Login

Kadoka Press, August 15, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 107
Number 5
August 15, 2013
Badlands Rodeo Bible
Camp all-around winners
Robyn Jones
All around winners at Badlands Rodeo Bible Camp were Herbie O’Daniel (L) and Brook Howell of Belle Fourche. With
over 90 campers, camp was held August 5 through 8. See more photos on page 4.
The Relay For Life of Quad County event is being
held this year in Wall on September 14th and 15th.
The West end of South Boulevard is where the
action will be.
This is a time for everyone to get involved in the
fight against cancer.
During this event we will have several special
ceremonies where we will Celebrate, we will Re-
member and we will Fight Back!
Several Relay For Life teams are working on var-
ious fundraisers to raise money. Although Relay
Teams gather for this event, the public is also wel-
come to attend and join in.
Besides our ‘special ceremonies’ we will have
great talent performing, delicious food being served
and much more. Please plan to attend and support
this amazing event.
A new feature at the Event will be a video hon-
oring anyone who is fighting cancer or who has lost
the battle to cancer.
Photos can be submitted electronically of some-
one you would like to honor or remember in the
video. When submitting a photo please indicate if
the photo is ‘in honor of ’ or ‘in memory of ’. If the
photo is ‘in memory of ’ a loved one please include
their birth date and date of death.
Example of information required with the photo:
In Memory Of:
•Name: (as you want listed with their photo)
•Birth Date and Date of Death:
(if you do not want these dates listed, please specify
that)
In Honor Of:
•Name: (as you want listed with their photo)
There is no charge to be included in the video.
All we ask is that Luminaria bags be purchased.
Luminaria bags can be picked up from any Relay
For Life team member or several businesses in Wall
have them available also ... Golden West, West
River Electric, Wall Building Center, Wall Food
Center and First Interstate Bank.
Recommended donation for the Luminaria are
$5.00 each. If you need help scanning a photo, let
us know.
The deadline for submitting photos is August 12,
2013. Please send your photo as an attachment to:
tkpeters@gwtc.net or lurzcamp@g
wtc.net. If you have any questions, please contact
Sue Peters at 279-2211 or Kelly Lurz at 279-2249.
The deadline for submitting photos is August 19,
2013.
Upcoming
Relay For Life
of Quad County
Hail damage to the city buildings came
in at an estimate just over $400,000. Eight-
een of the 19 buildings received some sort
of damage during the severe hail storm re-
cently. Lori Waldren from BankWest Insur-
ance attended the meeting that was held
on Monday, August 12 at the City Finance
Office, in order to quote yearly insurance
rates and review the hail damage to the
city buildings.
Waldren also gave an annual quote on
premiums for the city insurance. There will
be a slight increase in premium due to
property value increases.
During discussion on the insurance
quote councilman, Ryan Willert, ques-
tioned why additional quotes were not ob-
tained from more than one insurance
company.
He felt they should have also, obtained
quotes from Dale Christensen and Donna
Enders as well, since they also own insur-
ance companies here in Kadoka.
Another point Willert brought up was
the conflict of interest due to Jim Fugate,
BankWest Insurance representative, being
Ulmen’s nephew.
Ulmen stated that the current policy has
been in place since 1991. Long before Fu-
gate worked for Bank West and also, before
Ulmen was employed by the city.
Councilman, Arne Lund, stated that
switching companies can sometimes lead to
higher premiums.
With no further discussion being held,
Mayor Harry Weller, entertained a motion
to approve the Bank West Insurance quote.
The motion was approved with present
council members all voting yes. Absent
from the meeting were councilmembers
Brad Jorgensen and Colby Shuck.
The second draft of the 2014 budget was
reviewed. During discussion, Willert ques-
tioned why there had not been funds allo-
cated for the economic development
committee.
Willert stated that in order for economic
development to get the grant, they needed
to show they had operating money.
Ulmen stated she did not put their re-
quest in the budget. She suggested doing
another supplemental appropriation at the
end of this year for 2014.
This would give the economic develop-
ment committee time to draft a report
showing how they used the money that was
allotted to them in 2013. Then the city
could get a better idea of how the money is
being used.
Willert was concerned about speeding
the process along so economic development
could get the grant they applied for.
Ulmen said economic development could
get the paperwork filed in December of
2013, and they could request a supplemen-
tal appropriation by January of 2014.
In other business, council approved the
maintenance contract agreement with In-
terstate Power Systems for the emergency
generator.
There is some repair work that needs to
be done on the street by the city pool.
The pallet jack for the solid waste trans-
fer station has arrived and the fence has
been repaired around the dump site.
The bar has hired Lynne Jorgensen as
part time bartender.
The estimates for the shower room doors
at the auditorium have been submitted.
Also, new lighting for the auditorium has
been quoted.
Brant’s Electric has estimated the cost
at $7,852. The new lights would have four
times the life of the old bulbs. The existing
lights cost $0.80 per hour and produce
200,000 lumens. The new lights would cost
$0.58 per hour and produce 600,000 lu-
mens.
The new lights would be covered with a
wire guard but would require scaffolding to
change the bulbs. Installation should be
completed between the volleyball and bas-
ketball seasons.
The council approved the pay rate of
$7.50 for the temporary lifeguards em-
ployed at the city pool. Due to the lack of
lifeguards on staff, the pool will be closing
early.
Discussion was held regarding the girls
softball program. Although there was not a
team this year, Lynne Jorgensen had been
hired as the coach. Jorgensen attempted to
have a team, but there was not enough in-
terested girls to play. Following discussion,
the council agreed to pay the full salary to
Jorgensen.
The meeting for public input and zoning
ordinances will be held Wednesday, August
14, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the Kadoka annex.
With no further business, the meeting
adjourned.
Courtesy photos
The dunk tank was a popular game at the nursing home
carnival. Several employees took a turn at being
dunked. Jerica Coller had a little fear that those coming
to play the games might have a good enough aim to
dunk her.
What’s
Inside:
Kadoka Nursing Home carnival
Page 4
Back to school
Page 7
Badlands Rodeo Bible Camp
Page 4
Council receives insurance quotes
on hail damage to city property
Kadoka Nursing Home hosts carnival
The Kadoka Nursing Home
staff and residents held there sec-
ond annual carnival on Sunday,
August 4. Prior to the carnival,
residents and their families en-
joyed a barbecue lunch together.
Over 200 people attended and
took part in the games and en-
joyed the snacks.
The dunk tank was a huge suc-
cess with several nursing home
employees taking a turn to be
dunked. Several other games were
enjoyed including a jumping castle
and the cake walk.
Along with the carnival a car
and motorcycle show was held.
Several shined up their cars and
displayed them on the street for
all to admire.
This annual event is used to
raise money for the activities fund
at the nursing home. The funds
held cover expenses for the resi-
dents when going day trips, Bingo
prizes, along with several other
activities.
Public Notices
Page 8
Editorial
2 - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Ducks
“What kind of bird is that?” wife
Corinne might inquire. If I don’t
know and despite the fact that it’s
sitting in a tree, I’m apt to reply,
“It’s probably some kind of duck.”
Corinne knows by now that this
preposterous statement simply
means I don’t know although she
might give me a look of scorn any-
way. Well, there is a specie of said
waterfowl called a “wood duck”
that does actually nest in trees. I
have never actually seen one, but
there is such a bird although the
trees where they hatch their
young are usually next to bodies of
water. Wood ducks are about the
only ones that do frequent trees
because they, unlike most others,
have claws that allow them to get
a grip on wood. Otherwise, webbed
feet and trees don’t go that well to-
gether.
Actually, I mostly use the word
“duck” as often as possible because
the word amuses me somehow.
Unfortunately, it’s hard to incorpo-
rate it into normal conversations
so you have to work pretty hard at
sneaking it in, thus the above
statement, “It’s probably some
kind of a duck.” Of course, if some-
one asks you how you are, you can
reply, “Just ducky,” which I do
from time to time. Other than
that, possible uses of the word are
somewhat limited except as sharp
commands to dodge low-flying ob-
jects. There are other favorite
words as well that are difficult to
use very much such as “shrub-
bery.” I’m able to work them in oc-
casionally but all too infrequently.
Anyway, back to ducks. They
are amusing critters for the most
part since they are so awkward
and somewhat silly looking when
they’re waddling around on land.
Put them in water, though, and
they’re really quite graceful. I
have found through experience,
however, that their husbandry is
not all that enjoyable. For one
thing, if you put them in the
chicken house in the winter, they
make an awful mess with water.
You’re likely to have an ice field
around the waterer before spring.
Secondly, the meat from most
waterfowl is not that great. If you
roast a duck, you get a large pool
of fat, lots of skin, and a little
greasy meat that isn’t all that
good. Other people find them
tasty, I guess, but they aren’t a fa-
vorite of mine.
Nevertheless, one year I or-
dered quite a number of Khaki
Campbell Ducks. These are small-
ish, walk somewhat upright, and
lay more eggs in a year than most
chickens. The hype in the poultry
catalog got me. Only later did I
find out that these nutty birds are
wild as the dickens. When I
walked into the chicken house,
they’d all, as a group, race across
the floor and crash themselves
into the back wall. This raised a
lot of dust and upset the chickens.
What’s more, although they did
lay very well, their eggs were no
tastier than their meat. The eggs
were very solid so you had to work
awfully hard at scrambling them.
Using them in a cake or some-
thing was tricky as well. All in all,
raising them was not a worth-
while adventure, but it taught me
several things. Do not believe a
salesman’s hype, for one thing,
and secondly, “Do not raise ducks.”
I have also raised Pekin and Mus-
covy ducks, I might add, and, al-
though they are less frustrating
than Khaki Campbells, they aren’t
of much more use.
By the way, you really shouldn’t
bother with geese either. Your wife
will get attached to them so you
can never eat them. They will just
be around forever, and the gander
will occasionally sneak up behind
you and bite you on the rear when
he’s protecting his lady or ladies. I
do like eating geese better than
ducks, but raising either is still a
fairly useless endeavor. Plucking
either is the pits.
Neither is it worth your time to
raise rabbits or chinchillas. Rab-
bits are actually quite good to eat
and similar to chicken, but chin-
chillas are absolutely hopeless all
the way around. What’s more, rab-
bits are hard to raise in a climate
that gets both too hot and too cold
for them. I can’t recommend either
bunnies or chinchillas.
But you know what, I find in
looking through poultry catalogs
that I have never raised any
guineas. They say they are good at
keeping wood ticks under control
since they like to eat them. They
also warn you when intruders are
around. Other people have them
and seem to like them although
they often say they are quite noisy.
I wonder if we should give them a
try and see how they work out.
Oh, well. Maybe not. If I want
poultry around, I’d better stick to
chickens, if I can just manage to
keep them from digging holes all
around the lilacs and other shrub-
bery. Still, chickens and I gener-
ally get along just fine despite the
fact that the word “chicken” isn’t
nearly as neat as the word “duck.”
The Importance of
Affordable, Reliable
Commercial Airline
Service
Whether traveling for business
or a family vacation, South
Dakotans rely on commercial air-
line service and our state’s avia-
tion infrastructure to provide safe,
reliable air travel. While there can
be frustrations when it comes to
airline travel, maintaining con-
nectivity through safe, reliable,
and affordable air service is vital
to South Dakota’s growing econ-
omy.
The airline industry of today is
far different from what it looked
like prior to changes made in
1978, when Congress deregulated
the airlines and removed itself
from the business of selecting air-
line routes and setting ticket
prices. Since that time, capacity
has increased dramatically and
competition has often meant that
consumers have more options
when it comes to choosing an air-
line or a destination. Even with
deregulation, however, the federal
government maintains an impor-
tant role when it comes to infra-
structure investment, as well as
ensuring the safety and security of
our aviation system across the
country.
It is also important to mention
the economic significance of both
commercial and general aviation
in a state like South Dakota,
where distance often presents a
barrier for commerce. Estimates
from the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Transportation suggest
that, in our state, the aviation in-
dustry supports 7,000 jobs, and
generates $800 million in business
sales and $250 million in personal
income annually, both directly and
indirectly. Still, challenges remain
when it comes to maintaining
commercial service in a rural state
like South Dakota, which has six
commercial airports with regu-
larly scheduled flights and 65
other airports that provide vary-
ing degrees of general and busi-
ness aviation services.
Last week, as part of my work
as Ranking Member of the Senate
Commerce, Science, and Trans-
portation Committee, which has
jurisdiction over the Federal Avia-
tion Administration and the U.S.
Department of Transportation, I
hosted an aviation roundtable in
Sioux Falls. This roundtable pre-
sented an opportunity to discuss
not only the challenges, but also
the business opportunities when it
comes to commercial service for
both the aviation industry and
South Dakota communities. The
roundtable brought together air-
line representatives, along with
local leaders, and provided the
public with an opportunity to ask
questions and hear directly from
key stakeholders.
I was pleased with the discus-
sion and dialogue at the event,
and believe it represented a posi-
tive step to maintaining and
strengthening commercial airline
service throughout the state. I
look forward to continuing these
discussions in other South Dakota
communities and hearing from in-
dividuals, businesses, and commu-
nity leaders on this issue. As I
continue my role on the Senate
Commerce Committee, I will work
to improve the safety, reliability,
efficiency, and accountability of
the aviation industry.
Lookin’ Around| Syd Iwan
From the U.S. Senate | Senator John Thune
Combating Sex Traf-
ficking
Last year, the International
Labor Organization estimated 4.5
million victims were subject to sex
trafficking, many of which were
young girls. As a mom, the more I
learn about this issue, the more it
keeps me up at night. I can’t help
but think of the horror victims
face every day, as they live in fear
and endure abuse and loneliness.
Sex trafficking is not an easy topic
to talk about and it’s easy to con-
vince yourself that it isn’t happen-
ing here – but you would be
wrong.
While the Sturgis Motorcycle
Rally and South Dakota’s hunting
season are often known for their
positive impact on our state’s
economy and tourism industry,
both events pose incredible chal-
lenges in combating sex traffick-
ing. People travel to our state
under the pretense of attending a
special event, but instead travel to
sexually exploit victims. Just this
week, the Rapid City Police De-
partment, in coordination with
state and federal agents, arrested
seven men who were seeking sex
with underage girls at the Sturgis
rally. Unfortunately, this is far too
common.
It is estimated as many as
300,000 children are victims of sex
trafficking every year in the
United States. These victims are
often very young – most girls are
first exploited between the ages of
12 and 14, while boys are first
abused between 11 and 13. This
kind of repulsive activity is tragic
and must not be tolerated. In
order to help end sex trafficking,
we need to do more to crack down
on those who create the demand
for this exploitive industry.
I have joined a bipartisan effort
to combat sex trafficking by intro-
ducing H.R. 2805, the End Sex
Trafficking Act of 2013. This legis-
lation will help eliminate human
trafficking rings by targeting the
criminals who solicit or attempt to
purchase sexual acts and ensuring
they are prosecuted as human
traffickers.
Specifically, the End Sex Traf-
ficking Act will amend the Traf-
ficking Victims Protection Act to
make it absolutely clear that both
recruiters of underage trafficking
victims and the criminals who
purchase sexual acts from those
victims should be arrested, prose-
cuted and convicted as sex traf-
ficking offenders. The bill also
leverages existing resources by di-
recting federally funded law en-
forcement task forces that are part
of the Innocence Lost National Ini-
tiative to also focus on investigat-
ing and prosecuting those who
solicit children for sex.
Often given the anonymous
title of “john,” those who choose to
harm innocent children should be
anything but anonymous. It’s time
to bring these degenerates out
from behind computer screens as
they respond to online advertise-
ments for sexual activities, get
them off the streets and put them
behind bars.
While we are making progress,
we must do more and I hope you’ll
join me in raising awareness
about this critical issue. I will con-
tinue to work with my colleagues
on both sides of the aisle, and with
our partners in the Senate, in of-
fering concrete solutions we can
take to keep our children safe.
From the U.S. House | Representative Kristi Noem
Celebrating America’s
Farmers Markets
Over the first week of August,
local markets across the country
celebrated National Farmers Mar-
ket Week.
