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Kadoka Press, April 25, 2013

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KADOKA PRESS
The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 41
April 25, 2013
The Kadoka Area fourth graders
will be hosting their Pioneer Sup-
per next Wednesday, May 1 at the
Kadoka City Auditorium. The pro-
ceeds of the supper go to defray the
cost of their trip to Desmet, SD.
Supper will be served from 6:00
p.m. to 7:00 p.m.; with the enter-
tainment to begin at 7:00 p.m. The
supper will consist of chili, corn-
bread, and bars.
The trip is planned for May 8
and 9 to Mitchell and DeSmet. This
will be the 11th year that the
fourth graders have taken this trip.
The students from former years
have enjoyed learning about the
history of South Dakota, through
the hands-on learning activities. As
part of their South Dakota History,
the fourth graders will be going to
Mitchell to visit the Prehistoric In-
dian Village and the Corn Palace.
They will be spending the night at
a motel in Mitchell and then on to
DeSmet early Friday morning.
There they will visit Laura Ingalls
Wilder’s homestead and Surveyor’s
House.
We invite everyone to come and
join the fun, as our fourth graders
serve and entertain you. Their proj-
ects will also be on display for your
viewing enjoyment.
Fourth Grade
Pioneer Supper
Wed., May 1
Cash Mobbed by KCBA
On Wednesday, April 17 People’s Market was “Cash Mobbed” by KCBA and area
community members. Mystery specials were located throughout the store for
shoppers to take advantage of. Pictured are Corrie Kusick (L), Rich Bendt, and
Nedra Bettelyoun. --photos by Robyn Jones
--by Robyn Jones
Choose a job you love and you
will never work a day in our life.
Many people dream about this, oth-
ers hope for it, while some find it.
Dawn Rasmussen is among those
who have found it and she is grasp-
ing it tight.
Over twelve years ago, while
shopping in Rapid City, Rasmussen
was browsing through a shop when
she noticed that classes were being
offered on how to make glass
beads. Signing up for the class she
had no idea this was a start of new
beginning in her life.
Rasmussen has always enjoyed
creating different craft items and
being creative, but after finishing
the class, she realized how much
she enjoyed making the glass
beads.
“I began making beads, lots of
beads, of every color, shape and
size,” said Rasmussen, “I just really
fell in love with making them.”
In order for her to pursue her
new found hobby of making beads,
it required the purchase of several
tools and supplies. She invested in
several torches, kilns and massive
amounts of glass.
“I finally realized that in order
to support my bead habit, I needed
to do something with the beads,”
said Rasmussen, “and that's when
I began to use them to make jew-
elry.”
Being an interior designer, Ras-
mussen has the talent of combining
different colors, textures and pat-
terns.
“Learning to make glass beads
gave me a way to explore and be
creative,” said Rasmussen, “and
making beads and interior design
use many of the same concepts and
one of them is color.”
Rasmussen purchases glass rods
in basic colors. With the use of a
torch, she combines different colors
of glass rods, by melting them to-
gether to create new and different
colors. Four different types of glass
rods are used, mainly soft glass,
but not each type of glass is com-
patible with each other. Rasmussen
explains that each type of glass has
a different level of co-efficiency of
expansion and each type of rod
cools at a different rate when re-
moved from the heat. If the differ-
ent types are combined and are not
compatible, they will not bond and
will break apart after cooling.
“There's a little bit of chemistry
to making the beads,” said Ras-
mussen, “and understanding all el-
ements when working with the
different types of glass does require
some experimenting.”
As the glass rods are melted
with a torch to a temperature of
1500º, the glass becomes soft and
has the consistency of taffy. The
glass is then twisted on a small
metal rod. During this process, the
hot glass is dipped into frits. Frits
are small broken pieces of glass
which are avaliable in several col-
ors, but by using frits, several col-
ors can be mixed together, creating
new colors and different patterns.
Another way to manipulate and
change the color of the glass is by
adjusting the regulators on the
propane and oxygen bottles that
supply the torch.
“By changing to an oxygen rich
or an oxygen deprived flame this
will change the way the minerals
come to the surface of glass,” said
Rasmussen, “which changes the
appearance and the color of the
glass.”
The final bead color really de-
pends on the combination of the
orignal inherited color of the glass;
the way different glasses react to
each other; and how the glass re-
acts to the flame.
Melting the several layers of
glass together to make one bead
can take anywhere from ten min-
utes to over an hour. The amount of
time depending on the colored lay-
ers and combining the different
patterns.
Once the glass is removed from
the flame of the torch, they are
then placed in a kiln at 900º for
eight hours. As they are removed
from the kiln and begin to cool, the
final color appears. Then a new cre-
ative step begins when the glass
beads are combined with gem-
stones, pearls, leather, sterling sil-
ver, or cooper, and beautiful
jewelery is created.
Even though Rasmussen enjoys
making the glass beads she admits
that she is always looking at new
and different items and wondering
"what can I make with that?" Hav-
ing this creative desire prompts her
to continue to grow her jewelry de-
signs.
“Each year I attend different
shows and this year I attended one
that dealt with copper,” said Ras-
mussen. “It uses many of the same
techniques as working with glass
but in a new way.”
Going down to the local hard-
ware store, Rasmussen purchased
some copper piping. Cutting the
copper pipe in to rings, she begins
the process of transforming the
pipe into jewelry pieces. Kneeling
the metal (heating it) is done with
a torch, and this will change the
color and make it pliable. Hammer-
ing the metal is the next step and
this will make the metal hard
again. During this process, the
metal pieces can be bent and folded
to create a textured pattern. Etch-
ing can also be done with a chemi-
cal acid to create another type of
texture to the metal. Once the
desidered color and texture is
achieved, then layering pieces of
copper is done by cold contecting
and soldering them together.
“By intergrading glass beads
and metal in to my jewelry designs,
I'm able to create orignal pieces,”
said Rasmussen, “and also chal-
lenge myself on different creative
levels and to provide a variety of
pieces.”
After many months of making
jewelry, Rasmussen will spend her
summer months traveling and at-
tending jewelered art shows. There
she is able to share her personal
creations with others.
“Not only do I enjoy seeing the
final product, but I love each step
it takes to develop and trying some-
thing new,” she said.
So, if you are among those look-
ing for a job that challenges you to
grow and broaden your views, do
not be afraid to try and accomplish
new things. And when you do find
that job make sure you grasp it and
don't let go.
Jewelry designs, turning a hobby into a business
Central High School and are mem-
bers of the prestigious Central
Chamber Orchestra which has
been recognized as one of the top
high school chamber groups in the
nation.
With the evening coming to a
close, an auction of donated items
was held. Guests opened their
pocketbooks and ended up donat-
ing around $3,900.
With the sale of the tickets and
auction, minus the expenses, the
nursing home was able to raise
close to $10,000. This money will
be used towards some of the cur-
rent projects at the nursing home.
One of the projects that the
nursing home is working towards
is a new stove for the kitchen. The
kitchen currently has a two burner
stove, with one oven and a small
griddle. This makes cooking for the
residents an everyday challenge for
the kitchen staff.
A new stove would have six
burners, two ovens, and a large
griddle, but comes at the cost of
$15,000. A new stove would allevi-
ate the stress of preparing the
meals on time for the residents.
The other project is a fence for
the yard. A fence would allow resi-
dents affected by dementia the
freedom to enjoy the outdoors with-
out constant supervision.
With this year’s supper being
another great success, the Kadoka
Nursing Home looks forward to
continuing this annual tradition.
An event like this allows the com-
munity an opportunity to support
the nursing home while also enjoy-
ing a night of great food, friends
and entertainment.
--by Rhonda Antonsen
The Kadoka Nursing Home
Prime Rib Supper was held Satur-
day, April 20 at the Kadoka City
Auditorium. This benefit is held
every year to raise money for ongo-
ing projects at the nursing home.
This event helps defray much of
the out of pocket costs for those
projects.
The event showcased twenty-
one eye-catching tables which were
hosted and decorated by various
ladies. Each table reflected a theme
represented through the adorn-
ments added to the table. Decora-
tions ranged from Kadoka Kougars
theme to elegant with fine china to
patriotic. Depending on which
hostess the guests bought their
tickets from determined what table
each guest would sit at.
Tickets for the supper were $50
per ticket, and tickets for the occa-
sion were sold out. A total of 168
guests were to be served with only
two guests unable to attend.
Guests from surrounding areas as
well as Kadoka attended the event.
The prime rib was prepared and
cooked by Gene, Dale and Logan
Christensen. It took a whopping
180 pounds of prime rib to serve all
those attending. There were also
many volunteers working together
to prepare the food with the gym-
nastics team, rodeo club, 4-H club
and other local youth helping to
serve the guest tables.
Once supper had been served
and enjoyed by all, guests were
treated to some outstanding musi-
cal talent provided by Mikayla
Rogers and Jessica Bachman. Both
girls are sophomores at Rapid City
Annual Kadoka Nursing Home
Prime Rib Supper a success
Seated at Nicki Nelson’s table, who is also his granddaughter, Shorty Ireland (cen-
ter) shares a moment with daughter-in-law Lyndy Ireland.
--photos by Rhonda Antonsen
Dawn Rasmussen in the begining stage of creating a glass bead.
--photos by Robyn Jones
Combining two different colors of glass rods to create a new color.
Using plain copper pipe cut into rings, etching was done and the pieces were com-
bined with glass beads to create orginal jewelry designs.
Rock from the White River was used to
create these necklace pieces.
A finished necklace made from glass beads, copper, sterling silver, and stones.
An assortment of the glass beads which vary in shape, size,
and colors. Each bead has a one-of-a-kind pattern.
The designs and details are unique in on the cooper
bracelets, which are made from cooper blanks.
A 4-H theme was the highlight of the Country Cousins 4-H Club table.
See the answers at bottom of page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
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and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
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Church Page …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
3 Check It Out at the Library 3
NOTICE
The advertising
signs for
Main Street
are provided
by KCBA.
Please,
remember to
remove them
from the street
and take the posters
off the boards
after use.
Obituaries
Area Upcoming Events …
Long Valley School Spring concert will be Wednesday, April 24 at
7 p.m.
Special County Commissioners meeting will be held on Wednes-
day, April 24 at 1 p.m.
Kadoka Elementary and fifth grade band will be Thursday, April
25 at 7 p.m. at the auditorium.
Elementary music contest will be held on Friday, April 26 at Philip
School.
Junior high track meet will be held on Saturday, April 27 in
Kadoka at 10 a.m.
Junior high and high school track meet in Kadoka will be held
on Monday, April 29 starting at noon.
Fourth Grade Pioneer Supper will be held on Wednesday, May 1
at 6 p.m. at the city auditorium.
Interior School Spring concert will be held on Thursday, May 2 at
1 p.m.
Jackson-Kadoka Economic Development Corp. monthly meet-
ing will be Tuesday, May 7 at 7 p.m., Gateway Apartment Community
Room.
Monday, April 29
Macaroni and cheese with ham
cubes, broccoli-cauliflower blend,
waldorf salad, bread, and tropical
fruit.
Tuesday, April 30
Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and
gravy, corn o’brien, bread, and
peach crisp.
Wednesday, May 1
Eat at Jigger’s
Thursday, May 2
Eat at Jigger’s
Friday, May 3
Eat at Jigger’s
Meals for
the Elderly
Read 1 John 5:14-15
One question reverberates through the heart of
nearly all Christians at some point in their faith walk:
If God knows everything about me, why do I need to
pray to have my needs met? The Lord has specific rea-
sons for not using His omnipotence to respond to certain desires and hurts unless we share those things
with Him.
God encourages us to pray in order to build an intimate personal relationship between Himself and
us. He is interested in much more than meeting our needs; He also wants to become our source of strength
in every trial. We know from experience that developing any friendship takes a commitment of time.
Quick three-minute prayers—though valuable and important for maintaining continuous “fragrant in-
cense” before God—are not enough to sustain a personal connection with our Father.
James 1:17 says, “Every good gift . . . is from above” (niv). The Lord wants us to acknowledge Him as
the source of all our blessings. Directing our prayers toward God and trusting that they will be answered
in His will and timing strengthens our awareness that without Him, we can achieve nothing. In the Chris-
tian life, our dependence upon God grows in direct proportion to our spiritual maturity. Such a concept
runs contrary to our nature and culture, which prizes independence above all else.
We are privileged to belong to a God who desires a Father-child relationship with us. He could certainly
meet our needs without a single word from us, but then we would never know the wonder of asking and
receiving in love.
Prayer: A Great Privilege
Inspiration Point
June Wanczyk, age 85 of Wall,
S.D., died Saturday, April 20, 2013,
at the Hans P. Peterson Memorial
Hospital in Philip.
June Ailene Weller was born
June 6, 1927, at Arriba, Colo., the
daughter of Leonard “Bill” and
Stella (Anderson) Weller. She grew
up and received her education in
Arriba, graduating from Arriba
High School in May 1945. She at-
tended Bonnie Beauty School in
Denver, graduating in November
1946.
She met her husband to be in
Denver and was married to Joseph
L. Wanczyk on June 10, 1947, at
Sacred Heart Catholic Church in
Denver. A son, Gerard, was born to
this union on December 3, 1954.
The family moved to Philip in May
1957 to manage the Senechal Hotel
with her father, L.G. Weller, who
owned it. In July 1962, he passed
away so they bought the hotel from
the estate.
June later found that her heart
was not in beauty work, so after
talking with her family, decided to
go back to nursing school at the age
of 43. In 1969, June began nursing
school at Presentation College in
Aberdeen. June made it home often
during college, or the family would
travel to Aberdeen to see each
other. In May 1973, June gradu-
ated from nursing school, the same
week that their son graduated from
Philip High School.
June worked as a nurse for 30
years, retiring at the age of 78.
June and Joe worked at Sacred
Heart Parish and were always glad
when they could help. June and Joe
later moved to Wall, and became
members of St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church of Wall.
Survivors include her husband,
Joe Wanczyk, Wall; her son, Gerard
“Jerry” Wanczyk and his wife,
Colleen, Glenview, Ill.; a grandson,
Jordan Wanczyk, Milwaukee, Wis.;
a sister, Shirley Josserand and her
husband, Orville, Kadoka; two
brothers, Harold D. Weller and his
wife, Clara Belle, Kadoka, and
William Oscar Weller and his wife,
Jean, Kadoka; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
June was preceded in death by
her parents; two sisters, Ivalene
Weller and Marjorie Borbely; and
two brothers, Duane and Robert
Weller.
Mass of Christian burial will be
celebrated at 10:00 a.m. Thursday,
April 25, at St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church in Wall, with Father Leo
Hausmann as celebrant.
Interment will be 1:30 p.m. on
Thursday, April 25, at the Black
Hills National Cemetery near Stur-
gis.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial is
established to the Philip Nursing
Home.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
June Wanczyk___________________
In a world of selfishness, dishon-
esty, and discrimination, how do
our children find their way? Con-
ventional wisdom says that we
only learn by example, and just
look at what examples abound:
selfishness with criminals like
Bernie Madoff and other Wall-
street scoundrels; dishonesty with
blatant false marketing by actors
on TV; and discrimination by
politicians against people of other
religions, other sexual orientation,
other cultures, other anything. In-
deed, if our children only learned
by these kinds of examples, we
would be in big trouble. But here
is where mental health and choice
comes in.
During our lives, especially
when young, every one of us must
be on a quest for meaning, and ex-
perts say that mostly we find our
way by choosing examples for liv-
ing. I learned first from my par-
ents' and then there was the
farmer who taught work ethic, the
football coach who taught tough-
ness, the debate coach who taught
intellectual curiosity, the college
classmate who taught kindness,
and the med school professor who
taught the importance of honest
science. It is true that we grow
most, not from books, conferences,
lectures, or rules, but rather by ex-
ample from the heroes around us.
The religious expert Joseph
Cambell taught us that the “hero’s
quest” is a story that come from
every culture as a metaphor to
help us in our search for meaning.
The classic hero story of Greek
mythology begins with an innocent
baby, born from one mortal parent
crossed with a god, who somehow
escapes an evil menace, and as a
young adult embarks on some
quest to find meaning. This adven-
ture commonly finds the hero self-
lessly slaying an evil dragon to
save an innocent damsel while
bringing back truth and justice to
the nearby village.
The modern hero story is one of
a flawed ordinary person, someone
with whom each of us can relate,
who comes up out of the morass of
our modern troubled society to
stand for something that gives di-
rection and meaning to our lives.
The modern hero is someone
each of us could be. We can try,
even in a flawed way, to live a life
that is not selfish, but helpful to
others; not dishonest, but truthful
while considerate; not with cruel
discrimination, but respectful of
the rights of others who may be
different.
There could be a hero within
every one of us.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
The flawed hero within us
I find it quite amusing that
some of the brightest and richest
people in our country do not seem
to have a clue as to what they are
doing. Most do not have the com-
mon sense that God gave to a
caterpillar. As Abraham Lincoln
used to say, common sense is not
as common as it used to be. Amen,
to that one.
The financial experts are telling
us that we need to buy gold or sil-
ver to safeguard our investments.
I am way ahead of the game. Sev-
eral years ago, I got a gold tooth.
Fortunately, for me, I got it before
the financial crisis in our country.
