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Bison Courier, October 10, 2013

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Power crews continue to assist in Western South Dakota
More than 160 workers from
cooperatives, construction compa-
nies and the South Dakota Na-
tional Guard are assisting with
repairs at six western South
Dakota cooperatives hit by the
weekend winter storm.
By Monday afternoon, workers
from 20 South Dakota electric co-
operatives as well as a Minnesota
cooperative, a Nebraska public
power district, the South Dakota
National Guard and several pri-
vate contractors were on scene or
en route to one of six coopera-
tives. Cooperatives receiving out-
side assistance include:
Black Hills Electric Cooperative,
Custer, S.D.; Butte Electric Coop-
erative, Newell, S.D.; Grand
Electric Cooperative, Bison,
S.D.; Lacreek Electric Associa-
tion, Martin, S.D.; Moreau-Grand
Electric Cooperative, Timber
Lake, S.D.; West River Electric
Association, Wall, S.D.
Additionally, West Central
Electric Cooperative in Murdo,
S.D., had also experienced out-
ages over the weekend.
These outside crews are in ad-
dition to the more than 200 em-
ployees at the affected
cooperatives who have been
working since the beginning of
continued on page 2
Bison Courier
Official Newspaper for the City of Bison, Perkins County, and the Bison School District
A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc.
P.O. Box 429 • Bison, South Dakota 57620-0429
Phone: (605) 244-7199 • FAX (605) 244-7198
The
$1.00
Volume 31
Number 17
October 10, 2013
Includes Tax
urday, October 26th at 5 p.m. at
the Bentley Building. Auction
items can be left at Dacotah Bank.
Jessie’s Peck Sanchez’s shower
has been moved to Sunday, Octo-
ber 20th, at 1:30, due to the
weather.
Highlights & Happenings
Indian Creek Lutheran’s Fall
Dinner is Sunday, October 13th
from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Roast beef,
mashed potatoes & gravy, baked
beans, variety of salads, pie &
beverage. Free will offering.
Benefit supper and auction for
the Tracy Wolff family will be Sat-
Ida and Eric Sanders home in Prairie City.
Bison School, the south entrance.
Don Palmer, Prairie City shoveling out of his house.
THE BISON COURIER
Periodicals Postage Paid at Bison, SD 57620
POSTAL PERMIT #009-944
Published weekly every Thursday by Ravellette Publ., Inc.
at PO Box 429, Bison SD 57620-0429
Telephone: 605-244-7199 • Fax: 605-244-7198
E-mail Addresses: courier@sdplains.com
couriernews@sdplains.com
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Bison ............................................................................$36.04
Meadow, Shadehill, Prairie City, Reva & Lodgepole........$35.36
Lemmon........................................................................$36.04
in state ........................................................$39.00 + sales tax
out of state (Includes all Hettinger addresses.) ...$39.00 (no tax)
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Bison Courier, PO Box 429, Bison SD 57620-0429
Deadlines: Display and Classified Advertising: Mon-
days at 12:00 p.m. Legals: Fridays at 12:00 p.m.
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Editor/Office Manager: Arlis Seim
Asst. Editor/Reporter: Lita Wells
Ad Sales: Beth Hulm (-), beth@sdplains.com
COPYRIGHT: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced from this publication, in whole
or in part, without the written consent of the publisher.
Blood Drive, November 18, 2013 at
the Grand Electric Social room 12:45 p.m. -
5:15 p.m. contact Bernice Kari for information
244-5472.
Alcoholics Anonymous is meeting weekly in Bison.
The group meets every Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in the
basement of the Presbyterian Church. Everyone is wel-
come.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please
submit them by calling: 244-7199, or e-mailing to:
courier@sdplains.com. We will run your event notice the
two issues prior to your event at no charge.
T
h
i
s
w
e
e
k
in Bison
2 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
Nutrition Site
Menu
Thursday, October 10
Swiss steak
baked potato
oriental vegetables
grapes
Friday, October 11
BBQ beef on a bun
potato salad
parsley carrots
lime sunshine salad
banana
Monday, October 14
Taco salad
whole wheat roll
fresh fruit
pudding
Tuesday, October15
Turkey ala king
mashed potatoes
peas
lime perfection salad
orange
Wednesday, October 16
Ham & potato omelet
green beans
cinnamon roll
tropical fruit
Monday, October 14
Chicken ala king
biscuits
peas
salad bar
fruit & milk
Tuesday, October 15
BBQ meatballs
scalloped potatoes
yellow beans
salad bar, w/g roll
fruit & milk
Wednesday, October 16
Turkey sandwich
green beans
salad bar
fruit & milk
Thursday, October 17
Potato toppers, cheese
broccoli
salad bar, w/g roll
fruit, milk
the storm.
As of Monday, the electric coop-
eratives hit by the storm reported
that 8,200 South Dakota electric
cooperative members remain
without power in a 13-county area
of western South Dakota. The
storm downed nearly 3,800 poles
and caused power outages to thou-
sands in the western part of the
state.
For more information on storm
damage in South Dakota, visit the
South Dakota Rural Electric Asso-
ciation storm center at http://out-
ages.sdrea.coop/. Information
about outages within the specific
cooperatives can be found on the
cooperatives’ web and Facebook
pages.
The South Dakota Rural Elec-
tric Association, headquartered in
Pierre, S.D., is assisting with coor-
dinating crews to help the im-
pacted cooperatives.
SDREA is a member-owned,
member-controlled association of
31 electric cooperatives in South
Dakota, including distribution and
transmission cooperatives.
SDREA is devoted to unifying, pro-
moting and protecting the inter-
ests of member electric
cooperatives in South Dakota by
providing leadership, training,
communication, legislative repre-
sentation and other member serv-
ices. South Dakota’s 28
distribution electric cooperatives
provide electricity to more than
115,000 homes, farms and busi-
nesses in the state, averaging only
2.4 consumers per mile of line. Na-
tionally, cooperatives average 7.4
consumers per mile of line while
national and state investor-owned
utilities average more than 34 con-
sumers per mile of line.
Storm .......... continued from page 1
Clint Fordyce, near Usta, trying to reach his cows.
we Wou|d |||e lo serd a rearlle|l lrar| you lo a|| ol our lar||y ard lr|erds lor
lre|r supporl ard ||rdress oelore ard aller lre pass|rg ol our dear rusoard, lalrer,
grardlalrer, greal grardlalrer ard lr|erd, laro|d Ne|sor 0ullor.
we apprec|aled a|| lre cards, l|oWers, lood, e-ra||s, ca||s ard reror|a| dora-
l|ors.
