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Faith Independent, October 9, 2013

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October 9, 2013
The Faith City Council had
another interesting meeting on
October 1st.
Mayor Haines asked that the
utiliies connections for Inghrams
be removed from the agenda as
the policy wasn’t complete at
this time. Councilwoman Riley
attacked Mayor Haines again,
verbally, about not wanting to
permit the Inghrams to obtain
city water. Riley said that In-
ghrams were tøld if they came in
and requested their utilities that
it would be placed on the agenda
for discussion. Riley felt they
were being denied a timely re-
view of their utilities request.
There was no discussion on writ-
ing a policy when Hibner ap-
proached them about a water
hookup. All the taps were in
under the old ordinance so
should be able to get connection.
Atty. Bogue explained that con-
nections were not clearly ex-
plained in the current ordinance
and at the last meeting Council
tabled this until the Utilities
Committee could meet and come
up with a policy. Barb Berndt
said the committee had met with
Eric but didn’t have the policy
ready. Berndt said Karen In-
ghram didn’t want it placed on
this meeting’s agenda. Mayor
Haines stated emphatically that
he was not against Inghrams
getting water. He just wants a
policy in place. Council voted 4-
1 with Karen Inghram abstain-
ing to remove from the agenda
and brink back to the next meet-
ing.
Bids for a digger derrick truck
were opened at 7:15. Six bids
were received from as far away
as Texas and Alabama. Bids var-
ied from around $75,000 to
$94,000, some with delivery in-
cluded. The bids were turned
over to Donn Dupper to study
and bring back to Council’s next
meeting.
Riley had heard that they
could lease JD or Kabota mow-
ing tractors. They can’t use them
more than 200 hours. Mayor
Haines said Ziebach County,
through Lindskov of Isabel, has
one too, where all you pay is the
insurance. You must use it at
least 150 hours. Haines won-
dered if golf course members
could use it for mowing out there
or if only city employees could
use it. Riley wondered if the golf
course couldn’t use the old one.
Dupper will do some checking
into this.
Karen Butler, Butler Insur-
ance, was back with changes to
the liability policy. She removed
some items and added some. She
removed the dinosaur at the In-
formation Center, but members
thought that should be left on.
The total package with the fire
pack was around $38,600.
Karen also had health insur-
ance information. Karen said
there was an increase of approx-
imately 11%. Their current plan
is grandfathered in so there
shouldn’t be any significant
changes January 1st when the
Affordable Health Care Act goes
into effect. With the new Oba-
maCare there will be new plans,
etc. There could be some small
group plans available. Large
groups will really be hit with big
increases with the new Oba-
maCare. Council also had quotes
from the Health Pool through
the Municipal League. Council
will hold a special meeting on
Wednesday, October 9th to re-
view this further with Karen.
Their renewal deadline is Octo-
ber 15th.
Debbie Brown suggested that
they approve an additional
$2,000 to the library in case they
get their grant for new comput-
ers and need this extra. This
would not come out of their
budget.
The second reading of Ordi-
nance #305 was corrected to read
Ordinance #306, budget. Debbie
Continued on Page 2
Council opens bids for digger
derrick truck By Loretta Passolt
Early blizzard shuts down western
South Dakota; large livestock
losses By Loretta Passolt
Weekend blizzard ... knocked down this big cottonwood tree
in Mike and Dorothy Fisher’s front yard. They also lost their pine tree
in their front yard. They were lucky that the deck railing was the only
thing hit. Photo by Loretta Passolt
An early winter blizzard hit
the plains of western South
Dakota last Thursday. The
storm front started out with rain
Thursday night and continued
into the night, turning to snow in
most areas. Snow hit the Faith
area around mid-morning Friday
and continued all day into Satur-
day morning. Winds averaged
around 45 mph with gusts
around 60. Faith received 12”
oficially. The Hills towns were
hit much harder. Rapid City re-
ceived a record setting 31”. Lead
had 55”, and Deadwood 48”.
Sturgis was also hit hard. They
lost their middle school due to
the roof collapsing.
Power outages hit most of
western South Dakota. Thou-
sands of homes in the Hills
towns are without electricity, as
are many in the rural areas.
Trees, still with leaves, were
ladened with heavy, wet snow,
falling on power lines. Many res-
idents won’t have power restored
until later this week. Faith resi-
dents were without power for
about 4 hours Friday night.
The interstate and most high-
ways were closed. Interstate 90
was closed from Wall into
Wyoming. Highway 212 was
closed between Mud Butte and
Faith, and Highway 34 was also
closed. These were all opened for
travel on Sunday.
There are reports of many
livestock losses. Livestock,
driven by 60 mph wind gusts
over snow covered fences,
strayed from their usual pasture
land. Most hadn’t been moved
from their summer pasture and
many hadn’t been taken to the
sale ring yet this fall. Livestock
didn’t have their winter coats to
help them withstand the wet
snow. Ranchers are still out on
snowmobiles, four-wheelers, etc.
searching for their livestock,
whether they have just strayed
or are lying dead somewhere,
they don’t know. At this time,
they have no idea of their losses.
Some could have lost as much as
half their herd. Losses are going
to be in the millions of dollars.
Sunday brought sunshine and
warm temperatures, melting the
snow quickly, giving the ranch-
ers a much better day for search-
ing for their livestock. Monday
was the same.
To many residents of western
South Dakota, this is the worst
blizzard they have seen. And it
was so early in the season.
Gov. Daugaard declared a
state of emergency earlier in the
weekend for western South
Dakota.
Congratulations to this year’s Homecoming King and Queen - Clay
Bernstein and Karli Kilby. Photo by Marcia Samuelson
Page 2• October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent
Obituaries
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Independent of your
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Published in the Heart of the West River Empire
Publication No. 184760
Published Weekly on Wednesday
Faith, SD 57626-0038
POSTMASTER, Send Address Changes to:
P.O. Box 38, Faith, SD 57626-0038
PHONE: (605) 967-2161 – FAX: (605) 967-2160
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DEADLINE: Last possible moment to turn news
items in at the office to be published.
LEGAL NEWSPAPER FOR: State of S.D., Meade
County, City of Faith, Faith School District 46-2
Publisher.............................................................Don Ravellette
Office Manager.......................................................Diane Isaacs
Reporter, Proofreader, Composition.................Loretta Passolt
COPYRIGHT: 1988 Faith Independent. All rights re-
served. Nothing may bereprinted, photocopied, or in
any way reproduced from this publication, in whole or
part, without the written consent of the publishers.
Faith Community Health Center
Hours of Operation:
Monday 8:00 am – 7:00 pm
Tuesday - Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Verna Schad, CNP – Monday - Thursday
Peggy O’Connor, CNP – Monday – Friday
David Rollason, PA-C - Thursday
For appointments call:
605-967-2644 or
1-800-584-7668
Donald Richard Brynteson en-
tered eternity peacefully on Aug.
14, 2013, at his home in River-
ton, Manitoba, only 3 weeks
after being diagnosed with bile
duct cancer at the Mayo Clinic in
Rochester, Minnesota.
Weather permitting there will
be a 2 o’clock service this Sunday
afternoon, October 13 at the
Prairie Home Church, about 35
miles West of Faith on Hwy 212.
Don was born on July 31,
1940 in Chicago, Illinois. He
graduated in 1958 from Montev-
ideo High School in Montevideo,
Minn., and apprenticed as a car-
penter/bricklayer, for a couple of
years, under his father, who was
also a Pastor.
Answering the call of God on
his life, Don moved to Blooming-
ton, Minnesota to attend the
Bethany School of Missions.
This is where, in 1960, he met
his wife to be, Bonnie Nelson.
They were married on Aug. 17,
1963, and began their church
ministry one month later in
western South Dakota. Their
first boy was born during this
time while Don was assisting
Pastor John Hop in the Vale and
Newell Lutheran churches. Dur-
ing the following years as the
family grew, God opened the
doors to minister in the Opal
Community and Prairie Home
Churches where they eventually
became the full time pastor.
The Scripture is true: “The
steps of a good man are ordered
by the Lord.” In 1972, God led
the family to move to Federal
Dam, Minnesota where they
joined Daystar Ministries and
became part of the Staff at Zion
Harbor, a Christian Bible camp
on Leach Lake. In 1974, they
moved to Mercedes, Texas to join
the Ministry Staff at Harmony
Hill, an affiliate of Daystar Min-
istries just north of town.
In August of 1975, Don re-
ceived an invitation to Pastor the
Mercedes Christian Church
where he ministered for nearly
33 years until March 2008.
Don and Bonnie moved to
Riverton, Manitoba in the spring
of 2008 to be the pastors of the
Riverton Gospel Chapel. “It was
like being on a vacation,” he said,
“But don't tell anyone!” He loved
the opportunity of being pastor
here and living close to the Dyck
family. Always a family man
and a friend to folks who came
across his path in life, he had a
passion to know his Lord and
Saviour in a deep way and to
share God's love with everyone
he met.
Left behind are his loving wife
Bonnie and their four children,
Richard and spouse Debbie, Ran-
dall and spouse Deborah, Ruth
and spouse Brian (Dyck) and
Rachel Lovestrand and spouse
Gavin (Audagnotti); 10 grand-
children: Nathan, Jeremy, Joel,
Jessica and Curtis Dyck; Eythan
and Emilie Brynteson; Ginger
and Gus Lovestrand and Chloe
Brynteson.
He was preceded in death by
his father and mother, Harold
Donald Richard Brynteson
and Evelyn (Doosvand) Brynte-
son most recently of Fergus
Falls, Minnesota.
Although mixed with sadness,
we are celebrating Don’s life and
rejoicing because he is now in
the presence of his Creator.
“Well done, good and faithful
servant...Come and share your
master's happiness!” (Matt.
25:23). “Precious in the sight of
the Lord is the death of his
saints” (Psalm 116:15).
These past weeks would have
been very different had we not
had this overwhelming support
and excellent care. We have felt
so supported by the prayers and
many different expressions of
love and kindness throughout
this difficult time.
Funeral services for Cherron
Sitting Crow, 26, of Red Scaffold,
will be Thursday, Oct. 10 at 11:00
AM, CDT, at the Red Scaffold
Gym. Burial will follow at Sacred
Heart Catholic Cemetery, Red
Scaffold, under the direction of
Stout Family Funeral Home of
Mobridge. Meet at the Red Scaf-
fold hill at 5:00 PM Wednesday to
process to the gym for an all-night
wake with services beginning at
7:00 PM. Cherron entered the
spirit world September 30, 2013
near New Underwood.
www.stoutfamilyfh.com
Cherron Sitting Crow
made a few changes from the
first reading. She didn’t know
whether to take in the effect of
the new safe room, whether the
inkind would count toward their
share of the $100,000. She
changed the Sr. Center from
$3,000 to $1,000, and left the
Bus at $1,000. Riley questioned
whether they should leave that
or if the County would be paying.
Debbie said that both entities
are required to pay if they want
to continue the bus stopping
here. Debbie said they had a plus
of over $2,000 in the budget.
Council approved the second
reading.
Council also approved the
first reading of Ordinance #307
for Supplemental Appropria-
tions. This was to put funds back
into the library account as part
of their grant money.
Debbie checked with the His-
torical Society about the paint
for the ice house. There are no
specifics as to what type of finish
they can use. They can leave it
the same color it is. Reed still
has to do some caulking before
they can finish it. Debbie said
they have quite a bit of the grant
money yet. Annelle Afdahl asked
if Reed had a copy of the grant so
he knew more of the details. She
thought it would be nice for him
to have a copy. Reed said he had
most repairs done, and the
painting/finishing will depend on
the weather. He will submit a
quote for tinning around a venti-
lation area and caulking, and a
separate one for the painting.
These are for labor only. He will
have it ready for the special
meeting on the 9th.
Council approved furnishing
donuts for the Alumni Breakfast
on Saturday, October 12th.
Council retired into executive
session at 8:15 for possible litiga-
tion.
City council Continued from Page 1
U.S. Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD)
Senator Johnson says govern-
ment shutdown hurts ranchers in
storm aftermath
WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S.
Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD)
today issued the following state-
ment on the effects of the federal
government shutdown on
USDA’s ability to respond to
ranchers in the aftermath of this
weekend’s major snowstorm.
“While total losses are still
being determined, this major
blizzard has killed huge num-
bers of livestock across western
South Dakota. Exacerbating
these losses is the fact that the
government shutdown has shut-
tered USDA’s Farm Service
Agency’s (FSA) offices across the
state. As a result, producers
don’t even have anyone to con-
tact at USDA for assistance in
documenting losses.
The closure of FSA offices is
another demonstration of the
real impact the government
shutdown is having on South
Dakotans. Like the snow storm,
the government shutdown is
causing major disruptions in
people’s lives and every day busi-
ness.