Farmers markets are an impor-
tant part of America’s diverse agri-
culture sector, providing unique
benefits to communities across our
nation. They give Americans a
chance to learn about agriculture
by meeting some of the people who
grow and raise our food. They pro-
vide valuable marketing opportu-
nities for small and beginning
farmers – many of whom scale up
to larger regional markets and
other institutions. And they help
expand access to locally-grown
foods that are in greater demand
than ever before.
We have seen incredible growth
in the number of farmers markets
over the past few years. Today, ac-
cording to USDA’s National Farm-
ers Market Directory, more than
8,100 local markets are in opera-
tion – up from about 5,000 mar-
kets just a few years ago.
Sales of local foods have sky-
rocketed along with the popularity
of farmers markets. In 2005, local
food sales totaled about $1 billion
across the nation. Last year, ac-
cording to industry estimates,
sales of local foods totaled nearly
$7 billion.
At USDA, we believe that
strengthening local and regional
food systems, including farmers
markets, will be a cornerstone of a
revitalized rural economy.
Under the Obama Administra-
tion, USDA has helped nearly 450
farmers market and other direct-
marketing projects in every state,
under our Farmers Market Pro-
motion Program. We’ve also sup-
ported nearly 300 projects to help
farmers develop and sell new,
value-added products through our
Value-Added Producer Grants pro-
gram.
We have helped increase the
number of markets that accept
EBT technology – which allows
folks to use nutrition assistance
benefits to buy fresh, farmers
market produce – by nearly 100
percent in the last two years.
And to be sure American agri-
culture is ready to meet the grow-
ing demand for local products,
we’ve helped thousands of small
producers to get started and keep
growing.
We want to continue these ef-
forts – and to do so, USDA contin-
ues to urge Congress to pass a
comprehensive Food, Farm and
Jobs Bill. This would expand
USDA support for local and re-
gional marketing opportunities,
including farmers markets,
around the country.
This week we joined folks
around the country in celebrating
our nation’s thousands of farmers
markets. More Americans than
ever have a thriving farmers mar-
ket in their city or town – and by
providing support to grow and
strengthen these markets, we can
create even more opportunity for
American agriculture.
U.S. Dept. of Ag| Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
Preparing To
Celebrate Our
125th Anniversary
When my grandson, Henry,
turned one year old in July, our
family and friends gathered with
us to celebrate his special day. We
enjoyed a nice meal together and
then watched Henry attempt to
eat his birthday cake and open his
presents. As a one-year-old, Henry
probably doesn’t quite grasp the
birthday concept yet, but it was
important for us to celebrate.
Regardless of our age, we
should all take the time to recog-
nize the significant milestones in
our lives. Whether it’s a birthday,
anniversary, confirmation or grad-
uation, it’s important for loved
ones to come together and cele-
brate.
One momentous occasion worth
celebrating is quickly approaching
us – South Dakota is about to
reach its 125th anniversary.
More than 125 years ago,
Arthur C. Mellette, who would
later become the state’s first gov-
ernor, had a vision for the south-
ern half of the Dakota Territory
and led the movement for state-
hood. When a friend of Mellette’s
– U.S. Senator Benjamin Harrison
– was elected to the presidency,
South Dakota was admitted into
the Union.
Gov. Mellette and the first
South Dakotans struggled in those
first few years. Drought and
overly-optimistic predictions of
settlement negatively impacted
the economy and hurt farmers and
ranchers. Additionally, the first
Governor dealt with tension from
tragedies like the Wounded Knee
Massacre and the murder of Sit-
ting Bull.
There were also the difficulties
of establishing a new government,
convening the first Legislature
and enforcing new laws. Things
looked especially dim a few years
later, when the state’s second state
treasurer stole all of the money
from the state treasury and es-
caped to Mexico. Even though
Mellette was not responsible for
the theft, he donated almost all of
his own property to replenish the
state’s funds.
Although there was only one
Arthur Mellette, South Dakota’s
history is full of people like him –
people who worked hard and did
the right thing, even in the face of
adversity. Thanks to those brave
and resilient citizens – the Mel-
lettes of past generations – today
South Dakota is a place of oppor-
tunity and prosperity.
As we prepare for this signifi-
cant milestone, I hope South
Dakotans will reflect on the many
stories of our past and take the
time to celebrate how far we have
come as a state.
If you have ideas on how we can
celebrate South Dakota’s 125th
anniversary of statehood in 2014,
I hope you will take a few mo-
ments to share those ideas with
South Dakota’s 125th Anniversary
of Statehood Commission. You can
share your ideas by visiting the
commission’s website at
www.125.sd.gov or emailing
125info@state.sd.us.
Office of the Governor | Gov. Dennis Daugaard
Should You Become
Executor of Someone's
Estate?
One of the most important deci-
sions you'll make when writing
your will is determining who
should be named executor of your
estate. Even if you're just leaving
behind household goods and a
small savings account, someone –
whether appointed by you or the
state court – must settle your af-
fairs.
Some people consider it an
honor – or duty – to take responsi-
bility for ensuring that their loved
one's final wishes are carried out.
But serving as an executor can be
onerous and time-consuming,
even for those with a strong finan-
cial or legal background. In a
worst-case scenario, executors
who act imprudently or in viola-
tion of their duties can be sued by
beneficiaries and creditors.
Plus, you'll likely have to deal
with the dreaded probate, a court-
supervised process of locating and
determining the value of the de-
ceased's assets, paying final bills
and taxes, and distributing what's
left to the heirs.
Before you agree to serve as an
estate's executor, make sure you
understand what will be required
of you. Responsibilities include:
Manage paperwork on behalf of
the estate, including the will,
trusts, insurance policies, bank,
investment and retirement ac-
count statements, birth and death
certificates, marriage, prenuptial
agreement or divorce papers, mil-
itary service records, real estate
deeds, tax records, etc.
If the estate is complicated or
likely to be contentious, you may
want to hire a lawyer and/or ac-
countant to help navigate the
maze of paperwork.
File a certified copy of the will
with the local probate court, which
will determine if probate is neces-
sary.
If the probate court confirms
you as executor, you'll be issued a
document called "letters testa-
mentary," which gives you legal
authority to act on the estate's be-
half, including opening a bank ac-
count in the name of the estate to
pay outstanding debts (loans, util-
ities, medical bills, credit card bal-
ances, etc.)
Notify all interested parties of
the death. These might include:
government agencies (Social Secu-
rity, Veterans Administration,
Medicare, U.S. Post Office, DMV);
financial institutions; creditors;
current and former employers; re-
tirement plan administrators; in-
vestment firms; insurance
companies; doctors and other pro-
fessionals; landlord or tenants;
utilities, etc.
You'll often need to send a copy
of the death certificate to close out
accounts, claim insurance bene-
fits, change ownership of assets or
accounts to the estate or a benefi-
ciary, so order ample copies
through the funeral home or
county health department.
Locate assets, including per-
sonal property, bank accounts and
safe deposit box contents, and en-
sure that they are protected until
sold or distributed to inheritors.
This may involve updating home
and car insurance, changing locks,
overseeing appraisals of property
that must be sold, etc.
Collect money owed to the es-
tate, such as outstanding wages,
insurance benefits, retirement
plan benefits and rents.
Notify heirs about their be-
quest.
File the deceased's final federal,
state and local tax returns, as well
as federal and state estate tax re-
turns, if applicable.
Once probate has closed, you
will distribute the remaining as-
sets to named beneficiaries.
Because acting as an executor
can be very time-consuming (often
taking months or years), you are
allowed to charge the estate a fee
for your time – usually a percent-
age of the estate's value, as dic-
tated by state law.
In short, both parties should
thoroughly understand what's re-
quired of an estate's executor to
make sure it's a good fit. There's
no shame in saying no if it's be-
yond your abilities, and plenty of
professional help is available –
and advisable – if you do need as-
sistance.
Practical Money Matters | Jason Alderman, Financial Education Advisor
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
E-mails: press@kadokatelco.com • editor@kadokatelco.com
Telephone 837-2259 • Fax: 605-837-2312
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to: Kadoka Press, PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the
Town of Belvidere, the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson
and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
•ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS RATES•
Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette,
Bennett County, Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . .$35.00 (+ Tax)
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42.00 (+ Tax)
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00
Website Subscription Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36.00
*South Dakota residents are required to pay sales tax.
uddos
&
oncerns
Look for a new
section in the
paper soon!
Want to give credit to someone or
have a concern? Address it here!
Contact Kadoka Press for details.
Call 837-2259 or email:
press@kadokatelco.com
K
“The best way to break a bad
habit is to drop it.”
Capsule Sermons
John Hafner, who is the son of
Jan Rasmussen’s sister Marian, is
writing an historical novel based
on history and real people who
lived in this area some time ago.
He is scheduled to speak about it
at the West River History Confer-
ence this fall in Rapid City.
Jan Rasmussen will be under-
going knee surgery this week in
Rapid City.
Things are gearing up for the
beginning of the new school year,
as teachers and staff of the White
River School District will begin
meetings on Tuesday of this week.
School starts on Tuesday, August
20. School starts for Kadoka Area
students on Monday, August 26.
The flash flood on Friday morn-
ing, August 2 caused flooding in
the basement of the Bruce Ring
home. With Bruce in the hospital
in Rapid City and Jessie visiting
him there, Rachel and June Ring
and all the children coped with the
disaster as best as they could.
Pumping water out a basement
window, cleaning up a bit after the
drains worked once again, doing
some of the laundry in the time al-
lowed, but it still left an awful lot
of work for Jessie when she re-
turned home. June took Rachel
and the twins, Michael and
Matthew, to the airport in Rapid
City the next day, where they vis-
ited Bruce in the morning and
then they flew back to Texas in the
afternoon. Bruce was released
from the hospital on Tuesday, Au-
gust 6 and Jessie and the children
went up to bring him home.
The Ohrtmann boys had bor-
rowed the Ring’s goat, Roanie, and
her triplet kids, for a project and
showed them at the fair. They did
well with them and returned with
ribbons and plaques. The goats
were returned to the Rings on Sat-
urday.
Jan Ring was in Martin Mon-
day and Tuesday of last week to
get parts. Wednesday she accom-
panied June Ring to Winner where
June kept a medical appointment.
Friday Jan hosted St. John LA-
LWML at her home and Saturday
she was on the road again for
parts, only this time it was to
Kadoka.
Debbie Ring came home Thurs-
day to visit over the weekend, as
the office where she works was
closed Friday because of the mo-
torcycle rally. She had visited
Bruce when he was in the hospi-
tal.
Linda, Jeremy and Tyler Ring
left Sunday, August 4 for a trip to
drive over part of the Oregon Trail.
They went to Chimney Rock in Ne-
braska, then to Scotts Bluff, and
from there on to Fort Laramie in
Wyoming. They came back to
Spearfish to visit Debbie, and then
on home on Wednesday. The boys
earned more Junior Ranger
badges and medals.
Orlana Schmidt and teammates
on the Blackpipe women’s softball
team will be taking part in the
games at the Rosebud Fair. Jace is
going out for football and they
have started practice. Orlana will
be working in the high school
again this year.
Louann Krogman had two days
of training at school in White
River last week. Thursday Blaine,
Louann and grandson Nash vis-
ited Clarence in Winner. Saturday
Louann was busy making pickles,
and the guys were helping work
cattle at Adrians. Monday they
had scheduled for work with the
horses.
Since the rains began a cou-
ple weeks ago, Krogmans have
had over seven inches of rain.
Cliff and Elaine Krogman had
granddaughters Janey and Mad-
die Post visiting them from Min-
nesota for a week. They took them
back home on Sunday, August 4.
There was a good turnout for
the first Farmers Market held in
White River on Wednesday, Au-
gust 7.
Cliff and Pam Allard worked
cattle on Friday, ahead of that
downpour of rain Saturday morn-
ing that left them with an inch of
rain.
Rev. Glenn Denke began his va-
cation about the middle of July,
spending the first couple of days in
South Dakota. He visited Erna
Totton in Sioux Falls before head-
ing on to Reinbeck, Iowa. He at-
tended church there with the
congregation where he had been a
pastor previous to coming to Nor-
ris. He met Rev. Geyer who lives
there now, but earlier had been a
pastor at Chamberlain. A “meet-
ing” with a deer prolonged his stay
in Iowa while his car was repaired,
but it was fixed in time for him to
arrive on schedule in St. Louis,
where he was delegate to the
LCMS Synodical Convention.
After the convention he headed for
Nebraska, where he worshipped
with a former congregation in
Bridgeport, and took in some plays
at Scotts Bluff and Ft. Robinson.
He was back in the pulpit at St.
John and St. Peter on August 4.
On the 7th, he was in Pierre for
the Circuit Pastors’ Conference,
which also was a farewell for Rev.
Dennis Keyes of Presho.
Blake, Amy and Patrick
Lehman were in Waubay last
week for a few days of fishing. Son
Jason joined them there and they
had good luck fishing. Thursday
and Friday Blake attended a
school board convention in Sioux
Falls. Saturday the Lehmans were
up at George and Susanne Eng-
land’s helping butcher chickens.
Tuesday of last week was
“School Shopping Day” for Jim
and Marjorie Letellier and eight of
their school age grandchildren;
three of those are college age. They
went in shifts according to age,
and headquartered at the Beck-
with home in Pierre, where LuAnn
had meals all ready for them. The
day closed with a style show.
Jakki Burma is spending some
time with Grandpa Jim and
Grandma Marjorie. Friday Ja-
Lynn, Jakki and Marjorie had a
ladies day out in Kadoka.
The Letellier’s have
recorded over five inches of
rain just in August so far.
Dan and Heather helped work
cattle at Cliff Allard’s on Friday.
Morgan had been spending time
with relatives in the Hills all
week, and returned home Satur-
day, along with her cousin,
Gwyneth Simmons, daughter of
Jeff and Michelle Simmons of
Sturgis.
Kay and twins, Graedon and
Grace, came to visit Richard and
Noreen Krogman on Friday, and
that evening Glen arrived from
Fargo. Richard took them up to
George and Suzanne England’s to
pet the goats. That afternoon they
all went to Winner to visit
Clarence. Sunday Mark, Carolyn
and Cayne Krogman came from
Quinn to join them for dinner.
That afternoon Darrin, Amber,
Owen and Quinn came to visit.
The Mark Krogman family left for
home Sunday evening. Kay and
the twins and Glen left for their
homes on Monday.
Sharon Allard came from
Spearfish Saturday afternoon to
visit her mother, Maxine, and to be
there to help welcome Rick and
Judy Ladegard of Colchester, CT.
They had flown to Colorado
Springs to visit their son, Eric, and
drove out with him to visit Maxine
and family. They arrived about
suppertime, and Stan Allard of
Rapid City came for a visit in time
to join them for supper. Evan and
Dorothy Bligh visited for a while
that evening. The Ladegard’s left
Sunday morning to head for
Valentine and then on back to Col-
orado Springs.
June Ring came for a visit while
Sharon was there and had dinner
with Maxine and Sharon.
Due to the bike rally, Carol Fer-
guson worked at the Wanblee Post
Office all week. Wanblee Postmas-
ter Dena Buchholz was working in
Sturgis. There was a steady
stream of motorcycles going east
and west all week on Highway 44,
a popular route for bikers.
With the rainy weather stop-
ping the haying and combining,
Ed and Carol spent this weekend
in the Black Hills, taking advan-
tage of chance to get away.
Last Thursday through Sunday,
Rich and Shawn Bendt, AJ and
Lavin attended a family reunion
and went camping at Lake Kam-
pesca by Watertown. The family
reunion was for Rich’s family.
Rich, Shawna and AJ returned
home on Sunday and Lavin went
to spend the week with her grand-
mother, Sandy Bendt, in Clear
Lake.
Mike and Patty Groven spent
last week in Rochester, MN, where
Mike underwent a procedure and
received a pace maker. While
there they were guests of their
daughter, Michelle, and her hus-
band, Todd Hook, and family.
Weekend guests of Brian and
Jessi Fromm were Brian’s parents,
Joel and Lois Fromm, of New Ulm,
MN, and his brother, Jerry
Fromm, and wife, Kim, and family
of Sioux Falls, and Brian’s friend,
Chad Paulson, Minneapolis, MN.