Trar| you so rucr lor Paslor Varc|a 8rerrar lor your v|s|ls, ca||s ard lre |ove|y
ressages lral you de||vered al oolr serv|ces.
A ruge lrar| you lo lre lrrarua| Lad|es Wro c|eared lre
crurcr ard prepared a de||c|ous |urcr lor a|| ol us.
laro|d Was o|essed lo ||ve |r sucr a Worderlu| corrur|ly.
we rave |osl soreore very spec|a|. Trar| you lor a|| ol your
||rdresses ard srar|rg |r our gr|el.
0od o|ess you a||l
vera 0ullor, L|rda & 0err|s & lar||y, Ve| & Varc|a & lar||y,
0ave & 8orr|e & lar||y, 0ary|e & 3lacy & lar||y
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 3
Looking south east from Chapman’s Electronics
Watch next weeks paper for
Rosebud, Meadow and
Grand River News
Topsoil, River
Rock, Scoria &
Landscaping
Rock available!
Call for a
quote.
Besler Gravel &
Trucking, LLC
244-5600
4• The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
100th celebration of Indian
On September 7, 2013, Indian
Creek Lutheran Church rejoiced
in being able to celebrate 100
years of Christian life in the com-
munities of Chance, Meadow and
Coal Springs. Indian Creek
Church, also referred to as the
Chance Church, was founded Feb-
ruary 25, 1913 on the banks of In-
dian Creek. The site is
approximately 7 miles southwest
of Chance, South Dakota. It was
typical that the Churches were
named for some local landmark
and the name Indian Creek came
from the creek that ran through
the area.
Worship services were held in
the homes of the locals living
along the creek for the next eight-
een years and occasionally in the
local school. As the community
was predominately Norwegian,
the services were conducted in
Norwegian. Gustav Rudolph Es-
trem, driving a horse and buggy
came to the south Chance area in
1913. Rev. Rasmus Martinus
Holie (Holee) was one of the first
to minister to the congregation on
a more regular basis although not
weekly. This traveling pastor had
a circuit of 15 churches which
reached to Red Elm, South
Dakota. He was located in Reeder,
North Dakota from 1915-1919.
Families that wanted their babies
and children baptized or wanted
to be confirmed came from miles
around to the services.
Martin Monserud was a great
influence in starting the Chance
Church and securing a pastor.
Charter members were Emil and
Selma Engebretson, John and
Marie Hatle, Herman Arnt Jacob-
sen, Jacob and Anna Jacobson,
George and Rikka Krause and
Martin and Gertrude Monserud.
Arnt Jacobsen and Selma Enge-
bretson were the oldest charter
members.
At the annual meeting of the
Indian Creek church, November
29, 1918, a motion was approved
to have a delegate go to Bison to
meet with the Bison and Lone
Tree churches to discuss calling a
new pastor. This union was called
the Norwegian Lutheran Church
of America Parish and would con-
sist of American, Indian Creek
and Lone Tree congregations. An
official Sunday School was estab-
lished with Superintendents Mar-
tin Monserud from the west part
of the coverage area and John
Hatle from the Northeastern dis-
trict of the Indian Creek Church.
The October 24, 1920 annual
meeting had a motion approved to
collect the pastor’s salary by Jan-
uary 1st and July 1st to be paid
semi-annually. Earlier records of
pastoral salaries are unknown.
Years later, a motion at the Janu-
ary 1, 1943 annual meeting was
approved to pay the pastor a
salary of $300.00.
After the Perkins County State
Bank went bankrupt in 1925, the
Lutheran Church purchased the
building to be used as a house of
worship in the frontier town of
Chance. Numerous pie socials, ice
cream socials, and meals helped
the building fund grow suffi-
ciently to begin remodeling the
bank. The ladies aid group con-
tributed substantially to the
building fund. This building
would be used as a church from
December 13, 1925 to September
3, 1935.
In 1926, the spoken language
for worship came to be English
and not longer Norwegian. John
Hatle formed a very active Luther
League in 1926.
Disaster struck on September
3, 1935, less than a week after the
funeral of Mrs. George (Ethel En-
gebretson) Obst’s funeral. A fire
which originated in the Randall
store’s cream station spread to the
church and could not be contained
quickly enough. Services resumed
in the Chance school until an-
other option presented itself.
A special meeting was called to
order the fall of 1935 and plans
began for building a new church.
This time it would be a basement
church suitable for having wor-
ship each Sunday. Plans were to
add an upper level when feasible.
Money was scarce and so the in-
surance policy of $1,000.00 en-
abled the parishioners to start
building. One acre of land was do-
nated by TB Veal for the church
site. This building would be 26 x
40 in size. All the labor was vol-
unteer. Pete Monserud and Alvin
Krause made the pews, a couple
of which still exist. The first an-
nual business meeting held in the
new church was on December 20,
1936.
Some of the early families in
this basement church, as it was
commonly referred to, were Emil
Engebretson, Carlot Gaaskjolen,
CJ Gustafson, John Hatle, Julius
Hatle, Herman Jacobsen, Jacob
Jacobsen, Andrew Khristopher-
son, Knut Kornstad, Christ Ko-
pren, Louis Kopren, George
Krause, Carl Lensegrav, Otto Nel-
son, Peter Monserud, John Plad-
sen, and Mabel Veal.
The basement church brought
many challenges. It served well as
a place of worship but the heating
was a major drawback. The pas-
tor’s wife, who also played the
piano, had to wear gloves to keep
her hands warm. A very small
kitchen area and coal/wood bin
were behind the altar which made
meals and socials more compli-
cated to serve. The potbellied
stove provided the only source of
heat. Built on the down slope of a
hill, there was difficulty in getting
a good draft. That meant there
was smoke and odor saturating
the church. A galvanized tin sur-
round behind the cast iron potbel-
lied stove to increase the heat
radiance was approved at the
January 1, 1942 annual meeting.
One heavy snow winter inun-
dated the church with melting
snow, which left the piano, pews
and hymnals to float in ruins.
The prairie spirit, growing
membership and the desire to
worship GOD prevailed and soon
there would be a vision of a new
and larger Church. This little
country church, located on the
northwest corner of Chance,
served the community well from
1936-1963, a total of 27 years. A
fund for a possible new church
was started in 1950. At the an-
nual meeting, December 31, 1952,
a motion was approved to have a
planning meeting on how to pro-
ceed in building this new church.