While snowstorms happen,
government shutdowns are un-
natural events. The House needs
to pass a clean Continuing Reso-
lution not just for the sake of
South Dakota’s ranchers, but for
the good of the country.”
October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 3
email us at
faithind@faithsd.com
Senior Citizens Menu Senior Citizens Menu
Obituary
W We el lc co om me e A Al lu um mn ni i
G Go oo od d L Lu uc ck k L Lo on ng gh ho or rn ns s! !
in your football and volleyball games!
Parade candy and decorations
Get your favorite fall beverage
Foam coolers
Vilas Pharmacy &
Healthcare Store
Prairie Oasis Mall, Main St., Faith, SD
Carolyn Schnose, age 72,  of
Hot Springs, South Dakota, died
Wednesday, October 2, 2013, at
the Hans P. Peterson Memorial
Hospital in Philip.
Carolyn Elizabeth Deering was
born January 7, 1941, in New Un-
derwood, SD, one of 12 children
born to Oscar and Ruth (Caton)
Deering. Carolyn grew up north
of Wasta, SD, and attended rural
school in that area. Carolyn then
attended high school in Rapid
City. After graduation, she at-
tended Black Hills State College,
where she received her teacher’s
certificate.
Carolyn was united in mar-
riage to James L. Auker on July
29, 1961 in the Viewfield Church,
north of New Underwood. They
made their home in the Viewfield
Community and Carolyn taught
rural school there for a number of
years. Carolyn then raised her
family, along with working the
dairy farm and ranch. Carolyn
was a 4-H leader for over 25
years, and had great help and a
lot of fun with the parents in the
community. In 1986, they sold the
dairy farm-ranch and moved to
Arizona for a short time. As it
turns out city life was not for Car-
olyn. She was passionate about
her family, South Dakota, and the
open spaces. Carolyn returned to
South Dakota, and returned to
Black Hills State University,
where she received her B.A. De-
gree.
Carolyn then taught English in
Little Wound High School, where
she used her passion for writing
to motivate her students. She was
a strong supporter of local writers
and authors, and loved the chal-
lenge of bringing theater and
English to the school. The friend-
ships and camaraderie that came
with the experiences she received
in Kyle, connected her with the
history of the badlands and her
own family. She was also an ad-
junct at Oglala Lakota College,
and working toward earning her
masters degree.
During this time, Carolyn re-
united with her high school
sweetheart, Vernie Schnos, and
they tore it up from the floor up.
They enjoyed the outdoors, their
families, and had a deep and
abiding respect for each other.
Carolyn Schnose
They were united in marriage on
December 16, 1996, and made
their home in the Maitland area,
south of Hot Springs. They spent
their time ranching, going to rop-
ings, and having fun.
Carolyn was extraordinarily
resilient, surviving breast cancer,
ranching, teaching, and her fam-
ily, she always came out of any
situation, smiling. Her whole
family looked up to her with the
utmost respect.
Survivors include her husband
Vernon of Hot Springs; two sons
Tad Auker and his wife Paige of
Rapid City, and Nick Auker of
San Angelo, Texas; one daughter
Corinn Amiotte and her husband
Tucker of Interior; a step-son Tom
Schnose and his wife Brenda of
Oelrichs; a step-daughter-in-law
Kim Schnose of Oelrichs; 11
grandchildren, Gavin Auker and
Brady Ness, Oscar and Lily
Auker, Baxter (Skyler) Anders,
Dunbar Anders, Taylor Amiotte,
Breezy Amiotte, Theresa
Schnose, Mykelsi and Clay
Schnose; two great-grandchildren
Merit Anders and Ava Schnose;
three brothers John Deering and
his wife Mary of Union Mills, In-
diana, George Deering and his
wife Sandy of Loveland, Colorado,
and Pat Deering and his wife
Frankie of Belle Fourche; three
sisters Linda Pipal and her hus-
band Butch of Wall, Kathrine
Deering of Sacramento, Califor-
nia, and Joan Deering Sutton of
Rapid City; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Carolyn was preceded in death
by her parents; five siblings, and
a step-son Robert Schnose.
A celebration of life service was
held Monday, October 7, at the
Wall Community Center, with
Pastor Kathy Chesney officiating.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Wall.
Her online guestbook is at:
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Gov. Dennis Daugaard has
proclaimed October as Disability
Employment Awareness Month
in South Dakota, carrying the
national theme “Because We Are
Equal to the Task.” 
The state Department of
Human Services (DHS) joins a
broad effort to observe National
Disability Employment Aware-
ness Month (NDEAM), an an-
nual awareness campaign that
takes place each October. The
purpose of NDEAM is to educate
the public about disability em-
ployment issues and celebrate
the many and varied contribu-
tions of America’s workers with
disabilities. 
The history of NDEAM traces
back to 1945, when Congress en-
acted a law declaring the first
week in October as “National
Employ the Physically Handi-
capped Week.” In 1962, the word
“physically” was removed to ac-
knowledge the needs and contri-
butions of individuals with all
types of disabilities. In 1988,
Congress expanded the week to
a month and changed the name
to National Disability Employ-
ment Awareness Month. 
“The Department of Human
Services is proud to be a part of
this year’s National Disability
Employment Awareness Month,”
said Dr. Ted Williams, interim
Secretary of DHS. “We want to
spread the important message
that a strong workforce is one in-
clusive of the skills and talents
of all individuals, including indi-
viduals with disabilities.” 
This effort coincides with Gov.
Daugaard’s goal of making
South Dakota an “employment-
first state,” in which employ-
ment is the first priority and the
preferred outcome for the state’s
citizens with disabilities. Bring-
ing this goal into focus is the Em-
ployment Works Task Force –
comprised of representatives of
the disability, business and gov-
ernment communities – which
will present a report to the Gov-
ernor by the end of October, out-
lining strategies to increase the
employment of South Dakotans
with disabilities.
Reflecting this year’s theme, a
host of agencies and organiza-
tions will engage in a variety of
activities throughout the month
to educate the public on disabil-
ity employment issues and the
role they play in fostering a dis-
ability-friendly work culture.
October proclaimed Disability Employment
Awareness Month in South Dakota
As South Dakota livestock
owners begin to dig out from one
of the worst blizzards to hit west-
ern South Dakota in recorded his-
tory, reports of animal losses are
just coming in.
"Producers and family's mem-
bers are busy trying to recover
from the results of this terrible
blizzard. At the present time, we
don't know if there will be any
governmental program to assist
ranchers. This may take awhile
because the federal shutdown has
furloughed key local USDA staff,"
said Julie Walker, SDSU Exten-
sion Beef Specialist.
Walker urges livestock produc-
ers to document death loss.
"We know that you don't need
another task during this difficult
time but it is critical that you doc-
ument your losses. The lesson
learned from winter of 1996 to
1997 showed the importance of
good records needed for getting
some assistance from governmen-
tal programs," she said.
What to record
Here are some things to
record/document during this
time:
1)-Number of dead animals
2)-Time/labor for processing
dead animals
3)-Equipment used and
amount of time
4)-Pictures or videos - make
sure the date is set correctly and
is on. Try to show detail to sub-
stantiate number dead.
Walker added that having a
third party verify losses can be
helpful; however, she said that it
may not be practical in most situ-
ations because travel and access
are difficult to impossible. So, tak-
ing pictures is a producer's next
best options.
For more information contact
Walker at
Julie.walker@sdstate.edu or 605-
688-5458.
Ranchers should record livestock death loss
HI LO PRECIP.
Oct. 1st 70 43 0
Oct. 2nd 67 46 0
Oct. 3rd 57 42 .10
Oct. 4th 42 32 1.36
Oct. 5th 37 30 .62
Oct. 6th 48 30 0
Oct. 7th 56 39 0
All meals served with milk
and bread. Menu subject to
change without notice.
Wed., Oct. 9: Sweet & sour
pork, Oven baked brown rice,
Steamed broccoli, Apricots
Thur., Oct. 10: Swiss steak
w/tomato & onions, Baked po-
tato, Oriental vegetables, Grapes
Fri., Oct. 11: BBQ beef on
bun, Potato salad, Parsley car-
rots, Lime Perfection Salad, Ba-
nana
Mon. Oct. 14: Taco Salad,
Dinner roll, Fresh fruit, Pudding
Tue., Oct. 15: Turkey Ala
King, Mashed potatoes, Peas,
Lime Perfection Salad, Orange
Wed., Oct. 16: Ham & Potato
Omelet, Green beans, Cinnamon
rolls, Tropical fruit
Thur., Oct. 17: Roast beef,
Mashed potatoes & gravy, Har-
vest beets, Peach crisp
Fri., Oct. 18: Hamburgers on
bun, Hash browns, Baked beans,
Lettuce leaf & tomato slices,
Pears
Page 4• October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent
email us at
faithind@faithsd.com
Faith News
By Loretta Passolt
Keffeler Kreations
Hwy. 212, Faith, SD
Pink Rose Special
In honor of Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
Dozen pink roses $34.98!
(Regularly $65.00)
Special runs October 14-October 18
Free delivery in Faith
$5.00 delivery fee to Dupree
$10.00 delivery fee to Eagle Butte
Central Meade County News
By Sandy Rhoden
Monday morning brought
about a warm sunny day as the
huge drifts of white snow melted
gently away. One would never
know by the calm of the day how
fierce Mother Nature turned on
Western South Dakota just two
days before. It has left in its
wake hundreds of cattle and
many horses who succumbed to
the harsh winds and suffocating
amounts of snow. Ranchers in
Central Meade County are trail-
ing cows home and are still out
looking for members of their
herds. Power lines are down and
as of Monday there was still no
electricity. Large trees lost their
tops and branches. This all
comes at a time when it is most
devastating, as October is when
most ranchers sell their fall calf
crop.
The storm was bitter sweet as
before the snow hit, the area re-
ceived over an inch of moisture
in the form of rain. The ground
should be in good shape heading
into the winter for moisture, but
above ground is another story.
There was no school on Mon-
day for Meade 46-1 and sur-
rounding schools. Cleaning up
after this storm will continue
throughout the week.
Larry and I attended the
Hobo Day Parade in Brookings
on Saturday. We headed east on
Friday morning just before the
storm hit. Had we waited an-
other hour or two we would have
been in Union Center over the
weekend. The Sioux Falls area
had some rain and overcast over
the weekend, but no snow.
Thankfully, the outdoor wed-
ding of James Ingalls and
Tashonna Frye is next weekend
in Hot Springs at Chautauqua
Park. They had originally looked
at Oct.5 for their date. We wish
the young couple all the best on
their special day. James is the
son of Robert and JoDee Ingalls
near Maurine.
As a reminder, Soldiers of the
Cross will begin on Wednesday,
Oct.23 after school. Soldiers of
the Cross is a time for students
in our area to spend 2 hrs learn-
ing of God's truths, enjoying
game time, singing songs, eating
snacks, and making new friends.
All children ages 5 and up are
welcome. The team of instructors
and leaders are Sylvia Rhoden,
Ninu Spring, Melanie Cammack,
Wes Labrier, Sandy Rhoden,
Kristen Smiley, and Sharon Kef-
feler. For further questions one
may call Sandy Rhoden at 985-
5461, Melanie Cammack at 985-
5289 or Wes Labrier at
985-5988.
This week begins the week of
homecoming festivities for the
Faith High School. They will
play Lower Brule on Friday
night. They have had to post-
pone last Friday's game twice.
Bailly Enright, daughter of
Travis and Jone Enright, is on
the court for homecoming royalty
for Faith High School. Katy
Miller from the Opal area is also
a candidate for homecoming
queen. The Faith football team is
currently ranked #3 in class B.
The ranchers in Central
Meade County have a tough
week ahead of them locating and
herding cattle, as well as dealing
with dead cattle and horses.
With snow on top of moisture,
roads and pastures are difficult
to drive in. Many poles are still
down, so it may be days before
electricity is restored for some.
On Monday there was no Veri-
zon cell service. Please keep
these west river ranchers in your
prayers through this difficult
time.
Well, we had our first snow of
the season last week! And it was
one we could have done without!
It started out with rain Thurs-
day night into Friday morning.
It turned to snow by 9:30 or so
Friday morning, then we had a
full fledged blizzard with 60 mph
wind gusts. Did you notice the
thunder and lightning while it
was snowing? Strange!
Unfortunately, with this
storm came livestock losses.
Many area ranchers are still try-
ing to locate their livestock so
have no idea of their losses, but
the numbers are going to be big.
Sunday was a beautiful day! I
grabbed the camera and went
walking to catch some of the
damage on my side of town. The
leaves were rustling in the
breeze. It was just a gorgeous
day to be out! Except for trying
to get through the snowdrifts on
the streets! But the city crew
was busy working most of Sun-
day clearing one-lane paths
throughout the town, and
spreading the snow so it could
melt fast.