They came to help Brian cele-
brate his 30th birthday.
Phyllis Word and her sister-in-
law attended the funeral of Phyl-
lis’ aunt, Thelma Rada, 97, of
Rosholt on Saturday in White
River. Phyllis’ brother and wife,
Darrell and Carol Iwan, of Dead-
wood also attended the funeral.
The Radas lived in White River for
many years. Thelma died on Au-
gust 5 and was buried in the
White River cemetery.
Gary Ward and family of
Pahrump, NV, arrived in Kadoka
on Tuesday of last week to visit at
the home of his mother, Loretta
Ward. Before coming to Kadoka
they visited Gary’s wife’s family in
Rapid City. They left for their
home in Nevada on Fri., August 9.
Sam Parkinson of Rapid City
and a friend, Sam Hauglund of
Sioux Falls, stopped at the Larry
Parkinson home on Wednesday of
last week. They were on their way
to Vermillion where both are stu-
dents at the University of South
Dakota. Sam Parkinson is Larry
and Alvina’s grandson.
Word was received by friends
and family of the death of Mary
Jane Craven Green, 93, in Rapid
City on Tuesday, August 6. Memo-
rial services will be held on August
15 at the Black Hills National
Cemetery and another memorial
service is scheduled in Kadoka at
the Presbyterian Church on
Thursday, September 5. Her son,
Gus Craven and family, is from
Wanblee and sympathy is ex-
tended to all her family. The
Cravens were long-time residents
in this area.
Delane Boyer and his son,
Andre, of Raleigh, NC, and Dale
Pettyjohn of Bushnell, SD, arrived
in Kadoka to visit friends and rel-
atives on Friday. That same day
the Boyers went to Sturgis to visit
Zack Word, who is a resident at
the Veteran’s Facility at Ft.
Meade. Sunday a get-together was
held at the Frying Pan Ranch
south of Kadoka. Attending were
Kieth and Nona Prang, Brett and
Tammy Prang, Delane and Andre
Boyer, Dale Pettyjohn, Jeff Prang
and John Lyle Willsey. That after-
noon several friends got together
at Jigger’s Restaurant, including
Joe Stratton, Bud Weller, Bud and
Valene Perault, Kieth and Nona
Prang, and Ardis McCormick, to
visit with Dale, Delane and Andre.
Delane is busy writing a biog-
raphy which will soon be pub-
lished. He is planning a book
signing later at the Prang gift
shop. Monday his son left for his
home and Delane went back to
visit Zack again before leaving for
his North Carolina home on Tues-
day.
Saddle bronc riders update:
Red Horse Ranch PRCA rodeo in
Fergus Falls, MN, August 9-10 –
James Willert, 1st place, score 83
winning $1,467, tied for 4th place
with a 79, Cole Elshere, $422;
Catfish Stampede, Onida, August
9-10, Ryan Elshere, 1st place with
an 80, winning $684; Dawson
County Rodeo, Glendive, MT, Au-
gust 10, Jeremy Meeks, scored 71,
tie for 4th place, $160; Lawton,
OK, Rangers Rodeo, Aug. 7-10,
Cole Elshere tied for 5th with a 79,
$792; PRCA rodeo in Lovington,
NM, Aug. 7-10 – Cole Elshere, 84,
tied for 4th, $1,238; Sioux Empire
Fair, Sioux Falls, August 10-11 –
First, Ryan Elshere, 79 winning
$927 and 4th place, JJ Elshere
with a 74, $232.
The local area enjoyed another
nice cool week in August with
some moisture almost every day.
It is nice for everything to still be
so green this late into summer. By
the end of this week we will be ex-
perience typical August weather
with temperatures in the 90s.
The motorcycle riders have
headed home with another record
attendance in Sturgis.
WOW! What a weekend, Sun-
day was a very busy day starting
off with setting up the picnic and
carnival area. Thank God and all
the volunteers who stepped up to
help! After everything was ready
the men started barbecuing brats,
hot dogs and hamburgers. The
smell and smoke was awesome!
Then on the inside the ladies
were busy getting the salads,
desserts, and the beverages ready.
Let me tell you we had some deli-
cious food, we got some great cooks
out in the community. Finally it
was time to eat. We had 202 peo-
ple go through the chow line
and there was still quite a bit
of food left over. No one should
have left hungry.
The carnival and car and motor-
cycle show got started at 1:30 and
ended for the adults at 4:00, but
the kids continued to play in the
dunk tank until it was time to
drain it! Other games we had was
the free throw shoot, dunk tank,
duck pond, fishing pond, inflatable
bouncing castle and the cake walk.
I ran the cake walk and trust this
I never left that area until the car-
nival was over. Every few minutes
I’d yell out a winner and the spots
would be full for the next time!
We sure appreciate everyone
who brought out your cars and
bikes for the afternoon. This was
our first trial run for this and it
turned out fantastic! Next year we
will shoot for even a bigger turn
out and hopefully take up the
whole street.
The other games stayed real
busy, too. All the helpers we had
that day were awesome and clean-
up went fast and that’s what we
were shooting for. Elmer Williams
did a terrific job of being a clown
and selling balloons.
Now onto the weekly news, on
Sunday Wanda Swan and Betty
Rasmussen stop in to visit with
some real good friends, Bunny
Green and Clara Belle Weller.
They had a real nice visit. Also vis-
iting Clara Belle this week were
Bud Weller, Shirley Josserand,
Jade, Norma Hopkins, Renate
Carson, Phyllis DeSera, and Carla
Zimiga. Clara Belle didn’t get
much rest this week.
Mary Bull Bear had several vis-
itors this week. Stopping by were
Nevaeh and Mary Pierce, Tiffany
J., Raya Garnett, and Esperanza
Hartman, and Payton Garrett. It’s
always good to see them come
check on grandma!
We had several ladies stop by to
see and visit with the residents.
Those dropping in were Norma
Hopkins, Lova Bushnell, Shirley
Josserand, Bonnie Madsen, and
Renate Carson. Their kindness is
truly appreciated.
Ruth Klundt had both her son,
Arlyss, and her daughter, Cindy,
and her family here for the week-
end. The kids had good time on
Sunday and Ruth helped out at
the concession stand. Fun was had
by all!
Melford Koester got a surprise
visit from his son, Fred, and his
granddaughters, Tia and Libbi
Koester. They stayed over and
came to the family and resident
barbecue. I’m thinking one of
those granddaughter’s won a cake!
Nelva and Janet Louder were
here to have lunch with Dwight
Louder. Also sitting with them
were Dwight’s wife, Dorothy and
his son. The food was real good
and there was lots of it. Dwight en-
joyed the day by people watching!
Joining Emma Jarl for the Sun-
day doings were Stan, Deb, Trey,
and Savannah Knispel from White
River area. They loved the meal
and Savannah took part in all the
carnival happenings. She was the
last one to jump into the dunk
tank and the last one to get out!
She was fun to watch and to see
such fun and amazement through
her eyes and smile. Her mom had
a hard time keeping up but she did
it, way to go Deb!
There were many family and
friends that came out for the day
and it made so wonderful for all. I
hope that everyone enjoyed them-
selves and ate plenty of food.
We would like to extend sympa-
thy to the Gus and Terry Craven
family on the recently loss of his
mother, Mary Jane Craven.
Please add Val Cork on your
prayer list, that the results of her
medical test will be good. Val is em-
ployed at the nursing home.
Bonnie (Wayne) Riggins has had
several visitors. Her daughters,
Ella Hindman and Marla Nelson,
and her sons, Stephen Riggins and
Sterling Riggins, along with
Bridgit, Anne and other family
members have been stopping by to
check on her. Also coming to visit
was Cloretta Eisenbraun, Ardys
McCormick, and Lola Joyce Rig-
gins.
Judging by the cars and people
at the Kadoka Nursing Home on
Sunday, one can say that the carni-
val was a huge success and larger
than last year. They served a deli-
cious potluck dinner before the car-
nival started and many enjoyed the
fun all afternoon.
I accompanied Chris and Anita
Riggins and Dylan to Martin on
Sunday evening to the rodeo. Dylan
competed in the bull riding. There
were only two qualified rides in the
bull riding in both performances.
Thought of the week: What could
life be if we had no courage to at-
tempt anything.
Larry Johnston has been trying
to combine his grain, but the fre-
quent rains have made that a long
process. He doesn’t want to com-
plain about the rain, which we
around here don’t like to do, and
figures it will dry out sometime. In
order to take advantage of the
time not used in combining, Larry
has been trying to finish up the
trim in his basement. Larry and
Jo’s daughter, Jenny, had the mis-
fortune of breaking her arm re-
cently when a horse jumped a
little too high. The break was right
below the socket in her shoulder.
The Johnston clan was recently
visited by a distant cousin from
Florida, namely Ray Foster and
his wife, Nancy. Their ancestors
had homesteaded over west of Bill
Headlee’s. They had been looking
for relatives in this area and had a
notice in the Kadoka Press a while
ago seeking them. Larry re-
sponded, and eventually now they
got together. Ray is related
through the wife of Larry’s
grandpa, Louis, which was the
Maas family. When Ray and
Nancy were here, the clan gath-
ered to visit at Club 27 in Kadoka.
Mary Johnston came to that as did
the Lloyd Johnstons and Norma
Hopkins. This week, Larry has a
county commissioner meeting on
Monday where they are working
on the budget for next year.
Nicci DeVries and her three
sons have spent the last three
weeks at Nampa, Idaho, visiting
Nicci’s folks, Jim and Pat Gonza-
les. Nampa is the site of the Snake
River Stampede and other activi-
ties. Jeff Willert was once in the
rodeo at that and the family was
able to watch him compete. Mark
stayed home to finish up the hay-
ing and take care of things in gen-
eral. The travelers were due back
home on Sunday evening. This is
just as well since Gavin and Geof-
frey start football practice this
coming week. Greyson won’t start
until the following Monday. School
will start the week after this.
Chuck and Merry Willard were
visited for about two weeks by
their daughter and granddaugh-
ter, Coleen and Frankie. Coleen’s
husband, Billy, came on Wednes-
day and they all started back
home on Thursday. The reached
their home at Pinedale, WY, on
Friday and in good time since
there was a roping event there
that evening that Billy wanted to
be in. Chuck and Merry helped
with Rodeo Bible Camp this last
week with Chuck being a coun-
selor and staying full time from
Monday through Thursday. Merry
drove back and forth. One day at
the ranch, a horse got cut on some
wire, and Coleen took it to Kadoka
where Bill Headlee did a good job
of sewing it back together. Merry
said she has been applying some
snake repellent around the place
since she is somewhat cautious
about snakes after being bitten by
a rattler a short time ago. The re-
pellant has mint as the main in-
gredient which is said to confuse
snakes and keep them away.
Merry said she doesn’t know if the
stuff actually works, but she’s giv-
ing it a try anyway.
Mike and Marlene Perault had
no kin visiting this weekend which
is somewhat of a change. Marlene
said they hardly know how to act
when that happens. Instead, they
went to Martin on Friday to watch
daughter Laney’s kids participate
in a youth rodeo. They had various
events for kids and it was fun to
watch. On Friday, Marlene took
her mom, Lillian Carlson, to Rapid
City for an appointment with the
eye doctor at the eye institute.
Daughter Lesa came to the clinic
to visit with them while they were
there. Lesa is now an RN there in
Rapid City and does postpartum
work with mothers and their new
babies.
Jo Rodgers has just been run-
ning post offices as usual with last
week being spent at the Belvidere
and Murdo offices. Next weekend,
though, she is planning on taking
her annual two-day vacation in
order to attend Frontier Days in
White River. This is kind of a
Manke family tradition so several
of her kin will be there including
her mom, Carolyn, and a sister
and brother or two.
Betty Kusick was visited by her
daughter and son-in-law, Loretta
and Lawrence Schreiber, of Quinn
on Saturday. They came with their
mower and tidied up the place.
One day while Betty was fishing at
the Belvidere Dam, she had a good
visit with Terry Kezar and family.
Terry is the son of Norman Kezar.
Kezars were fishing for bullheads
and those “bit like everything.”
They put a small piece of worm on
a hook, threw it out with a bobber,
and waited for the bobber to duck.
Betty said she was mostly fishing
for bass at the time since she
didn’t have any worms.
Marie Addison attended a
ladies tea at the Open Bible
Church in Midland last week.
They hold these a couple of times
a year, and they are well attended.
She also took in a recent garden
tour that took them to see Buddy
Manke’s garden complete with two
large greenhouses and plenty of
tomato and cucumber plants.
Mark Reiman’s garden was also
visited. Mark has planted lots of
trees and always says he’s planted
enough. Then he finds a new one
and has to have one or two of
those. On the garden tour, she
went with her daughter, Shirley,
and some friends of hers.
Last weekend, Jim and Fayola
Mansfield drove 200 miles for din-
ner. Actually they went to Nio-
brara, NE, where they had a
family gathering of the Blanken-
feld clan which is on Jim’s
mother’s side of the family. A
brother and sister of Jim’s were
there and a whole lot of shirttail
relatives and some closer ones.
This reunion is always held the
first Sunday of August. The week-
end before that, Jim’s sister, Au-
drey Neiffer, celebrated her
eightieth birthday in Kadoka at
the home of her daughter, Laure
Hildebrand. There was an open
house in the afternoon and a dance
in the evening. Various brothers
and sisters came with their
spouses and there were at least
two brothers and four sisters that
were here. Some stayed with Jim
and Fayola where they were
served lots of pancakes and other
breakfast delights on Sunday
morning along with other meals
and snacks during their stays.
Correspondent News
Kadoka Press - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - 3
Norris News | June Ring, 462-6328 Kadoka Area News | Sydne Lenox, 837-2465
Kadoka Nursing Home | Cathy Stone, 837-2270
Gateway News | Lola Joyce Riggins, 837-2053 (Let it ring.)
Belvidere News | Syd Iwan, 381-2147
Sat., Sept. 21, 2013
Pearl Hotel
Kadoka, SD
Registration: 9-10 a.m.
Start time: 10 a.m.
Refreshments & Meal
provided to all participants
3rd Annual Badlands Trail
5K Walk and Run
Send registrations to:
Save the Pearl Hotel
PO Box 504
Kadoka, SD 57543
Questions:
Joy Schmidt
605-837-2476
Kolette Struble
605-441-1909
Email: oienranch@
goldenwest.net
Register by
Friday, Sept. 1
$20
After Sept. 1
$25
Please include
T-Shirt size
press@kadokatelco.com
Community
4 - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - Kadoka Press
/|+ / _|r|!
Kaidean Elizabeth
Daughter of Kipp & Jessica Magelky
Kadoka, SD
Born: May 14, 2013 · 6:29 a.m.
8 lbs., 4 oz. · 20¨ long
Maternal Grandparents:
Gary & Kathy Eikmeier, Flandreau, S.D.
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
John & Bernadean Johnson, Trail City, S.D.
The late Glen & Karen Eikmeier
Paternal Grandparents:
Jerry & Janet Magelky, Kadoka, S.D.
Paternal Great-grandparents
The late Sam & Marjorie Strand
Margaret Magelky, Dickinson, N.D.
& the late Frank Magekly
Wedding
Reception
Wade Fox &
Patty Irigoyen
Saturday, August 24
at 8:30 p.m.
Club 27 • Kadoka, SD
Come wish the couple best wishes
for their future together!
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Taking first place at the Lower Brule Ranch Rodeo on Sunday, August 11 was the Homewrecker team. Team mem-
bers Michael Jones (L), Frank Carlson, Tyler Jones, and Lex Grooms competed in five events including the wild
cow milking, horse relay race, bronc ride, range gathering, and double mugging.
Betty VanderMay sold tickets to all those attending the carnival.
Mary Ellen Herbaugh (L) and her
granddaughter, Tiffany Brown.
Don and Elaine Kemnitz
Ruth Klundt
Encouragement awards were presented to one camper in each event for their strive and hardworking to improve
themselves. Ben Stangle (L), Chase Mayer,Sam Doehling, Hunter Johnston, Brady Hill, Austin Pinney, Brandon
Moody. Front row: Amy Doehling, Sarah Scott, Rachel Hansen. Not pictured: Elle Moon. They were chosen by
the event instructors and were each given a camp T-shirt.