By 1960, a total of $4,928 had
been raised for the building fund.
Before January 1, 1960 there
were six churches in the parish
which were served by one pastor.
The Churches in that parish were
American Lutheran - Bison, In-
dian Creek Lutheran -Meadow,
Immanuel - Zeona, Skoger -
Sorum, Slim Buttes – Reva, and
Homme - Prairie City. Pastor
LeRoy Flagstad served the 6
churches. After January 1st, 1960
there were two churches in the
new Parish – American of Bison
and Indian Creek Church of
Chance.
On October 31, 1961, a future
meeting date was set to make the
decision on relocation of Indian
Creek Church. At this meeting,
the women were given the right to
vote at annual meetings by an ap-
proved motion of 11 to 8.
The motion was approved to
move the present church to the
new location of Highway 73 and 8
(now known as Hwy 20) junction.
Two acres of land were purchased
from the State of South Dakota
for $50.00 per acre. The building
committee consisted of Elmer
Hauge, chairman and Alvin
Krause, John Dries, Lowell Mar-
tin, and Christ Flatmoe. The
ground breaking ceremony took
place September 23, 1962 with
Pastor Charles Romstad officiat-
ing. The total cost of this 32 x 80
foot building in 1962 was
$23,622.13. The church members
provided the labor. The men sup-
plied the machinery and erected
the all steel L-shaped building
under the supervision of the Dries
Brothers. John and Bob Dries
worked with the wiring, wood-
work, altar and chancel furniture.
The women helped with painting,
finishing the wood, and providing
numerous meals and cleanup
chores. The baptismal font, which
is found in the current church’s
narthex, was built in 1949 by Pete
Monserud in memory of Anna Ja-
cobsen. Now it is used to hold the
guest book and pamphlets. The
farewell service of the Chance
basement church was May 19,
1963 and the dedication service
was May 26, 1963. The Rev.
LeRoy Flagstad was the guest
speaker.
As of 1996, the Parish consisted
Former Pastors and Mrs Flagstad
Basement Church
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 5
of American/Bison, Indian
Creek/Meadow and Rosebud/
Shadehill churches. To enhance
better communication between
the churches, Pastor Roger Di-
eterle encouraged the three point
parish to create the Prairie Fel-
lowship Parish which took effect
on August 14, 2000. He also began
the Prairie Fellowship Parish
newsletter and was the first edi-
tor. Editors since that time have
been Beth Hulm, Lorretta Hafner,
Pastor Anna Peck and Janet Jor-
gensen. The parish newsletter
continues to be supported by do-
nations from interested persons.
The Lutheran churches of this
parish have been served by 31
pastors and the 80 miles round
trip traveled in 1913 by horse and
buggy has changed to 130 miles
round trip by auto. Currently,
Pastor Dana Lockhart has two
services on Saturday evening and
two on Sunday. The three Evan-
gelical Lutheran churches plus
Buffalo Grand River Church have
been served by Pastor Dana Lock-
hart since June 1, 2013. The
music has changed from piano
and organ to technology- the DVD
player.
The 2013 church council – con-
sists of President Sharon Ander-
son, Trustees Doug Young and
Julie Foster, Secretary Vonnie
Foster and Treasurer Janet Jor-
gensen.
The 100th Anniversary commit-
tee (2013) was Milton Storm and
Sharon Anderson as Co- Chair-
persons; History Book Committee
Margaret Veal, Janet Jorgensen
and Julie Foster; Grounds com-
mittee Doug Young, Rhonda
Lensegrav, Dan Anderson and
Rusty Foster. Julie Foster
arranged a very complete history
table featuring record books from
the inception of Indian Creek
Lutheran Church in 1913 to 2013.
It was complete with scrap books
and history books for the 75th and
90th anniversary celebrations as
well as the 100th Anniversary
book Vonnie Foster and Pearl
Storm completed the roster as the
food committee. Milton Storm cre-
ated the wooden keepsakes that
were given to the guests as they
registered.
Guests were greeted at the door
with a cheerful sunflower and
mum theme which was continued
on the supper tables. A fall sun-
flower bouquet graced the lectern
and a white flower arrangement
from Evanson-Jensen decorated
on the piano. Margaret Veal and
daughters, Colleen and Kandi,
had a variety of lavender and
deep mauve flowers as an
arrangement adorning the altar.
Milton Storm and Gary Jorgensen
greeted everyone at the door and
gave them a wooden keepsake
cross scrolled by Milton and a
bookmark featuring the pencil
drawings of the churches.
Everyone sat down to enjoy a
roast beef meal, the highlight of
which was a cake made by Pearl
Storm which featured the photos
of the basement church and the
current church as it stands in
2013. Homemade ice cream com-
plimented the cake.
After the evening meal, the of-
ficial 100th celebration began by
unveiling the time capsule which
was buried between the 3 legs of
the Indian Creek sign. The cap-
sule was buried at the dedication
of the new church in 1963. The
contents told of time and environ-
ment. The Bison Courier which
was at the top of the metal con-
tainer was in excellent condition.
The Bible, given by Elmer Hauge,
received some damage on the
cover and outer pages. Luther’s
Hand Catechism and the dedica-
tion pamphlet were very fragile
and had decayed. The oldest ac-
tive member, Margaret Veal, and
the building committee presi-
dent’s wife, Colleen Hauge, were
on hand for the opening of the
container.
Everyone returned to the sanc-
tuary for the 7:00 PM evening
worship service. The message was
given by Pastor Dana Lockhart
who encouraged people to go back
to the basics of religion. People
are to study the Bible and pray
more than on just Sunday. He en-
couraged families to worship daily
in order to nurture and enhance
their spiritual life. The former
pastors assisted in communion
and Chauncey Jorgensen read the
scriptures for the service. Pastor
Anna Peck graced the worshipers
with the solo How Great Thou
Art. Old favorite hymns, The
Church’s One Foundation, Blest
Be the Tie That Binds and God Be
With You Til We Meet Again were
sung by the congregation. Janet
Jorgensen presented Margaret
Veal with a plaque of appreciation
for being the keeper of the
church’s history. After the wor-
ship was completed, the former
pastors reminisced about their
pastoral times at Indian Creek.