I cannot tell you what a remark-
able feeling it is to walk around
with your fortune in your mouth.
I hear about all of the invest-
ment schemes that are supposed to
make me rich. I have a sneaking
suspicion that the only people get-
ting rich are those with the invest-
ment schemes. They want us to
buy stocks and bonds and futures.
I never heard of anything so silly
in all my life.
What would I do with stocks,
bonds and futures, whatever in the
world they are, in my portfolio. I
have no idea what a portfolio is but
I am certain it has something to do
with these investment schemes. I
just do not want anybody folioing
around with my port, thank you
very much, sir.
If I got my facts right, and I
looked it up in the dictionary, port
has something to do with wine.
Why would I want to put a bottle
of port into my folio and pretend it
is some kind of an investment?
I really have to give it to these
investment schemers. They really
know how to pull the wool over our
eyes. I want to go on record as say-
ing that they are not pulling any
wool over my eyes. Just leave my
wool alone. If I want my wool
pulled, it certainly will not be over
my eyes, I will tell you that right
here. This wool pulling sounds
more like sheep fleecing to me, and
I want nothing to do with it.
For me I have discovered a way
of safeguarding my wealth. My
basic financial philosophy is sim-
ply spend less than I make. I know
that is a revolutionary concept in
today's world, but it has stood me
in good stead for many a year.
We live in a culture that has ab-
solutely no spending control what-
soever. This culture does not know
the relationship between saving
money and spending money.
For example. The Gracious Mis-
tress of the Parsonage came home
the other day and in a very exuber-
ant tone told me how much she
saved at the grocery store. "I saved
$119.23 today at the grocery store.
Isn't that terrific?"
Being the humble, demure sort
of guy that I am, I did not ask her
a question that was buzzing
around my head at the time. The
question was, how much did it cost
me to save you that much money?
Keeping close tabs on my investments
Having a happy home is more
important to me than exploring
truth at its core. Especially in this
area.
My financial strategy down
through the years has been a very
regular and wise investment plan.
I am not quite sure how I came up
with this marvelous plan, but one
day it just hit me. Ever since that
time, I have been using my finan-
cial investment plan.
My investment plan only cost
me $19.79 back in the year of our
Lord 1986. Since that time, it has
faithfully served me and I have no
complaints.
I have through the years
thought about upgrading my in-
vestment plan, but then what
would the purpose be?
Back in 1986, I saw in the men's
department of the JCPenney store
in our community a very nicely tai-
lored navy blue and gold striped
gentleman's vest. It immediately
caught my attention and as I ex-
amined it, I noticed that inside
this vest was a variety of pockets.
I looked at them and that is when
it hit me.
Down through the years I have
often wondered why somebody else
did not come up with this idea. I
guess I am just a genius.
I bought the vest and brought it
home and hung it in my closet
after I first labeled each of the in-
side pockets. There was a pocket
for dollar bills, one for five-dollar
bills, one for ten-dollar bills and
one that I do not use as often for
$20 bills.
Every time I have a little bit of
change left over I go to my closet
turned to my best and invest that
money where nobody can find it.
My investment plan is more or
less an in and out exchange pro-
gram. When I have a need, I some-
times divest some money. Through
the years, it has been a great bless-
ing in my investment plan and is
something that I am rather proud
of.
Solomon put it in great perspec-
tive concerning wealth when he
said, "Remove far from me vanity
and lies: give me neither poverty
nor riches; feed me with food con-
venient for me: lest I be full, and
deny thee, and say, Who is the
LORD? or lest I be poor, and steal,
and take the name of my God in
vain" ( Proverbs 30:8-9 KJV).
My investment plan is well but-
toned up for future security.
Family of God Fellowship
Rev. James L. Synder • Ocala, FL
Current and Upcoming
Programs:
•The next book planned for the
reading group is The Long-Shining
Waters. Author Danielle Sosin will
be here in June to lead the discus-
sion and offer a question/answer
session. The books will be in soon
for this cool summertime read.
•We are getting ready for the
Summer Reading Program here at
the Jackson County Library. The
theme this year is “Dig Into Read-
ing” and the kick-off will be June
12. Watch for more details as we
continue to make plans…
•Computer lessons for all levels
will be offered in April and May.
Please stop in at the library to
schedule a time and discuss the
level of assistance needed...
New Books In:
“The Legend of Sigurd & Gu-
drun” by J.R.R. Tolkien, “Gap
Creek: The Story of a Marriage” by
Robert Morgan, “The Swan
Thieves” by Elizabeth Kostova,
“Friends Forever” by Danielle
Steel, and “Soul of: Reflections on
the Spirits of the Animals of Bed-
lam Farm” by Jon Katz, and many
more…
Did You Know??
Wireless is coming to Jackson
County Library! This long-awaited
service will be coming this sum-
mer! Watch for more details…
If you need reliable journal and
magazine articles for study and se-
rious research purposes, the li-
brary provides access to a variety
of databases, offered through the
SD State Library and SDLN (SD
Library Network). Visit with Deb
for more information about access-
ing this valuable resource…
Check out our website:
https://sites.google.com/site/jack-
soncountylibrary/
Wish List:
If you are able to make, provide
the supplies, or contribute toward
new items, the library is in need of
these items for our upcoming sum-
mer programming (and beyond):
•Easel for holding program dis-
play items
•Sandwich-board for the street
to display event posters
•New or Like-New Newbury
winner books for the Young Adult
(YA) section
•New or Like-New Caldecott
books for the Children’s section
•Flannel Board & kits
•Posters for the Children’s area
“Life from the Seat of a
Tractor—an old farmer’s
words of wisdom”
Every path has a few puddles
When you wallow with pigs, expect
to get dirty
The best sermons are lived, not
preached
Most of the stuff people worry
about, ain’t never gonna happen
anyway
Questions?? Call Jackson
County Library @ 837-2689, e-mail
@ jclibrary2000@gmail.com or stop
in for a visit.
Belvidere News …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 381-2147
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Winter Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Belvidere Store
Open Daily
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Diesel • Gas
Farm Fuel
Pop • Snacks • Beer
Starting case lot specials.
344-2277
TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
vehicle maintenance!
Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
Mechanic
Shop!
J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
Several local girls are currently
planning a mission trip to the Do-
minican Republic in June. They at-
tended church in Belvidere on
Sunday and took turns telling
about their plans which included
helping to teach Bible school and
also constructing some buildings.
Those currently planning to go in-
clude Maria and Marti Herber,
Taylor Merchen, Kate Rasmussen,
Mariah Pierce, Cassie DeRocher,
and Jamie Brown. Lynn Herber
will go as well. It is only scheduled
to last ten days or so but those
going hope to be helpful as well as
learn more about missions. Anyone
wishing to help with donations
should talk to Lynn Herber.
Larry and Joy Dolezal attended
and helped with the nursing home
supper and benefit held on Satur-
day evening in Kadoka. Larry was
pleased to have four of his five
granddaughters there at his table.
Those included Kayla and Joanna
Nemec, Sarah DeVries, and Trisha
(DeVries) Bork. Only Beth (Nemec)
wasn’t there since she lives in Den-
ver. Kayla and Joanna stayed with
Larry and Joy while they were
here. They are both attending the
School of Mines in Rapid City and
are almost done for the year except
for final exams and such. Sarah
stayed in Belvidere with her dad,
Tom DeVries, and came across the
street to church with him on Sun-
day morning.
Nikki Bonenberger attended the
nursing home banquet on Saturday
as well. She and her mom, Diane
McDaniels, of Philip prepared one
of the tables. Nikki also helped
Pam Bonenberger with her table.
There was a nice turnout and the
evening went well. Earlier in the
week, Nikki and kids, MaKaylan
and McCoy, had things turn out not
quite so well when they were in-
volved in a car accident in Kadoka.
It was at low speed and no one got
hurt, but Nikki’s vehicle was still
pretty much totaled. She was re-
lieved that there were no injuries,
and the car can be replaced.
Aaron, Michelle, and Tyrel
Mansfield were visited on Friday
and Saturday by Michelle’s folks,
Bill and Pauline Jones, of Rapid
City. Michelle’s folks are planning
a trip to Atlanta, Georgia this com-
ing week to visit their son and de-
cided to just run down and see
their daughter and family before
heading out.
Chuck and Merry Willard went
to Rapid City on Friday. They met
up with their daughter, Niki Klein-
sasser, of Hot Springs and did a lit-
tle shopping. They also got to see
their son, Casey, and his kids,
Faron and Riley. They had planned
to see Niki, but hadn’t with Casey.
If Coleen had come from Wyoming,
they could have had a complete
family reunion. Back at home,
Merry said they’ve had to keep
their chickens penned up lately
until they can get a new fence built
around the yard. The silly birds
like to munch on emerging tulips
and other plants and dig holes here
and there. The supplies for build-
ing the fence are on hand but just
not yet installed.
A school board election was held
last week with voting being done at
the church hall. Those on the elec-
tion board included Dana Badure,
Jodie O’Bryan, and Mary Johnston.
Cole Hindman said he hasn’t
been away from home much lately
as calving is in full swing and the
weather has made that difficult
part of the time. He used to com-
pete in rodeos quite a bit in the
saddle bronc part, but that has
been put on hold for the last year
although it might be brought back
some time in the future.
Bill and Norma Headlee have
also been pinned down quite a bit
of late due to being busy at the vet
clinic. Norma said there have re-
cently been quite a few night calls.
They have just been riding out the
storms and dealing with people’s
calving difficulties. Last weekend,
Headlees were visited by their
daughter, Corale Dorn, and her
husband, Dan, and kids of Dell
Rapids. Tom DeVries came out to
see them and spend some time. A
couple of vet students also stopped
by to see the Headlee’s operation
since they are interns and trying to
get experience.
Mike Livermont and Amelia
have been snowbound part of the
time recently. Mike said they didn’t
move a vehicle, including four-
wheelers, for a few days, but are
enjoying the moisture and the fact
that some dams are getting some
runoff. On Sunday, Mike and
Amelia put some beef ribs in a
crock pot with pineapple, onion,
and brown sugar. That evening,
they loaded up the ribs and took
them to Philip to share with
Amelia’s folks, Leo and Mary Anne
Stoner. Baked potatoes and salad
completed the meal.
Syd, Corinne, and Chance Iwan
were visited on Monday by Alec
and Lynn Wendell of Glenfield,
New York. Alec pastored the
Belvidere Church from 1973 to
1977 while Lynn, also a pastor,
served a church in Philip. They
were making a trip around the
country visiting friends and rela-
tives since they are now retired and
can get away when they feel like it.
Alec enjoyed getting updated on
the people he knows. He also vis-
ited Phyllis Word in Kadoka while
here. The Wendells have four kids
with two daughters and their fam-
ilies near them in New York. An-
other daughter is in Poland, and
their son and family is in Florida.
There are numerous grandkids.
Gary McCubbin also dropped by a
few days before the Wendells.
I’ve had to be on my best behav-
ior all week. We’ve had ministers
dropping by right and left. One
wants to give a good impression
and all that. This might include
keeping your clothes hung up in-
stead of draped around on the fur-
niture. Naturally, if you have any
whiskey bottles or poker chips
lying about you might want to put
those under cover. Actually, we
never have any whiskey bottles or
poker chips to worry about, but
you get the idea.
As a kid, I remember my mom
always hiding any decks of cards
that were visible when a certain
minister came to call. I’m not sure
if the reverend was against all
cards or maybe just gambling, but
Mom wasn’t taking any chances.
The folks were avid whist and
bridge players, and Dad played
many other games including crib-
bage, five-hundred etc. I couldn’t
see much wrong with those activi-
ties so hiding cards seemed a bit
odd to me.
I always chuckle when I think of
one local fellow who got a visit
from his priest. This guy’s normal
speech was liberally sprinkled
with swear words. He barely said
anything without adding some
curses for emphasis. Anyway, in
the presence of the priest, he was
barely able to talk for fear of say-
ing the wrong thing. He got
through the visit by saying very
little, but he was fairly tongue-tied
all through it and he wasn’t a quiet
man by nature.
This is somewhat similar to see-
ing a police car when you’re out
driving. You just naturally slow
down whether or not you’re speed-
ing. You might even cast around in
your mind for any other possible
violations of law that might be no-
ticeable. In this area, we are some-
what prone to making U-turns in
the middle of Main Street in order
to park in front of a certain store
instead of across the street from it.
This is frowned on in some towns
so seeing a police cruiser might in-
spire us to drive around the block
so we can park where we want
without making a U-turn. One
local store has a parking lot across
from them so I have found myself
sometimes going into that lot,
turning around, and driving across
the street to park in front. I’m not
exactly sure if that is more law-
abiding than making a Uee, but I
do it anyway.
By one local town on the Inter-
state, experience has taught me
that the Highway Patrol likes to
sneakily park between lanes just
over one little knoll. That way, you
don’t see the patrol car until it is
too late to reduce speed if neces-
sary. It catches a lot of people un-
aware if you go by the speeding
tickets published in the paper from
time to time. Naturally, when I am
in that area, my speed is strictly
within the limit which it mostly is
anyway, but occasionally I’m going
a mile or two faster than what is
allowed.
All of this behavior modification
is naturally geared to making a
good impression on someone or
other. We want them to think well
of us, and many women especially
want their houses shipshape be-
fore having visitors. I recall when
it was Mom’s turn to host Ladies
Aid (church women’s group,) she
would often enlist my help in vac-
uuming, dusting, washing win-
dows and the like. It was
important to her for things to look
nice so I didn’t object all that much
to helping, but I was also relieved
when it was over so I could go back
to not worrying about being ex-
tremely tidy all the time.
The best thing to do, obviously,
is to always live in such a way that
there is nothing objectionable in
your behavior or lifestyle to worry
about. Sometimes that is tricky, of
course, so we have to occasionally
make last minute corrections.
Better yet, just associate with
those people who like you as you
are and are somewhat blind to
your faults. They shouldn’t be com-
pletely blind since friends some-
times need to help you steer a
better course, but somewhat blind.
The other evening, our minister
asked if he could catch a ride back
to his home after a meeting at the
church since his wife needed their
car to take someone else home. I
said, “Sure. Just give me a minute
to clear out the beer cans.” Gary
just laughed and said, “I won’t
look.” That really is what is
needed. Friends who don’t look, or,
if they do, still think the best of
you and like you anyway
Good Behavior
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
“Let every nation know, whether it
wishes us well or ill, that we shall
pay any price, bear any burden,
meet any hardship, support any
friend, oppose any foe to assure the
survival and success of liberty.”
John F. Kennedy
Inaugural address 1961
Evan and Dorothy Bligh went to
Rapid City on business Monday.
Evan kept an eye appointment and
came home with new glasses.
Monday, June Ring was among
the folks attending the funeral
services for Lizzie Stone in Rose-
bud. Our hearts go out to her dear
friends and family at this sad time.
Tuesday, Dan and Susan Taft
went to Martin for his physical
therapy treatment and received a
call that Morgan had sprained her
ankle really bad. Heather brought
Morgan to Martin and luckily there
were no broken bones, so perhaps
with a little tender care it will heal
up in time for the first track meet.
The Tafts were supper guests of
Susan’s parents, Alvin and Judy
Simmons, that evening.
Tuesday night Julie Letellier
came and was prepared to stay and
help on Wednesday if the predicted
storm arrived. It stormed all right
and Todd County closed school so
she was kept busy.
June Ring hosted the Mellette
County Cattlewomen meeting at
the White River Museum on Friday
afternoon.
The April storms have been
causing havoc with the school track
schedule and school in general
these days. Wednesday, was an-
other late start or close for this
area. No school here in Norris,
White River or Todd County on
Monday due to the snowfall
overnight and it is still snowing. It
was in the 50s the day before and a
wonderful spring day. We are very
grateful for the moisture and the
ground is drinking every drop that
falls, too.
Congratulations to Morgan Taft.
Morgan placed first in the eighth
grade Modern Woodman of Amer-
ica speech contest. Morgan gave
her speech on Walt Disney and how
no one ever encouraged him in his
scribbles and doodles. That evening
Morgan stayed with friends in
White River and attended the
Michael Glenn Coalition Talent
Contest.
Friday, Sharon Ring accompa-
nied JoAnn Letellier to Kadoka
and helped set up tables and deco-
rate in preparation for the nursing
home benefit supper.
Friday night the Jason Burma
family of Sunshine Bible Academy
near Miller, arrived at the James
Letellier ranch for the weekend.
Sunshine Bible Academy held their
prom in Pierre on Friday. Jason
and JaLynn are the senior class
sponsors. They just called and said
it is the first time in ages that Sun-
shine has called off classes but all
the students were away for the
weekend and all were affected by
the storm, because it is so wide
spread.
Saturday, Sharon and June Ring
accompanied Jan Ring to Gregory
for the Chamberlain zone
Lutheran Women’s Missionary
League. When the gals headed for
home there were snow flurries and
31 degrees and when they got home
the sun was shining and 51. That
is how unpredictable this April has
been.
Saturday afternoon, Edna Kary
visited in the home of Maxine Al-
lard. When I called Maxine she
said, “I am snowed in just like
everyone else.”
Saturday evening June Ring
was a guest at the home of her son,
Bruce, and family to help Reno cel-
ebrate his seventh birthday.