Pastor Terry and Diana Bot-
tjen accompanied Garnet
Gaaskjolen to the Darwin and
Arlene Oliver home in Lemmon
last Wednesday evening for a
potluck supper and a visit with
Merlyn and Sue Hammer who
are visiting in the area. They
are from Val Dosta, Georgia.
Garnet Gaaskjolen traveled to
the Keith and Roxi Gaaskjolen
ranch for supper last Tuesday
evening.
Mike and Dawn Stocklin and
George and Annelle Afdahl left
last Thursday to attend the wed-
ding of Clay and Jessica Stocklin
near Absorahee, Montana.
Marge Hoffman, Betty and
Darla Hulm and Darlys Hofer
left last Tuesday for Minot, ND
to attend the Hoosefest. They
took in several shows while
there. They didn’t find any snow
until Dickinson. They were ad-
vised not to come through Lem-
mon. Marge said they saw lots of
dead cattle down in the Howes
area on the way back to the
Hills. They had a great time!
They returned home Sunday.
The Longhorns were to take
on the Newell Irrigators last Fri-
day night, but with the storm
this was called off. I don’t know
if it was cancelled or just post-
poned to a later date.
The cross country runners
will be competing at Eagle Butte
this Thursday. The Region Cross
Country Meet will be held at
Philip next Wednesday. Good
luck to all our runners!
The jr. high volleyball girls
will be hosting Bison this Thurs-
day night, followed by the B and
A girls games. The jr. high will
be hosting a tournament here
this Saturday, and the varsity
will be traveling to Gettysburg
for a tournament.
Congratulations to Clay Be-
wrnstein and Karli Kilby for
being selected FHS Homecoming
King and Queen. Coronation was
held this past Monday night, fol-
lowed by the traditional burning
of the “F”. The Longhorn Chal-
lenge will be held this Friday at
10:15, followed by a pep rally at
12:45, and the parade at 2:00.
The Longhorns will be playing
Lower Brule for their homecom-
ing game at 6:00 Friday night.
Alumni, don’t forget the alumni
continental breakfast at the Sr.
Center Saturday morning. The
alumni banquet will be held in
the school gym at 6:00 Saturday
night. Welcome home alumni!
Hope you enjoy the festivities!
Fall Fun Craft Fair
Friday, October 11th
9 AM – 6 PM
Faith Community Center, Faith, SD
Crafts, Food, Raffles, Home-Based
Products, and so much more!
Sponsored by Angel Kennedy
For more information call 605-484-8919
$500 check ... Blake Finkbeiner, manager of Lynn’s Dakotamart
presented a check to Gnene Fordyce for the Faith Stock Show Assn.
The check is from their “We Care” program. Organizations receive
$100 for every $100,000 in Lynn’s receipts collected.
Photo by Loretta Passolt
Legal Advertising
Friday noon before
Wed. publication
The Faith Independent
October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 5
Moving?
Notify The Faith
Independent of your
change of address before
moving or as quickly as
possible, so as not to
miss a single issue.
Keep up with your city,
school, and county...
Read the Legals
ZIDKO LANDS, LTD.
FARM LAND AUCTION
±280.03 Jackson County, SD Acres very near Belvedere, SD
OFFERED IN 1 UNIT & 2 TRACTS
THURS., OCT. 17, 2013 - 10:30 AM
PROPERTY LOCATION:
At I-90 (Belvidere Exit) Exit 163. Both tracts are adjacent to I-90 on
the south side. Tract 1 straddles old Hwy 16 on each side approx.
1 mi. east of Belvidere. Tract 2 is just adjacent to Belvidere itself on
the western edge and also straddles old Hwy 16. Signs on each tract.
AUCTION LOCATION:
Kadoka Fire Hall, 810 Main St., Kadoka, SD.
AUCTIONEER/BROKER
Martin Jurisch
CAI, GPPA, #4300
This prime farmland was originally purchased by Dave Heaton in the early
1940s and has remained in the family (Donna Zidko is Dave!s daughter) all
of these past years and has never before been offered for sale in those 70+
years. Tract 1 (SE1/4, Sec. 28), the Heaton Quarter just east of Belvidere
consists of ±133.29 acres of which approx. 125.83 acres are tillable. Of these
acres, all are classified as Class 3 soils with 110 of these acres having a pro-
ductivity index of 58 and the remaining a productivity index of 71. This is a
very desirable and productive tract. Tract 2 (SW1/4, Sec. 29 & Outlot F & G,
Sec. 32) consists of ±146.74 total acres and is located on the western edge
of town. Most of these acres are tillable land with the exception of a dam and
drainage area in the northeast corner and consists mostly of Class 4 soils
with a productivity index avg. about 50. These two tracts will be offered indi-
vidually, and as one unit, selling in the manner realizing the greater return.
Make plans to attend and be in attendance.
PROPERTY INSPECTION: Brochures onsite, or Auctioneer/
Broker onsite on Tract 1 on Wed. Oct. 9th from 1:00 PM until 3:00 PM.
Broker/Auctioneer represents Seller. Broker participation invited.
Please call for a brochure, or view photos, maps and terms for this
land auction on www.martinjurisch.com
Emilee Smith is in 1st grade,
and Mrs. Brown is her teacher.
Emilee goes out of her way to
make others feel included. She is
nice, polite, friendly, and willing to
play with all of her classmates.
Katie Bogue is currently a soph-
omore at FHS. The teacher that
nominated Katie said that they can
always count on Katie. She is very
courteous to her teachers and all
other classmates. Katie tries very
hard in her school work too; she
goes above and beyond in her
work.
September Students of the Month
Elizabeth Johnson: Elizabeth
Johnson, a senior at FHS, is very
honest. She is kind to all her class-
mates and never leaves anyone
out. Elizabeth always hands in her
assignments in on time, and seeks
help when needed.
Madison Vance is a senior in
high school. The teacher that nom-
inated her said that she is always
trustworthy, has respect for adults
and peers, is one of the most re-
sponsible students he/she has
seen, she never says negative
words or things about anything or
anyone, and that she always shows
great leadership in the classroom
and in the community.
Allison Haines is a fifth grade
student in Mrs. Krause’s class. Her
teacher says Alison is always atten-
tive in class, and turns her work in
on time. She also strives to always
do her best.
Megan Drum is a sixth grade
student of Mrs. Dutton’s. Megan is
very respectful, responsible, and
caring. She strives to do well in her
academics and other school activi-
ties.
Mason Medrud is currently in
kindergarten, and Mrs. Lewig is his
teacher. This student is always very
polite in class. He always uses
please, thank you, and takes turns
with his classmates.
Place a Classified Ad...
in The
Faith Independent
967-2160/FAX 967-2160
Need tire chains
for your tractor,
truck, pickup,
car or
skid steer?
Call 967-2944
Iron Horse Ag
S. HWY 73, Faith, SD
can get them for
you!
Page 6• October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent
Grand River Roundup
By Betty Olson
It sure didn’t take long to go
from summer to winter, did it?
Fall lasted for just over a week
before winter set in with a
vengeance. I took the air condi-
tioner out Tuesday and fired up
the woodstove on Friday when
the snow storm moved in. After
hearing the nasty weather report
on Wednesday, I hurried to har-
vest everything above ground
from my garden. I got some more
tomatoes, several green and yel-
low peppers, cantaloupe and wa-
termelons, and a bountiful crop of
winter squash. It didn’t look like
there would be many squash, but
under all the heavy vines and dill
weed there was enough squash to
fill the storage room at the other
house! If you need some winter
squash, give me a call.
Mac and Terisa Thompson’s
baby boy was born Tuesday and
little Brady had to have heart
surgery right away. Sunday
morning Terisa posted on Face-
book that the doctors had re-
moved all his tubes and stopped
his morphine. Brady is opening
his eyes and following the sound
of his mother’s voice. According to
Terisa, the doctors say that this is
an incredible progression so soon
after such a huge surgery! Thank
God and thanks to everyone pray-
ing for this darling little boy.
Game Fish and Parks held
their commission meeting in
Spearfish Thursday. I and several
other legislators were there to lis-
ten to the GF&P agency review
and the discussion on reducing
the mountain lion harvest num-
bers next year. I left before the
meeting was over because of the
weather report and drove in
heavy rain all the way home. The
rain continued all night long,
dumping over an inch and a half
here.
Heavy, wet snow was coming
down hard by sunup on Friday
and the wind was blowing hard.
The was no school in Buffalo Fri-
day, so Missy and the kids made
it home before the roads became
impassible. By the middle of the
morning the power lines were
coated with snow and ice with
poles starting to snap off. The
electricity was cut off right at
noon, just before my cornbread
was done in the electric oven.
Grandma warned me not to trust
these new-fangled gadgets, but I
usually forget about her warnings
until it’s too late!       
Casey was supposed to go to
Dickinson Friday evening for a
banquet for him and his college
wrestling team that were being
inducted into the Dickinson Col-
lege Hall of Fame on Saturday.
He started out early Friday after-
noon but didn’t go far before he
turned around and came home
because the road conditions were
rapidly deteriorating. He counted
six REA poles down between here
and the highway. The rest of the
afternoon both the snow and the
poles kept falling. I could barely
get through the heavy snow on
my daily trip to the barn to feed
the chickens and was soaked to
the skin and darn near frozen
when I finally staggered back to
the house.  
When the sun came up Satur-
day morning, huge snow drifts
covered everything, the yard
looked like a war zone with all the
busted branches and downed
trees, and the electric lines to the
house were hanging in the creek!
The guys spent all day plowing
roads and trying to find all the
livestock. They found most of the
cows in good shape at Glendo and
moved them back across the
river. Casey had to rescue two
cows before they drowned, but
they didn’t find anything dead
and we think the sheep all sur-
vived.  
Not everyone was as lucky as
we were. The cost of one of the
worst blizzards in South Dakota’s
history will reach into the multi-
millions. Governor Daugaard de-
clared a state of emergency in
western South Dakota and put
National Guard troops on the
ground to assist with the worst
winter storm on record in the
Black Hills. Hundreds of cattle,
sheep, and horses were killed in
the blizzard and at least two peo-
ple have lost their lives. 25,000
people lost power in the storm
that dumped up to four feet of
snow in western South Dakota
and northeastern Wyoming.
Grand Electric crews are ac-
cessing the extensive damage in
this area. Crews are flying the
area to survey the damage. The
eastern half of Grand’s territory
suffered the worst devastation
from east of Ralph down through
Reva and south to Castlerock.
They brought in crews from sev-
eral other South Dakota Cooper-
atives and Bolt Construction and
Govert Powerline Services are as-
sisting with restoration efforts. It
will be several days before those
of us in the Ralph/Reva area get
back online with the hundreds of
poles that are down.
Sandy Dan and Lorri got hit
pretty hard down at Newell, too.
They were working at the sale
barn Friday and couldn’t make it
home that night so they spent the
night with Lorri’s sister Lynn Mc-
Clure. The power was off there,
too. They made it home Saturday
only to find a huge cottonwood
tree had fallen down across their
driveway, taking out both of the
corner posts on their gate and
blocking access to the house. A
friend of Sandy’s came by with
some heavy equipment, moved
the tree and dug out Sandy’s
pickup for him. It’s great to have
such good neighbors! All their
livestock survived, but they don’t
have electricity yet either.
Tiss Treib sent me this poem
several years ago, but it sure fits
now:
It’s winter in the Dakotas,
And the gentle breezes blow,
Seventy miles an hour
At twenty-nine below.
Oh, how I love the Dakotas,
When the snow's up to your butt,
You take a breath of winter air
And your nose gets frozen shut.
Yes, the weather here is wonder-
ful
So I guess I'll hang around.
I could never leave the Dakotas
'Cause I'm frozen to the ground!!
Jayne Jordan ... was the lucky winner of
this beautiful purple and black quilt raffled off
for the American Cancer Society. Pictured with
Jayne are Kristy Spencer who headed up the
raffle, and Rita Duck who made the quilt. Amy
Linn of Dupree did the quilting. The raffle
raised $1215. Photo by Loretta Passolt
Forest officials are asking for
help to prevent the spread of in-
vasive plants on the Black Hills
National Forest.
Noxious weeds can be spread
in a variety of ways. While some
of these methods are natural
(wind, water, and wild animals),
many seeds are spread by human
traffic, including recreational ve-
hicles.
Recreational vehicles, such as
two or four-wheel drive vehicles,
ATV’s, bicycles, or motorcycles
can bring weed seeds and plant
parts onto the Forest from other
sources. They can also spread ex-
isting infestations into new sites.
“We’d like to encourage you to in-
spect and clean motorized and
mechanized trail vehicles of
weeds and seeds before recreating
on the Black Hills National For-
est,” said Gene Bolka, Range
Technician on the Mystic Ranger
District.
“If visiting from out of area, it
is also recommended that you
wash your vehicles prior to re-
turning home,” said Bolka. “This
will help prevent your yards or
other properties from becoming
infested by invasive plants from
your trip to the Black Hills.”