God was available for the clo-
sure of the 100th Celebration of
Indian Creek Church. The guests
were greeted with a brilliant show
of sounds and light from heaven
as they traveled home. The rain
was an appreciated happening for
the countryside as it had been a
dry summer.
Indian Creek celebrated its
50th anniversary in 1963, the
75th in 1988 with Co Chairladies
Nora Anderson and Janet Jor-
gensen organizing the program
and activities. The 90th anniver-
sary took place in 2003. The com-
mittee members were Milton
Storm, Gary Jorgensen, Dan An-
derson, John Dries, Janet Jor-
gensen and Pastor Anna Peck.
And the Lord shall guide you
continually and satisfy you in
drought and in dry places and
make strong your bones. And you
shall be like a watered garden
and like a spring of water whose
waters fail not. Isaiah 58: 11
Creek Lutheran Church
Church members Colleen Hauge and Margie Veal.
Monserud Homestead
6 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
Perkins County unit boundaries
With several hunting season in
full swing, it has been brought to
my attention that there is some
people that do not fully under-
stand some of our laws regarding
big game hunting in SD. I would
like to take this time to explain
unit boundaries for Perkins
County. Perkins County is split
into two units for firearms deer
and firearms antelope. The divid-
ing line is SD Hwy 20. The first
and main reason for the divide is
we have more public land in the
northern part of Perkins County
and we are trying to spread out
the hunting pressure. Many
hunters anymore come from out
of the area and do not know any-
one or have the time to gain per-
mission on private ground. This
causes them to go to public land
and hunt there exclusively. This
can cause overcrowding which
can lead to accidents and wrecks
the quality of the hunt for every
hunter hunting in that particular
area. It also spreads out the har-
vest so we can get a more even
harvest in areas that do not have
as much public ground.
I understand that this can be
discouraging for the local hunter
as they have friends or relatives
that live in two different units.
Hunters need to be reminded
that once they draw a big game li-
cense for a specific unit they must
hunt in that unit and cannot go to
a different unit even if they have
permission to hunt on a specific
piece of ground. I have been in-
formed that this has taken place
in the past and some hunters
have even stated that it is accept-
able, which it is not.
There are a couple licenses that
allow hunters to hunt multiple
units. The first one is the west
river special buck license. This li-
cense is a more costly license and
allows the hunter to hunt west-
ern SD on private property. The
second license is the landowner
license. This is a license that is
sold at a reduced rate to the
landowner and only allows them
to hunt on their own land. With
this license the Landowner can
hunt between different units as
long as they own or lease (for
agricultural purposes) the land in
which they are hunting.
When hunters hunt in units
they do not have a license for they
could be charged with a class one
misdemeanor, lose their hunting
privileges for a period of one year
if convicted and be assessed civil
penalties. If anyone has any
questions regarding this please
feel free to give me a call 605-374-
7726. I hope everyone has a safe
and fun fall.
“Our sales are every day”
CC Flooring
Highway 12 • Hettinger • 701-567-2677
carpet • vinyl • hardwood
• ceramics
Monday, September 30, was a
great and historic day for Bison
XC. The boys' team won its first
meet in the history of the pro-
gram. It just so happened that
this meet was also the LMC
meet. It was a great way to kick
off the Homecoming week.
Daniel Burkhalter continued his
winning ways by out-distancing
second place by a minute and a
half and winning the individual
LMC title for the second straight
year. Josh McKinstry ran his best
race of the year and finished 4th,
while Joseph Kvale ran, by far,
his fastest race and took seventh.
The combined effort of these
three boys topped all the other
conference teams and made them
LMC Champions. Congratula-
tions! On the girls side, Rebekah
Burkhalter ran an unbelievable
race and finished third in the
Varsity girls race. Sydney Senn
finished 22nd and Ruth Burkhal-
ter stood and watched once again.
The closest race of the day came
in the Junior High boys' race
when Jonathan Burkhalter came
within a second of winning and
finished 2nd. It was a wonderful
day and we are looking forward to
our remaining meets and seeing
how we stack up when it comes to
the Region 5 Meet.
Bison boys win LMC cross country title
Daniel Burkhalter wins individual title
LMC Conference Champions Daniel Burkhalter, Josh McKinstry, Joseph Kvale.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 7
WE NEED CHILDLIKE DEPENDENCE ON GOD
Mathew 18:3 states that unless we become like children we shall not inherit the kingdom
of heaven. What does it mean to become like a child? Well, what are children like? They are
cute. If that is what Jesus is referring to then many of us don’t have a chance. Children are
submissive and obedient. They easily believe and there is not a selfish bone in their body.
Talk to a parent or teacher and they will quickly dispel this theory. Children are at times
submissive, obedient, selfless and innocent but not always. Sometimes they can be naughty,
selfish, and difficult.
There is, however one quality that all children have in common despite their looks or
their behavior, and that is dependency. Every child is dependent upon someone else for
their survival. Tell a six month old baby to walk to the refrigerator and get his own bottle of
milk or tell a toddler to get a job and provide for himself. They can’t. They are helpless and
dependent upon another. To become like a child means to become dependent upon Jesus. It
means to depend on him for your strength, your ministry, your marriage, your life and your
salvation. It is to understand that in yourself you have no resources to attain salvation or to
do anything of eternal value. To inherit the kingdom of heaven, one must cling solely to the
resources of Christ provided at the Cross. To do anything of eternal value for his kingdom
you must draw from his resources and not your own. It is a dependence upon his grace.
The problem is that we spend our entire lives trying to be independent. Teen-agers can’t
wait to leave home and married folks don’t want mom and dad butting into their lives. We
don’t want anyone telling us what to do. Self sufficiency is totally in congruent with the
Kingdom of heaven and is not in keeping with child likeness. Dependent children come to
Jesus humbly and say, “I can’t make it without you, you are my only hope of salvation, for
life and for effective ministry. MY ONLY HOPE IS YOU.” It is the people who show humble,
childlike dependence, that inherit the kingdom of heaven.
Would you consider yourself a humble, dependent child or a self-sufficient adult?
Pastors Perspective
First Presbyterian Church • Pastor Florence Hoff, CRE
Grace Baptist Church • Pastor Phil Hahn
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship Service - 10:30a.m.
Wednesday Prayer Mtg. - 7:30 p.m.
Church of Christ
18 mi. south of Prairie City - Worship Service - 10:00 a.m.