Happy belated birthday, Reno!
Sharon Ring and JoAnn Letel-
lier were among those helping with
and enjoying the prime rib benefit
supper for the nursing home at
Kadoka on Saturday night. The
gals decorated one of the tables for
it, too. It sounded like a lovely
event and so festive with 21 differ-
ently decorated tables in all.
Charlie Totton of Chamberlain
sold 52 bulls at the Pharo Cattle
Company sale at Burlington, Col-
orado on Monday at April 22, 2013.
The Totton Angus bulls averaged
$4,300. While there, Charlie also
bought two bulls for Joe Kary. The
bulls were sired by the Angus bull
Dunlouise Jipsy Earl E161 with
semen brought over to this country
from Scotland.
Word has also been received that
Erna Totton was hospitalized in
Sioux Falls with pneumonia over
the weekend. Erna was doing much
better on Monday.
This has been a very long emo-
tional week in the United States.
Monday, we were in the middle of
calving (like so many others in the
area) in a spring storm and strug-
gling to keep them dry and alive.
Life is our business. It seems we
are constantly battling to keep
everything alive from grass, flow-
ers, crops to cattle. Our biggest
enemy is the elements like snow,
fire and wind; we need every one of
them to survive, too. It is only
when they get out of control that
we are in danger. Our greatest as-
sets are our neighbors.
We turned on the TV only to see
the horrific live pictures from the
Boston Marathon bombings; people
running to save their lives and the
lives of others. I cannot find the
words to describe what I saw or
felt. I was mad, scared, heartbro-
ken and angry. Among the heroes
was a guy wearing a cowboy hat.
That didn’t surprise me at all, did
it you? That guy stood out like a
sore thumb, but he wasn’t suspi-
cious, he was doing the right thing.
Instantly I realized that life is
every ones business.
On Friday night, I was so happy
and very proud to be an American.
I couldn’t help but cry, when I saw
the Bostonians celebrating in the
streets over the capture of the loose
suspect. What a happy sight! That
is how freedom is celebrated in
America, we weren’t there, but we
were sure there in spirit.
God Bless the United States of
America!
Have a great week!
Vernon Uhlir (L), Al Badure, Bev McDaniel, Bill and Diane McDaniel enjoyed ap-
petizers at Pam Bonenberger’s table.
Kerri Schofield was hostess to Ella Hindman, Pat Jensen, Gary and Linda Petras.
Joan Letellier’s elegantly decorated table was enjoyed by family and friends. Joy Dolezal’s table was presented in an elegant fashion.
Locals …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
Kadoka Nursing Home
Cathy Stone • 837-2270
Local News
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Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 406, Kadoka, SD 57543
Join us for lunch…
Sunday, April 28
Pork Loin Chop Dinner
with salad bar and dessert
serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jigger’s Restaurant
837-2000 • Kadoka
Daily Noon Speicals
Monday through Friday
Serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
No Drivers License Exams
at Jackson County
Courthouse,
in Kadoka
on May 15, 16 & 17.
Thank you.
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Two-year-o|d Angus bu||s for sa|e!
8ons & grandsons of:
8 A V 004 Trave|er 4412 & N ßar Pr|me T|me 080ô
- 3erer Tesled & 3crola| Veasured
- Ca|v|rg Ease & Valerra||y 8red
- 3e|||rg Pr|vale Trealy
ßob Fortune: (ô05} 488-1003
6huck Fortune: (ô05} 891-8197
SAV004 TraveIer 4412
Proceeds go to help defray the
costs of the
Fourth Grade field trip to DeSmet.
Wednesday, May 1 • 6:00 p.m.
Kadoka City Auditorium
12 to adult $6.00 • Ages 6-11 $3.00
Kadoka Area 4th Grade
Pioneer Supper
Clayton Word stayed with his
grandmother, Phyllis Word, on
Sunday night, April 14. He was on
his way to Wyoming to visit his
mom, Teri Kezar, and he had also
been to visit his sister, Elizabeth, in
Sioux Falls. He will be stationed in
Alaska, after having been at Ft.
Bragg in North Carolina. While in
Kadoka he and Phyllis had dinner
with John Word and his daughters.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of June Wanczyk of Wall
who passed away on Saturday,
April 20, in the Philip hospital.
June’s Kadoka family includes
Shirley Josserand, Bill and Bud
Weller and their families. Her fu-
neral is set for Thursday, April 25,
at the Catholic Church in Wall.
June was 85 years old at the time
of her death.
A baby boy was born to Chelsea
(Kujawa) and Chad McBride of
Milliken, CO, on Thursday, April
18. He is the first child of the
McBrides and was named Brekkin
Paul, was nine pounds 12 ounces
and is 21” long. Local grandparents
are Jim and Arlene Kujawa, and
great-grandparents are Tootie and
Tom Terkildsen. Arlene has been in
Milliken for a few days and was
there for the birth of Brekkin.
Mitch Moor of Pierre was home
to visit for the weekend. He accom-
panied his parents, Deb and Marv,
to the dinner on Saturday evening
presented by the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Just before attending, the
Moors had an unexpected surprise
visit from Deb's dad, Hank Kosters
of Pierre, and her aunt, Betty
Schlueter of Mitchell. The two were
returning from a visit to several
relatives living around Washington
state, stopping at Wright, Wyo. to
visit brother Ed Kosters. The two
were accompanied on their journey
by Morris and Janice Kosters of
Rapid City.
Viola Olney is still a patient in
Rochester, MN, but is doing better.
She was at a therapy center and
had to return to the hospital be-
cause of a problem, but as of Friday
she is back at the Cannon Falls
Center. Russ, Rusty and Marcy are
still with her. Her address there
during her recuperation is Mayo
Clinic, 1116 W. Mill St., Cannon
Falls, MN. 55009, if anyone would
like to send her a card.
After the bombing at the
marathon in Boston I talked to Tim
Huffman to make sure Curtis was-
n’t there. He said that he had done
the Boston Marathon but not this
year. He is hoping to run
marathons in every state and his
next one will be in Toledo, OH, on
April 27.
Karen and Harvey Bryd trav-
eled to Rochester, MN, on Thurs-
day for a medical appointment.
While there Harvey was taken to
the emergency room on Saturday
and was diagnosed with gall
stones. He underwent surgery Sun-
day afternoon for removal of his
gall bladder and the stones. Their
daughters, Brook and Tessie, are
with their parents having left from
Sioux Falls over the weekend.
Hopefully by the time the paper is
in the mail boxes, they will be able
to come home. Lois Pettyjohn got a
call Monday morning and he is
doing very well.
Lloyd and Terri Johnston ar-
rived back in Kadoka on Monday
afternoon, April 15. They had spent
the winter months in Arizona and
maybe wish they had spent an-
other week or so there as the
Kadoka area has had two snow
storms since they came home. It
has been wonderful moisture and
warmer weather is coming for later
this week. Welcome back home.
Pat Brown of the Denver, CO,
area came to Kadoka on Wednes-
day of last week and spent a few
days here hunting wild turkeys. He
is a friend of Cindy and Kenny
Wilmarth and stayed with them
while here. Pat returned to his
home on Saturday with his limit of
turkeys.
Jim and Venessa Plaggemeyer
celebrated their 28th wedding an-
niversary on April 19 in Deadwood.
On their way home Saturday, they
stopped in Sturgis and visited Julie
Plaggemeyer, Jim’s late brother’s
wife.
A birthday party was held for
Faye Eisenbraun on Saturday,
April 13 at the Gateway Apart-
ments. Several of her family and
friends were in attendance.
Bergen, Sanftner to wed
Carrie Bergen and Tim Sanftner are happy to announce their engage-
ment and forthcoming marriage.
Carrie is the daughter of Ron and Loretta Bergen and the granddaugh-
ter of Frank Rasmussen.
Tim is the son of Lenny and Ruby Sanftner.
The wedding will be held at on May 17, 2013 at the Kadoka Nursing
Home Courtyard. The couple plans to reside in Kadoka.
Enjoying the supper was Brian and Jessi Fromm (L) and Hayli and Lucas Mayfield.
Hayli decorated this table in a Mexican theme which included somberos on each
chair. --photos by Rhonda Antonsen
Joan Enders, Cary Griswold and Jackie Stilwell were busy serving up dessert on
plates for the banquet.
Nicki Nelson accented her table with an antique rocking chair, wedding dress,
and many beautiful embellishments.
Ken and Mary Graupmann(L), Frances Terkildsen and Geraldine Allen enjoyed the
table hosted by Bev Berry and Marilyn Millage. A musical theme was the focal
point of the table.
Hello everyone!
Well another week has gone by
and we’re still in the winter mode,
will somebody say SPRING!
Monday of this week we had
Lois Pettyjohn and Faye Eisen-
braun come by to play and sing
hymnals. We have some ladies that
have very nice vocals going on. As
always we enjoy you coming in.
Kevin Kruse and his wife,
Joanne, stopped by to visit with
their brother, Sylvan Kruse. They
live on the family ranch outside of
Interior.
Betty VanderMay received a
visit from her son, Steve. She al-
ways enjoys her family time to-
gether. Suzanne and her daughters
usually stop by every Sunday to
pick her up for church services.
Sonia Hartman and Esperanza
came by to see their mom and
grandmother, Mary Bull Bear.
Mary’s looking forward to Spring
and the weather to warm up so she
can go out and enjoy the nice warm
sunshine on her face.
Ron and Renate Carson drop by
on a regular basis to check up on
Joy Parker. They always enjoy each
others company.
Arylss Klundt has been coming
down from Rapid City to see his
mom, Ruth, and to finish cleaning
out Lyle’s apartment.
Darin and Dorothy Louder was
here to see Dwight Louder on Fri-
day afternoon. Let’s say there was
a lot of snoozin’ going on and not
too much visiting, it’s always great
to see them though!
Robyn Jones stopped by to visit
Kate DeVries on Thursday and
they went to have ice cream.
Alice Wilmarth got a visit from
Paulette Wilmarth on Saturday.
Other family and friends stop in
quite often to see Alice’s beautiful
smile.
Don Keminitz drove down from
Murdo to see his wife, Elaine.
Elaine seems to be adjusting to her
new environment and we all enjoy
having her here!
On Saturday the nursing home
hosted their annual prime rib sup-
per at the auditorium. Residents
Shorty Ireland, Oliver Willert and
Shelia Bowen attended the evening
event.
GOLD MEMBERS
Rush Funeral Home • People’s Market • West Central Electric
BankWest • Rodeway Inn & H&H Restaurant
Kadoka Area School District • Headlee Enterprises
STAR MEMBERS
Discount Fuel • Badlands Petrified Gardens
Kadoka Gas & Go • Sanftner Mail • Kadoka Press
America’s Best Value • Sundowner • Midwest Coop
Jigger’s Restaurant • Club 27 • Pocketful of Posies
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
Crew Agency • Badlands National Park
West River Excavation
FRIENDS OF KCBA
Silver Court • Ryan Willert • Penny’s Catering
Bil-Mar Expressions
KCBA meets the first Thursday of the every month.
Meetings are open to the public, so be an active member
in your community by attending a meeting!
KCBA Members
Community growth through active support …
Cindy Willert and Shirley Doud dressed up their table in a Danish theme. The cen-
terpiece was called a “Kransekage”cake. Which means a celebration cake.
Kathy Rock decorated her table with Kadoka Kougars memorabilia. Jerseys and
letterman’s jackets adorned the chairs surrounding the table.
Shoppers filled the aisles at People’s Market on Wednesday, April 17 as part of
the “Cash Mob” hosted by KCBA. Shoppers took advantage of the several mys-
tery special throughout the store. --photo by Robyn Jones
Youth …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
PRE-SCHOOL/KINDERGARTEN
SCREENING
The Kadoka Area School District will be conducting their an-
nual pre-school and kindergarten screening on Tuesday, May
14th. All pre-school children ages birth through five and any six-
year-olds that are new to the district and have not previously
been screened are eligible for testing. This includes all children
in the Kadoka Area School District -- Kadoka, Long Valley, In-
terior and Midland. Sara Speer, Birth to Three Coordinator, will
be available for testing and questions.
This screening is free and will help determine the specific
needs of individual children. It will help answer questions about
developmental progress or school readiness skills. The pre-
school screening will include a check of speech, language, vi-
sion, hearing and motor skill development. Someone from
Jackson County Health will be there to conduct the hearing and
vision screening and to check shot records.
Parents are asked to call Danielle at 837-2173 and register
their children. Only those kindergarten children not already at-
tending pre-school need to call and register. This will help in
child count for pre-school and kindergarten enrollment.
Parents will be called to schedule appointments for this
screening. Parents with questions concerning the screening
and/or scheduling are requested to call the elementary office or
Pam Bonenberger, pre-school/speech, or Becky Keegan,
kindergarten, at 837-2173.
There will also be Head Start sign up.
By Marj Oleske
Bennett Co. Booster
SOLD! The rhythmic chant of
the auctioneer caught the attention
of Austin Thayer at an early age.
He has been sold on the idea of
learning the song of the auctioneer
ever since.
Austin, at age 17, is in the begin-
ning stages of becoming a profes-
sional auctioneer. The son of
Veldon and Mickie Thayer of Mar-
tin, Austin is a junior at Kadoka
High School.
“I’ve always been interested in
how auctioneering works. I’ve
spent a lot of time listening and
asking about how it’s done,” re-
marked Austin.
He first tested his auctioneering
yodel last summer for Lonnie Arne-
son of Arneson Auction Service. Ar-
neson was impressed, and gave
Austin some pointers, including in-
formal riddles to improve his fast
speaking abilities.
Austin’s skills improved quickly,
and he now works part time for the
Arneson Auction Service of New
Underwood, and Dan Piroutek of
Milesville, when they need help.
Betty Bauder bought some but-
ter. “But,” she said, “this butter’s
bitter.” Say that ten times fast!
Austin can do just that. This classic
tongue twister is his favorite to
practice as he works to improve his
auctioneer skills.
According to Teri Ann Arneson,
“Austin is a very dedicated young
man who always has a smile on his
face. We are lucky to have him as
part of our crew.”
Austin’s work ethic carries over
to his scholastic endeavors, where
he is involved with FFA, is Junior
Class president and is a member of
the national Honor Society. Austin
is also President Elect for the Re-
gional Student Council. He is also
a member of the Eagles 4-H Club of
Bennett County.
This summer’s activities for
Austin include attending the World
Wide Auction College in Mason
City Iowa, where he will further
develop his professional skills.
“I’m looking forward to learning
how to make myself better. I want
to get to be the best I can,” added
Austin. “It’s really fun. My favorite
part is meeting all the new people
at each sale.”
Austin Thayer in the beginning
stage of an auctioneer career
Midland School hosts educational night
Logan Sammons and his mom, Katie, have fun with M & M probability during the
Midland Education Fair.
Carson Daly sorting and graphing M &
M's during the education fair.
Rydek Neilan dancing to "Viking Style"
which was rewritten by Ashley
Schofield and performed to the tune of
Gangnam Style.
Ashley Hand graphing M & M's with the help of Duane, Annette, and Dustin Hand
Miranda and Mariah Dale (8th Graders) before the tumbling performance.
Kash Block giving his approval of the M & M probability game as he attempts to
defeat his mom, Aimee.
Cass Finn and his mom, Jenna, playing the probability game.
The Midland School hosted educational night on Thursday, April 11. Several activities were held, along with a performance by the Milland Tumblers. Tumbler include
back row (L-R): Eagan Fitzgerald, Carson Daly, Kaelan Block, Mariah Dale, Miranda Dale, Brandon McLaughlin, and Caylo McLaughlin. Middle row: Dane Daly, Cass
Finn, Ashley Hand, Logan Sammons, Kash Block, Kaitlyn Schofield, and Cole Finn. Front row: Shelby Schofield, Blaise Furnival, Rydek Neilan, Karlee Block, Ellie
Nemec, Ridge Furnival, Morgan Sammons, Cara Schofield, and Aja Fitzgerald. --photos by Renee Schofield
Shane Ring and Austin Thayer
dominated the Ag Business Man-
agement contest, which was also
held in Philip. Thayer placed 1st,
Knutson placed 2nd and Vander-
May placed 3rd, and the team
placed first.
The natural resources contest is
one of the most popular and com-
petitive contests, the Kadoka team
finished a close second to a strong
Philip team. Senior Kwincy Fergu-
son led the team in third place,
while other senior Clint Stout
placed 5th, while Kahler Addison,
Aage Ceplecha, and Lane Patter-
son participated. The team placed
second.
Senior Kwincy Ferguson quoted,
“I’m proud of my team and hope
they all keep studying so we can do
well at state.”
All in all, the entire group did
just…just wonderful.
--By Shai Lamont
and Tigh Livermont
On April 3, 2013 twenty-three
Kadoka High School students par-
ticipated in the District 5
Philip/Wall FFA Contest. At the
Range ID contest held in Wall,
Dustin Enders, Logan Christensen,
and Steven Kiewel participated. As
individuals, Christensen placed
2nd, Kiewel in 4th, and Enders in
7th. They placed 1st as a team.
The Horse Judging contest was
held in Philip, where Desmond Bad
Wound, Tessa Stout, Katie Lenseg-
rav, Logan Ammons and Tigh Liv-
ermont participated. Ammons
came in 3rd, while the team placed
3rd.