Preventing the introduction
and spread of noxious weeds is
one objective of Integrated Weed
Management Programs on Na-
tional Forest System lands
throughout the United States.
For more information on the
Black Hills National Forest, visit
http://www.fs.usda.gov/black-
hills. 
Help prevent invasive “Hitchhikers”
October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 7
Faith Community
Action Team is having a
GIANT
RUMMAGE SALE
& Arts & Crafts supplies
Oct. 2nd thru Oct. 17th
9:00 AM–4:30 PM
at the Faith Comm.
Legion Hall
All proceeds will help with
hall expenses!
The Profit and
Bison Courier
available here
weekly
Fun Walk/Run ... was held on Saturday, September 21st. Twenty walkers/runners participated and raised over $600 for the American Cancer Society.
Photo courtesy Kristy Spencer
Snow removal ... The city crew was busy Sunday cleaning up
Main Street following Friday’s blizzard.
Photos by Loretta Passolt
Early blizzard ... hit the Faith area Friday mornng leaving 12”
of snow on the ground before it was done.
Subscribe
The Faith
Independent
In Town & Dupree
$34.00 + local tax
In County
$34.00 + local tax
Out of County
$39.00 + local tax
Out of State $39.00
Online sub: $34.00
PO Box 38 • Faith, SD
57626
Ph: 605-967-2161
Page 8 • October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent
Good Luck Longhorns!!
Welcome home Alumni!
Homecoming Schedule
Thursday 10th: 2:00 P.M. – Cross Country at Cheyenne-Eagle Butte; 5:00 P.M. – Girls Volleyball with Bison
Friday 11th: 6 A.M. – Whitewashing - based on the weather; Alumni are welcome to walk through the school
while students are out completing Homecoming activities. Please check in at the office; 10:15 A.M. – Long-
horn Challenge at Faith High School; 12:45 P.M. – All school pep rally, Football Field; 2:00 P.M. – Homecoming
Parade (Main Street); 4:00-7:00 P.M. – Tailgate Party at school; 6:00 P.M. – Homecoming Football game with
Lower Brule
Saturday 12th: 8:00-11:00 A.M. – Alumni Breakfast at Senior Citizens Center; 9:00 A.M. – Girls Volleyball at
Gettysburg and Jr. High Volleyball here; 5:30-6:00 P.M. – Alumni Registration & Class pictures, Faith School
Gym; 6:00 P.M. – Alumni Banquet, Faith School Gym; 9:00 P.M. – Alumni social gathering VFW Club
• Afdahl’s Appliance
Joel, Claudine, Tori & Josh
• Bogue & Bogue Law
Offices
• Branding Iron Inn
• Cenex of Faith
• City of Faith
• Delbridge Trucking
• Brandace Dietterle,
Dr. of Chiropractic
• Faith Area Memorial
Chapel
• Faith Comm. Health
Center
• Faith Lumber Co.
• Faith School District 46-2
• Faith Veterinary Service
• FIrst National Bank
• Fisher Gas Co.
• Haines Trucking
• KeAnn Honey Co.
• Keffeler Kreations
• Lynn’s Dakotamart
• Linda’s Drive In
• Lonny’s Steakhouse
• M&D Food Shop
• Paul’s Feed & Seed
• Rick’s Auto
• The Faith Independent
• Tower Stool Co. LLC.
• Vilas Pharmacy &
Healthcare
The 2013 Faith Longhorn football team. Courtesy Photo
Good luck from these Proud Supporters!
October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 9
The Lady Longhorns travelled
to Harding County on Thursday,
October 3rd. The Lady Long-
horns showed great improve-
ment in this game, but couldn’t
quite get the win. The set scores
for the match were 18-25, 20-25,
25-17, and 21-25.
Leading the team in sets, at-
tacks and serves was Shanna
Selby. Leading the team in
blocks was Maddy Vance.
Michaelah Martin lead the team
in both receiving serves and digs.
Although all of the girls played
well the one that stood out the
most was Michaelah Martin,
who was named player of the
game. Michaelah stood out, be-
cause she had very good passing
during the match against Hard-
ing County.
Coach Alison Grueb quoted,
“This was the best we have
played all season. We had played
pretty poorly against them in the
conference tournament and
knew what we needed to do to
beat them. Although we lost I
see this game as a win for us, as
we made many improvements
and met many of our goals.” “Se-
nior Karli Kilby said, “I was re-
ally impressed by how we
played! Even though we lost we
still covered well, we hustled,
and we talked. We hung right
with them the whole game, and
I can’t wait to play them again.”
“I think that we are starting to
click, Ali switched up the lineup
and I think we did really well
this way. I think that for the few
Faith spectators that were there
probably thought we were a
whole different team. I think
that Harding County will have
an eye on us for the rest of the
season,” Junior Tori Simonson
stated.
There was also a JV game the
same night in Harding County.
The set scores for the JV match
were 25-21, 21-25, and 7-15. The
lead scorer for the JV game was
Brandi Enright, who had a total
of 8 points, 4 of them being aces.
Come out and support the
Lady Longhorns as they will be
taking on the Bison Cardinals
here this Thursday, October
10th. Then they will head to Get-
tysburg on Saturday, October
12th to compete in the tourna-
ment.
JV Lady Longhorns win tri-
angular with Harding County
and Tiospaye Topa. Winning
against Harding County in the
first match with set scores of:
25-22, 19-25, and 25-22. In the
second match, Harding County
defeated Tiospaye Topa in two
sets. Faith finishes it off with a
victory over Tiospaye Topa with
set scores of: 25-16 and 25-14.
The lead scorer for the Hard-
ing County match was Kassidy
Inghram with a total of 8 points,
with one being an ace. The lead
scorer against Tiospaye Topa
was Ellen Johnson with a total
of 12 points, with 3 being aces.
Coach Jozelle Humble’s take
on the game, “Very happy to
come out with two wins. It was
an accomplishment for us to
beat Harding County. Hoping to
bring back another win in Hard-
ing County on October 3rd. We
really hit the ball well to earn
our two wins.”
The Faith Varsity Boys’ Cross
Country team placed second at
the Little Moreau Conference
Meet held in Lemmon on Sep-
tember 30, 2013. The team of
Jacob Ulrich, Bailey Deuter and
Mark Smith was runner-up in
the conference to Bison. Little
Moreau Conference schools rep-
resented at the meet were:
Bison, Newell, Faith, Dupree,
Timber Lake, McIntosh and
Lemmon. The Varsity Girls
Team of Shayna Engel, Brooke
Enright and Lenae Haines
placed sixth as a team. The Jun-
ior High Team placed second in
the conference to Lemmon. The
top 10 varsity runners received
All-Conference Medals and are
on the Little Moreau Conference
Team. Faith had three LMC
medalists- Jacob, Bailey and
Mark.
The varsity boys’ placers: 5th-
Jacob Ulrich with 22:04, 8th -
Bailey Deuter with 22:23, and
9th-Mark Smith with the time of
28:25.
The varsity girls’ placers:
13th-Shayna Engel with 19:16,
18th place Brooke Enright with
19:44, and 26th-Lenae Haines
with the time of 22:26.
2,000 meter race had Faith
placers: 5th- Ryan Hohenberger-
9:22; 7th-Jerin Halligan with
9:55 and 9th-Tyson Selby with
the time of 10:49
Lady Longhorns fight for a tough
loss By Kassidy Inghram & Bonnie Lutz
JV Lady ‘Horns
come out on
top of triangular
By Kassidy Inghram &
Bonnie Lutz
Longhorns are Little Moreau
Conference Runner-Up
By Coach Gustafson
WASHINGTON, D.C.— Rep-
resentative Kristi Noem, Sena-
tor Tim Johnson  and Senator
John Thune announced today
that young South Dakotans in-
terested in being nominated to
one of the four U.S. Service
Academies for the Class of 2018
should apply by October 31,
2013.
South Dakota residents be-
tween the ages of 17 and 23 may
apply to any of the four service
academies if they meet eligibility
requirements in leadership,
physical aptitude, scholarship
and character. The four service
academies are the Military Acad-
emy at West Point, New York;
the Naval Academy at Annapo-
lis, Maryland; the Air Force
Academy at Colorado Springs,
Colorado; and the Merchant Ma-
rine Academy at Kings Point,
New York.
“Nominating students each
year for admission to our Service
Academies is one of my favorite
responsibilities as a U.S. Sena-
tor. I am continually impressed
by the caliber of South Dakota
students who apply,” said John-
son. “U.S. Service Academies are
rigorous, but open a world of op-
portunity for their students.”
“Our nation’s Service Acade-
mies attract some of the best and
brightest young men and women
from around the nation,” said
Thune. “These military men and
women serve our country with
distinction and it is an honor for
me to nominate students from
South Dakota to serve at these
fine institutions.”
“The U.S. Service Academies
help build up the next genera-
tion of American leaders, and it
is a privilege to nominate South
Dakotans to the four Acade-
mies,” said Rep. Noem. “South
Dakota’s young people continue
to impress and inspire me, and I
look forward to the nomination
process.”
Noem, Johnson and Thune
will each compile separate lists
and make nominations to the
academies of the most qualified
candidates by January 31, 2014.
Applicants are encouraged to
submit applications to all three
Congressional offices in order to
better their chances of receiving
a nomination. The academies
will make the final decision on
acceptance and announce ap-
pointments next spring.
Interested applicants should
contact:   Congresswoman
Noem’s office at (605) 275-2868;
Senator Johnson's office at (605)
332-8896; Senator Thune's office
at (605) 334-9596. 
Delegation invites South Dakotans to
apply to U.S. Service Academies
Keep up with your city, school,
and county … Read the Legals
Page 10 • October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent
800+ Acres Crop Land
(plus 200 A. Pasture)
Many Productivity Ratings over 79
~ABSOLUTE~ FARM LAND AUCTION
Mon. Nov. 4, 2013 ` 1 pm MT
1108¹ Acres, all adjoining
Offered in 4 Tracts (from 62 to 565 acres each) and as 1 Unit
Dewey County - 20 mi. SW of Mobridge, SD,
& NW of Lake Oahe & W of Missouri River
Auction heId at Community HaII in TraiI City, SD (Hwy 20)
Directions to property: From Mobridge, SD, go 7 W on Hwy 12, then 13
SW on Hwy 20, to Trail City, SD. Then S 1/2 mi. with property on both
sides oI road ****Maps & inIo in mail box
This is a productive area where excellent crops are raised. Most can be
farmed, as it is level land w/Class 2 & Class 3 productive soil types. A few
areas are best for summer grazing, or wildlife habitat. ~~~ Excellent fer-
tility! Larry has grown wheat on this ground, but in recent years, has re-
turned most of the land to alfalfa & grass. Alfalfa has been returning
nitrogen & fertility to the soil for quite a few years---Ready to produce
substantial row crops. Some native sod & pasture.
· 72° oI soils (793 acres) are Reeder Loams (average productivity rating oI
77, with some as high as 83)
· 88° oI land has overall average productivity rating oI 74
Mineral Rights transIer ~ Hunting: Deer, Antelope, Pheasants, Grouse,
Turkeys ~ Corrals ~ Trees, Shrubs, some Draws ~ Watered by Stock Dams
and Trail City-Glencross Rural Water Pipeline ~ Older 3 Bedroom, 1-1/2
Bath Home (26x42)
· 13 miles to spot where the Moreau River spills into Lake Oahe & the Mis-
souri River ~ Only a halI mile Irom Hwy 20
Inspect on your own, or auctioneers will be on property for guided tours and to
answer questions on: Mondays Oct. 14, 21, & 28 from 1-2 pm
Property absolutely sells to highest bidder on Auction Day
without minimum or reserve bid!
See www.PiroutekAuction.com or www.ArnesonAuction.com Ior photos
& more ~ Broker Participation Invited ~ Auctioneers represent Seller.
Owner: Larry Fritz
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Dan Piroutek
605-544-3316
Auctioneer RE Lic. #282
1ratssa 1at||sa ätrr|tt
Lonnie Arneson
605-798-2525
Auctioneer RE Lic. #11296
The State Library awarded
certification to 18 librarians
from 13 communities at the an-
nual South Dakota Library Asso-
ciation conference on September
27 in Sioux Falls. The voluntary
certification program recognizes
library directors and staff mem-
bers who have met the certifica-
tion standards. The program's
goals are to help library directors
and staff acquire, maintain and
develop skills through continu-
ing education in order to provide
better library service to their
communities. Through this pro-
gram, the State Library ac-
knowledges public library
directors and staff who update
their knowledge and skills on a
continuing basis. Further infor-
mation about the certification
process can be found at
library.sd.gov.