Prairie Fellowship Parish ELCA • Pastor Dana Lockhart
Sat. evening services • GR Luth. - 4:00 p.m. •American - 6:30 p.m.
Sunday morning services •Rosebud - 8:00 a.m. • Indian Creek - 10:30 a.m.
Christ Lutheran Church WELS
Pastor Gerhardt Juergens
Sunday Bible Class - 8:00 a.m., Worship Service - 8:30 a.m.
Coal Springs Community Church
Pastors Nels & Angie Easterby
South Jct. of Highways 73 & 20
Sunday School - 10:00 a.m., Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
Seventh Day Adventist Church • Pastor David Moench
Sabbath School - 2:00 p.m., Worship Service - 3:00 p.m.
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church • Fr. Tony Grossenburg
Saturday Mass: - Lemmon 4:45 p.m. Bison - 7:15 p.m.,
Sunday Mass: Lemmon - 8:15 a.m., Morristown - 10:30 a.m.
Holland Center Christian Reformed Church
Pastor Brad Burkhalter • Lodgepole
Worship Service - 8:00 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church • Pastor Florence Hoff, CRE
Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:30 for all ages
Slim Buttes Lutheran • Pastor Henry Mohagen
Reva • Sunday School 9:45 a.m. for all ages
•Worship Service - 11:00 a.m., WMF 2nd Wednesday at 1:00 p.m.
Beckman Wesleyan Church • Pastor Brad Burkhalter
Prairie City
Sunday School - 10:00 a.m., Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m.
Vesper Service - 6:00 p.m., Wed. Evenings - 7:30 p.m.
Church Services
Directory
A tree in front of Luke Clements house on Rodgers Street.
8 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
Are you saving?
Did you know that you could
easily help earn money for Bison
School? We participate in the Box
Tops for Education® program,
which has helped America’s
schools raise over $445 million
since 1996. All year long we col-
lect Box Tops, found on thousands
of products from cereal to office
supplies. Each Box Top is worth
10¢. When students, families,
schools and communities work to-
gether to collect Box Tops and
send them in, the money adds up
fast. Last year our school raised
more than $900.00 in Box Tops
Funds, which we used in individ-
ual classrooms for books, art sup-
plies, and special projects. We can
earn even more cash with your
help. Box Tops are on many prod-
ucts your family is probably
using, like Betty Crocker cake
mixes and frosting, Totinos Pizza,
Avery® binders, Boise® paper,
Scott® paper towels and bath tis-
sue, and Ziploc® brand storage
bags. There are new items every
year. Would you be willing to save
the Box Tops from those packages
for us? We’ll make it easy for you:
we’ll provide a collection box at
Bison Food Store, stop by fre-
quently to pick up the packages
and clip the Box Tops ourselves.
All you need to do is drop the
packages in the box.
We also collect the UPC codes
from Our Family products. Dur-
ing the school year, just save the
barcodes from Our Family prod-
ucts. We earn $25.00 in cash for
each bundle of 500 UPC barcodes
we send in. You will find more
than 2000 Our Family items with
national brand quality, every day,
all priced lower than national
brands. These items may also be
dropped in the collection box at
Bison Food Store.
Bison School also participates
in Labels for Education® From
soup, cereal and snacks to dairy
products, beverages and food
storage – your kitchen’s probably
full of eligible Labels for Educa-
tion® items. Clip and save UPCs
and beverage/ sauce caps from
participating products. Drop off
UPCs and beverage/ sauce caps
in the collection box at the store.
When the whole community par-
ticipates, the points really add
up! We can redeem Labels for Ed-
ucation® points for FREE educa-
tional resources! Get clipping and
start earning free stuff for your
school!
If you have questions about
what to save call Heidi Collins at
the school or stop by and someone
will help you out. Thank you in
advance for your support!
Due to Cows, Your
Plans Have Been Can-
celled
One of the most important
virtues of ranching is having con-
tortionist-like flexibility
(metaphorically, but physical flex-
ibility does come in handy at
times). Flexibility is required
when a major part of one’s life in-
volves managing numerous ani-
mals. They can get out, knock
important parts loose or break
stuff off that’s needed to ensure
they have water and it all has to
be taken care of immediately.
When it comes to a lifestyle
that revolves around animals,
scheduling in extra time helps in
the prevention of cancelling plans
because cows are just animals
doing what animals do: mess up
plans. Whether arrangements
are made for leisure and enjoy-
ment, appointments are sched-
uled, meetings are set, or kids’
sporting events are anticipated, it
does not matter, animals—espe-
cially in large numbers—have a
way of sensing plans that don’t
pertain to them. We may think
we’ve experienced every kind of
cow-related setback, but they
continue to show us new ways to
tamper with our plans. Cows get
possessive or jealous of us similar
to the way dogs get mad and
make a mess of things when left
alone too long. The only differ-
ence is that cows do their thing
right before we carry out our
plans so we run late or have to
cancel.
For families like us who have a
cow herd and no extended family
or friends close by or hired help to
oversee things when we’re gone,
the smart thing to do is to sched-
ule activities with a wide margin
for extra time beforehand. Re-
membering is the problem. Ex-
pecting setbacks and the
possibility of encountering prob-
lems has always been helpful in
making any plans. Many of ours
have had to be canceled com-
pletely on account of getting way-
laid by cows, but other times
we’ve been lucky and just showed
up late.
If I had a dollar for every plan,
meeting, appointment, fun event,
or date with girlfriends I’ve had
to scratch or attend late on ac-
count of problems regarding live-
stock, I would have enough
money for a new place with good
fences, top of the line equipment
and a hired man. More than once
we’ve had to skip church or go to
the late service. I have probably
missed more meetings than I’ve
attended and have showed up
late to pick up kids from practice
so much that scheduling setback
time is becoming habit-forming. I
definitely don’t plan anything for
the first six weeks of calving sea-
son and after that I check with
my husband first before making
any commitments.
Just to verify, I am not the only
ranch woman who experiences
such lifestyle problems. Other
ranch wives and I have jokingly
exchanged different plans we’ve
had to cancel or show up late for
because of cows. We’ve found our-
selves gathering cows out of
someone’s yard instead of attend-
ing a wedding ceremony, fixing
fences and asking friends or fam-
ily to pick up our kids from
school, or pushing cows home
spur of the moment and missing
a class we paid money to partici-
pate in, and the list goes on.