In the Livestock Judging Con-
test, also held in Philip, Gavin De-
Vries, Dylan Riggins, Jed Brown,
Myles Addison and Paul Kary rep-
resented our FFA chapter well with
Kary placing 8th, and the team
placed 4th.
Kenar VanderMay, Chance
Knutson, Chandlier Sudbeck,
FFA District Contest results
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
Wix Filters
Gates Belts & Hoses
We make
Hydraulic Hose &
Chainsaw Chains!
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WDozer
WCobett
Waters
WTire
Tanks
Brent
Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Gov. Dennis Daugaard is cur-
rently seeking applications for fall
2013 Governor’s Office Internships
in Pierre. The positions are paid
and run from early September
through December 2013.
Governor’s Office interns have
the opportunity to work at the
highest level of state government,
learning about and preparing leg-
islation to be introduced in the next
legislative session.
Interns’ duties depend on inter-
ests and strengths. Typical duties
will include aiding the Governor’s
general counsel, conducting policy
research, preparing policy brief-
ings, and staffing the Governor,
Lieutenant Governor and First
Lady.
The internships are open to all
undergraduate or graduate-level
students. Preference will be given
to South Dakota residents attend-
ing South Dakota colleges or uni-
versities.
Interested students should sub-
mit a resume, cover letter and 2
Letters of Recommendation by
June 1, via email, to Will.Morten-
son@state.sd.us
For more information on duties
or logistics, please visit
http://sd.gov/governor/internship.a
spx or contact Will Mortenson at
Will.Mortenson@state.sd.us
Governor seeking Interns for this Fall
Community …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
Sand County Foundation, the
South Dakota Cattlemen's Associa-
tion and the South Dakota Grass-
land Coalition are proud to
announce The Guptill Ranch as the
recipient of the 2013 Leopold Con-
servation Award, which honors
South Dakota landowner achieve-
ment in voluntary stewardship and
management of natural resources.
"Having grown up on a farm, I
know how precious the land is to
South Dakotans who owe their
livelihoods to our natural re-
sources," said South Dakota Gover-
nor Dennis Daugaard. "Farmers
and ranchers, such as the Guptill
Family, take great care to maintain
those resources for generations to
come.
Guptill Ranch in western South
Dakota is a 7,000-acre cattle oper-
ation near Quinn. Pat and Mary
Lou Guptill have owned and oper-
ated this family-run ranch for the
past 25 years. With their five chil-
dren, they are caretakers of this
special landscape in western South
Dakota. The area features grass-
lands with rolling hills and a main
wooded creek running through the
ranch.
In 2000, as their children grew
older, the Guptills decided to make
changes to lower production costs
and enhance the health of the land
to make the ranch better and bring
their family home.
Innovation and change have
been beneficial to the operation, ac-
cording to Pat Guptill.
"The more we change, the more
we learn," Guptill said. "We hope
we can help other producers bypass
all the mistakes we made along the
way to make their operations work.
Our goal is to make the land better
for future generations."
"The foreword to A Sand County
Almanac, Aldo Leopold's environ-
mental classic, points out, 'When
we see land as a community to
which we belong, we may begin to
use it with love and respect.' You
are unlikely to find agriculturalists
elsewhere in our United States
who exceed the Guptill family's use
of land with love and respect." said
Brent Haglund, president, Sand
County Foundation.
The $10,000 award and a crystal
depicting Aldo Leopold, will be pre-
sented to the Guptills at the South
Dakota Cattlemen's Association's
Annual Convention in December.
The ranch will also be featured
during a ranch tour this summer.
The Leopold Conservation
Award is presented in honor of
renowned conservationist and au-
thor Aldo Leopold, who called for
an ethical relationship between
people and the land they own and
manage. Award applicants are
judged based on their demonstra-
tion of improved resource condi-
tions, innovation, long-term
commitment to stewardship, sus-
tained economic viability, commu-
nity and civic leadership, and
multiple use benefits.
"The South Dakota Cattlemen's
Association is proud to recognize
the Guptills for implementing re-
sponsible stewardship practices on
their ranch and working to best
utilize the resources required to
meet the needs of a growing popu-
lation," said Cory Eich, president,
South Dakota Cattlemen's Associa-
tion.
"I applaud the Guptill's careful
efforts to manage the health of
their land and to hand that ethic
down to the next generation," said
Jim Faulstich, chairman, South
Dakota Grassland Coalition.
The Leopold Conservation
Award in South Dakota is possible
thanks to generous contributions
from many organizations, includ-
ing: American State Bank, Belle
Fourche River Watershed Partner-
ship, Daybreak Ranch, Ducks Un-
limited, Farm Credit, The Lynde
and Harry Bradley Foundation,
Millborn Seeds, Mortenson Family,
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS), Partners for Fish
& Wildlife, Professional Alliance,
South Dakota's Conservation Dis-
tricts, South Dakota Department of
Environment & Natural Resources,
South Dakota Farm Bureau, South
Dakota Game, Fish & Parks, South
Dakota Grassland Coalition, South
Dakota State University Founda-
tion, The Nature Conservancy and
World Wildlife Fund.
Award recognizes landowners who ex-
emplify outstanding stewardship
The Pat and Mary Lou Guptill family. --courtesy photo
Badlands National Park (Bad-
lands) and Minuteman Missile Na-
tional Historic Site (Minuteman)
will celebrate National Park Week,
from April 20-28, 2013. Fee free
days will be offered at Badlands, a
fee park, beginning on Earth Day,
Monday, April 22 and extending
through Friday, April 26.
Come visit us at our Badlands
Ben Reifel Visitor Center, open
from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily,
and at Minuteman Missile’s Visitor
Center, open 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.,
Monday – Friday, and 9:00 a.m. –
4:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
Enjoy the vastness of the south-
western South Dakota scenery -
soaring spires and pinnacles
amidst the pristine beauty of the
prairie. A visit to both the North
and South Units of the Badlands
can also inspire a greater appreci-
ation of this landscape’s cultural
histories. Next door, explore the
role of the Midwest in America’s
Cold War history at the Minute-
man Missile by visiting the Delta 9
missile silo and Delta-1 Launch
Control Center.
Explore some of the outdoor fea-
tures at Badlands in your own cel-
ebration of Earth Day. The Castle
Trail, ten-miles round trip offers
expansive views, and a relatively
level walk. Cliff Shelf Trail is a
moderately strenuous loop that fol-
lows boardwalks and climbs stairs
through a juniper forest perched
along the Badlands Wall. The Win-
dow Trail is a 0.25 mile trail lead-
ing to a natural window in the
Badlands Wall with a view of an in-
tricately eroded canyon. There is
truly a walking route for everyone
at Badlands, so get out there and
take a hike!
For the first day of National
Park Week (April 20), Minuteman
Missile will be featuring ranger-
guided tours conducted by a former
Minuteman missile systems engi-
neer. Re-live the Cold War experi-
ence with someone who actually
worked here preventing war and
preserving peace! Minuteman Mis-
sile offers daily tours of its Delta-1
Launch Control Center at 10:00
a.m. and 2:00 p.m. Missile silo
Delta-9 (I-90, Exit 116) is also open
to the public daily from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tour tickets for Delta-1 are
given out on a first come, first
served basis by coming to the Visi-
tor Center, located in Cactus Flat,
off I-90 at Exit 131.
Badlands will be hosting Artists-
in-Residence Jessica Bryant and
Judy Thompson. The artists have
been working with students on wa-
tercolors, and the role art has
played in the history and develop-
ment of our National Parks. The
park is also featuring a video from
former Teacher-Ranger-Teacher
Larry McAfee. This reflection on
Larry's travels through 52 of our 59
national parks can be enjoyed by
clicking this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
BP0-GVImMMs .
Visitors to the parks during
Earth Day weekend are encour-
aged to visit Cedar Pass Lodge in
Badlands National Park. The
Lodge features locally sourced &
sustainable gift and artwork of the
region and the restaurant offers
South Dakota sourced entrees and
desserts including kuchen and
South Dakota State University ice
cream. For more information on
lodging in the park go to
http://cedarpasslodge.com/.
Hikers expecting to be out
longer than 30 minutes should
pack water and food. Be prepared
for extreme changes in weather, in-
cluding sudden wind storms, rain,
snow or lightning. Hike safely and
enjoy your parks.
For more information see
w w w . n p s . g o v / b a d l ,
www.nps.gov/mimi, or follow us on
Twitter @BadlandsEdu, @Bad-
lands_Ranger, and
@MIMI_Ranger, or on Facebook at
Badlands National Park and Min-
utemanMissileNHS.
Badlands and Minuteman Missile
celebrate National Park Week
Since 1986, the State Bar of
South Dakota has been presenting
the Ask-a-Lawyer program, provid-
ing free legal advice to hundreds of
South Dakotans through a toll-free
call-in service.
The State Bar of South Dakota
will again offer this free service on
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day, April 30, and May 1-2, from
6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mountain
Time and 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Central Time.
Tom Nicholson, a Sioux Falls at-
torney and president of the South
Dakota Bar Association, an-
nounced, “Experienced lawyers an-
swering phones in Sioux Falls and
Rapid City will answer questions
on a wide range of legal issues.”
“Each call is anonymous and we
urge the public to take advantage
of this fine service,” added Linda
Lea Viken, coordinator for the West
River portion of the project.
Call toll free at 1-877-229-2214
to ask a lawyer your question about
the law.
S.D. State Bar ask-a-lawyer
The annual spring hunter safety
course put on by Kit Graham will
be held Saturday, May 4, at the
Philip Ambulance Service building
at 100 S. Larimer Avenue.
The course will run from 8:00
a.m. to approximately 5:00 p.m. It
is sponsored by the South Dakota
Game, Fish and Parks department.
Lunch will be provided by Branch
85 of National Mutual Benefit.
Parents can get more informa-
tion and register their children by
contacting Graham in person at his
office in the Haakon County Court-
house or by calling 859-2850 or
859-2325. Signed permission slips
must be turned in before the class
begins. Parents are not required to
stay while their sons or daughters
attend the course.
Assisting Graham this year will
be the area’s new GF&P conserva-
tion officer, Zach Thomsen. He may
be contacted at 859-3006. “Please
come join us on May 4,” stated
Thomsen. For more information of
this course or others, phone these
individuals or view the GF&P web-
site www.gfp.sd.gov and look under
outdoor learning and then hunter
education.
The course is for youngsters ages
12 or older, but the course will ac-
cept 11 year olds if their birthday is
before the end of this year. Adults
are more than welcome to also at-
tend.
Upon successfully completing
the course that day, attendees will
receive a hunters safety card.
Other items will be distributed,
such as orange hunter’s caps, upon
the discretion of the S.D. GF&P.
Successful completion of a
Hunter Safety Course is required
by law of every person under the
age of 16 who wishes to hunt in
South Dakota.
The hunter safety course will be
provided only twice in Haakon
County this year – this spring in
Philip and again this fall in Mid-
land. The course teaches the safe
handling of firearms, proper hunt-
ing ethics and introduction into
wildlife management and hunting
laws.
Hunter safety class May 4
Pearson endorsed for state
vice commander by Post #173
The Wheeler-Brooks American
Legion Post #173 of Philip, S.D.,
endorses Philip Pearson of Philip
as state vice commander for Dis-
tricts 1 and 2.
In his home post, Pearson has
held the positions of vice com-
mander, commander in 2003, and
is currently sergeant of arms. In
District 9, he has held adjutant,
vice commander, commander and
county commander. Pearson is a
paid up for life member of the
American Legion, now for 41 years.
He is retired from the National
Guard with 20 years of service. He
is a paid up for life member of the
Forty & Eight.
Pearson is also a 40-year mem-
ber of the Lions Club in Wall,
where he has held various offices.
In District 5 SW, he has been vice
district governor and district gov-
ernor.
Pearson has been married for 39
years to Cheryl Pearson. The have
four children, and three grandchil-
dren with a fourth on the way. His
daughter, Karolina, is in the
United States Air Force at Roy,
Utah. His son, Jeremiah, served in
the U.S. Navy, and now lives in the
Philippines. His son, Per, lives in
Madison. His son, Leroy, lives in
Roy, Utah. A nephew is in the U.S.
Marine Corps. A brother and
brother-in-law served in the U.S.
Army during Vietnam. Pearson’s
father and father-in-law served in
the U.S. Army during World War
II.
The South Dakota American Le-
gion State Convention, where the
posts for next year will be voted in,
will be held June 6-9 in Rapid City.
·Black Hills Firearms Elk
Oct. 1-31 and December 1-15
·Archery Deer Sept. 28-Jan. 15
·Youth Deer Sept. 14-Jan. 15
·Black Hills Deer Nov. 1-30
·West River Deer Nov. 16-Dec. 1
·East River Deer Nov. 23-Dec. 8
·Muzzleloader Deer
Dec. 1-Jan. 15
Deer and antelope tag alloca-
tions, waterfowl, sage grouse, and
the mountain lion season, as well
as new state laws will be addressed
at up-coming Commission meet-
ings. To view the complete list of
seasons and monthly meetings
where the Commission will discuss
and consider adjustments to ad-
ministrative rules can be found at
http://www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/com-
mission/default.aspx.
For information on the GFP
Commission, visit the GFP website
at www.gfp.sd.gov/agency/commis-
sion/default.aspx.
The Game, Fish and Parks Com-
mission has finalized most big
game hunting season dates for
2013 with no changes from 2012.
The Commission sets season
dates in the early spring to give
hunters a chance to plan their fall
schedule. The season structure, in-
cluding license numbers, will be set
in coming months.
Dates of interest for 2013 in-
clude:
·Pheasant Oct. 19-Jan. 5
·Youth Pheasant Oct. 5-9
·Resident Only Pheasant
Oct. 12-14
·Grouse/Partridge
Sept. 21-Jan. 5
·Mourning Dove Sept. 1-Nov. 9
·Fall Turkey Oct. 1-Jan. 31
·Archery Antelope
Aug. 17-Sept. 27 and Oct. 14-31
·Firearms Antelope
Sept. 28-Oct. 13
·Black Hills Archery Elk
Sept. 1-30
2013 hunting season dates set
South Dakota hay prices have
been at high levels throughout the
2012 marketing year. Based on
numbers from the National Agri-
cultural Statistics Service, March
alfalfa prices were at $230 per ton
and have remained steady for sev-
eral months. The March price for
other hay reached a record high of
$170 per ton.
“Usually, such high prices result
in a shift in production and use.
However, other commodity prices
and input costs are higher too,”
said Matthew Diersen, South
Dakota State University Extension
risk/business management special-
ist. He added that looking at this
year's hay prices by adjusting for
inflation shows that prices are also
at record-high levels on a real
basis.
“Despite a price index, with 1982
as the base year that has doubled
in recent years, the real price of
hay in South Dakota had not been
above $70 per ton during the past
decade,” Diersen said.
The last peak in real prices hap-
pened in the 2002 drought year
when the price reached $79 per
ton. Diersen said 2013’s record
rates are due to in 2012, South
Dakota producers had expected to
harvest 3.5 million acres of hay;
and higher expected returns for
other crops and drought conditions
combined to reduce harvested acres
to only 3.1 million acres. To top
that off, yields were low, limiting
supply. “The result was that price
increased to the high nominal lev-
els and a real price of $100 per
ton,” he said.
Price prospects continue to favor
sellers over buyers. “Fall disap-
pearance was unusually large leav-
ing a stocks level on Decemer 1,
2012, of only 4.3 million tons. The
stocks level was the smallest since
January 1, 1977, following the
1976 drought,” Diersen said.
He said current stocks are also
similar to the levels in late 1989
when there were only 3.35 million
head of cattle in South Dakota in-
ventories. On January 1, 2013,
there were 3.85 million head.
Diersen said modeling historic
stock levels and winter use gives
competing views of just how little
hay may be left in South Dakota.
“Usually, much of the hay produced
in South Dakota is used for feed
and not sold. As part of the collec-
tive feed inventory, one could take
the December 1 stocks and use
them evenly over the remaining six
months of the feeding year,”
Diersen said.
He shared an example: on May 1
only one-sixth of the December 1
4.3 million tons in inventory may
remain, or only 0.72 million tons.
“Most years, producers try to main-
tain a surplus over that level. Like-
wise, high prices may mean some
hay that was raised for on-farm use
enters the marketing channel,” he
said. “Factoring in the high price
level actually forecasts a negative
stocks level for May 1.”
The high real price would nor-
mally result in sharply higher hay
acres in South Dakota. Solid ex-
pected returns for other crops and
the presence of revenue insurance
have limited hay to an expected 3.1
million acres. Diersen said a tight
old crop supply, low expected pro-
duction for 2013 and no difference
in the national picture combine to
suggest high hay prices will con-
tinue for the 2013 marketing year.
Tight hay supplies and
high prices to continue
The City of Faith will use an
$800,000 grant to build a multi-use
community safe room that can
serve as a public shelter against se-
vere storms.
The funding comes through the
Hazard Mitigation Grant program,
a 75/25 percent federal-to-local
match program, according to Nicole
Prince, hazard mitigation officer
for the South Dakota Office of
Emergency Management.