Congratulations to the follow-
ing area librarians:
•Angela Ostrander, Faith
Public and School Library
•Stacy Kvale, Bison Public
Library
South Dakota librarians awarded
certification
This weekend's blizzard in
western South Dakota created
deadly conditions for cattle in af-
fected areas. Reports of cow and
calf death losses, along with dis-
placements of herds due to drift-
ing of snow over fencelines are
still coming in. SDSU Extension
Veterinarian, Russ Daly gives a
summary of some health issues
South Dakota ranchers may see
as a result of the blizzard.
"After mortalities are dis-
posed of and the lost cattle re-
turned to pastures, ranchers
may still face problems with
their animals in the days and
weeks following the storm," he
said, listing several health is-
sues.
Prolonged stress placed on an-
imals, especially younger ani-
mals, due to weather events
results in increased cortisol lev-
els in the animals' bloodstream,
which can have profound effects
on the immune system. Pro-
longed stressful events, such as
the blizzard experienced over the
weekend, are more significant
than short-term events.
"Long-term stress can have
the effect of shifting the immune
system towards production of an-
tibodies and away from cell-me-
diated responses. In practical
terms, this means that the body
has less of an ability to respond
to diseases caused by viruses,"
Daly said.
He added that in growing cat-
tle, respiratory diseases are
often caused or started by Infec-
tious Bovine Rhinotracheitis
(IBR, or "red-nose", Bovine Res-
piratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV),
and Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus
(BVDV).
"Respiratory diseases in cattle
generally have an "incubation
period" of 7-14 days. Therefore,
ranchers might expect that cat-
tle affected by the blizzard could
break with these illnesses over
the next two weeks," he said.
Weaned calves may be more
susceptible to coccidiosis as well.
"This condition will present as
bloody stools, along with dehy-
dration and depression in more
severely affected calves. Prompt
identification of affected calves
and treatment with individual or
feed-based medications is impor-
tant," he said.
Daly said ranchers should
consult with their veterinarian
whether feed- or water-grade an-
tibiotics, especially in weaned
calves, would be appropriate for
any of these conditions.
"In spring calving herds, the
storm hit in the midst of ranch-
ers' normal preparations for
weaning. Herds were in various
stages of the process, anywhere
from having calves weaned al-
ready to calves having their first
pre-weaning vaccination, to
calves that had not had pre-
weaning vaccinations at all," he
said.
Long-term stress has the ef-
fect of inhibiting the immune
system against infectious dis-
eases, but it also inhibits the
body's response to vaccines.
"It's best that calves have
seven to 14 days following the
blizzard event for their immune
system to recover from the stress
before they receive initial or
booster doses of vaccines. Vacci-
nations will be less effective in
cattle that are still under the in-
fluence of cortisol due to stress,"
he said.
In cattle, it is generally con-
sidered that the effect of stresses
on the body are additive. Daly
explained that this means that
any sort of transportation, pro-
cessing, or weaning will add to
the stresses already encountered
by cows and calves going
through the blizzard, or faced
with moving through snowbanks
or muddy lots.
"Likewise, it's best that calves
get a break from any processing,
weaning, or long-distance trans-
porting for seven to 14 days fol-
lowing the weather event," he
said.
The best source of information
regarding animal health in ad-
verse conditions is the local vet-
erinarian, as they will have the
proper advice for prevention and
treatment in light of local condi-
tions.
The blizzard also coincides
with the traditional marketing
window for spring calves. Ac-
cording to SDSU Extension Cow-
Calf Field Specialist Warren
Rusche, if at all possible, ranch-
ers should consider delaying
marketing until the calves have
had time to recover from the
added stress load.
"Feedlots or backgrounders
who purchase calves who have
undergone these conditions
should do all they can to mini-
mize stress and provide as much
TLC as possible. Feeders should
consult with their veterinarian
concerning timing of arrival vac-
cinations and possible preventa-
tive strategies," he said.
Animal health following weekend weather events
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Q: I reach my full retirement
age of 66 in May 2014. Friends
told me that I could collect full
Social Security retirement as of
January 2014 and still be able to
work and make as much money
as I can. Is this correct?
A: No. Your friends are wrong
for two reasons. First, in Janu-
ary you will still be younger than
your full retirement age (FRA) of
66 so a Social Security retire-
ment benefit started then would
be reduced for age. Second, the
annual earnings test, also called
the retirement test, applies until
you reach FRA. Starting with
the month you reach full retire-
ment age, the earnings test no
longer applies and then you can
receive SSA retirement with no
earnings limit. The earnings test
applies for earlier months.
There are three different
earnings test levels depending
on whether you are younger
than full retirement age the en-
tire calendar year, reach FRA in
the calendar year, and once you
attain FRA. Earnings test dollar
amounts for 2014 are not known
yet.
Only your gross wages or net
self-employment income count
for the earnings test. Usually the
earnings test is based on calen-
dar year earnings but a special
one-time rule uses monthly
rather than annual earnings.
Use of this special rule allows
benefit payment in the first year
of retirement since people retir-
ing mid-year often have earned
over annual earnings limit
amounts.
Tell your friends that accurate
Social Security information is at
www.socialsecurity.gov. If using
a search engine, be sure you go
to the official Social Security
website.
Do You Know? Use the Social
Security Benefit Eligibility
Screening Tool (BEST) at
http://www.benefits.gov/ssa if
unsure what SSA benefits might
apply to you. Providing general
Social Security Tips
information based on your an-
swers to questions, BEST lists
benefits for which you might be
eligible and provides information
about how to qualify and apply.
It is not a benefit application and
your personal records are not
used. When you leave the BEST
program, all information pro-
vided in your answers is erased.
The Benefit Eligibility Screening
Tool (BEST) can alert you to pos-
sibilities not originally consid-
ered. Any follow-up with Social
Security is up to you.
PLACE A
CLASSIFIED
AD...in
The FAITh
INdePeNdeNT
967-2161
FAX 967-2160
October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 11
At a seemingly young 89 years of age, Frank has decided to retire and sell this
choice farm and ranch land that has remained in his family since before he was born,
and includes his father’s own original “Homestead Quarter”. is choice farmland
has never before been oered for sale to the public and will now be sold on the day
of auction regardless of price. A very large portion of this choice land is Class 3 soils
and has produced untold bushels of winter wheat through the years on a crop-rota-
tion basis of farming methods. Other than the hayland and pasture, the cropland
found on this farm is now in fallow and will be ready to the successful buyer(s) for
planting of spring crops in 2014. At this time, until future plans are made, Frank will
retain a Life Estate enabling him to remain in the home at the headquarters. Please
check all of the les listed on the website concerning tracts, soils, complete terms,
etc.
Tract 1: ±160 Ac. – NE1/4, Sec. 10. e headquarters tract and includes the mod-
est ranch home, a separate mobile home, a nice Behlen Quonset bldg., (11) grain
bins with approx. 33,000 bushel of grain storage, older livestock corrals and shelters
all found within a mature shelter belt encompassing approx. 20 acres. Rural water is
to the property feeding 4 hydrants within Section 10 and includes 2 shallow water
wells. e productive cropland consists of approx. 70% Class 3 soils with the Pro-
ductivity Index averaging around 60, with the remainder being Class 4. Unfenced
along west edge of this tract.
Tract 2: ±160 Ac. – SE1/4, Sec. 10. e “south pasture” tract and consists at this
time of entirely native grass pasture with an approx. 2-1/2 acre lake near the northern
edge. A good portion of this tract is tillable. Unfenced along the west side.
Tract 3: ±320 Ac. – W1/2, Sec. 10. Access is o Anderson Hill Rd. along the
north. Consists of approx. 84 acres of productive hayland, a few acres of drainage to
the center of the tract, approx. 85 acres of native grass pasture with the balance of
the remaining approx. 140 acres being very productive cropland of which over 70%
are Class 3 soils with the Productivity Index running mostly from 52-77. Extra tillable
acres are included in the pasture area if desired. Unfenced along the entire east side
and one shallow water well is located on this tract.
Tract 4: ±80 Ac. – N1/2NE1/4, Sec. 9. A very picturesque tract fronted on two
sides by Anderson Hill Road, this choice tract would make a great ranchette property,
or would add well to any existing operation. Includes an approx. 1.5 acre well-fed
stock dam with a scattering of mature trees in the drainage areas, an approx. 10 acre
portion of hayland and approx. 45 acres of productive mostly Class 3 soils.
Tract 5: ±320 Ac. – N1/2, Sec. 11. Lies to the east of Cedar Butte Rd. directly
across from the Headquarters Tract 1 consisting of Class 3 soils of the Blackpipe-
Wortman complex and loams for nearly 70% of this productive tract. ere are four
small dams/dugouts dispersed within the eld area with an overall slope of 0 to 3%.
An extremely nice farm tract.
Tract 6: ±160 Ac. – SW1/4, Sec. 34. e old original Anderson Homestead tract,
this parcels joins 229th Street one-half mi. west of Cedar Butte Rd. Currently, there
is approx. 54 acres of productive hayland, approx. 93 acres of mostly very productive
Class 3 farmland with a portion of that being Class 2 soils, (2) shallow water wells
and an approx. 1 acre livestock dam located in the very northeast corner. Completely
fenced tract.
Entire Unit: ±1,200 Ac. e entire unit consisting of Tracts 1 through 6 and in-
cludes all of the features spoken herein above. An ideal-sized unit within this area
within which to raise a family and/or to add to an existing operation. Water includes
rural water, 5 water wells (4 hydrants & auto waterer), 4 livestock dams and 7
dugouts. is aordable unit has amply supported Frank and his wife Bernice and
allowed them the pleasure to raise four grown adult children. Completely fenced.
We urge you to consider the purchase of the entire Frank Anderson farm operation.
You will never be disappointed.
Auctioneer’s Note ~ As many of you are aware, excellent farmland and agland in
general within this area is closely-held to say the least, and rarely ever comes onto
the market. is is a rare opportunity for anyone to invest in prime land, in a prime
location, that has never before been oered for sale. Do no miss this opportunity.
PROPERTY LOCATION: At I-90 Exit 107 (Cedar Butte Rd
Exit) just west of Wall, SD, travel north on paved
Cedar Butte Rd. 3 miles to the farm headquarters.
AUCTION LOCATION:
Wall Community Center, Main St., Wall, SD.
FRANK O. ANDERSON
“PENNINGTON COUNTY CENTURY FARM”, Wall, SD
ABSOLUTE LAND AUCTION
±1,200 Pennington County, SD Acres
very near Wall, SD on Cedar Butte Rd.
OFFERED IN 1 UNIT & 6 TRACTS From 80 to 320 Acres
WED., OCT. 16, 2013 - 10:30 AM
PROPERTY INSPECTION: Auctioneer/Broker onsite at the
Headquarters on Wed., Oct. 2nd & Wed., Oct. 9th from 10:00 AM
until 12:00 noon each day OR inspect at your leisure, brochures
onsite and tract boundaries will be clearly marked. Broker/Auc-
tioneer represents Seller. Broker participation invited. Please view
more photos, FSA maps, etc. on www.martinjurisch.com
AUCTIONEER/BROKER
Martin Jurisch
CAI, GPPA, #4300
NEXT SALE: MONDAY, OCTOBER 14TH
Special Calf Sale
Sale Time: 10 AM
Expecting 4000-4500 calves & 300-400 yearlings
Consignments
J Longbrake – 400 Angus calves 75-525#
A & C Price – 270 Angus steers 475-550#
Storm Inc – 180 Angus steers 850-600#
D & G Storm – 150 Angus steers NHTC 525-575#
VTV Ranch – 250 Angus calves 5-600#
Williams – 400 Angus calves 400-550#
Cammack – 170 Angus steers 550-600#
Ulrich – 180 blk & bldy steers 500-550#
Lensegrav – 100 Angus steers 575#
Harper – 140 Angus steers 525-575#
Peck – 180 Angus calves 475-550#
C Escott – 90 blk & bldy steers 450-525#
Teller – 125 blk & bldy calves 450-550#
Holmes – 140 Angus calves – 450-525#
Mastel – 140 Angus calves 400-525#
Smith – 80 blk & bldy calves 500-575#
Anderson – 70 blk & bldy calves 400-500#
Gray – 60 Angus calves 550-600#
Wood – 65 blk & bldy calves 500-550#
Dupris – 220 blk & bldy calves 425-500#
Levin & Graham – 230 blk & bldy steers 450-500#
More calves expected by sale time, over 95% of these calves will have their fall
pre-conditioning shots with shot records available on sale day.