Roger Porch (L) and Boyd Porch (R) presented Bryce Olson of Prairie City
and Josh Hunt of Faith Bibles in memory of their parents, Cy and Dorothy
Porch.
Bridget Howell; Belle Fourche, SD;
Brooke Howell; Belle Fourche, SD
37.12
Mattee Pauley; Wall, SD; Herbie
O’Daniel; Kadoka, SD 14.62
Tyler Byrne; Martin, SD; Rhett
Fanning; Martin, SD 26.28
Pole Bending
Bailey Blain; Hermosa, SD 43.731
Alaina Stangle; Philip, SD 45.998
Amanda Farr; Hartford, SD 46.831
Bryce Olson; Prairie City, SD
47.902
Girl’s All Around
Brooke Howell; Belle Fourche, SD
85
Boy’s All Around
Herbie O’Daniel; Kadoka, SD 61
Girl’s Bible
Bryce Olson; Prairie City, SD
Boy’s Bible
Josh Hunt; Faith, SD
Westrom’s Determination/En-
couragement Award
Tie Down: Sam Doehling
Breakaway: Elle Moon
Team Roping Header: Chase Mayer
Team Roping Heeler: Ben Stangle
Steer Wrestling: Hunter Johnson
Bareback: Austin Pinney
Saddle Broncs: Brandon Moody
Pole Bending: Amy Doehling
Barrels: Sarah Scott
Goat Tying: Rachel Hansen
Bull Riding: Brady Hill
Calf Roping
Herbie O’Daniel; Kadoka SD 39.62
Tyler Byrnel; Martin, SD 46.15
Brendon Porch; Kadoka, SD 16.86
Jeb Hunt; Faith, SD 18.36
Bull Riding
Brady Jandreau; Kadoka, SD 106
Brady Hill; Onida, SD 67
Jordan Hunt; Faith, SD 55
Riley Page; Colton, SD 54
Barrel Racing
Brooke Howell; Belle Fourche, SD
33.123
Bryce Olson; Prairie City, SD
34.216
Courtney Bartlett; Interior, SD
34.602
Meghan Corr; Hermosa, SD 34.657
Goat Tying
Becca Lythgoe; Colton, SD 16.85
Tawny Barry; Carter, SD 17.26
Emilee Pauley; Wall, SD 17.78
Tricia Wilken; Meadow, SD 18.17
Breakaway Roping
Brooke Howell; Belle Fourche, SD
6.29
Becca Lythgoe; Colton, SD 7.21
Kamira Miller; Newell, SD 7.97
Alaina Stangle; Philip, SD 8.95
Bareback
Tanner Langdeau; Presho, SD 108
Dylan Riggins; Kadoka, SD 107
Jordan Hunt; Faith, SD 64
Saddle Bronc
Brady Jandreau; Kadoka, SD 55
Jordan Hunt; Faith, SD 54
Steer Wrestling
Dalton Hurst; Buffalo, SD 18.20
Herbie O’Daniel; Kadoka, SD 10.16
Brendon Porch; Kadoka, SD 21.59
Team Roping
Hanna Hostutler; Midland, SD;
Sabrina Fanning; Marting, SD
34.17
2013 Rodeo Bible Camp rodeo results
Snapshots from the KNH carnival
Send Photos &
Stories
press@kadokatelco.com
Community
Kadoka Press - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - 5
Be thinking about starting a subscription
for your college student this fall!!
First year or graduate student …
Your college-bound student will love getting news from home!!
It’s Almost Back-to-College Time …
Are you ready for another semester of hard work and fun?
Use these helpful tips to make the most of the coming school year,
whether it’s your first or last!
• Don’t schedule classes back-to-back. You won’t be rushed, and you’ll have time after class to study.
• Get involved! If you didn’t last year, play a sport, join a club, or start one of your own.
• Have fun! A balance between work and play is the key to a good year.
• Take breaks while studying – 10 minutes for every hour is sufficient. Also, study in the daytime as much
as possible.
• Make and stick with a livable budget. Don’t forget to factor in little things like CDs and haircuts.
• Create open communication with your roommate(s) early on. Get to know each other’s personal values,
habits and expectations.
Pioneer Review
Box 788 • Philip • (605) 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant
Box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
Kadoka Press
Box 309 • Kadoka • 837-2259
Faith Independent
Box 38 • Faith • (605) 967-2161
Bison Courier
Box 429 • Bison • (605) 244-7199
Murdo Coyote
Box 465 • Murdo • (605) 669-2271
New Underwood Post
Box 426 • New Underwood • (605) 754-6466
All College Subs to any of these newspa-
pers: $25.48 tax included
“He is the Shepard of the Stars”
was this year’s theme for the an-
nual Midland Open Bible
Women's Ministry Friendship Tea.
The church social event, held
Thursday, August 8, had approxi-
mately 65 ladies attend. They
came from many surrounding
towns – Midland, Philip, Murdo,
Hayes, Kadoka and others. The
farthest traveled attendees was
from Gillette, Wyo., and Mission.
“It was a very good turnout, and
we didn’t have any problems with
the weather. It was a great day,”
said Betty Sinkey, director of
women’s ministries. “Each year
we have such good reports.”
Every year the luncheon takes
place in August and has a unique
theme. Each of the tables was dec-
orated with china tea cups and
flowers, but also included a stack
of hymnals to be used by the
ladies at the table. The main cen-
terpiece was a cake shaped like a
star, with cupcakes surrounding
it.
Each guest received a memento
and a person at each table re-
ceived a door prize.
Some of the activities of the an-
nual luncheon, which all tied in
with the theme, included an open-
ing led by Sinkey and a devotion
given by Jennifer Blye. Singing
was led by Beth Flom and Kim
Bierle.
“People keep saying that it is
the highlight of the summer. Peo-
ple feel good when we accomplish
something like that,” said Sinkey.
She added that it makes a nice fel-
lowship – sit back and enjoy.
Midland’s annual friendship tea
Courtesy photo
by Kindra Gordon
The year was 1907 and agricul-
tural leaders in South Dakota rec-
ognized that conducting research
on the soils, crops and rangelands
of South Dakota would be impor-
tant to helping the state's future
progress.
With much of the research at
that time focused on the areas
near the South Dakota State Uni-
versity campus in Brookings, they
looked west to the heart of South
Dakota's rangeland. The Agricul-
tural Experiment Station at
SDSU established the Cottonwood
Range and Livestock Field Re-
search Station near Philip – and
106 years later, SDSU scientists
are still conducting studies to ben-
efit South Dakota agriculture.
Located along U.S. Hwy. 14 ap-
proximately 12 miles west of the
town of Philip – and more than
300 miles from the campus in
Brookings – the station initially
included 640 acres and research
focused on crops and soils. In
1940, 2,000 acres of federal land
were added and research was ex-
panded to include grazing and nu-
trition studies.
In 1942, a long-term grazing
study was initiated at the Cotton-
wood station to evaluate the im-
pact of range condition on range
ecosystem dynamics and livestock
production. This ongoing study
provides an opportunity to exam-
ine the responses of mixed grass
prairie ecosystems to a wide array
of climatic conditions and grazing
systems, and has resulted in sci-
entific papers that challenge sev-
eral long held range paradigms.
SDSU rangeland management
professor and Extension Range
Specialist Roger Gates explained
the value of having several
decades of research information,
“The long-term stocking rate stud-
ies at Cottonwood are extremely
important scientifically because
only a few locations nationwide
have maintained studies for so
many years. This research forms
the foundation for scientific un-
derstanding of vegetation dynam-
ics and response to grazing in the
Northern Plains. Current ecologi-
cal site descriptions, which are
used to guide management, are
derived directly from Cottonwood
research for clayey ecological
sites, one of the most widespread
in western South Dakota.”
He added, "The same long-term
studies have more recently been
used to understand relationships
of vegetation production to cli-
matic variation and the relation-
ships of financial returns to
stocking decisions. Commitment
to maintaining long term research
has provided a very important re-
source to help ranchers and their
advisors make rational manage-
ment decisions."
SDSU Extension Beef Specialist
Ken Olson added, "Most research
is short term, meaning the exper-
iment is conducted for three years
at the most. However, responses
in agricultural systems are typi-
cally slow and dynamic, and in the
rare long-term studies in exis-
tence – like what we are able to do
at Cottonwood, we often find that
the long-term conclusions change
dramatically from those drawn in
the early years.”
SDSU range science professor
Sandy Smart has completed re-
search with analysis from the his-
toric data sets and that inform-
ation provided insight into the
ability to predict forage produc-
tion from weather variables.
Smart also analyzed Cottonwood
data along with other long-term
data sets from several states in
the Great Plains to gain a better
understanding of harvest effi-
ciency under different stocking
rates.
Presently, Smart is working on
measuring annual root production
to help develop models to predict
runoff, sediment yield, nitrogen
and phosphorus from rangelands.
As a result of this long-term re-
search, SDSU scientists and
South Dakota livestock producers
readily agree that the research
conducted at the Cottonwood field
station has been instrumental in
developing and refining proper
grazing management on western
South Dakota rangelands.
In the 1990s a donation was
made to update the facilities at
the Cottonwood field station to en-
hance livestock research efforts at
the site. The donation was made
by Lake Preston native and SDSU
animal science alum Bill Larson
(Ph.D. '69). The Cottonwood facil-
ity improvements were completed
during 2000 and 2001 and added
a feedlot area, cattle handling
barn and commodity shed.
The drylot feedlot area included
12 pens, waterers and concrete
feedbunks with capacity for up to
10 head per pen. On a range based
station such as Cottonwood, this
facility allows for comparing live-
stock response to various treat-
ments in drylot versus grazing
conditions or for studying re-
sponses to a forage based diet in a
more controlled setting than on
pasture.
Today, research at this 2,640
acre facility continues to focus on
range and cow-calf management.
Recent research studies have eval-
uated water quality issues during
persistent drought, use of dried
distillers grains for supplementa-
tion, and currently are focusing
work on heifer development and
utilizing the cowherd for fetal pro-
gramming studies. The station is
used to develop and calve out
more than 100 heifers which are
utilized for research programs,
and yearlings are purchased for
additional research projects.
SDSU range science professor
Pat Johnson has conducted re-
search at the Cottonwood field
station for 25 years and said facil-
ity improvements at the station
have been critical to ensuring
quality research continues there.
She stated, "The Cottonwood sta-
tion has focused on range live-
stock production throughout its
history, however the addition of
the feedlot and cattle feeding and
handling facilities has dramati-
cally improved our ability to eval-
uate the consequences of grazing
strategies on livestock production.
Without the feedlot pens and com-
modity shed, the water quality
work that we conducted would
have been impossible. They al-
lowed us to evaluate the impact of
various levels of sulfate on animal
production and to compare animal
responses to sulfate in water in
both drylot and rangeland situa-
tions."
She continued, "These facilities
have vastly increased the scope
and quality of the research for fac-
ulty and students and the Exten-
sion programming conducted at
the station in the past, and will
continue to do so into the future.”
For the future, the traditional
range research work will continue
along with new projects, such as
fetal programming studies being
initiated by SDSU meat science
assistant professor Amanda Blair.
With funding from two grants, she
reported, “We have utilized nearly
all of the cows from the Cotton-
wood station for this project and
relied on the feedlot area, working
facilities, commodity storage
areas, unit manager and pastures
for completion of this work. It is
my hope that these studies are
only the beginning of much more
research linking the beef produc-
tion chain from conception to con-
sumption, and I plan to continue
utilizing the resources of the Cot-
tonwood station for this work.”
In 2013, another upgrade was
made to the Cottonwood field sta-
tion with the addition of a modern
multi-purpose facility to enhance
the research work being done.
Built through private donations,
the facility includes office space, a
laboratory with separate drying
and grinding rooms for sample
preparation and analysis, a
heated shop area, a secure feed
storage area and a machinery
storage area.
An open house at the Cotton-
wood Range and Livestock Field
Station will be held Saturday, Sep-
tember 7. Current research proj-
ect information will be shared by
SDSU faculty along with tours of
the new multi-purpose facility.
Cottonwood is one of five field
research stations across the state
operated by SDSU's Agricultural
Experiment Station.
Cottonwood Range and Livestock
Field Station – data for 106 years
Ane open house at the Cottonwood Range and Livestock Field Station, 12
miles west of Philip, will be held Saturday, September 7.
Courtesy photo
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota
daily & weekly
papers through the
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
Call 605-837-2259 Today
and let us help you!
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
Read Numbers 13-14
When you hear the term “faith failure,” what comes to mind? If you’re like
most people, the expression immediately drums up uncomfortable thoughts
of a spiritual stain on your Christian walk. Try as we might, however, we
simply cannot or will not go through this life without failing from time to
time.
Most troubling to Christians are those instances when we allow other fac-
tors to get in the way of what we know God is telling us. Can you remember
a time when you knew the Lord wanted you to do something, but for some
reason, you decided upon a different course of action? When we allow any-
thing to short-circuit our obedience to the heavenly Father, we can be certain
that we have just had a faith failure.
One of the key reasons for spiritual missteps is the simple issue of fear.
Now, we never have to be afraid of losing our salvation once we are secure in
Christ; instead, what I’m talking about here is the fear of failure. We simply
do not want to fall on our face in the challenge God sets before us. So, rather
than meet the call head-on, we run and hide. In our minds, it is better not
even to bother trying than to try and fail.
Is that the attitude God desires? Of course not. Our heavenly Father hasn’t
given us a spirit of fear (2 Tim. 1:7 nlt); He desires boldness and veracity in
our faith. Don’t bow down to the idol of apprehension. The God who calls you
is strong enough to keep you. Whenever He assigns you to a task, you can be
sure He’ll empower you to achieve it.
Inspiration Point
Church
A God of Grace
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
Midland • Rev. Glenn Denke • 462-6169, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Sunday Worship--10:00 a.m. MT/11:00 a.m. CT
Church Calendar
Monday, August 19: Sweet and sour pork, rice, stir fry vegetables,
cranberry juice and pears.
Tuesday, August 20: Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and gravy, corn
o’brien, bread and mixed fruit.
Wednesday, August 21: Fish portions, scalloped potatoes, seasoned
carrots, bread and acini de pepe dessert.
Thursday, August 22: Oven crisp chicken, pasta salad with tomato
and cucumber, sliced beets, dinner roll and peaches.
Friday, August 23: Chef salad with beef or turkey, juice, blueberry
muffin and sherbet.
Wednesday, August 14:
•Planning and Zoning Commission will meet to hold a public
hearing to consider public comments on the proposed City of Kadoka
Zoning Ordinance at 7:00 p.m. in the annex.
Thursday, August 15:
•High school football practice begins.
•Stronger Economics Together (SET) meeting will be held in
Kadoka.
Friday, August 16:
•10th-12th grade class registration, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Monday, August 19:
•High school volleyball and cross country practice begins.
•Computer Handbook Meeting for Kadoka School 6th Graders and
9th Graders at 4:00 p.m. in the Great Hall.
Monday, August 26:
•First day of school for Kadoka Area School District.
Notices:
The KHS Alumni Association is trying to locate class composite
photos for all graduating classes from 1913 to 2013. If you have one,
please call Nona Prang at home 837--2684 or cell 488-0098.
Meals for the Elderly
Upcoming Events
Whatever Happened to
Those Lazy Days of
Summer?
According to my calculations,
summer is half over. I am not
quite sure how this came about
but the calendar has never lied to
me before. It has confused me and
taunted me but it has never lied to
me.
Looking at my calendar I can
see no lazy days of summer noted
anywhere in the foreseeable fu-
ture. I am not sure if this is an
oversight on my part and that I
should have at least penciled in
one lazy day of summer or if those
lazy days of summer are a thing of
the past. I sure hope it is not the
latter.
I can hardly imagine a world
without any lazy days of summer.
It just would not be summer in my
opinion.
This probably is the price peo-
ple pay for getting old. When I was
young most of my summer was
filled with lazy days where I prac-
ticed the fine art of doing nothing.