“The federal share is through
FEMA (Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency), and while this
multi-purpose room may be used as
a gym and cafeteria for the Faith
school, it will be designed to offer
what is called ‘near absolute pro-
tection’ to occupants during ex-
treme wind storms and tornadoes,’’
Prince said.
The city’s application for the
grant said that Faith typically ex-
periences at least two extreme
wind events a year. In the past 30
years, those storms have caused 40
reported injuries and more than $8
million in property and crop dam-
age. In the summer of 2006, two ex-
treme wind storms downed trees,
knocked out power and caused
more than $250,000 in damage in
Faith.
In the past, citizens in the area
took shelter at the school during
major storms. That structure was
condemned in 2004 and later torn
down, leaving area residents with-
out a public shelter. The new safe
room will have an occupancy rating
of 875 people.
Faith receives grant for
community storm shelter
Public Notices …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Legal
Deadline
Friday at Noon
This Ad will
disappear
in seconds
if we put it on
the radio.
~~~
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
~~~
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
call:
Kadoka
Press
605-837-2259
NOTICE OF
TAX SALE CERTIFICATE
TO: Austin O’Dea, Deceased, Record
Owner, and Estate of Austin O’Dea
and unknown Heirs, Devisees, Lega-
tees, Personal Representatives,
Creditors and Assigns of any de-
ceased owner of interest; and all per-
sons unknown who have claim to
have any interest or estate in, claim
to lien or encumbrance upon the
premises described in this Notice
TO: Joe Jeffers, Bernice Clary, Bon-
nie Fitzgerald, Dr. Douglas O’Dea,
Shelia Rittgers, Mike O’Dea, Kristy
Chavez, Diane Visconti, Donna
Moore, Mary Hercher, Nancy Flagler,
Rita O’Dea, Roxie Smith, Randi Knut-
son, Dixie Schweers, Raymond
O’Dea, Bud O’Dea, Eva Trimble, Mary
Hansen, Rosemarie Richmond, and
Shirley Baye.
AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson
County is the lawful holder of a 2008 Tax
Sale Certificate, Number 94, purchased
by Jackson County at Kadoka, South
Dakota on the 21st day of December
2009, said real property described as fol-
lows:
Lots ten (10), eleven (11),
and twelve (12), Block six (6),
Town of Cottonwood, Jack-
son County, South Dakota
as shown by the plat recorded in the Of-
fice of the Register of Deeds of Jackson
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that the right of re-
demption will expire and a Tax Deed for
the above described property shall be is-
sued to Jackson County (60) sixty days
from the date of completed service of this
Notice unless the property is redeemed
as permitted by law.
Dated at Kadoka, South Dakota the 12th
day of April, 2013.
Cindy Willert,
Jackson County Treasurer
[Published April 18 & 25, 2013 at the total
approximate cost of $44.78]
NOTICE OF
TAX SALE CERTIFICATE
TO: Austin O’Dea, Deceased, Record
Owner, and Estate of Austin O’Dea
and unknown Heirs, Devisees, Lega-
tees, Personal Representatives,
Creditors and Assigns of any de-
ceased owner of interest; and all per-
sons unknown who have claim to
have any interest or estate in, claim
to lien or encumbrance upon the
premises described in this Notice
TO: Joe Jeffers, Bernice Clary, Bon-
nie Fitzgerald, Dr. Douglas O’Dea,
Shelia Rittgers, Mike O’Dea, Kristy
Chavez, Diane Visconti, Donna
Moore, Mary Hercher, Nancy Flagler,
Rita O’Dea, Roxie Smith, Randi Knut-
son, Dixie Schweers, Raymond
O’Dea, Bud O’Dea, Eva Trimble, Mary
Hansen, Rosemarie Richmond, and
Shirley Baye.
AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson
County is the lawful holder of a 2008 Tax
Sale Certificate, Number 93, purchased
by Jackson County at Kadoka, South
Dakota on the 21st day of December
2009, said real property described as fol-
lows:
Lot six (6), Block five (5),
Town of Cottonwood, Jack-
son County, South Dakota
as shown by the plat recorded in the Of-
fice of the Register of Deeds of Jackson
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that the right of re-
demption will expire and a Tax Deed for
the above described property shall be is-
sued to Jackson County (60) sixty days
from the date of completed service of this
Notice unless the property is redeemed
as permitted by law.
Dated at Kadoka, South Dakota the 12th
day of April, 2013.
Cindy Willert,
Jackson County Treasurer
[Published April 18 & 25, 2013 at the total
approximate cost of $44.78]
NOTICE OF
TAX SALE CERTIFICATE
TO: Austin O’Dea, Deceased, Record
Owner, and Estate of Austin O’Dea
and unknown Heirs, Devisees, Lega-
tees, Personal Representatives,
Creditors and Assigns of any de-
ceased owner of interest; and all per-
sons unknown who have claim to
have any interest or estate in, claim
to lien or encumbrance upon the
premises described in this Notice
TO: Joe Jeffers, Bernice Clary, Bon-
nie Fitzgerald, Dr. Douglas O’Dea,
Shelia Rittgers, Mike O’Dea, Kristy
Chavez, Diane Visconti, Donna
Moore, Mary Hercher, Nancy Flagler,
Rita O’Dea, Roxie Smith, Randi Knut-
son, Dixie Schweers, Raymond
O’Dea, Bud O’Dea, Eva Trimble, Mary
Hansen, Rosemarie Richmond, and
Shirley Baye.
AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson
County is the lawful holder of a 2008 Tax
Sale Certificate, Number 92, purchased
by Jackson County at Kadoka, South
Dakota on the 21st day of December
2009, said real property described as fol-
lows:
Lots seven (7), eight (8), nine
(9), ten (10), eleven (11), and
twelve (12), Block two (2),
Town of Cottonwood, Jack-
son County, South Dakota
as shown by the plat recorded in the Of-
fice of the Register of Deeds of Jackson
County, South Dakota.
Notice is further given that the right of re-
demption will expire and a Tax Deed for
the above described property shall be is-
sued to Jackson County (60) sixty days
from the date of completed service of this
Notice unless the property is redeemed
as permitted by law.
Dated at Kadoka, South Dakota the 12th
day of April, 2013.
Cindy Willert,
Jackson County Treasurer
[Published April 18 & 25, 2013 at the total
approximate cost of $44.78]
IN CIRCUIT COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF YANKTON
In the Matter of the Termination of
Parental Rights Over
N.D.S.
a minor child.
ADP 13-10
ORDER AND NOTICE
TO: Luke Pebeahsy or
to whom it may concern:
You are hereby notified that a hearing will
be held before the above named Court,
Judge Cheryle Gering presiding in the
Courtroom of the Yankton County Court-
house in the City of Yankton, South
Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2013,
at the hour of 2:00 o’clock P.M. of said
day, when the Court will hear and deter-
mine the above entitled matter upon a
certain Petition filed in this Court praying
that all parental rights over said child be
terminated for the reasons set forth in
said Petition, which Petition was filed
with the Clerk of the above named Court
at Yankton, South Dakota, on March 29,
2013. You will please take further notice
that the termination of parental rights is
a possible remedy under these proceed-
ings.
WITNESS the hand and seal of said
Court this 9th day of April, 2013.
BY THE COURT:
/s/ CHERYLE GERING
HON. CHERYLE GERING
ATTEST:
JODY L. JOHNSON
Yankton County Clerk of Courts
/s/ Jody L. Johnson
[Published April 18, 25 & May 2, 9, 2013]
)
)SS
)
TOWN OF BELVIDERE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON AP-
PLICATION FOR SALE OF MALT BEV-
ERAGE SPECIAL ONE DAY EVENT IN
THE TOWN OF BELVIDERE.
Notice is hereby given that the Town
Board of Belvidere in the Town of
Belvidere on the 6 th day of May, 2013 at
the hour of 7:30 p.m. local time in the city
office will meet in regular session to con-
sider the following application for a one
day special event license.
Belvidere Volunteer Fire Department:
Town of Belvidere all of Block 6 and
Block 7 for June 8, 2013.
Notice is further given that any person(s)
or their attorney may appear and be
heard at said scheduled public hearing
that are interested in the approval or re-
jection of any such application.
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published April 25 & May 2, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $23.40]
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that the Town
Council of Belvidere will be holding public
bids on the following pasture land for a
five (5) year period starting May 1, 2013
and ending on April 30, 2018. All pasture
fencing and liability will be the responsi-
bility of the lessee with the following pas-
ture to be bid:
Original Town of Belvidere according to
recorded plat thereof, also that part of the
North ½ of the NW ¼ of section 32,
Township 25, Range 24, Jackson
County, State of South Dakota, de-
scribed as lying South of Chicago, Mil-
waukee and St. Paul Railway Company
right of way as now there located and es-
tablished and North of the line of A Street
West on the line of 3rd Street in said
Town known as Outlot E and Outlot H,
containing an estimated 40 acres.
Bidding will be held on Monday May 6,
2013 at 6:30 p.m. local time at the Town
Finance office. The first years lease pay-
ment will need to be made at that time.
For further information contact a member
of the Belvidere Town Council.
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Town of Belvidere
Finance Officer
[Published April 18, 25 & May 2, 2013, at
the total approximate cost of $39.97]
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING
APRIL 8, 2013
7:20 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:20 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert, Kieth Prang, Colby
Shuck and Dick Stolley. Member absent:
Brad Jorgensen. Others present: Patty
Ulmen, Finance Officer; Forrest Davis;
Jackie Stilwell; Nathan Riggins; Arne
Lund; Robyn Jones; and Patrick Solon.
Willert made Motion 13-04-08:37 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of March 11, 2013; the special meeting
of March 18, 2013; and the Board of
Equalization Meeting of March 18, 2013.
The motion was seconded by Shuck,
with all members voting yes and the mo-
tion carried 4-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
Stolley made Motion 13-04-08:38 to ap-
prove the bills as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Willert. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 4-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
APRIL 8, 2013 MEETING.
AFLAC, Monthly Premium 85.82; Delta
Dental, Monthly Premium 575.50; SD
Police Chiefs Association, Conference
Registration 65.00; SD Retirement,
Monthly Contribution 2,173.36; Verizon
Wireless, Cell Phone 78.14; Bottom Line
Welding, Trailer Repair 253.17; Double H
Feed, Supplies 46.85; Ecolab, Pest Con-
trol 10.08; Electro Watchman, Security
System 80.85; Golden West, Tele-
phone/Cable 711.31; Happy Chef, Re-
fund Meter Deposit 99.00; Hogen's
Hardware, Supplies/Repairs 251.99; J &
S Restore, Vehicle Repair 74.00; John
Deere Credit, Monthly Payment/Front
End Loader 2,023.03; Kadoka Area
School District, Sound System Repairs
295.80; Kadoka Oil, LLC, Heating/Vehi-
cle/Equipment Fuel 4,092.00; Kadoka
Press, Publishing 780.75; KCBA, Reim-
burse/Expenses 2,655.84; McGee-
Ballinger, Robert, Refund Meter Deposit
35.00; McLeod's Printing, Election Sup-
plies 43.65; Northwest Pipe, Supplies
15.08; Oien Implement, Supplies 78.56;
Pahlke, Alvin, Legal Services 150.00;
Peoples Market, Supplies 631.23; Pierre
Landfill, Tipping Fees 549.40; Quill, Sup-
plies 537.68; SD Assoc of Rural Water,
Annual Membership Dues 380.00; SD
Dept. of Health, Lab Samples 26.00; Ser-
vall, Laundry 251.20; The Lodge at
Deadwood, Lodging/Police Chiefs Con-
ference 178.00; United States Postal
Service, Postage 165.00; West Central
Electric, Electricity 6,065.94; West River
Excavation, Solid Waste
Transporation/Backhoe 595.90; West
River Lyman Jones, Water Payment
3,948.75; Chamberlain Wholesale,
Liquor Supplies 990.78; Coca Cola,
Liquor Supplies 36.00; Dakota Toms,
Liquor Supplies 70.58; Eagle Sales,
Liquor Supplies 6,508.10; Jerome Bev-
erage, Liquor Supplies 2,391.95; John-
son Western Wholesale, Liquor Supplies
3,259.66; Republic, Liquor Supplies
2,453.12; ACH Withdrawal for Taxes,
Federal Employment Taxes 4,166.08;
ACH Withdrawal for Dakota Care, Health
Insurance Premium 6,922.03; Total Bills
Presented: 54,802.18
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of March was distributed. After a
review of the information, Shuck made
Motion 13-04-08:39 to approve the finan-
cial report. The motion was seconded by
Willert. A roll call vote was taken, with all
members voting yes and the motion car-
ried 4-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 3-3113:
Revenue: General Fund - $28,708.02; 3
B’s Fund - $1,062.65; Street Fund -
$3.85; Liquor Fund - $25,492.04; Water
Fund - $8,044.85; Sewer Fund -
$2,074.19; Solid Waste Fund -
$4,076.09.
Expense: General Fund - $31,861.22;
3B’s Fund - $524.02; Street Fund -
$1,320.00; Liquor Fund - $23,534.56;
Water Fund - $9,929.28; Sewer Fund -
$394.40; Solid Waste Fund - $3,052.94.
Payroll: Administration - $3,057.00;
Streets - $2,515.80; Police - $2,628.46;
Auditorium/Parks - $2,379.20; Liquor -
$5,202.67; Water/Sewer – $2,737.61;
Solid Waste - $806.40; Group
Health/Dental - $7,497.53; Retirement -
$2,173.36; Social Security/Medicare -
$4,166.08.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$831,204.14; ATM Account - $2,504.54;
Certificates of Deposit - $769,575.68.
Citizen Input: No one was present to ad-
dress the council.
Second Reading of Supplemental Appro-
priation Ordinance 2013-SA1: The sec-
ond reading of Supplemental
Appropriation Ordinance 2013-SA1 was
held. Willert made Motion 13-04-08:40
to approve the supplemental appropria-
tion ordinance as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Stolley. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 4-0.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. Special Events Liquor License Re-
quest: Jackie Stilwell was present on be-
half of the Kadoka Ambulance and
Kadoka Volunteer Fire Department to re-
quest a special events liquor license for
Friday, June 21, 2013 and Saturday,
June 22, 2013. This is for reunion week-
end and the Ambulance will sponsor a
dance on Friday night and the Volunteer
Fire Department will sponsor a dance on
Saturday night. Shuck made Motion 13-
04-08:41 to approve the Special Events
Liquor License. The motion was sec-
onded by Prang, with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: no report
B. Streets: The tentative date to mill 6th
Street (west side of Nursing Home) is
April 18, 2013 with the asphalt to be com-
pleted in late May to early June.
C. Solid Waste: no report
D. Liquor: The inventory for the first quar-
ter is completed.
E. Auditorium/Park: The prom was held
the previous weekend. The sound sys-
tem upgrades have been installed and
everything is working well.
F. Public Safety: The monthly report was
distributed. Davis requested permission
to attend the annual joint Police Chief
and Sheriffs conference May 1, 2013
through May 3, 2013. After discussion,
Willert made Motion 13-04-08:42 to grant
this request. The motion was seconded
by Shuck, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 4-0.
G. Mayor’s Report: Arne Lund has stated
that he would be interested in filling the
vacant seat in Ward 2. This will be placed
on the agenda for the May meeting. The
council set Friday, April 19, 2013 at 5:00
as the date and time to canvas the mu-
nicipal election. The council was re-
minded that the District 8 SDML meeting
will be held in Murdo on April 16, 2013.
Executive Session per SDCL 1-25-2
(1)/Personnel: Shuck made Motion 13-
04-08:43 to go into executive session for
personnel. The motion was seconded by
Willert, with all members voting yes and
the council went into executive session
at 7:40 p.m.
The council was declared out of execu-
tive session at 8:03 p.m.
Willert made Motion 13-04-08:44 to re-
advertise for all swimming pool employee
positions, with a closing date for applica-
tions of April 29, 2013. The motion was
seconded by Stolley, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Willert made Motion 13-04-08:45 to hire
Brady Sudbeck as a summer worker at a
salary of $7.75/hour; and to re-advertise
for an additional employee with a closing
date for applications of April 29, 2013.
The motion was seconded by Prang. A
roll call vote was taken with all members
present voting yes and the motion car-
ried 4-0.
Stolley made Motion 13-04-08:46 to hire
Jody Sudbeck as boy’s baseball coach
at a salary of $1,650.00, plus mileage to
out of town games at state rate. The mo-
tion was seconded by Willert. A roll call
vote was taken with all members present
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Prang made Motion 13-04-08:47 to hire
Lynne Jorgensen as girl’s softball coach
at a salary of $1,650.00, plus mileage to
out of town games at state rate. The mo-
tion was seconded by Willert. A roll call
vote was taken with all members present
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-04-08:48 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Willert, with all members voting yes and
the meeting was adjourned.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $87.40]
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
Estate of
Terry F. Gartner
Deceased.
PRO. NO. 13-2
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
and Appointment of Personal
Representive
Notice is given that on the 16th day of
April, 2013, Shirley L. Gartner, whose ad-
dress is PO Box 87, Interior, SD 57750
was appointed as Personal Representa-
tive of the Estate of Terry F. Gartner, De-
ceased.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four (4) months after the
date of the first publication of this Notice
or their claims may be barred. Claims
may be filed with the Personal Represen-
tative or may be filed with the Clerk of
Courts, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
Dated this 16th day of April, 2013.