I have spotlighted the negative
aspects of having to cancel plans
on account of cows, but their an-
tics have come in handy when I
would rather be messing with
cows than go to a meeting or ap-
pointment I wasn’t excited about
to begin with.
Amy Kirk is a ranch wife from Custer, SD
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 9
Walk in areas provide free access to wildlife
By Lura Roti, South Dakota
Game, Fish & Parks
Each season hunters enjoy ac-
cess to more than 1.2 million
acres of privately owned habitat
in South Dakota through South
Dakota Game, Fish & Parks'
Walk in Area program.
Initially launched to increase
access to pheasant habitat 25
years ago, today Walk in Areas
provide hunters with access to a
broad diversity of habitat and
wildlife species.
"As the program expanded
westward it was adjusted to offer
more hunting opportunities,"
says Mike Kintigh, Regional
GF&P Supervisor for western
South Dakota. "If you're not from
South Dakota you may think that
our state has pheasants from bor-
der to border. Although there are
some Walk in Areas out west that
do have pheasants, most are
home to other game species -
geese, turkey, grouse, mule deer,
whitetail deer and antelope."
Walk in areas exist through
partnerships between S.D. Game,
Fish & Parks (GF&P) and South
Dakota landowners. As Habitat
Program Manager, Tyrel Schmelz
explains, GF&P basically rents
the hunting rights for the season.
"Walk in Areas provide hunters
with free access to all types of
habitat and game species without
the need to contact the landowner
for permission," says Schmelz.
Convenient for both hunters
and landowners, Conservation
Officer, Zach Thomsen says there
are many reasons landowners en-
roll acres in the program.
"Many landowners will enroll
their CRP acres in the program,
so it gives them another source of
income from those acres and they
don't have to worry about vehicle
traffic on their land during hunt-
ing season," Thomsen says.
Rancher, Ken McIlravy agrees
with Thomsen. Prior to becoming
involved in the Walk in Area pro-
gram McIlravy allowed hunting
on his land - and sometimes
hunters asked permission, but
many times they didn't.
"We were dealing with hunting
on our land whether we enrolled
acres in the program or not,"
McIlravy says. "At least now we
don't have to worry about vehicle
traffic."
And, this, he feels has led to a
higher caliber of hunters visiting
his land.
"For the most part they are se-
rious hunters - and you have to be
committed to walk in two miles in
order to hunt a piece of CRP
ground," says the second-genera-
tion rancher, who initially en-
rolled his CRP acres in the
program. Today his entire ranch
is enrolled.
He has enjoyed the friendships
which he's developed over the
years with many of the hunters
who return year after year.
"I try to be as helpful as possi-
ble. I will even drive them out
and show them areas where I
think they will have the best suc-
cess. The way I see it, the Walk in
Area program is a two-way
street. As a landowner I benefit
quite a bit from this program fi-
nancially, there's no vehicle traf-
fic; and for the most part our
liability is covered by public ac-
cess laws," McIlravy says.
Game, Fish & Parks inspects
all acres before they are enrolled
in the program. Acres are en-
rolled based on quality of habitat
or access to public lands, explains
Resource Biologist, Samantha
Nichols, who helps facilitate en-
rollments for GF&P.
"Habitat is key. We're looking
for acres that provide hunting op-
portunities for specific game
species - and because each species
require different type of habitat,
you may even see an open field of
wheat stubble enrolled because it
provides great goose hunting op-
portunities," Nichols says.
She further explains that in some
cases, the Walk in Area program
helps access public lands that are
landlocked by private lands. "We
may enroll private land that
doesn't have the best habitat, but
it allows hunters access to 5,000
acres of public Bureau of Land
Management (BLM) land."
User fees collected through the
sale of hunting licenses fund the
Walk in Area program.
"If you don't hunt or fish, then
you aren't contributing to this
program - no tax dollars are
used," Kintigh said. "We evaluate
the cover, habitat and hunting op-
portunity on each property and
land owners are paid accord-
ingly."
For a map of Walk in Areas
throughout South Dakota,
hunters can grab a Walk in Area
Atlas where hunting licenses are
sold or online at http://www.gfp.
sd.gov. In addition, from the web
site hunters can also download
the Walk in Area map to their
GPS.
"This application is quite
handy because then hunters
know where the boundaries are -
especially in western South
Dakota where some Walk in
Areas can be thousands of acres
in size with interior cross fences
or no fences at all," Kintigh says.
Zach Thomsen is a Wildlife Conservation Officer for South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks.
Weather
Wise
DATE HI LO PRECIP
Oct. 1 79 38
Oct. 2 67 43
Oct. 3 61 43
Oct. 4 not available
Oct. 5 49 28
Oct. 6 47 25
Oct. 7 53 37
One year ago
Hi 81 Lo 37
Data colleted by
Grand Electric Co-op, Inc.
10 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 11
See us for all your automotive
& industrial parts!
110 Airport Road N
Hettinger
701-567-4387
800-729-2719
Windshields & Car Care Products
Paint & Body
Supplies
Tools & Equipment
SECTION 504 OF THE
REHABILITATION
ACT OF 1973
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 and the Americans with disabili-
ties Act prohibits discrimination
against person with a disability in any
program receiving federal financial as-
sistance. Section 504 defines a person
with a disability as anyone who:
has a mental or physical impairment
which substantially limits one or more
major life activity such as walking,
breathing, learning, reading, concen-
trating, thinking, communicating, see-
ing, speaking, caring for one’s self,
working, helping, eating, sleeping,
standing, lifting, bending, and the op-
eration of a bodily function ;
Has a record of such impairment;
Or is regarded as having such impair-
ment.
In order to fulfill obligations under sec-
tion 504, the Bison School District ac-
knowledges its responsibility under
section 504/ADA to avoid discrimina-
tion in policies and practices regarding
its personnel and students. No dis-
crimination against any person with a
disability shall knowingly be permit-
ted in any program and practice in the
school system.
The Bison School District has respon-
sibilities under Section 504, which in-
clude the obligation to identify,
evaluate, and if the student is deter-
mined to be eligible under Section 504,
to provide appropriate educational
services. If the parent or guardian dis-
agrees with the determination made
by the professional staff of the school
district, they have a right to a hearing
with an impartial hearing officer.
If there are questions, please feel free
to contact the Bison School District at
605-244-5271.
The Bison School District has the fol-
lowing documents available for review
by parents of children with disabilities
and the general public:
Comprehensive Plan for Special Edu-
cation
IDEA Federal Application for Funds
The most recent Special Education
Compliance Monitoring final report.