NEXT SALE: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15TH
Weigh-up Cows and Sheep Sale
Sale Time: 11 AM
Expecting 400-500 cows & bulls,1800-2000 lambs, 800-1000 ewes
Consignments
Haines – 220 Angus calves 450-550#
Gray – 250 blk & bldy calves 400-525#
Gray – 200 Angus calves (bull calves) 400-525#
Larson – 150 Angus calves 425-550#
Wok – 90 Angus calves 375-475#
Hulm – 80 Angus calves 350-400#
Loughlin – 50 blk & bldy calves 400-425#
Holmes – 40 Angus calves 425-500#
McTighe – 150 1st x & Hereford steers HR 700-800#
Grage – 160 blk & red steers 900-950#
Cowan – 70 blk & red steers & hfrs (spay) 850-925#
Vanderham – 70 blk & red steers 900-950#
Flintrock – 150 blk & red heifers (open) 850#
UPCOMING SALES
Monday, October 21: Livestock Week
**Tuesday, October 22: Weigh-up cow and sheep sale**
Wednesday, October 23: Livestock Week
Faith Livestock Commission Co.
(605) 967-2200
We appreciate your business. Give us a call at 605-967-2200
or www.faithlivestock.com if you have livestock to sell.
We would be glad to visit with you.
Gary Vance – (605) 967-2162 OR Scott Vance – CELL: 484-7127
OR Max Loughlin – 1-605-645-2583 (cell)
OR Glen King 1-605-390-3264 (cell)
Page 12 • The Faith Independent • October 9, 2013
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2011 F-150 SUPER CREW 4X4:
Lariat, nearly all the options, 19,000
miles .................................$35,995
2010 F-350 CREW CAB LARIAT
4X4: FX4 pkg., V-10, shortbox, box-
liner, heated seats, camera, 31,000
miles .................................$34,995
2010 F-150 SUPER CREW 4X4:
Lariat, heated & cooled leather, box
cover & lots more, 34,000 miles,
town pickup, just in ..........$32,995
2010 F-350 REGULAR CAB: V-10,
cab chassis, heavy duty,
good rig .............................$15,995
2009 CHEVY 2500 EXT CAB 4X4:
Silverado HD with utility box, very
usable trade-in,
way under book . . . . . . . . $18,995
2005 RANGER SUPERCAB 4X4:
Edge, 5 speed, 4.0 V-6 engine, well
equipped, 111,000 miles. Just trad-
ed. One owner . . . . . . . . . . $9,995
MURDO FORD • 669-2391
(605) 669-2784 EVENINGS: 669-2881 • 669-2918 • Murdo, SD
Terry Van Dam: 669-2918 • Jim Butt: 669-2881 • Travis Van Dam: 406/239-8020
TOLL-FREE: 1-800-658-5585 • www.murdo-ford.com
2013 EXPEDITION EL: Heated &
cooled leather, 18,000 miles, very
nice, under book . . . . . . . $38,995
2013 ESCAPE SEL: Ecoboost, 4x4,
heated leather, sunroof & more,
16,500 miles . . . . . . . . . . $27,995
2011 FORD EXPLORER 4X4:
Back-up camera, 34,000 mile local
trade . . . . . . . Call for great deal!
2004 EXPEDITION 4X4 XLT: Like
new tires, ready to go . . . . . $7,895
2004 EXCURSION XLT 4X4: V-10,
trailer tow, 109K miles . . . $14,495
1996 CHEVY SUBURBAN: 3/4 ton,
4x4, very usable . . . . . . . . . $3,995
TRAILERS
New DCT 20 ft. Car Hauler: Tandem 3500 lb. axles...$3,695
2005 Trailer:
2 place snowmobile, drive-on, drive-off ....................$1,995
PICKUPS • 4x4s • 4x2s
2005 DODGE DAKOTA: 4x4, V-8,
SLT pkg., quad cab & more $8,995
1998 DODGE D2500 EXT CAB:
4x4, V-10, with tommy lift . $4,995
1995 F-250 4X4: 7.3 diesel, 120K
miles ...................................$8,495
1999 F-150 4X4 SUPERCAB:
Ready for winter ..................$4,995
1988 DODGE 3/4 4X2: 4 speed, V-
8, good running...................$2,495
SUVs & Vans
2012 CHEVY MALIBU LT: 26,000
miles, very well equipped ..$15,995
2012 TAURUS LIMITED: Loaded
with options, very nice 20,000-mile
program car ........................23,900
2012 LINCOLN MKS: Navigation,
heat & cool seats, 16,000 miles,
Ecoboost engine, like new. $38,995
2012 FUSION SEL: Sunroof, heated
leather, 17,000 mile program
car ....................................$21,495
2010 IMPALA LT: 72,000 miles,
well equipped....................$11,995
Mid-Sized & Family-Sizes Cars
MURDO FORD • MURDO FORD • MURDO FORD • MURDO FORD • MURDO FORD • MURDO FORD • MURDO FORD •
2010 GRAND MARQUIS LS: Ulti-
mate pkg., good full sized car,
63,000 miles.....................$14,995
2009 FORD TAURUS LIMITED:
Sunroof, heated leather, 60,000
miles, call on this one! ......$16,250
2003 LINCOLN TOWN CAR: Signa-
ture, 170,000 easy miles, well cared
for car.................................$5,995
2003 FORD TAURUS SES: Sunroof,
power seat, good tires, 119K easy
miles...................................$4,995
18 FT. CAR TRAILER
Dovetail Tandem, 3500 lb.
Axles … $2,895
2012 SUPER DUTY FINAL SELL-OUT
STOCK#
8036 2012 F-350 Crew Cab, Lariat, shortbox, 6.7 diesel, 4x4
$59,440. Discounts & Rebates: $10,618.
Final Price ..................................................................$48,822
8056 2012 F-350 Crew Cab, 4x4, shortbox, 6.2 gas, XLT
$45,450. Discounts & Rebates: $7,243.
Final Price ..................................................................$38,207
8091 2012 F-350 Crew Cab, shortbox, Lariat, 4x4, 6.7 diesel
$58,445. Discounts & Rebates: $10,433.
Final Price ..................................................................$48,012
2013 F-150s & F-350s
Nice Rebates & Discounts!
F-150 4x4 Super Crew, XLT, shortbox, 5.0 engine ~
Kodiak Black
F-150 4x4 Super Crew, Lariat, shortbox, Ecoboost ~ White
F-150 4x4 Super Crew, XLT, longbox, 5.0 ~ White
F-150 4x4 Super Crew, Lariat, shortbox, Ecoboost ~ Blue
F-350 4x4 Crew Cab, XLT, shortbox, 6.7 diesel ~ Blue
Social Security
Questions
& Answers
Q: Is it ok to laminate a
Medicare card to protect it?
A: I am not aware of any rec-
ommendation against laminat-
ing Medicare cards. The Social
Security Administration does
recommend against laminating
Social Security number cards al-
though doing so will not invali-
date the card. Do not routinely
carry your Social Security card
with you.
Lost or damaged Medicare
cards are easily replaced online
at no charge. From the Social Se-
curity homepage at www.so-
cialsecurity.gov , go to the
“Numbers & Cards” tab and click
on the “Replacement Medicare
card” link.
A replacement Medicare card
will arrive by mail in about 30
days at the address that Social
Security has on record for you.
Do not use the online replace-
ment request if you recently
changed your mailing address
and have not yet provided the
new address to Social Security.
In this case, contact Social Secu-
rity to report your new address
and request a replacement
Medicare card at the same time.
Call the Social Security national
toll-free number at 1-800-772-
1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) from
7:00am – 7:00pm, business days,
or your local office.
Q: A friend has Medicare from
Railroad Retirement, not from
Social Security. Is the coverage
the same?
A: Yes. Medicare coverage is
the same for everyone entitled to
it, no matter how that coverage
was obtained. Details about
what is covered by Medicare are
on the Medicare website,
www.medicare.gov.
Railroad employment is not
covered by Social Security. Leg-
islation enacted in 1934, 1935,
and 1937 established a separate
retirement system, now admin-
istered by the Railroad Retire-
ment Board. The Medicare
program covers railroad workers
just like workers covered under
Social Security.
Although railroad employ-
ment is part of a separate retire-
ment system from Social
Security, the two systems coordi-
nate benefits when a person has
employment through both.
Did you know? Social Secu-
rity information is on Facebook,
YouTube, Twitter and Pinterest.
Learn more at www.socialsecu-
rity.gov.
Based in Grand Forks,
Howard I. Kossover is the Social
Security Public Affairs Specialist
for North Dakota and western
Minnesota. Send general inter-
est questions to him at
howard.kossover@ssa.gov. Read
his online articles at http://so-
cialsecurityinfo.areavoices.com/.
LEGALS Legal Newspaper for the City of Faith • Faith School district 46-2 • Meade County October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 13
School Seeks to
Identify Children
with Special Needs
The Faith School District, in order
to fulfill the obligations of the Individuals
with disabilities education Act (IdeA), is
required to inform and provide full edu-
cational opportunities to all individuals
with disabilities ages birth through
twenty-one.
Kelly Daughters, Superintendent
of the Faith School District, in con-
junction with Northwest Area Schools
Educational Cooperative, needs your
assistance to identify, locate and evalu-
ate all children with disabilities. This pub-
lic awareness notice is to inform parents
and other individuals/agencies of the
availability of special education and re-
lated service to all individuals who reside
within the jurisdiction of the Faith
School District and who are between
the ages of birth through twenty-one, re-
gardless of the severity of their disability.
This included individuals in all public and
private agencies and institutions, highly
mobile children with disabilities, such as
migrant and homeless children, who re-
side within the legal boundaries of the
district.
Anyone aware of an individual who
may benefit from special education
and related service is encouraged to
call Donald Kraemer, Director of Spe-
cial Education for the Faith School
District, at 605-967-2152.
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA)
Directory Information
The Family educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FeRPA), a Federal law, re-
quires that Faith School District, with
certain exceptions, obtain your written
consent prior to the disclosure of person-
ally identifiable information from your
child's education records. however,
Faith School District may disclose ap-
propriately designated "directory infor-
mation" without written consent, unless
you have advised the district to the con-
trary in accordance with district proce-
dures. The primary purpose of directory
information is to allow the Faith School
District to include this type of informa-
tion from your child's education records
in certain school publications. examples
include:
A playbill, showing your student's role
in a drama production;
The annual yearbook;
honor roll or other recognition lists;
Graduation programs; and
Sports activity sheets, such as for
wrestling, showing weight and height of
team members.
directory information, which is infor-
mation that is generally not considered
harmful or an invasion of privacy if re-
leased, can also be disclosed to outside
organizations without a parent's prior
written consent. Outside organizations
include, but are not limited to, companies
that manufacture class rings or publish
yearbooks. In addition, two federal laws
require local educational agencies
(LeAs) receiving assistance under the
elementary and Secondary education
Act of 1965 (eSeA) to provide military
recruiters, upon request, with three di-
rectory information categories—names,
addresses and telephone listings—un-
less parents have advised the LeA that
they do not want their student's informa-
tion disclosed without their prior written
consent. hYPeRLINK
"http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco
/ferpa/mndirectoryinfo.html" \l "notes" (1)
If you do not want Faith School District
to disclose directory information from
your child's education records without
your prior written consent, you must no-
tify the district in writing by 30 days from
this public notice. Faith School Dis-
trict has designated the following infor-
mation as directory information:
Student's name
Address
Telephone listing
Electronic mail address
Photograph
Date and place of birth
Major field of study
Dates of attendance
Grade level
Participation in officially recog-
nized activities and sports
Weight and height of members of
athletic teams
Degrees, honors, and awards re-
ceived
The most recent educational
agency or institution attended
Student ID number, user ID, or
other unique personal identifier used
to communicate in electronic sys-
tems that cannot be used to access
education records without a PIN,
password, etc. (A student's SSN, in
whole or in part, cannot be used for
this purpose.)
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA)
Notification of Rights
Elementary and Secondary Schools
The Family educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FeRPA) affords parents and
students over 18 years of age ("eligible
students") certain rights with respect to
the student's education records. These
rights are:
The right to inspect and review the
student's education records within 45
days of the day the School receives a re-
quest for access.
Parents or eligible students should
submit to the school principal (or ap-
propriate school official) a written re-
quest that identifies the record(s) they
wish to inspect. The school official will
make arrangements for access and no-
tify the parent or eligible student of the
time and place where the records may
be inspected.
The right to request the amendment
of the student's education records that
the parent or eligible student believes
are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise
in violation of the student's privacy rights
under FeRPA.
Parents or eligible students who wish
to ask the School to amend a record
should write the school principal (or
appropriate school official), clearly
identify the part of the record they want
changed, and specify why it should be
changed. If the School decides not to
amend the record as requested by the
parent or eligible student, the School will
notify the parent or eligible student of the
decision and advise them of their right to
a hearing regarding the request for
amendment. Additional information re-
garding the hearing procedures will be
provided to the parent or eligible student
when notified of the right to a hearing.
The right to privacy of personally
identifiable information in the student's
education records, except to the extent
that FeRPA authorizes disclosure with-
out consent.