/s/ Shirley L. Gartner
Shirley L. Gartner
PO Box 87
Interior, SD 57750
Clerk of Courts
Jackson County Courthouse
PO Box 128
Kadoka, SD 57543
Ph: 605-837-2122
Ralph A. Kemnitz,
Kemnitz Law Offices
PO Box 489
Philip, SD 57567
605-8592540
[Published April 25 & May 2 & 9, 2013]
)
)SS
)
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
SPECIAL MEETING
APRIL 19, 2013
5:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the special meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
5:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Kieth Prang, Ryan Willert, Brad
Jorgensen, Colby Shuck and Dick Stol-
ley. Others present: Patty Ulmen, Fi-
nance Officer and Tina Williams.
Election Canvas: A canvas of the elec-
tion held on Tuesday, April 16, 2013, was
conducted. All council members and
Mayor Weller reviewed the poll book
completed on Election Day, and the re-
sults as tabulated after the voting
process was complete.
The results are as follows:
Ward 3:
Ryan Willert: 46 Votes (81%)
Benjamin E. Latham: 11 Votes (19%)
Jorgensen made Motion 13-04-19:49 to
accept the results of the election and de-
clare the results official. The motion was
seconded by Stolley, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 5-0.
Mayor’s Report: The District 8 SDML
meeting has been rescheduled for April
30, 2013 in Murdo. The regular May
meeting for the city council was sched-
uled for Monday, May 13, 2013. How-
ever, the meeting will be changed to
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 due to a con-
flict with a school event.
Executive Session per SDCL 1-25-2
(1)/Personnel: Stolley made Motion 13-
04-19:50 to go into executive session for
personnel. The motion was seconded by
Shuck, with all members voting yes and
the council, along with Patty Ulmen and
Tina Williams went into executive ses-
sion at 5:10 p.m. The council was de-
clared out of executive session at 5:43
p.m.
Stolley made Motion 13-04-19:51 to hire
Samantha DeKay as the assistant bar
manager at a salary of $8.95/hour with a
120 day probation period and upon suc-
cessful completion of the probationary
period, a salary increase to $9.22/hour.
The motion was seconded by Willert. A
roll call vote was taken, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 5-0.
Stolley made Motion 13-04-19:52 to set
the annual salary for Tina Williams, who
previously had been promoted to the po-
sition of bar manager, at $26,682.75. The
motion was seconded by Willert. A roll
call vote was taken, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 5-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-04-19:53 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Willert, with all members voting yes and
the meeting was adjourned at 5:45 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published April 25, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $29.58]
Public Notices …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
FINANCIAL REPORT
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR
THE PERIOD
BEGINNING
MARCH 1, 2012
ENDING
MARCH 31, 2012
GENERAL FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 12,696.51; Transfer
into account: (from MMDA account)
234,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 13,711.71; Jones
Co.Treasurer, taxes 0.00; Haakon Co.
Treasurer, taxes 4,772.15; County appor-
tionment 5,398.20; BankWest, interest
57.13; First National Midland, int.
78.79; State of SD, state aid 100,475.00;
Student Activities 312.44; Student Partic-
ipation fees 0.00; Sale of supplies, other
175.95; Rentals 10.00; Horizons, sound
system 100.00; State of SD, sparcity aid
48,960.00; State of SD, medicaid admin
6,284.00; State of SD, LEAP Long Valley
1,688.00; College access reimb 46.93;
State of SD, common core 240.00; US
Dept of Ed, Indian Ed 2,635.25; State of
SD, IDEA, RtI 1,000.00; State of
SD, Title I 50,683.00; State of SD,FFV
867.62; State of SD, REAP 8,641.00;
Total receipts: 246,137.17; Transfers out:
(to MMDA) 221,349.31; Disbursements:
270,676.59; Ending balance, checking:
807.78; Money Market Deposit Account:
(300,000 Imp Aid) 287,270.52; Money
Market Deposit Account:(MB)
159,240.87; Petty Cash: 130.00; Total
Balance of Account: 447,449.17
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: Checking ac-
count balance, beginning: 5,339.11;
Transfer in: 0.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 5,186.89; Jones Co.
Treasurer, taxes 0.00; Haakon Co.
Treasurer 1,813.26; First National, Inter-
est 85.95; BankWest, interest 79.30;
Horizons, sound system 100.00; G&M,
scoreboard 2,000.00; BankWest, score-
board 8,000.00; Transfers out: 1,165.25;
Disbursements: 17704.21; Ending bal-
ance, checking: 3,735.05; Money Market
Deposit Account: 220,074.69; Money
Market Deposit Account:(MB)
161,960.66; Total Balance of Account:
385,770.40
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: Checking
account balance, beginning: 2,179.13;
Transfer into account: from savings
27,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 6,352.20; Jones Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 0.00; Haakon Co. Treasurer,
taxes 2,223.31; First National, interest
28.64; BankWest, interest 39.65; State of
SD, medicaid admin 652.00; State of SD,
IDEA 13,910.00; State of SD, state aid
1,692.00; Transfers out: 16,322.29; Dis-
bursements: 37,130.46; Ending balance,
checking: 624.18; Money Market Deposit
Account: (BW) 99,047.48; Money Market
Deposit Account: (MB) 49,682.99; Total
Balance of Account: 149,354.65
PENSION FUND: Checking account bal-
ance, beginning: 2,291.57; Receipts:
Jackson Co. Treasurer, taxes 1,357.12;
Jones Co. Treasurer, taxes 0.00; Haakon
Co. Treasurer, taxes 476.57; Transfers
out: 0.00; Disbursements: 0.00; Ending
balance, checking: 4,125.26
IMPACT AID FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est 857.06; Transfer to General Fund
300,000.00; Money Market Deposit ac-
count 762,302.43; C.M.A. Account
1,016,694.04; Balance of Account:
1,778,996.47
CAPITOL PROJECTS FUND: Beginning
balance, checking 0.00; Receipts: Inter-
est, BankWest, interest 56.65; Transfer
to MMDA 56.65; Disbursements 0.00;
Money Market Deposit Account
169,954.92; Balance of account:
169,954.92
FOOD SERVICE FUND: Beginning Bal-
ance: 1,001.20; Tranfer in (from Impact
Aid) 0.00; Receipts: Sales 6,405.22;
State of SD, reimbursement 9,726.36;
Disbursements 15,687.63; Total balance
checking account: 1,445.15; Cash
change 0.00; Total balance accounts:
1,445.15
TRUST & AGENCY FUND: Beginning
balance, checking: 53,124.98; Transfer
in: 0.00; Receipts: 57,823.80; Transfers
out: 46,770.88; Disbursements:
22,693.47; Balance, Checking:
41,484.43; Cash Change: 0.00; Money
Market Deposit Acct: 33,753.32; Total
balance of account: 75,237.75
ALBIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Non ex-
pendable trust fund: Beginning balance:
397.01; Transfer in: Receipts: 132.50;
Disbursements: 0.00; Ending Balance:
529.51
/s/ Eileen C. Stolley
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
April 2, 2013
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OF THE REGULAR MEETING
OF THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION HELD
WEDNESDAY,
APRIL 11, 2012
AT THE KADOKA SCHOOL
AT 7:00 P.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Dale Christensen,
Ross Block. Absent: D.J. Addison, Mark
Williams, Ken Lensegrav. Also present:
Supt. Jamie Hermann; Eileen Stolley,
business manager; Jeff Nemecek and
George Seiler, principals. Visitors pres-
ent: JoBeth Uhlir, Robyn Jones, Chad
Eisenbraun.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay at 7:33 p.m.
The Consent Agenda included the follow-
ing items: to approve the agenda, to ap-
prove the minutes of the March 13, 2013
meeting; to approve the financial report;
to approve the bills as presented. The bill
from Joe Handrahan for work on the au-
ditorium sound system was questioned
as a shared city/school expense as it in-
cluded cleaning of ceiling fans also.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to approve the
consent agenda. Motion was seconded
by Ross Block and carried.
GENERAL FUND: AMERICAN TIME &
SIGNAL COMPANY, M-REPAIR PARTS
76.90; BEST WESTERN RAMKOTA
HOTEL - PIERRE, TRAVEL 171.98;
BLOCK, AIMEE, MIDLAND LUNCHES
70.00; BORK, TRISHA, ACCOMPANIST
500.00; BYRD, KAREN, BOOK STUDY
327.80; CENTURY BUSINESS PROD-
UCTS INC, COPIER MAINTENANCE
1,387.33; CHILDREN'S CARE, OT & PT
SERVICES & MLG 100.00; CHRIS SUP-
PLY COMPANY, TECH SUPPLIES
217.40; DISCOUNT FUEL, FUEL
ACCTS 3,215.91; DOUBLE H FEED,
SUPPLIES 150.00; ENDERS, JOAN, LI-
BRARY BOOKS 89.87; ERNIES BUILD-
ING CENTER, MID-SCH CUST
SUPPLIES 20.48; FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OMAHA, CREDIT CARD PMT
3,293.37; FOLLETT EDUCATIONAL
SERVICE, BOOKS 257.80; FOREMAN
SALES & SERVICE INC, BUS REPAIRS
398.33; GOLDEN WEST TECHNOLO-
GIES, SONIC FIRE WALL FILTER
14,248.33; HANDRAHAN, JOE, RE-
PAIRS & MAINT. LABOR 897.60;
HAUFF MID-AMERICA SPORTS INC,
ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 19.90; HEART-
LAND WASTE MGT INC, MIDLAND
GARBAGE 120.00; HOGEN'S HARD-
WARE, SUPPLIES/MATERIALS/ RE-
PAIRS 291.92; THE
INSTRUMENTALIST, BAND/CHORUS
AWARDS 226.50; J & S RESTORE, RE-
PAIRS 1,737.19; JOSTEN'S PRINTING
& PUB. DIV., DIPLOMAS & COVERS
411.01; KADOKA AREA SCHOOL T&A,
BACK GROUND CHECKS 129.75;
COACHES CLINIC & TRAVEL 166.00;
AD CONFRENCE & TRAVEL 232.00;
TRAINING & TRAVEL 58.00; LEGAL
SIMINAR 210.00; KADOKA CITY
TRANSFER STATION, RUBBLE 15.50;
KADOKA PRESS, PUBLICATIONS
304.67; LONG VALLEY BOOSTER
CLUB, CUSTODIAL SERVICES 200.00;
LONG VALLEY STORE, LV MILK/CUST
SUPPLIES 2.40; MCLEOD'S, OFFICE
SUPPLIES 43.10; MIDWEST COOPER-
ATIVES, PROPANE/BUS RT FUEL
2,647.42; MILLER'S GARBAGE,
GARBAGE SERVICE 241.60; MISS
JEAN'S PIZZA, MS 30.00; MUSICIAN'S
FRIEND, SUPPLIES 820.00; NEOPOST
USA INC, POSTAGE MACHINE
RENTAL 133.50; NETWORK SERV-
ICES COMPANY, CUST SUPPLIES
118.54; NORTHWEST EVAL ASSOC,
ACADEMIC PROGRESS SOFTWARE
625.00; OLSON'S PEST TECH, PEST
CONTROL 90.00; PEOPLE'S MARKET,
SUPPLIES 1,106.79; POCKETFUL OF
POSIES, NHS&MS 235.95; PUBLIC
LOCKERS, NHS&MS 147.94; QUILL
CORPORATION, SUPPLIES 126.24;
RASMUSSEN MECHANICAL, BOILER
REPAIR 4,488.38; RHODES, JERRY,
MILEAGE 15.54; SASD, ADMIN HAND-
BOOKS 405.00; SD DEPT OF HEALTH,
HEALTH NURSE SERVICE 60.00; SD
DEPT OF REVENUE, LV-WATER EVAL
13.00; SDHSAA, DUES 470.00;
SEILER, GEORGE, REIMBURSEMENT
76.10; SERVALL TOWEL & LINEN,
K/I/LV/M-DUSTMOP SERVICE 437.70;
SMALL ENGINE HOUSE, SNOW
BLOWER PARTS 20.80; SPRINGHILL
SUITES, TRAVEL 441.64; TRUGREEN
CHEMLAWN, SCHOOL YARD&FOOT-
BALL FIELD 3,326.86; WAGEWORKS,
SERVICE FEE 125.00; WALKER RE-
FUSE, I & LV - DUMP SERVICE 281.30;
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION LLC,
SNOW REMOVAL 107.14; WRIGHT EX-
PRESS FSC, TRAVEL EXP
4.00TEACHER SALARIES, ELEME-
MENTARY 38,435.21; MILEAGE:
NANCY WELLER 109.07; RENEE
SCHOFIELD 316.30; MISTY HAMAR
123.67; MARK REIMAN 18.50; ROGER
DALE 38.48; RICHARD ROCKAFEL-
LOW 15.54; SUB TEACHERS, ELE-
MENTARY 1,419.44; INDIAN
EDUCATION, INSTRUCTION 1,005.51;
TEACHER SALARIES, HIGH SCHOOL
15,847.02; SUB TEACHERS, HIGH
SCHOOL 837.41; PRE SCHOOL
SALARIES 1,056.46; TITLE II A
SALARIES 4,480.50; GUIDANCE
SALARY 2,436.42; TITLE I SALARIES
25,419.32; TITLE I SUB TEACHERS
211.28; TITLE I TUTORING 1,066.72;
TITLE I SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT AC-
TIVITIES 62.29; OFFICES OF THE
SUPT., PRINCIPAL AND BUSINESS
MANAGER 19,241.30; TECHNOLOGY
3,484.91; LIBRARY 175.03; OPERA-
TION OF PLANT SALARIES 6,380.31;
PUPIL TRANSPORTATION 3,039.27;
ACTIVITY BUS DRIVERS: ROGER
DALE 161.61; KENNETH GRAUPMANN
478.72; RICHARD ROCKAFELLOW
55.41; RICHARD STOLLEY 37.18;
COACHING SALARIES: ROGER DALE
5&6 MIDLAND 277.05; REFEREES,
SCOREKEEPERS 57.64; BUS MONI-
TOR & TUTORING TRANSPORTATION
622.77; CO-CURRICULAR SALARIES
PRORATED 205.79; AMERICAN FAM-
ILY LIFE ASSURANCE CO, CC/IC INS
W/H 1,942.22; BREIT LAW OFFICES,
W/H 100.00; WASHINGTON NATIONAL
INSURANCE CO, W/H 208.70; BENE-
FIT MALL, SD, LIFE INS W/H 678.72;
MG TRUST COMPANY, 403(B) W/H
2,000.00; CREDIT COLLECTION BU-
REAU, W/H 38.96; DELTA DENTAL INS.,
GROUP DENTAL 3,975.90; KADOKA
SCHOOL T&A CAFETERIA ACCT.,
PAYFLEX W/H 729.50; KADOKA
SCHOOL T&A INSURANCE FUND 6.00;
KADOKA SCHOOL T&A FIT/FICA
ACCT., TAX 43,575.63; SD RETIRE-
MENT SYSTEM, TR AND MATCH.
23,762.71; S.D. SCHOOL DISTRICT
BENEFIT FUND, GROUP HEALTH
39,590.51
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: KADOKA
CITY AUDITORIUM, AUDITORIUM
RENT 3,900.00; KADOKA CITY WATER
DEPT., WATER/SEWER 128.77;
KADOKA OIL CO, HEAT & BUS FUEL
4,527.90; LACREEK ELECTRIC ASSN.,
INC., ELEC-LV SCHOOL 233.88; MID-
WEST COOPERATIVES, PROPANE/
BUS RT FUEL 2,045.22; OIEN IMPLE-
MENT & SUPPLY INC, BUS GARAGE
RENT 600.00; TOWN OF INTERIOR,
SEWER 132.00; TOWN OF MIDLAND,
MIDLAND SCH-WATER 22.00; WEST
CENTRAL ELECTRIC COOP, ELEC AC-
COUNTS 3,745.94; WEST RIVER
ELECTRIC ASSOC., INTERIOR ELEC
ACCT 378.85; WR/LJ WATER SYS-
TEMS INC, I-SCH WATER 32.50
SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: BAD-
LANDS GROCERY, I-FOODS & SUP-
PLIES 56.38; BLACK HILLS SPECIAL
SERVICES, STUDENT EVAL 1,542.75;
CHILDREN'S CARE, OT & PT SERV-
ICES & MLG 330.00; DISCOUNT FUEL,
FUEL ACCTS 121.51; THE MAILBOX
MAGAZINE, SUBSCRIPTION 29.95;
PEOPLE'S MARKET, SUPPLIES
104.77; WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT,
SPEECH SERVICES 1,561.14; REGU-
LAR SALARIES 14,447.26; SUBSTI-
TUTE SALARIES 1,225.52; KATHY
BROWN, REIMBURSED SUPPLIES
52.00
FOOD SERVICE: BADLANDS GRO-
CERY, I-FOODS & SUPPLIES 56.04;
BLOCK, AIMEE, MIDLAND LUNCHES
937.95; CASH-WA DISTRIBUTING,
FOOD & SUPPLIES 3,064.39; CHEMI-
CAL SANITIZING SYSTEMS, DISH-
WASHER CHEMICALS 180.54; DEAN
FOODS, DAIRY PRODUCTS 1,421.95;
EARTHGRAINS CO, K&I-BREAD
PRODUCTS 188.00; FARMER BROTH-
ERS COMPANY, K-FOODS 106.95;
HOGEN'S HARDWARE, SUPPLIES/
MATERIALS/REPAIRS 59.97; LONG
VALLEY STORE, LV MILK/CUST SUP-
PLIES 287.63; MILLER'S GARBAGE,
GARBAGE SERVICE 148.80; PEO-
PLE'S MARKET, SUPPLIES 257.85; US
FOODSERVICE, FOOD & SUPPLIES
5,180.71; REGULAR SALARIES
3,714.53
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT: Supt.