Applications, evaluations, periodic pro-
gram plan or reports relating to federal
programs including auditor’s reports,
statements of assurance, budget and
grant materials.
Information will be available at the
Bison School District’s Superintend-
ents Office, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $27.08.]
School Seeks to
Identify Children
with Special Needs
The Bison School District, in order to
fulfill the obligations of the Individuals
with Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA), is required to inform and pro-
vide full educational opportunities to
all individuals with disabilities ages
birth through twenty-one.
Marilyn Azevedo, Superintendent of
the Bison School District, in conjunc-
tion with Northwest Area Schools Ed-
ucational Cooperative, needs your
assistance to identify, locate and eval-
uate all children with disabilities.
This public awareness notice is to in-
form parents and other
individuals/agencies of the availability
of special education and related service
to all individuals who reside within the
jurisdiction of the Bison School District
and who are between the ages of birth
through twenty-one, regardless of the
severity of their disability. This in-
cluded individuals in all public and pri-
vate agencies and institutions, highly
mobile children with disabilities, such
as migrant and homeless children, who
reside within the legal boundaries of
the district.
Anyone aware of an individual who
may benefit from special education and
related service is encouraged to call
Donna Keller, Director of Special Edu-
cation for the Bison School District, at
605-244-5271.
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $15.53.]
Family Educational
Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA)
Directory Information
The Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federal law,
requires that Bison School District,
with certain exceptions, obtain your
written consent prior to the disclosure
of personally identifiable information
from your child's education records.
However, Bison School District may
disclose appropriately designated "di-
rectory information" without written
consent, unless you have advised the
District to the contrary in accordance
with District procedures. The primary
purpose of directory information is to
allow the Bison School District to in-
clude this type of information from
your child's education records in cer-
tain school publications. Examples in-
clude:
A playbill, showing your student's role
in a drama production;
The annual yearbook;
Honor roll or other recognition lists;
Graduation programs; and
Sports activity sheets, such as for
wrestling, showing weight and height
of team members.
Directory information, which is infor-
mation that is generally not considered
harmful or an invasion of privacy if re-
leased, can also be disclosed to outside
organizations without a parent's prior
written consent. Outside organizations
include, but are not limited to, compa-
nies that manufacture class rings or
publish yearbooks. In addition, two
federal laws require local educational
agencies (LEAs) receiving assistance
under the Elementary and Secondary
Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to pro-
vide military recruiters, upon request,
with three directory information cate-
gories—names, addresses and tele-
phone listings—unless parents have
advised the LEA that they do not want
their student's information disclosed
without their prior written consent. (1)
If you do not want Bison School Dis-
trict to disclose directory information
from your child's education records
without your prior written consent,
you must notify the District in writing
by 30 days from this public notice.
Bison School District has designated
the following information as directory
information:
Student's name
Address
Telephone listing
Electronic mail address
Photograph
Date and place of birth
Major field of study
Dates of attendance
Grade level
Participation in officially recognized
activities and sports
Weight and height of members of ath-
letic teams
Degrees, honors, and awards received
The most recent educational agency or
institution attended
Student ID number, user ID, or other
unique personal identifier used to com-
municate in electronic systems that
cannot be used to access education
records without a PIN, password, etc.
(A student's SSN, in whole or in part,
cannot be used for this purpose.)
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $31.41.]
Dr. Jason M. Hafner
Dr. David J. Prosser
OPTOMETRIST
Faith Clinic
1st & 3rd Wed. of the month
Buffalo Clinic
2nd & 4th Wed. of the month
1-800-648-0760
Every day at
Northwest
Supply Co.
Lemmon, S D
Pepsi - Coke
products:
12 pack $4.19
24 pack $6.99
12 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
BISON SCHOOL
BOARD
AGENDA
October 14, 2013
7:00 pm
1. Pledge of Allegiance
2. Call to Order
3. Consent Agenda
a. Approve Agenda
b. Minutes
c. Financial Reports
4. Approval of Claims –
5. Delegations –
6. Home school application
7. Medical insurance request
8. Contract approval
9. Building/renovation project
10. Eligibility policy- D.Beckman
11. Surplus/disposal
12. Website update
13. Quote on new locks
14. Field trip approval form, permis-
sion slip, medical release, and
overnight rules
15. DSS reporting form
16. Facility use agreement
17. Superintendent Report– M.
Azevedo
18. Executive Session – (for personnel
matters if needed)
19. Adjournment – Next meeting
November 11
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $13.36.]
Family Educational
Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA)
Notification of Rights
Elementary and Sec-
ondary Schools
The Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents
and students over 18 years of age ("el-
igible students") certain rights with re-
spect to the student's education
records. These rights are:
The right to inspect and review the
student's education records within 45
days of the day the School receives a
request for access.
Parents or eligible students should
submit to the school principal (or ap-
propriate school official) a written re-
quest that identifies the record(s) they
wish to inspect. The school official will
make arrangements for access and no-
tify the parent or eligible student of
the time and place where the records
may be inspected.
The right to request the amendment of
the student's education records that
the parent or eligible student believes
are inaccurate, misleading, or other-
wise in violation of the student's pri-
vacy rights under FERPA.
Parents or eligible students who wish
to ask the School to amend a record
should write the school principal (or
appropriate school official), clearly
identify the part of the record they
want changed, and specify why it
should be changed. If the School de-
cides not to amend the record as re-
quested by the parent or eligible
student, the School will notify the par-
ent or eligible student of the decision
and advise them of their right to a
hearing regarding the request for
amendment. Additional information
regarding the hearing procedures will
be provided to the parent or eligible
student when notified of the right to a
hearing.
The right to privacy of personally iden-
tifiable information in the student's ed-
ucation records, except to the extent
that FERPA authorizes disclosure
without consent.
One exception, which permits disclo-
sure without consent, is disclosure to
school officials with legitimate educa-
tional interests. A school official is a
person employed by the School as an
administrator, supervisor, instructor,
or support staff member (including
health or medical staff and law en-
forcement unit personnel); a person
serving on the School Board; a person
or company with whom the School has
outsourced services or functions it
would otherwise use its own employees
to perform (such as an attorney, audi-
tor, medical consultant, or therapist);
a parent or student serving on an offi-
cial committee, such as a disciplinary
or grievance committee; or a parent,
student, or other volunteer assisting
another school official in performing
his or her tasks.