Oh how I yearn for the return of
those good old days of yesteryear.
Someone once told me, ''Sonny,
don't ever grow old.'' At the time, I
did not know what he meant. I as-
sumed he was referring to his loss
of hair or arthritis in his joints or
forgetting things. I thought that
was what it meant to grow old. He
meant nothing of the sort.
Now that I am old, I understand
exactly what he was warning.
There is no doubt in my mind; he
was bemoaning the fact that his
lazy days were gone. Perhaps, he
was envious of the fact that at the
time I had loads and loads of lazy
days on my hands. I did not know
just how rich I was.
Now I do, but it is too late.
Where have all those lazy days
gone?
I was whining about this to the
Gracious Mistress of the Parson-
age hoping to get some empathy at
least. Instead of sympathizing
with me, all she did was look at me
and say in that tone of voice that I
know so well, ''You just want an
excuse to do nothing.''
To which I replied most sharply,
''I don't need an excuse to do noth-
ing, all I need is an opportunity.''
Thinking about what I said I
discovered there was more wisdom
in that one sentence than any-
thing else I have ever said. I had
to sit in the corner for a few mo-
ments recovering from the shock
of saying something with wisdom
in it. I probably say many things
with wisdom in it without even
thinking. In fact, I am good at say-
ing many things without thinking.
Although I may not be good at a
wide variety of things, I have mas-
tered the art of doing nothing. I
can do nothing better than I can
do anything. Of course, I do not
have too many opportunities to do
anything; I have more opportuni-
ties to do nothing. If I had my
choice, I would rather do nothing
than anything.
My philosophy is simply this,
why be good at nothing and not
put it to good use?
I have invested a lot of time and
energy into doing nothing and I
am concerned that not having an
opportunity to do nothing I might
forget the finesse associated with
that art.
I do not get a chance very often
to do nothing so I am anxious to
practice the skills associated with
nothing. In this regard, my calen-
dar has not been very cooperative.
Where are those lazy days of sum-
mer where I can do nothing?
Not only has my calendar not
been cooperative but also my wife
has been the epitome of obstruc-
tion in this pursuit of mine. Just
when I think a lazy day is looming
on the horizon, she comes up with
something for me to do. Even
though all I wanted to do was
nothing, she insists that I do her
something. Either I do her some-
thing or else. I do not want to do
her or else for nothing.
Those lazy days of summer
were the perfect opportunity to
perfect the fine art of doing noth-
ing. Regretfully I have to honestly
face the fact that those times are
far behind me. No more lazy days
of summer for me. At least not as
many as there used to be.
The old preacher in Ecclesiastes
was right when he said, ''To every
thing there is a season, and a time
to every purpose under the
heaven:'' (Ecclesiastes 3:1 KJV).
I can look back with a sense of
satisfaction and know that when I
did have those lazy days of sum-
mer I put them to good use and de-
veloped skill in doing nothing. I
know before me are some days
when I will not have the strength
or energy to do anything, then my
ability to do nothing will come in
good use.
I think it is quite important to
live in the time at hand. The apos-
tle Paul understood this when he
wrote, ''And that, knowing the
time, that now it is high time to
awake out of sleep: for now is our
salvation nearer than when we be-
lieved.'' (Romans 13:11 KJV).
Now that I am older, (and who's
to say how much older I will get) I
can say with a good deal of expert-
ise, never grow old. By that I
mean, never forget those lazy days
of summer.
Fellowship of God| Dr. James L. Snyder
6 - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Mary Jane Craven Green, 93
years and 10 months old, of Rapid
City passed away on Tuesday, Au-
gust 6, 2013 at Rapid City Regional
Hospital after a short illness.
She is survived by her four chil-
dren, Vivian (Jerry) Snyder of
Pierre, Theodore (Donna) Craven of
Rapid City, Wyndy (Michael) Buck-
ner of Soddy Daisy, TN, and Gus
(Terry) Craven of Wanblee, and
many beloved grandchildren, great
grandchildren and great great
grandchildren. She is also survived
by two brothers, Ray Young and
Maurice Young both of Martin; two
sisters-in-law, Norma (Monroe)
Johnson of Arkansas and Alice
Young of Martin, and many nieces,
nephews, cousins and friends.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; three brothers; an in-
fant sister and two nephews.
Memorial services will be at 10
a.m. on Thursday, August 15, 2013
at Black Hills National Cemetery
near Sturgis.
A second memorial service will
be at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Septem-
ber 5, 2013 at the Presbyterian
Church in Kadoka.
In lieu of flowers memorials may
be given to a charity of the donor’s
choice.
Family and friends may sign
Mary Jane’s online guest book at
www.kirkfuneralhome.com
Mary Jane Craven ______________________________
Stanley Dean Peterson, age 87,
of Kadoka, died Monday evening,
August 12, 2013, at his home next
to his son’s residence south of Rapid
City.
Survivors include his son, Casey
Peterson, and his wife, Kathryn, of
Rapid City; his daughter, Robin Pe-
terson-Lund, and her husband,
Arnold, of Kadoka; six grandchil-
dren; a brother-in-law Edmund
Risse of Martin; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Stanley was preceded in death
by his wife, Frances (Craven) Peter-
son on June 7, 1995; and two sis-
ters, Gloria Risse and Donna
Wagner.
Funeral services are pending
with the Rush Funeral Chapel of
Kadoka.
Stanley Peterson _______________________________
Thelma Rada, age 97, of White
River, South Dakota, died Monday,
August 5, 2013, at the Coteau des
Prairies Hospital in Sisseton.
Thelma Marguerite Crume was
born March 29, 1916 in Mylo, (Ro-
lette County) North Dakota to John
and Hazel (Pickett) Crume. On Au-
gust 5, 2013 she rode home, on
horseback no doubt.
In October 1919 Thelma, with
her parents and her sister, Viola,
left Mylo, North Dakota for White
River, South Dakota in a wagon.
She could even recall a few inci-
dents that happened during that al-
most year long trip.
Thelma was united in marriage
to Roy (Swede) Rada on June 26,
1937 in Murdo, SD. They settled on
a ranch northwest of White River.
To this union four children were
born: Curtis, Shawn, Melvin and
Cleone.
Swede passed away in 1977.
Thelma moved into White River in
1992, then to Murdo, in 2003 and in
Sept 2012 she moved to a care cen-
ter in Rosholt, SD, where her
granddaughter Tina was adminis-
trator.
Thelma loved to be on the back
of a horse riding and checking cat-
tle. She even rode one this past
July. She never turned down an
offer to ride a horse.
Thelma and Swede raised, and
broke, Appaloosa horses, raised
Hereford cattle and worked with 4-
H clubs on their horse projects.
Thelma also worked for a time in
the lunchroom at the White River
School and at the White River
Nursing Home. She belonged to
Cottonwood Ladies Aid, Riverview
Ext. Club and the Rebekah Lodge.
She read the Bible, would do any-
thing for a friend and believed that
if God kept you here you better
make yourself useful.
During her life, Thelma got to go
on a trip of a lifetime to visit Mike
and Cleone’s former exchange stu-
dents from Germany and Denmark
and meet their families. The ex-
change students became her grand-
kids too. Blood never mattered to
her, her heart was big enough for
many children. She was “Grandma”
to all who knew her.
In the early years, Thelma and
Swede always had family around,
especially on Sundays. Thelma was
known for her ability to whip up a
meal for everyone in no time. A few
of their nieces and nephews also
lived with them while they were
growing up and summers were like
Grand Central Station. She was
known for her “pranks” that she
loved to pull on people and her con-
tagious laughter.
Thelma is survived by her
daughter, Cleone (Michael) Ras-
musson of White River, SD; a sister
Maryetta Wacek of White River,
SD; a brother Iver (Rene) Edwall of
Castro Valley, CA; three sister-in-
laws, Clara Bowers of Fernley, NV.,
Gladys Hix of Colorado Springs,
CO. and Velda Rada of Coos Bay,
OR; 11 grandchildren Mona (Dave)
Taggart of Gregory, SD, Tina
(Doug) Muller of Rosholt, SD, Ron
(Stacy) Rasmusson of Farmington,
MN, Dana Rada of Winner, SD,
Dina Schultz of Rosholt, SD, Cory
Rada of Springfield, SD, Clinton
(Lisa) Rasmusson of Casper, WY,
Angela (Nick) Leach of Farming-
ton, MN, Arthur Rada of Fair-
banks, AK, Matthias Zastrow of
Berlin, Germany and Birgitte
Svendson of Denmark; 14 great-
grandchildren, Paul Taggart, Roy
and Nathan Muller, Michael,
Trevor, Adam and Trent Rasmus-
son, Kali Adamson, Serenna, Julia
and Elaina Leach, Lindsey, and
Melvin and Angel Rada; hundreds
of adopted grandchildren, great-
grandchildren and great-great-
grandchildren; as well as several
nieces and nephews.
Those preceding her in death
are: her husband, Roy (Swede)
Rada; three sons Curtis, Shawn
and Melvin; her sister Viola; her
brother Francis, a brother-in-law
Bernard Wacek; and her parents.
Visitation will be held one hour pre-
ceding the services.
Funeral services were held at
2:00 p.m. CDT Saturday, August
10, at the Community Events Cen-
ter in White River.
Interment was at the White
River Cemetery.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements are with the Rush
Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Thelma Rada _________________________________
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts
& Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Kadoka Area School
Kadoka Press - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - 7
ADMINISTRATION
Jamie Hermann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Superintendent
George Seiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .High School Principal
Jeff Nemecek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elementary Principal
Chad Eisenbraun . . . . . . . . .Technical Coordinator/Head Football
JoBeth Uhlir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Business Manager
Eileen Stolley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Impact Aid Coordinator
Kay Reckling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Administrative Assisstant
Danielle Stoddard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elementary Secretary
Andrea Johnston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .High School Secretary
Cindy VanderMay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Payroll Clerk
ELEMENTARY STAFF - KADOKA
Karen Byrd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reading First Program Coach
Pamela Bonenberger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pre-School/Speech
Dana Eisenbraun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pre-K/Asst. Track
Becky Keegan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kindergarten
Gail Reutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .First Grade
Cassie DeRocher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Grade
Maribeth Roghair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Third Grade
Mary Graupmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fourth Grade
Arlene Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fifth Grade
Michelle Mansfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Middle School Language Arts
Barry Hutchinson . . . . . . . .Middle School Social Studies/Head VB
Laurie Prichard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Title I Technology
Jean Holzkamp . . . . . . . . . .Middle School Science, P.E. & Health
Gregory Norris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K-12 Instrumental Music
Anita Riggins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Ruth McCubbin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Joan Enders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Speech Facilitator/Library
Kathy Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Curtis Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Dana Eisenbraun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education/Asst. Track
Merilee Grimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education Aide
Nicole DeVries . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education Aide/Cheerleading
Carmen Huffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Janice Allen-Perkins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Sara Speer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Nichole Thompson . . . . . . . . . .MS Response to Intervention (RTI)
Kristie Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Guidance Counselor
INTERIOR
Edna Kary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kindergarten
Mia Whirlwind Horse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .First & Second Grades
Claire Beck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Third, Fourth & Fifth Grades
Jennifer Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sixth, Seventh & Eighth Grades
Carrie Sanftner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Ed Aide
Barb Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Title I
Valarie Kruse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
LONG VALLEY
Valerie Ohrtman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kindergarten & First
Skye Brucklacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second & Third
Nancy Weller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fourth & Fifth
Misty Hamar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sixth, Seventh & Eighth
MIDLAND
Renee Schofield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kindergarten - Third
Mary Parquet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fourth - Eighth
Nicole Nelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
HIGH SCHOOL STAFF
Jessica Magelky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .English
David Ohrtman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Social Science & History/Track
Susan Sudbeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Guidance Counselor/Registrar
Jean Holzkamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Science/First Aid
Brandy Knutson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Industrial Technology & Vo-Ag
Carol Kroetch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Math/Title I
Dylan Moro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Science/Asst. Boys’ Basketball
Joan Enders . . . . . . . .1/2 time Speech Facilitator 1/2 time Library
Mark Reiman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P.E./Boys’ Basketball
Colby Shuck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K-12 Vocal/Pep Band
Teresa Shuck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Psych/Soc/Elective
Amy Smiley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Deetta Terkildsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Computer Technology
Harry Weller . . . . . . . . . . . .Title I/Activities Director/Cross Country
Christy Willert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .High School Math
Gregory Norris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K-12 Band/Pep Band
CUSTODIANS
Polly Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kadoka
Brad Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kadoka
Matthew Plaggemeyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kadoka
Larry Manley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Interior
Reuben Vollmer, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Midland
FOOD SERVICE
Richard Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Cook - Kadoka
Carol Tucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant - Kadoka
Linda Riggins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kitchen Helper - Kadoka
Tara Leach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cook - Interior
Larry Manley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kitchen Helper - Interior
Amee Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cook - Midland
EXTRA-CURRICULAR/NON-STAFF
Jody Sudbeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant Football
Annette VanderMay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Girls’ Basketball
John Herber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assitant Girls’ Basketball
Jake VanderMay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assitant Girls’ Basketball
Kadoka Area School District Administration and Faculty
Kadoka Area
School District
School Calendar
2012-2014
August
26 First Day of School
September
2 Labor Day - No School
6 School in Session
27 Homecoming -
School in Session
October
3 Parent/Teacher Conferences -
Dismiss at 2:30
11 Teacher In Service
24 End of 1st Quarter
November
8 Teacher In Service
27 Dismiss at 2:30
28-29 Thanksgiving Vacation
December
6 Teacher In Service
23 Christmas Vacation Begins -
No School
January
6 School Resumes
16 School in Session
17 Teacher In Service
February
13 Parent/Teacher Conferences -
Dismiss at 2:30
21 Teacher In Service
March
14 Teacher In Service
20 End of 3rd Quarter
April
11 Teacher In Service
21 Easter Monday - No School
25 School in Session
May
15 End of 2nd Semester
15 Last Day of School - Dismiss
at 11:00
16 Teacher In Service
18 Graduation - 1:00
Kadoka Area Kougars
Sports Center
BOYS’
BASKETBALL
December
14 Faith - Here
16 RC Stevens - Here
20 Dupree - There
23 Philip - There
27 Stanley County - There
January
4 Kadoka Classic
11 New Underwood - Here
16-18 Jones Co. Invite
30 Jones County - There
31 Bison - Here
February
4 Bennett Co. - Here
6 RC Christian - Here
7 Wall - There
11 New Underwood -
There
14 RC Christain - There
21 Lyman - Here
28 Philip - Here
District 15 …
Mar. 3, 6 & 7 - TBD
Regions …
Mar. 11 - TBD
State …
Mar. 20, 21 & 22 - Aberdeen
Gymnastics
Wall/Kadoka
December
13 Hot Springs - 5:00
21 Stanley Co. - 11:00
28 Vermillion Winter
Wonderland - 10:30
January
11 Stanley Co. Inv. - 10:00
24 Chamberlain Tri. - 5:00
31 Hot Springs - 5:00
February
7 Kadoka/Wall Inv. - 12:00
15 Wagner State Qualifer - 11:00
State …
Feb. 21 & 22 - Aberdeen
Track
April
10 Todd County
12 Belle Fourche
15 Harry Weller
22 Kadoka Community
25 People’s Market/Dis-
count Fuel
26 Chamberlain
May
1 Lyman
3 Sturgis
9-10 Howard Wood, Sioux
Falls
10 Lead/Deadwood
16 Western Great Plains
Conf.
17 Kadoka Area
Regions …
May 22 IV-B - Kadoka
State …
May 30-31 - Sioux Falls
GIRLS’
BASKETBALL
December
12 White River - There
14 Faith - Home
17 RC Central - There
23 Philip - There
27 Stanley Co. - There
January
4 Kadoka Classic - Here
7 Lyman - There
11 New Underwood -
Here
16 Philip - Here
23-25 Southern Plains
Tourney
Lyman & Kadoka
30 Jones Co. - There
31 Bison - Here
February
3 New Underwood -
There
6 RC Christain - Here
7 Wall - There
14 Colome - Here
18 Dupree - Here
20 Bennett Co. - There
District 15-B …
Feb. 24, 25, & 27 - TBD
Regions …
Mar. 4 - TBD
State …
Mar. 13, 14 & 15 - Huron
FOOTBALL
August
30 Jones Co. - Home - 6:30
Parents Night
September
6 Open
13 Wall - There - 7:00
20 RC Christain - There -7:00
27 Philip - Home - 7:00
Homecoming!