Hermann reported that the FY 12 audit
report has been accepted by the S.D.
Department of Legislative Audit. The
audit report review with the auditor has
been postponed due to weather.
Supt. Hermann reviewed policy items to
be reviewed by the policy committee
meeting. The policy committee meeting
will be held April 17th.
PRINCIPALS’ REPORTS: Mr. Seiler pre-
sented and reviewed proposed changes
to the student handbook. He proposed
making a change to senior privileges
from senior privileges last period of the
day to open campus. Senior students
who are eligible for privileges would be
allowed to leave campus during their free
period(s). The goal is to build student re-
sponsibility and could be a factor in the
students’ selection of course electives.
Mr. Seiler reported that the sports com-
plex scoreboard is done; school person-
nel will be traveling to Brookings to get
the scoreboard; the welding work that
needs to be done for the extension is
scheduled.
Mr. Seiler reported that he has received
a request that the name of the football
field be reverted to Solon Field. The
board consensus was to honor the re-
quest that the football field name be
named Solon Field but the complex
name will be Jackson County Sports
Complex.
Mr. Nemecek reviewed proposed revi-
sions to the elementary handbook.
SDHSAA: Dale Christensen moved to
adopt the resolution authorizing member-
ship in the SDHSAA for 2013-2014. Mo-
tion was seconded by Dawn Rasmussen
and carried.
Ross Block moved to authorize a transfer
in the amount of $300,000.00 from Im-
pact Aid Fund to General Fund per
budget. Motion was seconded by Dale
Christensen and carried.
Dale Christensen moved to approve a
contract with the South Dakota Depart-
ment of health to provide county health
nurse services for the 2013-2014 school
year for 55 hours @ $20.00 per hour for
screening services and $40.00 per hour
for additional services. Motion was sec-
onded by Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
Ross Block moved to approve the track
concessions proposal from the Sopho-
more class. Motion was seconded by
Dale Christensen and carried.
At 8:40 Ross Block moved to go into ex-
ecutive session for negotiations per
SDCL 1-25-2. Motion was seconded by
Dawn Rasmussen and carried. The
board came out of executive session at
9:10.
Dale Christensen moved to approve the
negotiated agreement for the 2013-2014
school term. Motion was seconded by
Ross Block and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to approve a
contract to Brad Stone as janitor @ $9.00
per hour during probationary period per
policy. Motion was seconded by Ross
Block and carried.
A letter of resignation from Laurie
Prichard for assistant volleyball coach
was read. Ross Block moved to accept
the resignation. Motion was seconded by
Dale Christensen and carried.
Dale Christensen moved that the con-
tracts of Ben Latham and Janet Evans
not be renewed for the 2013-14 school
term per recommendations of the admin-
istration. Motion was seconded by Ross
Block and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to offer con-
tracts to certified staff for the 2013-2014
school term. Motion was seconded by
Dale Christensen and carried.
Dawn Rasmussen moved to offer con-
tracts to the non-certified staff for the
2013-2014 school term. Motion was sec-
onded by Ross Block and carried.
Dale Christensen moved to offer extra-
curricular contracts for staff with continu-
ing contract status – list as follows: Chad
Eisenbraun, head football; Harry Weller,
cross country; Amy Smiley, m/s volley-
ball; Dave Ohrtman, head track; Mark
Reiman, head boys basketball; Dana
Eisenbraun, asst. track; Colby Shuck, co-
music extra-curricular; Teresa Shuck,
one act play; Dave Ohrtman, student
council; Brandy Knutson, ag advisor;
Harry Weller, activities director; Colby
Shuck, concessions advisor; Colby
Shuck, school/community musical
drama; Colby Shuck, K-12 spring musi-
cal; Barry Hutchinson, head volleyball;
Teresa Shuck, assistant concession ad-
visor. Motion was seconded by Dawn
Rasmussen and carried.
At 9:15 Ross Block moved to go into ex-
ecutive session for negotiations with ad-
ministration per SDCL 1-25-2. Motion
was seconded by Dawn Rasmussen and
carried. The board came out of executive
session at 12:15.
The next regular meeting will be May 8,
2013 @ 7:00 p.m. at Kadoka School.
There being no further business, Ross
Block moved that the meeting be ad-
journed. Motion was seconded by Dawn
Rasmussen and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
Eileen C. Stolley, Business Manager
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Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
BIDS
SEALED BIDS FOR A 140-H2007
CAT Motor Grader #CCA03280 with
rear ripper. Bids accepted until May
6. For information call Faulk County
Highway Department 1-605-598-
6233.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
AVON – Only $10 to start. Call for in-
formation without any obligation. 1-
877-454-9658.
EMPLOYMENT
DEPUTY STATES ATTORNEY for
HUGHES COUNTY, full time. Con-
tact your local Dept of Labor or Carla
Lantz, 605-773-7461, Hughes
County Courthouse. Closes May 13.
EOE.
NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOLS
EDUCATION COOPERATIVE 2013-
2014: Early childhood special educa-
tion teacher: Starting salary $35,000
with great benefits: Contact Director
Cris Owens 605-466-2206, Chris-
tine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
TOP PAY FOR RN’s, LPN’s/LVN’s,
CNA’s, Med Aides. $2,000 Bonus –
Free Gas. AACO Nursing Agency
Call 1-800-656-4414 Ext. 18.
IMMEDIATE OPENING - ELECTRIC
LINEMAN who will assist with mis-
cellaneous City maintenance duties.
Knowledge and skills in construction,
maintenance, repair, and installation
of electric distribution system neces-
sary. Certified Journeyman or ability
to enroll in apprentice program. EOE
Accepting applications or resumes
until filled. City Finance Office, PO
Box 587, 209 N Main, Groton, SD
57445.
KTC CONSTRUCTION SEEKS EM-
PLOYEES, both part-time and full-
time. Excellent pay/benefits!
Underground plumbing, digging,
trenching, operating equipment.
Willing to train. Submit resumes to
rodb@kennebect el ephone. com
<mailto:rodb@kennebectelephone.c
om>. Questions, call 605-869-2220.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has an exciting full time Occupa-
tional Therapist opportunity, working
with a supportive team of profes-
sional therapists in the beautiful
southern Black Hills of SD. We are
located just a short distance from
Mount Rushmore, Wind Cave Na-
tional Park, Custer State Park, Jewel
Cave National Park and many other
outdoor attractions. Competitive
salary and benefits available includ-
ing sign on bonus. Please contact
Jim Simons, Rehab Services Direc-
tor, at 605-673-2229 ext. 301or jsi-
mons@regionalhealth.com for more
information or go to www.regional-
health.com to apply. EOE.
SMART SALES AND LEASE seeks
bookkeeper. Work from home.
Hourly wage based on experience.
M-F 8-4, Degree/management expe-
rience a plus. Resume, questions:
careers@smartsalesandlease.com.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
CAREER! 3 Week Hands-On Train-
ing School. Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Excavators. National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Placement Assistance.
VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-
6497.
NOTICES
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent, loca-
tion and other options.
www.sdhousingsearch.com South
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thority.
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-
3697 for details.
VACATIONS
BLACK HILLS VACATIONS: Mystery
Mountain Resort – Cabins, TV sites
& Camping in the Pines. Visit:
www.blackhillsresorts.com &
www.facebook.com/mysterymoun-
tain or 800-658-2267.
WANTED
WANTED: HUNTING LAND for
Pheasant, quality Mule Deer 170”
class+, Whitetail Deer 150” class+
and Merrium Turkey. Call 605-448-
8064.
Suduko Answers
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Kadoka Press
Classifieds
605-837-2259
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April 26-27-28-29:
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May 3-4-5-6:
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May 10-11-12-13:
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May 17-18-19-20:
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Suduko Answers
CITY OF KADOKA
Seasonal Street Department Employee(s)
The City of Kadoka, SD is now accepting applications for the po-
sition of Seasonal Street Department employee to work variable
hours per week for the 2013 summer season. Basic knowledge
of mowing, weed eating, painting curbs, operation of small power
tools and general maintenance is required. Applicants must be at
least 16 years old, have a valid driver’s license and be able to lift
up to 30 pounds. Some physical, manual labor will be required.
Applications may be obtained from the City Finance Office, PO
Box 58, Kadoka, SD 57543; telephone (605) 837-2229. Office
hours are 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Applications will be accepted through 4:00 PM, April 29, 2013.
The City of Kadoka is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
CITY OF KADOKA
Swimming Pool Positions
The City of Kadoka is now accepting applications for the following
swimming pool positions for the 2013 summer season: Swimming
Pool Manager, Assistant Swimming Pool Manager, and Life-
guards. Applicants must be at least sixteen (16) years of age.
Applications may be obtained from the City Finance Office, PO
Box 58, Kadoka, SD 57543; telephone (605) 837-2229. Office
hours are 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Applications must be received by 4:00 PM, April 29, 2013.
The City of Kadoka is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Word Search
NOTICE: Hogen’s Hardware will be
closed on Monday, April 29 for in-
ventory. K40-1tc
POSITION OPEN: The Kadoka
Area School District is accepting ap-
plications for a certified teacher for
the upper grades at the Long Valley
School. Certified applications may
be obtained from the school or on
the school district’s website;
kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please feel free
to contact the school with further
questions about this position. Com-
pleted applications may be dropped
off at the school or sent to: Attn: Jef-
fery M. Nemecek, Elementary Prin-
cipal, PO Box 99, 800 Bayberry
Street, Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 1-
605-837-2175. K40-2tc
POSITION OPEN: The Kadoka
Area School District is accepting ap-
plications for a certified teacher for a
K-12 band instructor. Certified appli-
cations may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please
feel free to contact the school with
further questions about this position.
Completed applications may be
dropped off at the school or sent to:
Attn: George Seiler, High School
Principal, PO Box 99, 800 Bayberry
Street, Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 1-
605-837-2172. K40-2tc
FOR SALE: 1997 Buick Park Av-
enue $1,800 and 2000 Dodge
Grand Caravan $2,900. Call 605-
837-2722 or 605-685-5924.
KP40-2tc
IMMEDIATE POSITION OPEN: at
the Kadoka City Bar for a part-time
bartender, flexible schedule to work
either morning or night shifts, ap-
proximately 16-24 hours per week.
Required application forms are
available at either the City Finance
Office or the Kadoka City Bar. Com-
pleted application form must be re-
turned to the City Finance Officer,
PO Box 58, Kadoka, SD 57543 be-
fore 4:00 p.m. Monday, May 13,
2013. EOE. K40-3tc
FOR IMMEDIATE SALE: House re-
cently remodeled on 1&1/2 lot. In-
cludes: Main floor with three
bedrooms, very large living room,
full bath and kitchen, hardwood
floors in all but the bathroom, kitchen
and one bedroom plus oak cup-
boards in the kitchen and large room
attached to the kitchen which can be
used an exercise room, office, play-
room, sitting room or a huge storage
room. Upstairs entirely cedar pan-
eled has 1 bedroom, ½ bath, living
room, large storage space, another
area large enough for a bed and
dresser. Full basement with a bed-
room or recreation room, workshop,
laundry room with room for a recre-
ation or living room; plenty of stor-
age throughout the house. Carport
call (605) 222-6226.
KP40-4tc
WANTED: Pasture for 40-80 pairs
or to rent land. Call 605-837-2589 or
605-488-0086. KP40-3tc
LAWN AND YARD MOWING
SERVICE call 837-2320 or 515-
0616 or contact Dick Stolley.
K40-10tp
HELP WANTED: Kadoka Subway
Accepting applications for full and
part-time positions, seasonal and
year round. Please make application
at Kadoka Gas & Go or call 837-
2350. “Will be opening in June.”
K40-2tc
HELP WANTED: Kadoka Sun-
downer: Two people to work 8 or 9
hour shifts renting rooms (some
laundry work): Also, taking applica-
tions for housekeepers. Please
apply at Americas Best Value Inn or
call 605-837-2188. K40-2tc
HELP WANTED: A summer part-
time caretaker is needed for the
Kadoka Cemetery. Flexible hours. If
interested call Bud Olney at 837-
2345 by May 1. K40-2tp
CITY WIDE RUMMAGE SALE: will
be Saturday, June 1. Call the
Kadoka Press to list your sale! K40-
3tc
NEED A PLUMBER? Call Dale at
605-441-1053 or leave a message
at home 605-837-0112. K39-4tp
MANAGER NEEDED for busy retail
store in Wall, SD. Must have sales
experience as well as supervisor ex-
perience. Salary plus commission
depending on experience. Call
Jackie, 348-8108, or fax resumé to
348-1524; email jw@bhgolddig-
gers.com KP38-3tp
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge construction
/maintenance preferred. CDL Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information (605)
837-2410 or (605) 837 - 2422
Fax (605) 837-2447 KP37-5tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
is accepting applications for full time
Deputy Director of Equalization. Se-
lected applicant may be required to
become certified as per SDCL.
Must work well with the public, and
have clerical and computer skills.
Jackson County benefits include
health insurance, life insurance,
S.D. Retirement, paid holidays, va-
cation and sick leave. Position open
until filled. Beginning wage $9.00
per hour. Applications are available
at the Jackson County Auditor’s of-
fice or send resume to Jackson
County, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD
57543. Ph: 605-837-2422
KP40-5tc
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thank you to all the people who
made the Annual Prime Rib Dinner
a great success. Your support of the
Kadoka Nursing Home is greatly ap-
preciated. The cooks, servers, host-
esses, entertainers and attendees
made the evening a great event. You
are all winners in our eyes.
The residents, staff, and
Board of Directors of the Kadoka
Nursing Home
Thank Yous
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Finals
Tuesday Men’s Early
People’s Market ........................35-17
Philip Motor..............................32-20
George’s Welding ......................29-23
Kennedy Implement .................26-26
G&A Trenching.........................24-28
Bear Auto ..................................24-28
Philip Health Service ...............22-30
Kadoka Tree Service.................16-36
Highlights:
Bryan Buxcel.................209, 203/605
Earl Park...............................246/575
Wendell Buxcel......................236/574
Jim Larson ............................213/557
Fred Foland...........................200/549
Cory Boyd..............................213/547
Bill Stone...............................202/537
James Mansfield...................207/534
Tony Gould ...................................530
Ed Morrison .................................527
Bill Bainbridge......................219/523
Randy Boyd..................................518
Alvin Pearson.....3-6 - 7-10 split; 511
Jason Sampson ............................506
Steve Varner.................................503
Ronnie Williams...........................501
Terry Wentz..................................501
Ryan Seager ..........................200/500
Colt Terkildsen.............................202
Kent Buchholz...................3-10 split
Bill Sumpter .........................2-7 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Dakota Bar................................46-10
Morrison’s Haying ....................34-22
Wall Food Center ......................26-30
Chiefie’s Chicks...................25.5-30.5
Hildebrand Concrete ................25-31
First National Bank .................24-32
Just Tammy’s......................22.5-33.5
Dorothy’s Catering....................21-35
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz ..............216 clean/504
Mitzi Boyd.............................185/501
Deb Gartner .........3-5-8-10 split; 183
Chelsea Moos ...............................138
Kalie Kjerstad..............................126
Marlis Petersen.....................199/546
Shar Moses ..........3-10 split; 190/475
Cristi Ferguson...................9-10 split
Emily Kroetch ......................4-5 split
Annette Hand.......................4-5 split
Agriculture …
April 25, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED
HEIFEF & PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE & PAIRS: 12
P.M. (MT}
PAIRS & BRED CATTLE:
PAUL SLOVEK - 50 DLK & FED ANC FIFST CALF HFF
PAIFS (DLK CLVS} (35 DLK & 15 FED}; 40 DLK DFOKEN
MOUTH PAIFS (DLK CLVS}
SHANE GRUBL - 50 DLK SOLID & DFOKEN MOUTH
PAIFS (DIC CLVS}
JEFF NELSON - 40 DLK HOME FAISED FIFST HFF
PAIFS (SIFED DY FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS}
DARTT ANGUS - 22 PUFEDFED DLK ANC FIFST CALF
HFF PAIFS (DIC FED CLVS}
CREW CATTLE CO - 15 DWF SOLID TO DFOKEN
MOUTH COWS; DFED.CHAF; CLV.NOW
BUSTER PETERSON - 12 DWF FIFST CALF HFF PAIFS
(FED & MAF CLVS}
FEEDER CATTLE:
RADWAY - 80 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI 650-700=
MORTENSON RANCH - 75 DLK, DWF & A FEW FED
HFFS; FS,NI ........................................................700-750=
STOUT - 60 DLK DV FEPLC. HFFS; FS,NI (SIFED DY
FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS DULLS}...................700=
MCDANIEL - 40 DLK STFS; FS,NI
GOOD - 25 DLK, DWF & A FEW FWF CLVS; FS..........600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE,
DFED CATTLE & PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE
SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECU-
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party
ver|f|ed NhT6 catt|e
(Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering video
saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 9: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 16: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 23: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JULY 30: SPECIAL ANNIVEFSAFY YEAF-
LINC & FALL CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE &
ANNIVEFSAFY DDQ
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, MAY 21: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE
FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: APR1L 2S, 2DJS
We Þod o b1g run o] ]eeder & ue1gÞ-up oo1-
11e o1ong u11Þ some po1rs ]or our speo1o1 so1e
Þere Tuesdog, Apr11 2S. Feeders s1rong u11Þ
o b1g oroud o] bugers. Ano1Þer b1g run o]
ue1gÞ-ups on o good morKe1. For1une´s Ro]1er
U Cross Bu11 So1e dreu o n1oe oroud. Good
run o] po1rs ne×1 ueeK, o1ong u11Þ some
]eeder oo111e ond bongs vooo1no1ed Þe1]ers.
