605-967-2161
Bison
605-244-7199
Murdo
605-669-2271
New
Underwood
605-754-6466
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
Tri-County
Ranchers Workshop
The Tri-County Ranchers Work-
shop will be held Wednesday, Jan-
uary 16, 2013 at the Winner
Regional Extension Center in Win-
ner, SD, beginning with registra-
tion at 9:30 am, CST. Dr. Barry
Dunn, Dean of the College of Agri-
culture and Biological Sciences,
SDSU is scheduled to emcee the
event, and share some thoughts
about SDSU, SDSU Extension and
how the University serves farmers
and ranchers during the noon
break.
The topics and speakers were
selected to address issues facing
ranchers dealing with the linger-
ing effects of the 2012 drought, but
should be of interest to anyone in
the ranching business over the
long term.
Starting the program will be
Jim Krantz, Extension Cow/Calf
Field Specialist, discussing
CHAPS and Record Keeping.
CHAPS is a computerized per-
formance testing system that was
originally developed in the early
1990’s in North Dakota. North
Dakota State University is collab-
orating with SDSU to revamp the
program to better fit the needs of
today’s cattlemen.
The next speaker will be Adele
Harty, Extension Cow/Calf Field
Specialist, providing information
on Livestock Nutrition and Water
Quality. The 2012 drought re-
quired producers to get creative in
securing enough feed to maintain
their cow herds, and may be deal-
ing with feedstuffs they are not
used to dealing with. Water was
also a major concern, and an im-
portant part of a ranching opera-
tion.
Finishing up the morning will
be Pete Bauman, Extension Range
Field Specialist, outlining some in-
novative ideas for Rangeland
Water Development. Lunch will be
served at no charge to partici-
pants, courtesy of area Conserva-
tion Districts and agri-businesses.
After lunch, Laura Edwards, Ex-
tension Climate Field Specialist
will provide a Weather Update and
outlook for 2013, and Matt
Diersen, Extension Risk Manage-
ment Specialist, will outline the
Market situation in the cattle in-
dustry.
For more information, contact
your local NRCS office; Winner –
842-0603, Burke – 775-9122, Ken-
nebec – 869-2216, or the Winner
Regional Extension Center – 842-
1267. The Winner Regional Exten-
sion Center is located at 325 S
Monroe St., Winner, SD, one block
south of the stop light on SD Hwy
18.
Calendar
1/04/2013 – Private Applicator
Certification meeting (PAT), 1:00
pm MST, Sr. Citizens Ctr, Philip,
SD
1/9/2013 – Ag CEO, 5:30 pm
CST, Winner Regional Extension
Center, Winner, SD
1/11/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm MST,
Library Learning Center, Martin,
SD
1/14/2013 – PAT, 1:30 pm
CST/12:30 pm MST, Pierre, Win-
ner, Lemmon & Rapid City Re-
gional Extension Centers
1/15/2013 – PAT, 1:00 pm CST,
Fire Hall, Presho, SD
1/16/2013 – Ranchers Work-
shop, 9:30 am CST, SDSU Re-
gional Extension Center, Winner,
SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Delbert Sebade__________________
Delbert Sebade, age 95, of Wall,
S.D., died Sunday, December 23,
2012, at his home in Wall.
Delbert James Sebade was born
on September 16, 1917, on Bull
Creek, west of Wall, the son of
Henry and Anna (Mooney) Sebade.
He attended school in Wall, gradu-
ating from Wall High School in
1935. After high school he moved
to Chillicothe, Mo., where he re-
ceived training at a business
school.
After traveling to Nebraska with
a piston out of their ’35 Plymouth,
Delbert and his soon-to-be wife,
Armista Ronning, stopped and
picked up a marriage license. After
adding one year on to her age, and
two marriage licenses later, Del-
bert and Armista were married on
November 15, 1941. To this union
were born four children, Sandra,
Norbert, Rosalind and Marsha.
Since 1963 they have made their
home in Wall.
Delbert had a lifetime of work in
the banking business. He joined
the U.S. Army on November 23,
1942, where he served in the in-
fantry in Northern France,
Rhineland and Central Europe. He
was honorably discharged on Octo-
ber 26, 1945.
Delbert was active in civic, busi-
ness, fraternal and social organiza-
tions.
Survivors include four children,
Sandra (Everett) Lerew of Valley,
Neb., Norbert (Jane) Sebade of
Rapid City, Rosalind Ham of Hud-
son, Colo., and Marsha Lytle of
Reva; 10 grandchildren; 17 great-
grandchildren; two sisters, Bernice
Anderson and Edith Paulson, both
of Wall; and one brother, Norman
Sebade of Puyallup, Wash.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Henry and Anna Sebade;
his wife, Armista Sebade; his sis-
ter, Eunice Johnson; his brother,
Dayton Sebade; and his grand-
daughter, Kimberly Cluff.
Visitation will be held from 5:00
to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, Decem-
ber 27, at the Rush Funeral
Chapel in Wall, and one hour pre-
ceding the services on Friday.
Services will be held at 10:00
a.m. Friday, December 28, at the
United Methodist Church in Wall,
with Pastor Darwin Kopfmann of-
ficiating.
Interment with military honors
will be held at the Wall Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Santa and the Mrs. …visited the residents and family members
at the Kadoka Nursing Home.

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