October
4 White River - There - 6:30
11 Stanley Co. - Home - 6:30
18 Lyman - H - 6:00
24 New Und. - Home - 7:00
Playoffs …
Oct. 29 - 1st Round
Nov. 4 - 2nd Round
Nov. 9 - Semi-Finals
Nov. 14-16 - State Finals
@ Vermillion
WRESTLING
Philip/Kadoka/Wall
December
7 Kimball/White Lake
13 RC Central
14 RC Central
21 Valentine, NE
January
10 Lyman Tourney
11 Lyman Tourney
17 Philip Tourney
18 Philip Tourney
25 Winner Tourney
31 Pierre MS
February
1 Wagner Tourney
1 Red Cloud
15 Philip Area Invite
at Wall
State …
Feb. 28 & Mar. 1 at
Aberdeen
VOLLEYBALL
September
3 Kadoka Triangular
5 Philip - Home
10 Little Wound - There
12 Wall - There
14 Philip Tourney
17 New Underwood -
There
21 Faith - Home
24 White River Tourney
October
1 Bennett Çounty - Home
5 Lead/Deadwood
Tourney
8 Lyman - There
17 Jones Co. - There
19 Douglas Tourney
22 Kadoka Triangular
28 R C Christian - There
District 13-B …
Nov. 5 & 7 - Kadoka
Region 7-B …
Nov. 12 - Site TBD
State …
Nov. 21, 22 & 23 - Huron
CROSS-COUNTRY
August
30 Douglas
September
5 Spearfish
7 Faith
14 Wall
19 Chamberlain
21 Lyman
25 Western Great Plains - Philip
October
3 Sturgis
12 Philip
Regions …
Oct. 16 - TBD
State …
Oct. 26 - Rapid City
All times listed - MT
ELEMENTARY TRANSPORTATION MILEAGE:
Transportation mileage is paid to parents who transport their elementary children
to a bus stop or to school if the miles traveled are in excess of five (5) miles. The
mileage rate for this transportation is state rate -- currently .37 per mile. Transporta-
tion is paid to the school or bus stop closest to the residence. If the parent chooses
not to use the bus or to send their child to another school within the district, mileage
is paid only to the closest bus stop or closest school.
If your residence within the district changes during the school year, contact the
school to determine the bus stop closest to you.
At the beginning of the school year, a calendar is sent to each parent who will
be claiming transportation mileage. Parents are asked to use this calendar to keep
track of the days driven. At the end of the year a transportation mileage claim
voucher will be sent to the parents for the purpose of submitting the mileage claim.
The mileage voucher is to be completed and the school asks that you also attach
the calendar to this voucher. If there are any questions regarding transportation
mileage, please call the school business office at 837-2175.
Requests for assignment to an alternate attendance center within the district: A
parent or guardian must submit the request, in writing, to the elementary principal
to be approved by the school board. Mileage will be paid according to the above
policy.
SCHOOL POLICY
The Kadoka Area School will not discriminate because of sex, race, color, na-
tional origin or handicap.
CEO/Superintendent Jamie Hermann is the designated coordinator of Title IX
and Title VII. Telephone number: 837-2175.
Principals George Seiler and Jeffery Nemecek are the designated coordinators
of Section 504/ADA.
STUDENT ACCIDENT INSURANCE
Through: Student Assurance Services, Inc.
Since children are particularly susceptible to injuries, we encourage you to review
your present health and accident insurance program to determine if your coverage
is adequate. If you do not feel your insurance is adequate because of a deductible
or co-insurance clause, or if you do not have insurance, we encourage you to re-
view the student insurance program. This plan will provide benefits for medical ex-
penses incurred because of an accident. An explanation of the cost and benefits is
explained on the premium envelope. Please return envelope and check to school
if coverage is needed.
STATEMENT FROM THE
DEPT OF HEALTH
From time to time during the year, screenings or education may be provided
through a contract with the SD Department of Health (DOH), who is subject to the
rules and regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
(HIPAA). You may view their notice of privacy practices on the DOH website or re-
quest a printed copy by contacting them at 1-800-305-3064.
INCLEMENT WEATHER SCHOOL CLOSINGS
For various reasons it may be necessary to close school or to alter school hours.
In case of any emergency, such as a blizzard, making it necessary to close school,
the announcement will be made over radio stations KIMM, Rapid City; KGFX,
Pierre; KILI, Pine Ridge; Channel 6, KCLO (CBS); Channel 3, KOTA (ABC). If
weather conditions indicate that school may be closed or delayed in opening,
please keep tuned to one of those stations for such information or for other changes
in the bus schedules. Hear announcements between 6:30 - 7:30 a.m., for these
announcements.
DELTA DENTAL ACCIDENT PLAN
Provides coverage around-the-clock. No deductible - pays 100 percent of cus-
tomary fees up to $2,000 per accident.
Your child will receive application forms from the Kadoka Area School for these
insurance plans. Parents are encouraged to look them over carefully and mail them
back to the company. If your child does not bring the applications home, please
contact the school business office.
PARENT TEACHER CONFERENCES
Oct. 3 & Feb. 13
Two parent-teacher conferences are scheduled: Thursday, Oct. 3 and Thursday,
Feb. 13, 3:00 to 8:30 p.m. both days. As education of the child is a cooperative
school and home responsibility, all parents are urged to attend parent-teacher con-
ferences; and all parents are encouraged to visit the school buildings and the school
lunch program at any time.
TICKET PRICES • HS Athletic Activities
Adults • $3.00 Students K-12 • $2.00
Double-Header (Boys/Girls’ Events)
Adults • $5.00 Students • $3.00
Family Season Ticket • $100.00
Good for all athletic contests (excluding drama & tournaments),
for all members of the immediate family.
Adult 10-Punch • $25.00 • Students K-12/All Activities • $20.00
Students & children under age 5 are admitted free.
Free admission to grade school games.
FREE SENIOR GOLD PASS
60 years & older, residing in the district
Get pass request at the business office of the Kadoka School.
The pass must be presented at every sporting event.
Picture
Schedules
Midland School
Mon., Sept. 23
morning
Long Valley School
Mon., Sept. 23
morning
Interior School
Mon., Sept. 23
afternoon
Kadoka School
Thurs., Sept. 26
morning
SCHOOL
LUNCH SERVICE
We look forward to an excellent school lunch program this year, with school
lunches and the milk program beginning on the first day of school. Parents, please
encourage your children to participate in the school lunch program. Ala cart pro-
gram will also be offered. Prices are as follows and each ticket pays for 20 servings:
Breakfast: Kadoka & Interior: K-8: $1.15/$23.00 per ticket
Lunch: Kadoka, Midland & Interior
K-5, $2.30/$46.00 per ticket; 6-12, $2.70/$54.00 per ticket
Adults, $3.80/$76.00 per ticket
Extra Milk: 30¢/$6.00 per ticket.
Student Second Meals: $1.45/$29.00 per ticket - Lunch
$1.40/$28.00 - Breakfast
BUS SCHEDULE
School begins at 8:00 and ends at 3:40. Students need time to eat breakfast if
the school serves breakfast.
Long Valley - Melissa VanderMay
Leaves 6:50 a.m. • Arrives 7:50 a.m. •Leaves 3:45 p.m.
Interior - Larry Manley
Leaves 6:15 a.m. • Arrives 7:45 a.m. • Leaves - 3:45 p.m.
Wanblee - Ted Schnee
Leaves 6:00 a.m. • Arrives 7:45 a.m. •Leaves 3:45 p.m.
REMINDER TO PARENTS:
If you change residence during the school year, contact the school to deter-
mine your closest bus stop.
Legal Deadline: Friday at Noon
Public Notices
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Belvidere Store
Open Daily
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Diesel • Gas
Farm Fuel
Pop • Snacks • Beer
344-2277
8 - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - Kadoka Press
Thomas Black Hawk, Mitchell: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: DRIVING
WITH REVOKED (NOT SUSPENDED) LICENSE; Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Dispo-
sition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 03/27/2013 Plea: Guilty; Fine: $0.00
Court Costs: $0.00 Surcharges: $0.00: Incarceration: Begins: 03/27/2013 Sent. To:
Jail 15 Day(s) Susp.: 9 Day(s) Credit: 6 Day(s) Comment: balance is suspended
on conditions: OBEY ALL LAWS 03/27/2013 - 03/27/2014; Fine and costs waived;
pay the clerk for court appointed attorney fees.
Jacinda Blessoe, Grand Rapids, MI: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: NO
DRIVERS LICENSE; Disp. Date: 02/28/2013 Disposition: Dismissal-Defendant not
Available.
Asa Peters, Hot Springs: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: Charge: SIMPLE AS-
SAULT; Disp. Date: 04/24/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor.
Justin Jung, Sioux Falls: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: RECKLESS
DRIVING; Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Plea
Date: 03/27/2013 Plea: Guilty; Fine: $216.00 Court Costs: $125.00 Surcharges:
$44.00 Incarceration: Begins: 03/27/2013 Sent. To: Jail 30 Day(s) Susp.: 30 Day(s)
Credit: 0 Days
Charge: USE OR POSSESSION OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA; Disp. Date:
03/27/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor
Charge: OPEN ALCOHOLIC BEV CONTAINER ACCESSIBLE IN VEHICLE;
Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor.
Conditions: Obey all laws 03/27/2013 - 03/27/2014; Pay fine and costs, including
$85 blood test cost; pay the clerk for court appointed attorney fees; apply $350
cash bond to fine and costs.
Dustin Hill, Big Fork, MT: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: DRIVING
UNDER INFLUENCE-1ST OFFENSE: Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Disposition: Sus-
pended Imposition of Sentence; Plea Date: 10/24/2012 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine:
$500.00 Court Costs: $125.00 Surcharges: $44.00 Restitution: $578.00; License:
Revoked for 30 Day(s) Incarceration: Begins: 03/27/2013 Sent. To: Jail 30 Day(s)
Susp.: 29 Day(s) Credit: 1 Day(s) Comment: Amended order does not require jail
time to be served if conditions met.
Charge: CARELESS DRIVING: Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Disposition: Suspended
Imposition of Sentence; Plea Date: 10/24/2012 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $54.00
Court Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00: License: Revoked for 30 Day(s): Incar-
ceration: Begins: 03/27/2013 Sent. To: Jail 30 Day(s) Susp.: 29 Day(s) Credit: 1
Day(s) Comment: Amended order does not require jail time to be served if condi-
tions met.
Charge: INTENTIONAL DAMAGE TO PROPERTY - $400 LESS-3RD DE-
GREE: Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor.
Charge: RECKLESS DRIVING: Disp. Date: 10/24/2012 Disposition: Dismissed-
Motion by Prosecutor.
Conditions: Obey all laws 03/27/2013 - 03/27/2014; pay fine and costs, including
$85 blood tests costs; defendant is to self report to jail no later than two weeks
from 3/27/13 to serve six days; pay $578 to the clerk for restitution to the following
victim: Merle Stilwell.
Tyler LeBeau, Wanblee: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: INGEST INTOX-
ICANT OTHER THAN ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposi-
tion: Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 05/29/2013 Plea: Guilty; Fine: $166.00
Court Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $44.00; Incarceration: Begins: 05/29/2013 Sent.
To: Jail 10 Day(s) Susp.: 10 Day(s)
Charge: DRIVING UNDER INFLUENCE-1ST OFFENSE: Disp. Date:
05/29/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor
Charge: USE OR POSSESSION OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA: Disp. Date:
05/29/2013 Disposition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor.
Charge: SPEEDING ON OTHER ROADWAYS: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Dispo-
sition: Dismissed-Motion by Prosecutor.
Conditions: Pay the clerk for court appointed attorney fees; pay the fine and
costs including $45 UA cost; obey all laws 05/29/2013 - 05/29/2014.
Waylon Means, Interior: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: Charge: ELUDING: Disp.
Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 05/29/2013
Plea: Guilty; Fine: $216.00 Court Costs: $110.00 Surcharges: $44.00: Incarcera-
tion: Begins: 05/29/2013 Sent. To: Jail 30 Day(s) Susp.: 30 Day(s).
Charge: DRIVING UNDER INFLUENCE-1ST OFFENSE: Disp. Date:
05/29/2013 Disposition: Dismissal-Reduction.
Charge: NO DRIVERS LICENSE: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Dis-
missal-Reduction.
Charge: YIELD TO EMERGENCY VEHICLES: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Dispo-
sition: Dismissal-Reduction.
Charge: ILLEGAL LANE CHANGE: Disp. Date: 05/29/2013 Disposition: Dis-
missal-Reduction.
Conditions: Pay fine and costs, including any blood test costs if applicable.
Javier Alegre, Salt Lake City, UT: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: Charge:SPEED-
ING ON OTHER ROADWAYS: Disp. Date: 02/15/2013 Disposition: Judgment on
Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 02/15/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $59.00 Court
Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00.
Kristopher Loflin, Fort Drum, NY: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge:SPEED-
ING ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 02/27/2013 Disposition: Judgment
on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 02/27/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $39.00 Court
Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00.
Sean Rooks, Rapid City: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: Charge: SPEEDING ON
A STATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 02/27/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of
Guilty
Plea Date: 02/27/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $19.00 Court Costs: $40.00 Sur-
charges: $26.00.
Eric Bicknese, Rochester, MN: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: Charge: SPEEDING
ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 02/27/2013 Disposition: Judgment on
Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 02/27/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $19.00 Court
Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00.
Jennifer Reisser, Interior: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: RECKLESS
DRIVING: Disp. Date: 03/27/2013 Disposition: Judgment on Plea of Guilty; Plea
Date: 03/27/2013 Plea: Guilty; Fine: $500.00 Court Costs: $125.00 Surcharges:
$44.00: Incarceration: Begins: 03/27/2013 Sent. To: Jail 30 Day(s) Susp.: 30
Day(s).
Conditions: Obey all laws 03/27/2013 - 03/27/2014; pay fine and costs, including
$85 blood test costs; obtain alcohol evaluation, attend and successfully complete
any recommendations and file proof with clerk by date stated. Defendant has al-
ready completed the alcohol eval and the eval was filed with the clerk today
3/27/13.
Rodney Fredrickson, Wisner, NE: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: SPEED-
ING ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 02/27/2013 Disposition: Judgment
on Plea of Guilty; Plea Date: 02/27/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine: $39.00 Court
Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00.
Justin Lauigueure, Grandview, WA: Issued by Sheriff’s Office: Charge:
SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE HIGHWAY: Disp. Date: 02/27/2013 Disposition:
Judgment on Plea of Guilty: Plea Date: 02/27/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine:
$19.00 Court Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00.Offense
Martin Stuurman, Oakton: Issued by Highway Patrol: Charge: RENEWAL
REGISTRATION DURING ASSIGNED MONTH: Disp. Date: 02/27/2013 Disposi-
tion: Judgment on Plea of Guilty: Plea Date: 02/27/2013 Plea: Guilty by POA; Fine:
$54.00 Court Costs: $40.00 Surcharges: $26.00.
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
•Major Appliances
•Color Match Paint System
Fromm’s Fromm’s
Hardware Hardware
& Plumbing, & Plumbing,
Inc. Inc.
Kennebec Telephone
Construction
605-869-2220
Excavation work of ALL
types! Back Hoe
Trenching
Excavation
Waterers
Tire tanks
Mainstreet
Kadoka, SD
Contact us for all your plumbing
service calls
605-837-2274
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
SPECIAL MEETING
JULY 29, 2013
7:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the special meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Colby Shuck; Brad Jorgensen;
Ryan Willert; and Cory Lurz. Dick Stolley
arrived at the meeting at 7:05 p.m. Mem-
ber absent: Arne Lund. Others present:
Patty Ulmen, Finance Officer; Jackie Stil-
well; Jared Carlson; Tina Williams; Rick
Wilmarth; and Nathan Riggins. Patrick
Solon arrived at the meeting at 7:05.