One exception, which permits disclo-
sure without consent, is disclosure to
school officials with legitimate educa-
tional interests. A school official is a per-
son employed by the School as an
administrator, supervisor, instructor, or
support staff member (including health or
medical staff and law enforcement unit
personnel); a person serving on the
School Board; a person or company with
whom the School has outsourced serv-
ices or functions it would otherwise use
its own employees to perform (such as
an attorney, auditor, medical consultant,
or therapist); a parent or student serving
on an official committee, such as a dis-
ciplinary or grievance committee; or a
parent, student, or other volunteer as-
sisting another school official in perform-
ing his or her tasks.
A school official has a legitimate edu-
cational interest if the official needs to re-
view an education record in order to fulfill
his or her professional responsibility.
Upon request, the School discloses
education records without consent to of-
ficials of another school district in which
a student seeks or intends to enroll, or is
already enrolled if the disclosure is for
purposes of the student's enrollment or
transfer.
Notification of Rights under the
Protection of Pupil Rights
Amendment (PPRA)
PPRA affords parents certain rights
regarding our conduct of surveys, collec-
tion and use of information for marketing
purposes, and certain physical exams.
These include the right to:
• Consent before students are required
to submit to a survey that concerns one
or more of the following protected areas
(“protected information survey”) if the
survey is funded in whole or in part by a
program of the U.S. department of edu-
cation (ed)–
1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the
student or student’s parent;
2. Mental or psychological problems
of the student or student’s family;
3. Sex behavior or attitudes;
4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminat-
ing, or demeaning behavior;
5. Critical appraisals of others with
whom respondents have close family re-
lationships;
6. Legally recognized privileged rela-
tionships, such as with lawyers, doctors,
or ministers;
7. Religious practices, affiliations, or
beliefs of the student or parents; or
8. Income, other than as required by
law to determine program eligibility.
•Receive notice and an opportunity to
opt a student out of –
1. Any other protected information
survey, regardless of funding;
2. Any non-emergency, invasive
physical exam or screening required as
a condition of attendance, administered
by the school or its agent, and not nec-
essary to protect the immediate health
and safety of a student, except for hear-
ing, vision, or scoliosis screenings, or
any physical exam or screening permit-
ted or required under State law; and
3. Activities involving collection, dis-
closure, or use of personal information
obtained from students for marketing or
to sell or otherwise distribute the infor-
mation to others.
•Inspect, upon request and before ad-
ministration or use –
1. Protected information surveys of
students;
2. Instruments used to collect per-
sonal information from students for any
of the above marketing, sales, or other
distribution purposes; and
3. Instructional material used as part
of the educational curriculum.
These rights transfer to from the par-
ents to a student who is 18 years old or
an emancipated minor under State law.
Faith School District will develop and
adopt policies, in consultation with par-
ents, regarding these rights, as well as
arrangements to protect student privacy
in the administration of protected infor-
mation surveys and the collection, dis-
closure, or use of personal information
for marketing, sales, or other distribution
purposes. Faith School District will di-
rectly notify parents of these policies at
least annually at the start of each school
year and after any substantive changes.
Faith School District will also directly
notify, such as through U.S. Mail or
email, parents of students who are
scheduled to participate in the specific
activities or surveys noted below and will
provide an opportunity for the parent to
opt his or her child out of participation of
the specific activity or survey. Faith
School District will make this notifica-
tion to parents at the beginning of the
school year if the district has identified
the specific or approximate dates of the
activities or surveys at that time. For sur-
veys and activities scheduled after the
school year starts, parents will be pro-
vided reasonable notification of the
planned activities and surveys listed
below and be provided an opportunity to
opt their child out of such activities and
surveys. Parents will also be provided an
opportunity to review any pertinent sur-
veys. Following is a list of the specific ac-
tivities and surveys covered under this
requirement:
•Collection, disclosure, or use of per-
sonal information for marketing, sales or
other distribution.
•Administration of any protected infor-
mation survey not funded in whole or in
part by ed.
•Any non-emergency, invasive phys-
ical examination or screening as de-
scribed above.
Parents who believe their rights have
been violated may file a complaint with:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. department of education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, d.C. 20202-
SECTION 504 OF THE
REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1973 and the Americans with disabili-
ties Act prohibits discrimination against
person with a disability in any program
receiving federal financial assistance.
Section 504 defines a person with a dis-
ability as anyone who:
has a mental or physical impairment
which substantially limits one or more
major life activity such as walking,
breathing, learning, reading, concentrat-
ing, thinking, communicating, seeing,
speaking, caring for one’s self, working,
helping, eating, sleeping, standing, lift-
ing, bending, and the operation of a bod-
ily function ;
has a record of such impairment;
Or is regarded as having such impair-
ment.
In order to fulfill obligations under
section 504, the Faith School District
acknowledges its responsibility under
section 504/AdA to avoid discrimination
in policies and practices regarding its
personnel and students. No discrimina-
tion against any person with a disability
shall knowingly be permitted in any pro-
gram and practice in the school system.
The Faith School District has re-
sponsibilities under Section 504, which
include the obligation to identify, evalu-
ate, and if the student is determined to
be eligible under Section 504, to provide
appropriate educational services. If the
parent or guardian disagrees with the
determination made by the professional
staff of the school district, they have a
right to a hearing with an impartial hear-
ing officer.
If there are questions, please feel free
to contact the Faith School District at
605-967-2152.
The Faith School District has the
following documents available for review
by parents of children with disabilities
and the general public:
Comprehensive Plan for Special ed-
ucation
IdeA Federal Application for Funds
The most recent Special education
Compliance Monitoring final report.
Applications, evaluations, periodic
program plan or reports relating to fed-
eral programs including auditor’s reports,
statements of assurance, budget and
grant materials.
Information will be available at the
Faith School District’s Superintend-
ents Office, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.
Published October 9, 2013 for a total ap-
proximate cost of $128.65
Page 14 • October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent LEGALS Legal Newspaper for the City of Faith • Faith School district 46-2 • Meade County
Proceedings of the
Common Council
City of Faith, SD
The Common Council for the City of
Faith, South Dakota met in regular ses-
sion on October 1, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. in
the Council Room of the Community
Center. Mayor Haines called the meeting
to order, Brown called roll call, and
Mayor Haines led the Pledge of Alle-
giance.
Council members present: Riley, In-
ghram, Spencer, Berndt, Lightfield and
Hellekson.
Others in attendance were: Debbie
Brown, Donn Dupper, Jon Collins, Sandy
Rasmussen, Carol Pratt, Loretta Passolt,
Annelle Afdahl, Eric Bogue, Lexy Hostet-
ter, Karen Butler, Reed Henschel and
Justin Inghram.
Lightfield made a motion, seconded
by Spencer to approve the agenda re-
moving item #4. Riley stated she dis-
agreed as they requested these utilities
before the rewrite of the ordinance came
up. No request was made for a rewrite
when Hibner came to ask for water.
James Inghram is in need of water.
Riley asked for Eric Bogue to come into
the meeting. Bogue explained that the
committee is working on the ordinance
and is not ready for this to be put on the
agenda. Four – yes votes. Riley – no. In-
ghram abstained. Motion carried.
Berndt made a motion, seconded by
Lightfield to approve the minutes of the
September 17, 2013 meeting. Motion
carried.
CLAIMS APPROVED:
The following claims were presented
and read:
A-1 Sewer & Drain, Inc., Jet Vac
Sewer Lines – $7,860.00; Afdahl's Appli-
ance Sales & Service, Repaired Ice Ma-
chine – $116.00; Aflac, Cancer &
Accident Insurance – $997.52; Avesis
Third Party Administrators, Inc., Vision
Insurance – $126.38; Black Hills Area Fi-
nance Officers Assoc., Annual Membe-
ship Dues – $5.00; City of Faith, Utilities
& Telephone Refund – $6,709.52; Con-
sortia Consulting by Telec, General Con-
sulting & Settlements – $1,500.00;
Dakota Business Center, Supplies at Li-
brary – $28.55; Delage Landen Fin.
Service, Copier Lease – $44.46; Depart-
ment of Revenue, Testing Water –
$13.00; Faith Fitness Center, Full Time
Employees Membership – $50.00;
Heartland Waste Management, Hauling
Garbage & Dumpsters – $4,135.00;
Jerome Beverage, Inc., Beer –
$6,134.35; Johnson Western Wholesale
Liquor – $4,134.27; M&D Food Shop,
Gasoline – $2,320.50; Northwest Bever-
age Inc., Beer – $12,418.45; Pelfrey,
Vincent, Refund Telephone Deposit –
$23.20; Reliable Corporation, Supplies –
$276.40; Roy's Pronto Auto Parts, Re-
pair & Maintenance, Supplies –
$1,122.22; S&S Roadrunner, Misc –
$265.90; SD Assoc. of Rural Water Sys-
tems, Annual Dues – $345.00; SD Re-
tirement System, Retirement Plan –
$3,560.36; SD Historical Society, Mem-
bership – $35.00; Schwan's Home Serv-
ice, Misc – $138.92; South Dakota
Network, 800 Database Landline –
$9.78; Sodak Distributing Company,
Liquor – $3,867.38; Tri County Water,
Water – $9,765.80; Verizon Wireless,
Ambulance & Police Cell Phone –
$234.26; Visa, Airport Listing, Support –
$65.00; Missouri River Energy Services,
WAPA Service Chg, Member Dues –
$19,484.94; First National Bank, With-
holding & SS – $744.82; First National
Bank, Withholding & SS – $3,140.79;
First National Bank, Withholding & SS –
$561.94; HD Supply Waterworks, LTD,
Supplies – $12.00; Companion Life,
Dental Insurance – $603.95; Dearborn
National Life Insurance Co., Life Insur-
ance – $34.65; Wellmark BlueCross &
Blue Shield, Health Insurance –
$7,993.18; Tower Stools, Work on Ice
House per Bid – $2,030.00; Tower
Stools, Ice House Extra – $790.00.
Lightfield made a motion, seconded
by Spencer to approve all claims as pre-
sented. All yes votes. Motion carried.
RESOLUTIONS & ORDINANCES:
Ordinance No. 306: 2014
Appropriation Ordinance (2nd
Reading)(Correction to the Number):
Lightfield made a motion, seconded
by Riley to approve the second reading
of Ordinance No. 306: 2014 Appropria-
tion Ordinance. All yes votes. Motion car-
ried. (See Separate page for the
Ordinance)
Ordinance No. 307: Supplemental
Appropriation Ordinance
(1st Reading):
Lightfield made a motion, seconded
by Spencer to approve the first reading
of Ordinance No. 307: Supplemental Ap-
propriation Ordinance. All yes votes. Mo-
tion carried.
BIDS:
7:15 – Open Bids for
Digger Derrick Truck:
The following bids were received for
a Digger Derrick Truck:
Southwest Equipment, Lewisville, TX,
2004 Freightliner – $74,900 (delivered)
Utility Fleet Sales, Bryan, TX, 2005
International – $76,056.35 (delivered)
Sunrise Equipment, SW Canton,
Ohio, 2004 International – $76,000.00
Trout Machinery Inc., 2006 Interna-
tional – $77,900.00
Altec Nueco, Birmingham, AL, 2007
International – $79,900.00
Altec Nueco, Dixon, CA, 2007 Inter-
national – $94,000.00
Inghram made a motion, seconded
by Berndt to turn over the bids to City At-
torney and Foreman to verify bid specifi-
cations. All yes votes. Motion carried.
Leasing of JD or Kabota Mowing
Tractor:
Riley stated she had heard that there
is a possibility that the City could lease a
mowing tractor from JD or Kabota if you
used it for 200 hours and then turn it
back in to them. Haines stated that he
was at Ziebach County office and they
are leasing one and it’s through Lindskov
and you have to use it at least 150 hours,
you insure it and maintain it. Council
would like Donn Dupper to look into it.
Butler Insurance Quotes:
Some changes were made as far as
taking off the solar panels at the swim-
ming pool, adding the heater, chlorinator
and pool house. The quote amount is
$38,485. To insure the metal sculpture
dinosaur would be $131. Berndt made a
motion, seconded by Spencer to ap-
prove the two quotes with Butler Insur-
ance. All yes votes. Motion carried.
Health Insurance Quotes:
Karen Butler submitted some quotes
for health insurance and explained some
of the extra expenses that will be added
on as of January 1, 2014. There was
also a quote from the Health Pool of
South Dakota through SD Municipal
League. Mayor Haines asked for a spe-
cial meeting to be held on October 9th,
2013 to go over the quotes. Spencer
made a motion, seconded by Hellekson
to table until the special meeting on Oc-
tober 9th. Motion carried.
Library – Computers and funding:
The library is applying for a grant to
receive two computers and may need
extra money in their budget to pay for the
difference. Riley made a motion, sec-
onded by Lightfield to approve to pay the
difference in the grant and the comput-
ers and add extra to their budget in that
amount when we pay for the computers.