FEEDER CATTLE:
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
82.................................DLK STFS 577=............$164.00
78.................................DLK STFS 678=............$152.75
STANLEY & MATT PORCH - WANBLEE
140 ..............DLK & DWF DV HFFS 754=............$144.00
JEFF NELSON - PHILIP
61 ................................DLK HFFS 788=............$139.50
LYLE & BRETT WILCOX - RED OWL
76...........................DLK DV HFFS 703=............$142.00
18...........................DLK DV HFFS 652=............$138.00
CORY FORTUNE - QUINN
69 ................................DLK HFFS 769=............$138.00
THAD STOUT - PHILIP
58 ................................DLK HFFS 692=............$143.50
BILLIE PARSONS - MILESVILLE
163...........DWF & A FEW FWF STFS 909=............$131.25
73 ................................DWF STFS 808=............$132.50
141..............................DWF HFFS 864=............$121.50
71................................DWF HFFS 744=............$127.75
25 .....................FWF & DWF HFFS 838=............$122.00
MYRON WILLIAMS - WALL
123...............................DLK STFS 984=............$122.25
44.................................DLK STFS 993=............$120.75
9 ........................DLK & DWF STFS 890=............$120.25
GRANT PARSONS - MILESVILLE
70...........................DLK DV HFFS 854=............$121.00
RADLEY KENNEDY - PHILIP
20 ................................DLK HFFS 640=............$140.00
COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
83......................DLK & DWF HFFS 688=............$136.00
DARREL WILCOX - UNION CENTER
46......................DLK & DWF HFFS 587=............$142.50
LARSON LTD FAMILY PART - SPEARFISH
41......................DLK & DWF HFFS 837=............$125.50
BROCK SMITH - PHILIP
17 ................................DLK HFFS 813=............$126.00
6 ..................................DLK HFFS 786=............$127.50
CARLEY RANCH - MILESVILLE
11.................................DLK STFS 661=............$147.75
19 ................................DLK HFFS 587=............$145.50
JEFF JASPER - STURGIS
7...................................DLK STFS 600=............$146.00
8........................FED & DLK HFFS 566=............$142.50
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
7 ..................................DLK HFFS 860=............$116.50
MIKE AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
5 ..................................DLK HFFS 947=............$111.00
BERNARD HERBER - KADOKA
62......................DLK & DWF HFFS 640=............$138.50
13......................DLK & DWF HFFS 572=............$139.00
17 ..............................HEFF HFFS 556=............$141.00
JOHN BRENNAN - MUD BUTTE
8........................DLK & DWF HFFS 728=............$127.75
JASON & PAUL PAULSEN - WALL
28......................DLK & DWF HFFS 755=............$127.50
EMMIT DICKSCHAT - HERMOSA
11 ................................DLK HFFS 714=............$132.00
MIKE & BUD PERAULT - BELVIDERE
8 ........................DLK & DWF STFS 481=............$162.50
10 .....................FWF & DWF HFFS 469=............$149.50
JOYCE CHORD - WHITE OWL
3...................................DLK STFS 543=............$159.00
4........................DLK & DWF HFFS 521=............$145.00
JAY & CONNIE PRICE - NEW UNDERWOOD
3 ..................................DLK HFFS 525=............$141.50
PAIRS:
JOHN CAP FARMS - CORSICA
50 .........................DLK HFF PAIFS 981=.........$1,560.00
21 .........................DLK HFF PAIFS 940=.........$1,500.00
20 .........................DLK HFF PAIFS 879=.........$1,385.00
REUBEN VOLLMER JR. - MIDLAND
7.......DLK 3 TO SOLID MOUTH PAIFS 1436=.......$1,510.00
9...........DLK DFOKEN MOUTH PAIFS 1468=.......$1,310.00
WEIGH-UPS:
TOM SCHOFIELD - PHILIP
1...................................FED COW 1425=............$84.50
H&K RANCH - WALL
1...................................DLK COW 1475=............$83.50
ROGER SCHOFIELD - FAITH
11...............................DLK HFFTS 808=............$109.50
ROSS & AIMEE BLOCK - MIDLAND
1...................................FED COW 1520=............$82.50
RICK KING - PHILIP
1...................................DLK DULL 2025=..........$103.50
3.................................DLK HFFTS 980=..............$97.00
3.................................DLK HFFTS 1048=............$93.00
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
1...................................DLK COW 1345=............$81.00
1...................................DLK COW 1530=............$80.00
2 ...........................DLK COWETTES 1030=............$90.50
TUCKER SMITH - QUINN
1 ..................................DWF COW 1390=............$83.00
1...................................FED COW 1260=............$82.00
1 ..................................FWF COW 1410=............$81.00
1 ..................................DWF COW 1535=............$80.50
STEVE DALY - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1295=............$83.50
TESSA STOUT - KADOKA
1 ..................................DWF COW 1515=............$83.00
MONTE WHITCHER - SCENIC
1...................................DLK COW 1150=............$87.00
2 ...........................DLK COWETTES 1015=............$92.00
2.................................DLK HFFTS 930=............$106.00
2ACH MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1...................................DLK COW 1210=............$85.50
BILL & NORMA HEADLEE - KADOKA
1...................................DLK COW 1155=............$84.00
MIKE MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1...................................DLK COW 1235=............$83.00
DAN OLDENBERG - PHILIP
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 795=............$110.00
3.................................DLK HFFTS 745=............$105.00
MICKEY SIMONS - WHITE OWL
1...................................DLK COW 1150=............$82.00
7 ...........................DLK COWETTES 1010=............$94.00
DENNIS & KAY SIELER - QUINN
1...................................DLK COW 1310=............$81.50
THAD STOUT - KADOKA
1 ..................................DWF COW 1160=............$81.50
DON KELLY - QUINN
1...................................DLK COW 1300=............$81.00
REUBEN VOLLMER JR. - MIDLAND
1.................................CHAF COW 1620=............$80.50
JUDY DALY - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1520=............$80.00
1...................................DLK COW 1405=............$80.00
MARK KIEFFER - RAPID CITY
2 .................................DLK COWS 1405=............$80.00
2 .................................DLK COWS 1438=............$78.00
CHARLES & JANET VANDERMAY - KADOKA
1...................................DLK COW 1300=............$80.00
KNUTSON RANCH - QUINN
4.................................FED COWS 1335=............$79.75
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
1 ..................................DWF COW 1465=............$79.50
1.................................HEFF COW 1300=............$77.00
MICKEY DALY - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1490=............$79.00
ANDREW SCHOFIELD - BELVIDERE
1 ..................................DWF COW 1435=............$79.00
HOSTUTLER RANCH - MIDLAND
1...................................DLK COW 1220=............$78.50
STEVE & LORI SWANSON- NEW UNDERWOOD
3 .................................DLK COWS 1517=............$78.00
JERRY MADER - NEW UNDERWOOD
2.................................DLK HFFTS 880=............$103.00
LANCE FREI - RED OWL
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 920=............$102.00
MATT HEEB - MIDLAND
2.................................DLK HFFTS 915=............$102.00
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 995=..............$90.50
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
7.....................CHAF & DLK HFFTS 834=............$100.50
NORDINE BRINK - MIDLAND
1 ..................................DLK HFFT 820=............$100.00
LARRY EISENBRAUN - WALL
2.................................DLK HFFTS 863=..............$99.00
JOSH GEIGLE - WALL
2.................................DLK HFFTS 935=..............$96.00
FOLAND RANCH - MIDLAND
5.................................DLK HFFTS 1005=............$92.50
H & S PARTNERSHIP - PHILIP
21 .........................DLK COWETTES 962=............$100.00
JUSTIN WULF - OWANKA
3...........................DWF COWETTES 1103=............$94.00
VOLMER RANCH - OWANKA
1...................................DLK DULL 1420=............$92.00
1...................................DLK DULL 1885=............$90.50
1...................................DLK DULL 1605=............$88.00
FORTUNE RAFTER U CROSS - QUINN
75 HD AVC. ...................................$3923.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
SD Drought Tool Available
to Assist in Your Planning
The following information was
taken from Drought Planning Up-
date, “Grassland Drought Condi-
tion and the NRCS SD Drought
Tool,” April 2013 information
sheet.
The South Dakota NRCS devel-
oped and utilizes a tool to assess
drought conditions using local pre-
cipitation data to model impacts to
grazing lands production. The SD
NRCS Drought Tool uses long-
term (30-50 year) and short-term
precipitation, including data from
High Plains Regional Climate
Center and the SD State Univer-
sity (SDSU) state climatologist.
Understanding current drought
conditions stirs difficult questions:
•How will the 2012 drought im-
pact the upcoming 2013 growing
season?
•What will it take for grasslands
to recover from drought?
Our current grassland drought
conditions reflect the effects of pre-
cipitation and soil moisture
deficits originating in 2012. Using
current drought conditions in con-
junction with historic average
long-term data, we can project fu-
ture grazing land production
across SD. South Dakota grass-
lands typically reach peak produc-
tion by early July. This data is
used to predict peak forage produc-
tion. This tool can be helpful in the
development and/or modification
of a contingency drought manage-
ment plan, as well.
To learn more about this tool
and its benefits, access the follow-
ing website listed below:
http://www.sd.nrcs.usda.gov/tech-
nical/Range_Pasture.html
Managing Soil Health
on Your Lands
Soil health and rainfall manage-
ment are priorities for SD NRCS
in 2013. There has been a great
deal of information developed and
assembled by means of videos and
Fuel/Oil Storage
Regulations
The May 10, 2013 deadline for
the EPA Spill Prevention Control
and Containment (SPCC) regula-
tion is rapidly approaching. Facil-
ities that have capacity to store
more than 1320 gallons of diesel,
fuel oil, gasoline, crop oil, used oil,
and/or animal fat in 55 gallon con-
tainers or larger need to complete
a SPCC plan and install secondary
containment for these containers.
Producers who have total stor-
age of less than 10,000 gallons can
self-certify or employ a profes-
sional engineer to complete their
plan and design their secondary
containment system. Those with
storage of 10,000 gallons or more
must hire a professional engineer.
If you have storage capacity for
more than 1320 gallons of petro-
leum products, and do not have
secondary containment for those
containers in place, it is not likely
that you will be able to do so by the
May 10, 2013 deadline. It is recom-
mended that you proceed as soon
as possible to install secondary
containment, but in the meantime,
go ahead and complete an SPCC
plan.
If you choose to self-certify, you
can download a Tier 1 Qualified
Facility SPCC Plan Template from
the EPA website:
http://www.epa.gov/emergencies/co
ntent/spcc/tier1temp.htm. A Tier 1
facility must meet the following
criteria: total aboveground oil stor-
age capacity of 10,000 U.S. gallons
or less, no aboveground oil storage
containers with capacity greater
than 5,000 U.S. gallons, and no
discharges of oil in the 3 years be-
fore the SPCC plan is certified in-
volving a single discharge greater
Springtime is an excellent time
to vaccinate their horses against
threats from infectious diseases,
says Russ Daly, SDSU Extension
Veterinarian and State Public
Health Veterinarian.
"Many of the infectious diseases
are transmitted by insects that be-
come active in the spring," Daly
said. "Others are transmitted be-
tween horses, and spring and sum-
mer activities are more apt to
bring horses from different loca-
tions into contact with one an-
other."
Core and risk-based vaccines
The American Association of
Equine Practitioners (AAEP) pro-
vides guidelines for the vaccina-
tion of horses. Rebecca Bott, SDSU
Extension Equine Specialist ex-
plains that vaccinations are
grouped into core or risk-based
vaccinations.
"Core vaccinations are recom-
mended for all horses, while cer-
tain risk-based vaccinations are
strongly recommended for horses
that travel, mingle with other
horses, or live in regions were the
risk of a certain disease is high,"
she said.
Core vaccinations include dis-
eases such as tetanus, sleeping
sickness, West Nile Virus, and ra-
bies. Risk-based vaccinations may
include diseases such as rhinop-
neumonitis (Equine Herpesvirus-
4), influenza, and others.
She reminds horse owners the
first time a horse is vaccinated for
a specific disease they may need
booster vaccinations to help the
immune system develop a full re-
sponse to disease-causing organ-
isms.
"After the initial series, most
vaccinations will be given annually
or semi-annually to help maintain
this level of protection in the
horse," she said.
Equine herpesvirus
Forms of equine herpesvirus
causing neurologic signs have
emerged in various places around
the country. Dustin Oedekoven,
SD State Veterinarian, says that
horse owners with horses that will
come in contact with other horses
should consider vaccination
against Herpesvirus infections.
Vaccinations for both EHV-1 and
EHV-4 are available; however,
there is not a vaccine to prevent
the neurological signs associated
with EHV.
"Your local veterinarian should
be able to help you determine
which EHV vaccinations to select
and how often to vaccinate based
on the specific risk factors for your
horse," he said.
Horses that are frequently trav-
eling and coming into contact with
other horses should likely receive
boosters every 90 days. Since EHV-
1 can cause abortion in pregnant
mares, Oedekoven says those ani-
mals should be vaccinated at five,
seven and nine months of gesta-
tion with an EHV vaccine that is
labeled for prevention of equine
abortion.
than 1,000 gallons or 2 discharges
of oil each greater than 42 gallons
within any 12-month period.
If your facility has total oil stor-
age capacity of less than 10,000
gallons and either have a storage
container with a capacity greater
than 5,000 gallons or have had one
or more discharges of oil as out-
lined above, it is classified as a
Tier 2 facility and must comply
with those criteria. Tier 2 report-
ing requirements and procedures
are outlined at:
http://www.epa.gov/emergencies/co
ntent/epcra/tier2.htm.
Your SPCC plan does not need to
be sent to anyone, but must be
complete, updated if you make
changes to your oil storage facility,
maintained in terms of scheduled
inspections, and on file, readily ac-
cessible if an inspector asks for it.
Storage containers with a capac-
ity of 55 gallons or more must be
included in the total storage capac-
ity, even if they are not being used.
Storage containers can be taken
out of service if specific procedures
are carried out. This can be helpful
for operations that no longer use
these containers, and may allow
them to drop to the Tier 2 category
and not need to hire a professional
engineer, qualify as a Tier 1 facil-
ity if putting a 5,000 gallon tank
out of service, or even drop below
the 1,320 capacity level and not
need to complete an SPCC plan.
For more information, an EPA
fact sheet with complete informa-
tion is available at:
http://www.epa.gov/emergencies/co
ntent/spcc/index.htm.
Calendar
5/2/2013: PAT Certification Meet-
ing, 1:00 pm, Phoenix Center,
Main St., Onida, SD
facts sheets listed below. To access
and view the videos and fact
sheets, please use the following
National Soil Health website listed
below:
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/por-
tal/nrcs/main/national/soils/health
Short Length, Soil Health The-
ater Videos, available from website
listed above:
•Can your soil past the Infiltra-
tion Test?
•Is your soil healthy and func-
tioning?
•Have you discovered the cover?
•How should healthy soils look?
•How should your soils smell?
•How to boost your soil’s en-
ergy?
Soil Health Fact Sheets, avail-
able from website listed above:
•Soil Health Key Points
•Unlock Your Farm’s Potential:
Basics and Benefits
•Unlock Your Farm’s Potential:
Dig a Little, Learn a Lot
•Unlock Your Farm’s Potential:
Discover the Cover
•Unlock Your Farm’s Potential:
Do Not Disturb
Upcoming Events
& Activities
2013 SD Rangeland/Soil Days,
June 25-26, 2013 @ Kadoka, SD.
2013 Range Camp, June 4-6,
2013 @ Sturgis, SD.
For more information on: county
soils, planting shelterbelts, seed-
ings, and technical and potential
financial assistance, call the
Kadoka NRCS field office at 605-
837-2242 ext. 3, or stop in at the
field office located at the Kadoka
USDA Service Center in Kadoka,
SD for further assistance.
“USDA is an Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer”
Jackson County NRCS
Kelly O’Connell, NRCS District Conservationist
Vaccinate your
horses this Spring

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