Building Permit/Mark Carlson: A building
permit from Mark Carlson was presented
to the council for approval. The building
permit is for the construction of an auto-
matic car wash. After discussion, Shuck
made Motion 13-07-29:90 to approve the
building permit. The motion was sec-
onded by Jorgensen. A roll call vote was
taken with all members present voting
yes, and the motion carried 5-0.
2013 Budget: Rick Wilmarth was present
on behalf of the Kadoka Volunteer Fire
Department. Mr. Wilmarth asked the
council to consider an increase in funding
due to higher costs. After discussion, Mr.
Wilmarth left the meeting at 7:35 p.m.
The first draft of the budgeted expenses
for 2014 was reviewed for each depart-
ment. The second draft of the budget will
be prepared and distributed to the coun-
cil at the regular City Council meeting to
be held on August 12, 2013.
Willert made Motion 13-07-29:91 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by Stol-
ley, with all members voting yes and the
meeting was adjourned at 8:43 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $18.85]
TOWN OF BELVIDERE
REGULAR MEETING
JULY 8, 2013
A motion was made by Rudy Reimann to
call the meeting to order. Wayne Hind-
man seconded the motion. The following
people were present: John Rodgers,
Rudy Reimann, Wayne Hindman, Jo
Rodgers, Casey Jensen, Frank Carlson,
Toni Romero, Wally Wells, Tom DeVries,
and Mike Blom.
OLD BUSINESS:
Minutes from the June 10, 2013 meeting
were read. With there being no correc-
tions, Rudy Reimann made a motion to
accept the minutes. Wayne Hindman
seconded the motion.
NEW BUSINESS:
The reading of Resolution 13 – 01: Jack-
son County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard
Mitigation Plan (2013 update) was held.
With all the council members voting yes,
the Resolution took effect immediately
upon passage.
John Rodgers presented the survey re-
sults from Brosz Engineering for the
property along the E-W Section Line on
the south side of Outlot B-1.
At 7:30 pm the sealed bids were opened
for the West Town Pasture Lease. There
were 3 bids turned in with the highest bid
going to Frank Carlson.
BILLS APPROVED AND PAID:
Armstrong Extinguisher,
maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.00
Ernie’s Building Center,
culvert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .915.00
Golden West, phone
& DSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108.87
Jo Manke-Rodgers, wages . . . .83.11
Kadoka Press,
publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.94
Seaman’s Heating, repairs . . . . .40.80
Tollefson Law, legals . . . . . . . . .45.00
US Postal Service, postage . . . .46.00
West Central, electricity . . . . . .525.26
WR/LJ, water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60.00
West Central, new
service fees . . . . . . . . . . . .850.00
With there being no further business,
Wayne Hindman made a motion to ad-
journ the meeting. Rudy Reimann sec-
onded the motion. The next council
meeting will be August 5, 2013 at 7:00
p.m. in the city office.
John L. Rodgers
Council President
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $24.05]
TOWN OF
COTTONWOOD
NOTICE OF MEETING
DATE CHANGE
The regular meeting of the Town of Cot-
tonwood which was scheduled for the
third Wednesday of the month on August
21 has been changed to Monday, Åugust
19, 2013 at 7 p.m. at Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $24.05]
TOWN OF BELVIDERE
RESOLUTION 13-01
WHEREAS; The Town of Belvidere has
experienced severe damage from strong
winds, flooding, hail, heavy snow, heavy
rain, and other various natural disasters,
resulting in property loss, economic hard-
ship, and threats to public health and
safety;
WHEREAS; the Jackson County Multi-
Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Planning
Team, Jackson county Emergency Man-
agement, and the CSDED have con-
ducted over a year’s worth of research
and public meetings to gather informa-
tion to prevent or minimize disaster im-
pacts on the Town of Belvidere and,
WHEREAS; the citizens of the Town of
Belvidere have been afforded the oppor-
tunity to participate, comment and pro-
vide input in the plan content and
mitigation strategies; and,
WHEREAS; the plan recommends haz-
ard mitigation actions that will protect the
people and property affected by the nat-
ural hazards that face the Town;
WHEREAS; the Jackson County Multi-
Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Planning
Team recommends the adoption of the
Jackson County Hazard Mitigation Plan
(2013 Update: and,
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED
by the Mayor and the Town of Belvidere
Town Board that:
The Jackson County Multi-Jurisdictional
Hazard Mitigation Plan (2013 Update) is
hereby adopted as an official document
that identifies hazard mitigation goals
and strategies for projects within the
Town of Belvidere.
That the Jackson County Multi-Jurisdic-
tional Hazard Mitigation Plan (2013 Up-
date) shall be incorporated into any
Comprehensive Plans developed and
approved by the Town of Belvidere
The Town of Belvidere Town board will
seek to update the plan prior to the plan
expiring five years from adoption.
PASSED by the Town of Belvidere Town
Board this 8th day of July, 2013.
John Rodgers
Council President
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published August 15, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $23.76]
Matt "Rip" Rippentrop of Oel-
richs has received Boone and
Crockett Club's inaugural Hunt
Fair Chase Award. The award rec-
ognizes extraordinary determina-
tion, self reliance and respect for
game.
Rippentrop was honored for
these ethics during a grueling
Montana hunt that ultimately
produced a massive bighorn ram
scoring 203-6/8, which ranks num-
ber eight in all time records.
The award was presented as
part of the club's recent 28th Big
Game Awards in Reno, Nev.
Well-known hunting writer and
television personality Craig Bod-
dington presented the award to
Rippentrop before a banquet
crowd of 450. Boddington told the
audience:
“Fair chase is just two words,
but their meaning has deep signif-
icance to everyone who hunts and
teaches young people about hunt-
ing. This was not an easy call to
make, but of all the accounts of
hunts from these 28th awards,
Rip's story read 'fair chase' from
beginning to end. A 38-day, out-of-
state, do-it-yourself campaign was
certainly the way to honor a once-
in-a-lifetime sheep tag.”
The Hunt Fair Chase Award
reads, “In recognition of a hunt
that best represents the determi-
nation, self reliance, and respect
for the game that embodies the
tenets of fair chase set forth by
Boone and Crockett Club founder
Theodore Roosevelt.”
“We're honored to sponsor the
Hunt Fair Chase Award,” said
Jason Ritthaler of Hunting GPS
Maps. “All of us at Hunting GPS
Maps are deeply grateful for the
club's work in conservation and
fair chase across North America ...
It is these ethics that Hunting
GPS Maps works to pass on to the
next generation of hunters."
Hunting GPS Maps personnel
joined the Boone and Crockett
Records Department and others in
judging for the award a number of
written descriptions of hunts that
exemplify the term fair chase.
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt
in 1887, the Boone and Crockett
Club promotes guardianship and
visionary management of big
game and associated wildlife in
North America. Member accom-
plishments include enlarging and
protecting Yellowstone and estab-
lishing Glacier and Denali na-
tional parks.
Oelrichs hunter
Rippentrop
honored by Boone
and Crockett Club
AUCTION
OLD SD GOVERNOR’S Mansion
Real Estate AUCTION in Rapid Val-
ley. August 22, 2013 at 10AM held
on site. Visit www.SturgisSD.com
for terms, details, & photos. 14.7
acres, 7000+/-sqft home. 605-347-
7579.
MEADE COUNTY, SD Absolute
Real Estate LAND AUCTION. Au-
gust 20, 2013 2:30pm held in Stur-
gis. 72+ Mountain Top Acres near
Boulder Canyon. 2 Tracts & 1 Unit.
605-347-7579.
EMPLOYMENT
POLICE CHIEF – FREEMAN, SD
The City of Freeman is taking ap-
plications for a full time Police
Chief. Responsibilities include su-
pervision and direction of police
department personnel and poli-
cies, community relations, police
patrol and other law enforcement
duties. High School Diploma or
G.E.D. required. Certified Officer
preferred. Salary is dependent on
qualifications and experience. Ap-
plication and job description can
be picked up at Freeman City Hall,
185 E. 3rd Street, Freeman, SD, or
call 605-925-7127. Completed ap-
plication can be sent to Lisa Edel-
man, Finance Officer, PO Box 178,
Freeman, SD 57029. Deadline for
applications is August 23, 2013.
FARMERS UNION OIL COMPANY
at Rolette ND is seeking a qualified
General Manager. A energy /
agronomy cooperative with sales
of $15 million. Successful agricul-
tural business management expe-
rience desired. Send or fax
(866-653-5527) resume ASAP to:
Larry Fuller, 5213 Shoal Drive, Bis-
marck ND 58503, Email
larry.fuller@chsinc.com
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
WANTED. Full-time, competitive
wages, and benefits provided. Ex-
perience in auto body or transmis-
sion repair preferred. B & M Body
and Repair. Hoven, SD. Contact
Mike @ 605-948-2224.
NOW HIRING A full-time writer at
the award winning weekly newspa-
per, Chamberlain/Oacoma SUN lo-
cated on the Missouri River, along
I-90 in central South Dakota. Con-
tact lucy@lcherald.com.
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-On
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedi-
cated Routes *2500 Miles Weekly
*$50 Tarp Pay (888) 691-5705
www.drive4ewwylie.com.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-5650,
www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classi-
fieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper or 800-658-3697 for de-
tails.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-
658-3549.
HEALTH/BEAUTY
ARE YOU A 45-79 Year Old Woman
Who Developed Diabetes While
On Lipitor? If you used Lipitor be-
tween December 1996 and the
present and were diagnosed with
diabetes while taking Lipitor, you
may be entitled to compensation.
Call Charles H. Johnson Law toll –
free 1-800-535-5727.
This Ad
will vanish
in seconds
if we put it on
the radio.
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Philip
605-859-2516
Wall
605-279-2565
Murdo
605-669-2271
Faith
605-967-2161
Classifieds
605-837-2259
Suduko Answers
Sudoku
Classifieds
Kadoka Press - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - 9
Classified Advertising & Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum for 20 words, plus 10¢ for each additional word.
To place an ad call 605-837-2259 or email: press @kadokatelco.com
Statewide Classifieds:
South Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-word classified ad in each of the states’ 150 daily and weekly newspapers. Your message
reaches 375,000 households for just $150.00! This newspaper can give you the complete details. Call (605) 837-2259.
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
•PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309•
Telephone 605-837-2259 • Fax: 605-837-2312
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette,
Bennett County, Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . .$35.00 (+ Tax)
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42.00 (+ Tax)
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00
Website Subscription Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36.00
*South Dakota residents are required to pay sales tax.
•ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS RATES•
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:
August
16-17-18-19:
Wolverine
Inmortal
PG-13
August
23-24-25-26:
Smurfs 2
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
is accepting applications for a full
time Deputy Auditor. Must work well
with the public, have clerical, secre-
tarial and computer skills and per-
form other duties as directed.
Knowledge of governmental ac-
counting and payroll beneficial. Se-
lected applicant will also work with
voter registration and the election
process. Jackson County benefits
include health insurance, life insur-
ance, S.D. Retirement, paid holi-
days, vacation and sick leave.
Hourly wage. Position open until
filled. Applications are available at
the Jackson County Auditor’s office
or send resume to Jackson County,
P O Box 280, Kadoka, SD 57543.
Ph: 837-2422. KP4-2tc
HELP WANTED: Cooks, counter
personnel, wait staff, and assistant
manager position(s) are available
for Aw! Shucks Café opening soon
at 909 Main Street in Kadoka.
Please apply within or contact
Teresa or Colby Shuck for more in-
formation: 837-2076.
KP2-tfn
HOUSE KEEPERS AND LAUN-
DRY PERSONNEL WANTED: High
school and college students are
welcome to apply. Will train. Apply
at either America’s Best Value Inn
and Budget Host Sundowner in
Kadoka or call 837-2188 or 837-
2296.
KP47-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Weed Sprayer. Seasonal
part-time employment spraying
county highway right of way. Com-
mercial herbicide license required
or to be obtained before start of
work. Pre-employment drug and al-
cohol screening required. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted.
Information 837-2410 or 837-2422,
fax 837-2447.
KP2-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Part-time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Tractor operator to mow
county road right of way, and per-
form other duties as directed. Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications /
resumes accepted. Information
837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-
2447.
KP2-4tc
POSITION OPEN: Full time Jack-
son County Highway Department
Worker. Truck driver, heavy equip-
ment operator, light equipment op-
erator. Experience preferred, but will
train. CDL required, or to be ob-
tained in six months. Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Benefits package. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted. Informa-
tion 837-2410 or 837-2422, Fax
837-2447. KP2-4tc
HELP WANTED: Dedicated, de-
pendable people to work in the
Kadoka Nursing Home housekeep-
ing department either full-time or
part-time. If interested call Ruby at
605-837-2270 or stop for an appli-
cation. KP4-1tc
Help Wanted
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay. De-
livery available and volume discount
available. Call 798-5413.
KP49-11tc
Farm/Ranch
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you.
Just call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in
the lobby and pick up an applica-
tion. Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
Rentals
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your in-
door plumbing and outdoor water
and sewer jobs call Dale Koehn
441-1053 or leave a message at
837-0112 KP52-4tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we
will give you a quote. Office 837-
2621, Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free
877-867-4185. K45-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call
837-2243 or contact Wendell Bux-
cel, Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259 tfc
Business/Services
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored at Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 25¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 30¢ each; 11x14 - 40¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50¢ each at the
Kadoka Press. tfc
Supplies
A big thank you to the residents,
families, employees, community
members and kids for your atten-
dance at the 2nd Annual Carnival.
It was a great day for everyone.
Thank you to the people who dis-
played the cars and motorcycles.
The support of the Nursing Home is
appreciated.
The Kadoka Nursing Home resi-
dents, employees and
Board of Directors
I would like to thank Kadoka law
enforcement, Kadoka ambulance,
and the Philip Hospital for their fast
response when I needed it. I appre-
ciate the concern of my family and
friends during my stay in the hospi-
tal. Special thanks to Steve, Jim,
Janell, and Mike for checking up on
me. I really appreciated it.
Thanks again,
Alice Williams
Thank You
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:
Kadoka Area School District is ac-
cepting applications for a special ed-
ucation aide. Applications are
available on the website at
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or contact
Supt. Jamie Hermann at 837-2175.
K5-1tc
Full-Time
Position Open
Kadoka Press
For Details Call
Kadoka Press
837-2259
Join us for lunch…
Buffet Every Sunday
Includes Salad Bar & Dessert
serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jigger’s Restaurant
837-2000 • Kadoka
Daily Noon Speicals
Monday through Friday
Serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Kadoka Press
Get all your local news in one place
Contact us for all your advertising needs
Call
837-2159
Fax:
605-837-2312
Email:
press@kadokatelco.com
or
editor@kadokatelco.com
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Winter Wheat Planting Tips
Winter wheat planting is
around the corner. Good practices
increase the odds for success.
Choose one or more varieties
with good agronomic characteris-
tics, recommended for your area,
and on average, performed well in
locations near your farm in the
last few years.
When possible, direct seed into
standing stubble. Standing stub-
ble traps snow that insulates
wheat seedlings against cold tem-
peratures, reducing risk of win-
terkill. Seeding into broadleaf crop
stubble reduces the risk of insect,
disease and weed problems. Seed-
ing into wheat stubble is common,
but increases the risk of residue-
borne diseases. Seeding wheat
into corn, wheat, sorghum or mil-
let residue increases the risk of
scab (Fusarium Head Blight). If
planting winter wheat into fallow,
minimize the number of tillage op-
erations just before planting.
Plowing and other deep tillage op-
erations can reduce seedbed firm-
ness, dry the topsoil and bury
protective residues, increasing the
risk of winter kill.
Control weeds early. Controlling
grassy weeds and volunteer wheat
two weeks prior to planting winter
wheat will provide a break in the
life cycle of the wheat curl mite
and help to control wheat streak
mosaic virus. Preventing annual
weeds from producing seed will
help reduce weed problems in the
planted crop. Prior to planting
winter wheat is also a good time to
control perennial weeds and re-
duce competition from them in the
following season.