All yes votes. Motion carried.
Ice House and Painting Update:
Reed Henschel updated the Council
on the progress of restoring the ice
house. A bill was submitted for the por-
tion that is already completed from the
quote. Some extra items have been
taken care of. Items left to quote are
caulking, replacing some tin over a ven-
tilation area and then painting. Hellekson
made a motion, seconded by Berndt to
quote caulking and replacing some tin
and the paint on a separate quote, then
bring back to the special meeting on Oc-
tober 9th. All yes votes. Motion carried.
Donuts for Alumni Breakfast:
Lightfield made a motion, seconded
by Hellekson to approve the purchase of
two dozen donuts for the Alumni Break-
fast. All yes votes. Motion carried.
Executive Session – Possible
Litigation:
Hellekson made a motion, seconded
by Berndt to retire into executive session
at 8:15 PM to discuss possible litigation.
Motion carried.
Mayor Haines declared the Council
out of executive session at 8:22 PM.
Lightfield made a motion, seconded
by Spencer to adjourn. Motion carried.
_______________________________
Glen Haines, Mayor
_______________________________
Debbie Brown, Finance Officer
Published October 9, 2013 for an ap-
proximate cost of $77.97
NOTICE OF REAL
ESTATE AUCTION
Meade County
Absolute Land Sale
The Meade County Board of County
Commissioners have declared the below
described property as surplus pursuant
to SDCL 6-13 and declared the same
subject to sale at auction; with such auc-
tion taking place October 15, 2013 at
10:00 a.m. at the Meade County Com-
missioners Room, Erskine Office Build-
ing, 1300 Sherman Street, Sturgis SD
57785.
Selling at auction without minimum or
reserve 640 acres of Meade County pas-
ture land.
Legal Description: Section 16, Town-
ship 6, Range 9 located in Meade
County SD; Approx. 640 acres +/-,
Meade County parcel # 36.16.11
Dated September 25, 2013
Jerry W. Derr, Commission Assistant
Published October 2 & 9, 2013 for a total
approximate cost of $15.58
Public Hearing
Public Hearing for the Faith Ambu-
lance, to be held at the Faith Fire and
Ambulance Meeting Room on October
10, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. for a Hardship Ex-
emption due to our service cannot not al-
ways staff our ambulance with 2 EMTs
and a driver.
Published October 2 & 9, 2013 for an ap-
proximate cost of $8.44
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WTire Tanks
WVacuum
Excavation
WCobett Waters
WDirectional
Boring
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
Subscribe
The Faith
Independent
In Town & Dupree
$34.00 + local tax
In County
$34.00 + local tax
Out of County
$39.00 + local tax
Out of State $39.00
PO Box 38 • Faith, SD 57626
Ph: 605-967-2161
FAX 605-967-2160
October 9, 2013 • The Faith Independent • Page 15
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
Dr. Jason M. Hafner
Dr. David J. Prosser
OPTOMETRISTS
Faith Clinic
1ST–3Rd WedNeSdAYS
OF The MONTh
Ph: 967-2644
1-800-648-0760
910 harmon St
RyAN SEAGER
Cell: (605) 441-7465
Fax: (605) 859-2766
ryanseager@hotmail.com
PHILIP MOTOR,
INC.
Bus. (605) 859-2585 or 1-800-859-5557
101 W. Oak St., PO Box 816
Philip, SD 57567-0816
Chrysler • Dodge Ram • Ford-Lincoln
Faith Community
Health Service
hOURS Mon.–Fri.:
8 a.m.–12; 1 -5 p.m.
605/967-2644
After hours
Verna Schad: 964-6114 or
605-365-6593 (cell)
Dusty’s Tire Service
PH: 605-490-8007 – Faith, SD
“Have truck will travel”
For all your on-farm tractor, truck &
machinery tire repairs call Dusty.
Leave a message if no answer
Call anytime 7 days a week!!
I have tubes & most common
tires on hand & can order in any
tire of your choice.
WEST RIVER CABLE
TELEVISION
Serving the town of
Faith, SD
1-888-411-5651
Bison, SD
H&H Repair–Jade Hlavka
3 mi. W & 3 mi. N of Howes, SD
Equip. Repair/Maintenance -
Hydraulics - A/C - Tires
Car & Light Truck Tires
Shop: 605-985-5007
Cell: 605-441-1168
Certified Diesel Tech
hhrepair@gwtc.net
Dr. Brandace Dietterle
DC Chiropractor
EVERY MONDAY
Located in
Imagine and More
Prairie Oasis Mall,
Faith, SD
PH: 415-5935
Ravellette Publ. Inc.
We offer a complete commercial
printing service ...
• Business Cards • Letterheads
• envelopes • Brochures
• Office Forms • And More!
The Faith Independent
Ph: (605) 967-2161 OR
FAX: 967-2160
e-mail: faithind@faithsd.com
Ravellette Publ. Inc.
We offer a complete commercial
printing service ...
• Business Cards • Letterheads
• envelopes • Brochures
• Office Forms • And More!
The Faith Independent
Ph: (605) 967-2161 OR
FAX: 967-2160
e-mail: faithind@faithsd.com
Ravellette Publ. Inc.
We offer a complete commercial
printing service ...
• Business Cards • Letterheads
• envelopes • Brochures
• Office Forms • And More!
The Faith Independent
Ph: (605) 967-2161 OR
FAX: 967-2160
e-mail: faithind@faithsd.com
Ravellette Publ. Inc.
We offer a complete commercial
printing service ...
• Business Cards • Letterheads
• envelopes • Brochures
• Office Forms • And More!
The Faith Independent
Ph: (605) 967-2161 OR
FAX: 967-2160
e-mail: faithind@faithsd.com
Faith Veterinary
Service
(605) 967-2212
Monday–Friday: 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: 8 am-Noon
CLOSED: SUNDAYS
For the best in critter care!
For all your Real Estate Needs
call Kevin Jensen
381-4272
Black Hills land, homes and businesses.
With values and honesty born and bred in Faith,
trust Kevin Jensen to help you
solve your real estate questions.
Kevin Jensen your friend
in real estate
Exit Realty, Rapid City
Bogue & Bogue
Law offices
Eric Bogue
Cheryl Laurenz Bogue
416 S Main St., Fai th, SD
967-2529 or 365-5171
Available for all
occasions
Birthdays
Graduations
Anniversary - Weddings
Call Diane Fees
605-748-2210 or 2244
J-1
Cakes
email us at:
faithind@faithsd.com
CÞLw AGLNCY, L1O.
Crop Insurance Specialists Since 1984.
0lve us a calll
We'd be happy to
dlscuss .
All Your crop lnsurance Needs
5a|es U|ose 0ate for 2014 Urops Are:
Paìnfa|| Index on Pasture & Pay|and:
11/15/13
Annua| Iorage (Pay Mì||et, 5udan, etc.):
12/15/13
1hese are the dates to purchase, change or
cancel multi-peril crop insurance.
0fflce (606) 433-6411
or 1oll-Free (888) 433-8760
Pusty 0|ney ¹ Maurìce Pandcock ¹ Peìdì Porch ¹ 1ay|or Mohnen
1anner Pandcock ¹ Urady & ßernìce Urew
Crew Agency is an equal opportunity provider.
Northern Hills
Eye Care
Schedule for Faith Clinic
For Appointment call: 1-800-648-0760
1st & 3rd
Wednesdays
of each month
Dr. Prosser
OCT. 16, 2013
Dr. Hafner
NOV. 6, 2013
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Moving?
Notify The Faith
Independent of your
change of address before
moving or as quickly as
possible, so as not to
miss a single issue.
Keep up with your city, school,
and county...Read the Legals
CLASSIFIEDS • CALL 967-2161 • Email: faithind@faithsd.com The Faith Independent • October 9, 2013 • Page 16
∞ CLASSIFIED ADS ∞
CLASSIFIED RATE: $5.00 minimum for first 20 words; 10¢ each word after.
CARDS OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $5.00 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ each word after. Each name and initial must be counted as one
word.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
Classified Display Rate.....................................................$4.70 per column inch
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is sub-
ject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise
“any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or national ori-
gin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimina-
tion.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which
is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Legal Advertising
Friday noon before
Wed. publication
The Faith Independent
AUCTION
LAND AUCTION: 428+/- acres,
Walworth County, Cropland, Recre-
ational, Investment, 6 miles west of
Bowdle, SD at the junction of Hwy
12 and Hwy 47, October 30th,
2013. Call Dakota Properties, Todd
Schuetzle, Auctioneer, 605-280-
3115, www.DakotaProperties.com.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
CALL AVON TO EARN extra money
for Christmas. **40%
discount/commission - $10 to
start** Call 605-334-0525.
EMPLOYMENT
HUNKPATI INVESTMENTS, a Na-
tive CDFI in Ft. Thompson, SD
seeks a qualified Executive Direc-
tor. For more information, call 605-
245-2148 or email:
searchcommittee@hunkpati.org.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL,
Custer Clinic, Hot Springs Regional
Medical Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care have full-time, part-
time and PRN (as-needed) RN, LPN,
Licensed Medical Assistant and
Nurse Aide positions available. We
offer competitive pay and excellent
benefits. New Graduates welcome!
Please contact Human Resources
at (605) 673-9418 for more infor-
mation or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We
have lowered the price & will con-
sider contract for deed. Call Russell
Spaid 605-280-1067.
SPORTING GOODS
REDFIELD GUN SHOW - Saturday,
November 2, from 9am-5pm, Sun-
day, November 3, from 9am-3pm.
For more information call 605-472-
0965.
HEALTH AND BEAUTY
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal
placement of mesh for pelvic organ
prolapse or stress urinary inconti-
nence between 2005 and the pres-
ent? If the mesh caused
complications, you may be entitled
to compensation. Call Charles H.
Johnson Law and speak with fe-
male staff members 1-800-535-
5727.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota.
Scott Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig
Connell, 605-264-5650, www.gold-
eneagleloghomes.com .
OTR/DRIVERS
AMERICAN TRUCK DRIVING
ACADEMY offering 80-hour CDL
class for drivers with experience.
$2,135, funding may be available,
job guarantee if accepted for class.
1-866-308-7755 Yankton,SD.
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up
to 48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call
Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional
word $5.) Call this newspaper or
800-658-3697 for details.
WANT TO BUY
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb. Bleached
3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb. Also need
Porcupines, Rattlesnakes, Elk
Ivories ,Mt. Lion skins. More info;
605-673-4345 / clawantlerhide@
hotmail.com
We would like to send a heartfelt thank you to all of our family and friends for
their support and kindness before and after the passing of our dear husband, father,
grandfather, great grandfather and friend, Harold Nelson Dutton.
We appreciated all the cards, flowers, food, e-mails, calls and memorial dona-
tions.
Thank you so much for Pastor Marcia Brennan for your visits, calls and the lovely
messages that you delivered at both services.
A huge thank you to the Immanual Ladies who cleaned the
church and prepared a delicious lunch for all of us.
Harold was blessed to live in such a wonderful community.
We have lost someone very special. Thank you for all of your
kindnesses and sharing in our grief.
God bless you all!
Vera Dutton, Linda & Dennis & family, Mel & Marcia & family,
Dave & Bonnie & family, Daryle & Stacy & family
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Family type restau-
rant located on main street in
Bison, South Dakota. Large din-
ing area as well as two additional
rooms that can be used for over-
flows, special meetings or family
gatherings. New ice machine and
deep fryers were recently in-
stalled. Priced to sell. If interested
please contact Penny Nelson 605-
490-1068 (cell) or 605-244-7249
(home). F4-2tc
NOTICES
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE:
Countryside Apartments in
Faith. 1 bedroom, carpeted
throughout. Laundry facilities
available. Handicap accessible.
Rent based on income. For infor-
mation contact: MetroPlains
management, LLC 1-800-244-
2826 or 1-605-347-3077 Equal
Opportunity Housing F5-tfc
PASTURE WATER LINES
with trencher and backhoe, Live-
stock Water Systems. 10 1/2 miles
south of Maurine, 605-748-2473
Merle Vig. F2-tfc
BROKEN TREE CLEANUP for
hire. will remove and trim
brocken branches and trees due
to storm damage. Call 967-2290
or cell 605-515-1957. F6-2tc
CARD OF THANKS
We would like to say a big
THANK-YOU to all the carpen-
ters, the cooks, the cleaners and
everyone who worked so very
hard on the Prairie Home Church
project before the funeral service
for Della Rae Mickelson.
Thanks, too, to all those who
came to the service and the fel-
lowship that followed. Thanks for
the food provided and those who
served the meal
We have appreciated all the
cards, notes, thoughts, and
prayers
What a community!
God bless you all.
From Kansas,
Shirley Miller
Ken & Reta Fae Kelly & Family
Keep up with your city, school, and
county ... Read the Legals

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