The recommended time to plant
winter wheat in South Dakota is
Sept. 15 through Oct. 10. Wheat
plants should be well established
before freezing to attain maxi-
mum cold tolerance and accumu-
late enough energy reserves for
the following spring. Planting too
early may produce excessive fall
growth, reducing amounts of soil
moisture and nutrients. Early
planted wheat is vulnerable to in-
festations of wheat curl mites that
transmit wheat streak mosaic
virus and also increases the risk of
root and crown rot diseases. Re-
search from western South
Dakota has shown that grain yield
is decreased and the crop can suf-
fer substantial winter injury when
planting later than Oct. 15.
Plant winter wheat at a depth
of 1.5 to 2 inches in a firm
seedbed. Planting deeper than 2
inches reduces emergence and can
result in weak spindly seedlings
with poor ability to survive the
winter. If it is necessary to plant
deeper to get to moisture, growers
should choose a variety with a
longer coleoptile (see Table 3 of
“2010 Winter Wheat Variety Yield
Results and Planting Tips”:
http://igrow.org/up/resources/ExE
x8136-10.pdf). Make sure there is
good soil-to-seed contact, espe-
cially under drier conditions. If
soil cover over the seed is poor
there is risk of exposing the crown
and adversely affecting winter
survival.
The recommended seeding rate
is 22 pure live seeds per square
foot (approximately 960,000
seeds/acre, depending on seed
size). If you have a poor seedbed or
are planting later than the recom-
mended dates, increase seeding
rate to 28 pure-live-seeds per
square foot. Properly managed
winter wheat does have the ability
to tiller and can compensate for
thin stands.
Test soils and apply fertilizer
based on soil test results and yield
goals. Research has shown that
adequate phosphorus helps winter
survival by stimulating root
growth and tillering in the fall. If
soil test results indicate low phos-
phorus levels, apply the recom-
mended rate.
Calendar
August 20-22: DakotaFest,
Mitchell, SD
August 27: Winter Wheat Meet-
ing, 6:30 p.m., Auditorium,
Draper, SD
Agriculture
Kadoka Press - Thursday, August 15, 2013 - 10
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist 842-1267
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: FECULAF CATTLE SALE. SALE
TIME: 10 A.M. (MT}
TUESDAY, AUG. 2?: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 3: NO SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & SPFINC CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE TUESDAY, SEPT. 17÷ FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 22: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 29: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF
SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 12: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 26: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 3: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS WEANED CALF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC
SHOTS
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our
vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e
produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues. Jo1n
1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
TUESDAY, DEC. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL
& FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF & STOCK
COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS
FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 24: NO SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 31: NO SALE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 20: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S: DAD FIVEF FALL EXTFAV-
ACANZA HOFSE SALE. VIEW ONLINE SOON!
CATTL£ R£PORT:
TU£SDAY, AUGUST JS, 2DJS
A b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e ]or our Speo1o1
Yeor11ng So1e. MorKe1 ogo1n verg oompe1111ve.
Good oroud o] bugers. Mong 1Þ1nner bu11s 1n 1oun.
We1gÞ-ups & Þorses ne×1 ueeK.
YEARLINGS:
LANDERS LIVESTOCK CO - HOT SPRINGS
69....................................DLK & DWF STFS 815= .................$163.00
61 ..............................................DLK STFS 906= .................$155.00
62....................................DLK & DWF STFS 894= .................$155.75
61....................................DLK & DWF STFS 869= .................$157.75
61 ..............................................DLK STFS 891= .................$155.25
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
120 ............................................DLK STFS 828= .................$159.50
60 ..............................................DLK STFS 842= .................$158.50
A CONSIGNMENT OF -
204 ............................................DLK STFS 980= .................$145.50
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
65..............................................FWF STFS 837= .................$159.00
63 ...................................FWF & DWF STFS 898= .................$153.00
22...................................FED & FWF HFFS 835= .................$148.00
KC BIELMAIER RANCH - WALL
3 ................................................DLK STFS 712= .................$162.00
5................................................DLK HFFS 673= .................$148.50
HEWITT RANCH - PIEDMONT
13 ..............................................DLK STFS 887= .................$147.75
ROD KIRK - CODY, NE
7................................................DLK HFFS 866= .................$140.25
MADSEN RANCH CATTLE - MIDLAND
8 .....................................FED & DLK HFFS 789= .................$146.00
CASEY BRINK - UNION CENTER
7................................................DLK HFFS 858= .................$139.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND - RED OWL
7 ..............................................CHAF STFS 727= .................$154.50
9....................................CHAF & DLK HFFS 729= .................$151.75
SHAYNE PORCH - WANBLEE
2 ................................................DLK STFS 673= .................$163.00
2................................................DLK HFFS 650= .................$150.50
THOMPSON RANCH - WANBLEE
6................................................DLK HFFS 811= .................$141.75
SCHULTES RANCH - HOWES
11..............................................DLK HFFS 772= .................$140.00
MERLE HICKS - MARTIN
9 .....................................FED & DLK HFFS 803= .................$146.50
LONNIE HALL - SPEARFISH
14....................................FED & DLK STFS 613= .................$162.50
GEORGE GITTINGS - PHILIP
2 ................................................DLK STFS 670= .................$151.00
6................................................DLK HFFS 645= .................$147.00
WAYNE HEATH - CODY, NE
14..............................................DLK HFFS 861= .................$139.50
DAVID SCOTT - OWANKA
11..............................................DLK HFFS 734= .................$148.25
LARRY HEATH - CODY, NE
13..............................................DLK HFFS 845= .................$140.00
HARLEY & COLLEEN ROUNDS - UNION CENTER
14..............................................DLK HFFS 837= .................$141.50
DALE YOUNG - WANBLEE
6......................................FED & DLK STFS 811= .................$150.00
7................................................DLK HFFS 701= .................$149.50
SHANE GRUBL - RED OWL
10 .....................................DLK OPEN HFFS 966= .................$134.00
TERRY & LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
12 .............................................FED HFFS 934= .................$133.75
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
8..............................................CHAF HFFS 1071= ...............$113.50
SPRING CALVES:
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
14 ......................DLK MXD STF & HFF CLVS 338= .................$780.00
CREW CATTLE COMPANY - PHILIP
8 ......................CHAF MXD STF & HFF CLVS 371= .................$770.00
WEIGH-UPS:
DONELLE COBB - RED OWL
1 ..............................................CHAF COW 1440= .................$88.00
OFM PARTNERSHIP - CREIGHTON
1.................................................DLK COW 1355= .................$87.50
1.................................................DLK COW 1545= .................$85.00
1.................................................DLK COW 1650= .................$83.50
1.................................................DLK COW 1520= .................$82.50
BILL GIKLING - BOX ELDER
1..............................................HEFF DULL 2030= ...............$107.50
DAN STARR - BOX ELDER
1................................................FED DULL 2000= ...............$104.00
CHUCK O'CONNOR - PHILIP
1..............................................CHAF DULL 1805= ...............$107.50
1..............................................CHAF DULL 2205= ...............$102.00
KJERSTAD CATTLE COMPANY - QUINN
1................................................DLK DULL 1980= ...............$103.00
JAMES MANSFIELD - NORRIS
1.................................................DLK COW 1020= .................$88.50
1................................................DWF COW 1320= .................$82.50
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
1.................................................DLK COW 1370= .................$84.50
1 ..........................................DLK COWETTE 1145= .................$95.00
RUSSELL NELSON - LEMMON
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1395= .................$84.00
1...............................................HEFF COW 1160= .................$83.00
1...............................................HEFF COW 1265= .................$82.00
4.............................................HEFF COWS 1313= .................$81.50
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1308= .................$81.25
3.............................................HEFF COWS 1322= .................$81.00
1................................................FWF COW 1215= .................$80.00
4.............................................HEFF COWS 1173= .................$78.25
17.....................................DLK COWS (WET} 1158= .................$78.00
2.............................................HEFF COWS 1530= .................$77.50
3.......................................HEFF COWETTES 828= ...................$96.50
1 ........................................HEFF COWETTE 950= ...................$92.50
2.......................................HEFF COWETTES 973= ...................$91.50
1................................................FED DULL 2050= ...............$103.50
ASA LEE HICKS - MARTIN
1.................................................DLK COW 1315= .................$82.50
1................................................DWF COW 1235= .................$81.50
DARRELL PETERSON - PHILIP
1.................................................DLK COW 1255= .................$82.50
FLOY & ALAN OLSON - BOX ELDER
1 ..............................................CHAF COW 1385= .................$82.00
1................................................FED DULL 2025= ...............$100.50
ALLEN BADURE - BELVIDERE
2...............................................DLK COWS 1358= .................$81.50
3.....................................FED & DLK COWS 1440= .................$81.25
5.....................................FED & DLK COWS 1292= .................$80.50
1..........................................FWF COWETTE 1215= .................$88.50
NEWTON BROWN - FAITH
2...............................................FED COWS 1390= .................$80.75
3...............................................FED COWS 1480= .................$80.00
PAT GUPTILL - QUINN
1................................................FED DULL 2135= ...............$102.50
1................................................FED DULL 1840= .................$97.00
CHUCK WILLARD - BELVIDERE
1..............................................CHAF HFFT 970= .................$109.50
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 980= ...................$97.00
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 965= ...................$96.00
1..........................................FED COWETTE 1020= .................$95.50
1..........................................DWF COWETTE 1065= .................$94.00
1..........................................FED COWETTE 1025= .................$91.00
TOM MILLER - RED OWL
1................................................DLK DULL 1850= ...............$102.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1815= ...............$101.50
SHANE GRUBL - RED OWL
1................................................DLK DULL 1800= ...............$102.00
DIANE BISHOP - HERMOSA
1 ................................................FED COW 1270= .................$78.50
GARY ALLISON - CREIGHTON
2 ....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1590= .................$78.25
BUSTER PETERSON - KADOKA
1...............................................HEFF COW 1430= .................$78.00
JON MILLAR - NEWELL
1................................................DLK DULL 2110= ...............$101.50
1................................................DLK DULL 1995= .................$97.00
JEREMY MANSFIELD - NORRIS
1................................................DLK DULL 1940= ...............$101.50
ADAM ROSETH - MIDLAND
1.................................................DLK COW 1680= .................$77.50
ROGER PETERSON - PHILIP
1................................................DWF COW 1550= .................$77.00
STEVE CLEMENTS - PHILIP
39 ..........................DLK & DWF COWS (WET} 1350= .................$76.75
4 ....................................DLK & DWF COWS 1231= .................$75.00
JIM STRATMAN - BOX ELDER
1.................................................DLK COW 1395= .................$76.50
3...............................................DLK COWS 1223= .................$75.25
TRAVIS THOMPSON - WANBLEE
2.........................................DLK COWETTES 1143= .................$89.00
TREVOR WILLIAMS - INTERIOR
1................................................DLK DULL 2030= ...............$101.00
BRETT GUPTILL - INTERIOR
1................................................DLK DULL 1945= ...............$101.00
BURL BARBER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1................................................DLK DULL 1605= ...............$101.00
LL & RE KJERSTAD - QUINN
1................................................DLK DULL 1980= ...............$100.50
LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................FED DULL 1890= ...............$100.00
GLEN SPRING - UNION CENTER
1................................................DLK DULL 1690= .................$99.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1720= .................$98.00
TERRY BUCHERT - PHILIP
1................................................FED DULL 2130= .................$98.50
OBIE BRUNSKILL - PHILIP
1..............................................HEFF DULL 1910= .................$98.00
1................................................DLK DULL 1880= .................$95.50
MARLIN MAUDE - HERMOSA
1................................................DLK DULL 1870= .................$98.00
CODY O'DEA - MIDLAND
1................................................DLK DULL 1995= .................$97.50
A new study of land use pat-
terns across seven Midwestern
states, including South Dakota,
found little net movement of habi-
tat to crop land – even by crops
covered under federal crop insur-
ance.
SD Farm Bureau was one of
seven state Farm Bureaus to com-
mission the study, conducted by
Decision Innovation Solutions of
Urbandale, Iowa. The purpose of
the study was two-fold: to esti-
mate the degree to which land use
changes have occurred in these
states, and to identify potential
factors contributing to these land
use changes.
“Land use is a complex topic,
and to fairly assess what changes
are happening and why, Farm Bu-
reau wanted to make sure that we
had completely thorough and ac-
curate data,” said Wayne Smith,
executive director of the SD Farm
Bureau. “The study found that
there is a shift from grassland to
cropland, but it is not as large as
some would have you believe, nor
is it exclusively driven by federal
crop insurance subsidies.”
The study found that during
2007-2012 across the seven state
region, an estimated net total of
8.5 million acres has shifted away
from grassy habitat, representing
just three percent of total land
area in those states. Even as eco-
nomic returns from crop produc-
tion have risen, large shifts of land
from grassland and toward crops
have not uniformly occurred
throughout the study area. In ad-
dition, the research does not sup-
port the notion that crop
insurance subsidies alone are the
dominant factor contributing to
the loss of grassy habitat.
Unlike other recent studies, this
study does not rely exclusively on
data from the United States Dept.
of Agriculture’s National Agricul-
tural Statistics Service crop data
layer. This research cross checks
the crop data aayer with farmer
and rancher land surveys from
NASS, which have a much lower
standard error rate, thereby im-
proving the overall accuracy of the
results.
Because of limitations in re-
motely identifying the type of land
cover, the crop data layer has been
found to overstate the amount of
grassland, especially during the
early years of this study time-
frame. The technology is improv-
ing each year, so later years of
data from the crop data layer are
more accurate and show less
grassland because the acres are
correctly identified as cropped.
Therefore, research that relies on
the crop data layer will erro-
neously conclude a larger net shift
away from grassland.
Specifically for South Dakota,
the study found between 2007 and
2012 a net change from grassy
habitat to cropland of 2.172 mil-
lion acres, which the researchers
said is lower than they expected.
These 2.172 million acres repre-
sent only 4.4 percent of the total
land in South Dakota. Of this
total, 1.549 million acres went to
corn (682,573 acres), small grains
(451,626 acres), and soybeans
(414,804 acres) – crops covered by
federal crop insurance. Interest-
ingly, of the total acres of grassy
habitat that were changed, more
than 324,000 acres became
“woody habitat.”
SDFB’s 2013 multi state land use study
The SD Department of Agricul-
ture (SDDA) announces a Bridge
Loan program available for Farm
Service Agency (FSA) approved
applicants.
“The department has always
worked closely with FSA, but the
new SDDA Bridge Loan program
is great collaboration between
both entities to ensure our produc-
ers can continue with an agricul-
tural real estate purchase when
funds may not be readily available
at FSA,” says SD Secretary of
Agriculture Lucas Lentsch. “We
have also heard from many
bankers who think this is a great
tool for them to utilize when the
opportunity is right and the bank
itself may not be interested in a
bridge loan.”
The Bridge Loan program is de-
signed to provide interim financ-
ing for FSA applicants approved
for loans to purchase land when
FSA funding is not available at
the time the applicant wants to
proceed in closing the land pur-
chase. The SDDA loan is struc-
tured for monthly interest only
payments until the funding is
available at FSA and the FSA loan
is closed. It is anticipated that a
bridge loan will be paid off by FSA
within three to nine months.
SDDA does have the ability to
extend the term for up to two
years. If, for any reason, FSA does
not fund the loan, SDDA will term
the loan out over 10 years. The
current interest rate for the de-
partment’s loan is four percent
and borrowers are required to pay
all closing fees.
“Due to the limitations of the
federal budget, there may be a gap
between loan approval and fund-
ing,” said Craig Schaunaman,
state executive director at USDA
FSA. “The partnership with the
state is perfect timing and I expect
this collaboration to be a great
benefit to the approved applicants
to be able to go forward with their
land purchase.”
For additional information and
details contact your local FSA Of-
fice or Terri LaBrie, Finance Ad-
ministrator at 605.773.5436.
FSA and State
Dept. of Ag
working together

Published under a Creative Commons License By attribution, non-commercial
AttachmentSize
E-Press_8-15Kadoka.pdf3.62 MB