A school official has a legitimate edu-
cational interest if the official needs to
review an education record in order to
fulfill his or her professional responsi-
bility.
Upon request, the School discloses ed-
ucation records without consent to of-
ficials of another school district in
which a student seeks or intends to en-
roll, or is already enrolled if the disclo-
sure is for purposes of the student's
enrollment or transfer.
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $33.22.]
Notification of Rights
under the Protection
of Pupil Rights
Amendment (PPRA)
PPRA affords parents certain rights re-
garding our conduct of surveys, collec-
tion and use of information for
marketing purposes, and certain phys-
ical exams. These include the right to:
• Consent before students are required
to submit to a survey that concerns one
or more of the following protected
areas (“protected information survey”)
if the survey is funded in whole or in
part by a program of the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education (ED)–
1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the
student or student’s parent;
2. Mental or psychological problems of
the student or student’s family;
3. Sex behavior or attitudes;
4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminat-
ing, or demeaning behavior;
5. Critical appraisals of others with
whom respondents have close family
relationships;
6. Legally recognized privileged rela-
tionships, such as with lawyers, doc-
tors, or ministers;
7. Religious practices, affiliations, or
beliefs of the student or parents; or
8. Income, other than as required by
law to determine program eligibility.
•Receive notice and an opportunity to
opt a student out of –
1. Any other protected information sur-
vey, regardless of funding;
2. Any non-emergency, invasive physi-
cal exam or screening required as a
condition of attendance, administered
by the school or its agent, and not nec-
essary to protect the immediate health
and safety of a student, except for
hearing, vision, or scoliosis screenings,
or any physical exam or screening per-
mitted or required under State law;
and
3. Activities involving collection, disclo-
sure, or use of personal information ob-
tained from students for marketing or
to sell or otherwise distribute the infor-
mation to others.
•Inspect, upon request and before ad-
ministration or use –
1. Protected information surveys of
students;
2. Instruments used to collect personal
information from students for any of
the above marketing, sales, or other
distribution purposes; and
3. Instructional material used as part
of the educational curriculum.
These rights transfer to from the par-
ents to a student who is 18 years old or
an emancipated minor under State
law.
Bison School District will develop and
adopt policies, in consultation with
parents, regarding these rights, as well
as arrangements to protect student
privacy in the administration of pro-
tected information surveys and the col-
lection, disclosure, or use of personal
information for marketing, sales, or
other distribution purposes. Bison
School District will directly notify par-
ents of these policies at least annually
at the start of each school year and
after any substantive changes. Bison
School District will also directly notify,
such as through U.S. Mail or email,
parents of students who are scheduled
to participate in the specific activities
or surveys noted below and will pro-
vide an opportunity for the parent to
opt his or her child out of participation
of the specific activity or survey. Bison
School District will make this notifica-
tion to parents at the beginning of the
school year if the District has identi-
fied the specific or approximate dates
of the activities or surveys at that
time. For surveys and activities sched-
uled after the school year starts, par-
ents will be provided reasonable
notification of the planned activities
and surveys listed below and be pro-
vided an opportunity to opt their child
out of such activities and surveys. Par-
ents will also be provided an opportu-
nity to review any pertinent surveys.
Following is a list of the specific activ-
ities and surveys covered under this
requirement:
•Collection, disclosure, or use of per-
sonal information for marketing, sales
or other distribution.
•Administration of any protected in-
formation survey not funded in whole
or in part by ED.
•Any non-emergency, invasive physi-
cal examination or screening as de-
scribed above.
Parents who believe their rights have
been violated may file a complaint
with:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $46.93.]
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 13
APPROVED FINANCIAL REPORT
GENERAL FUND CAP OUTLAY SPED ED PENSION T & A
Cash on Hand 8-1-13 11800.11 937.70 10801.79 40891.12
Invested in Securities 831979.07 689604.33 58633.79 81551.36
Local Sources:
Receipts:
Interest 174.83 132.13 62.40
Taxes 35507.43 296.92 207.91 44.56
Co-Curricular 462.50
Intermediate Sources:
County Apportionment 1132.03
State Sources:
State Aid 33716.00
Gross Receipts 67879.77
Total Receipts: 138872.56 429.05 270.31 44.56 1486.65
Total Disbursements: 66814.15 24574.98 19465.12 1319.98
Cash on Hand 8-31-13 5450.79 1362.72 11336.67 41057.79
Invested In Securities 910386.80 665033.38 38904.10 52363.97
IMPACT AID FUND: $81,551.36
OSCAR SMITH SCHOLARSHIP FUND $296,051.81
SCHOOL LUNCH FUND 2058.30
Receipts 0.00
Disbursements 559.02
Ending Balance $1499.28
TRUST AND AGENCY
Disbursements:
Roseann Emly Bookshelves 150.00
Postmaster Postage 103.88
Petty Cash Postage 84.12
Donna Keller Travel Expenses 777.23
SD DCI Background Check 43.25
SD DCI Background Check 43.25
SD DCI Background Check 43.25
SDAEA Registration Fee 75.00
Revenues:
General Fund July Reimbursement 1484.89
Dacotah BankInterest 1.76
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total approximate cost of $89.17.]
BISON SCHOOL
DISTRICT #52-1
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
MEETING
DATE: September 9, 2013 TIME
HELD: 7:00 p.m. KIND OF MEET-
ING: Regular WHERE HELD: Board-
room MEMBERS PRESENT: Arneson,
Beckman, Kari, Kvale, Thompson
MEMBERS ABSENT: None OFFI-
CERS AND OTHERS PRESENT:
Supt. Azevedo, Asst. Bus. Mgr. John-
son, Tim Roach, Kevin Weishaar, and
Theora Carlson
CHAIRMAN KVALE CALLED THE
MEETING TO ORDER WITH A CALL
FOR THE SALUTE TO THE FLAG.
CONSENT AGENDA
33. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to approve the consent agenda
with the following additions: 7a.Con-
tract with TIE, and 7b. Emergency Bus
Pact, and to approve the minutes of the
August 12th regular meeting and to
approve the financial reports. Motion
carried.
APPROVAL OF CLAIMS
34. Motion by Beckman second by Ar-
neson to approve the claims listed
below. Motion carried.
A&B BUSINESS SUPPLIES/FUR-
NITURE 9,585.85; ADVANCE PAY-
MENTS MONTHLY REIMBURSEM
ENT, 1,319.98; ADVANCED BUILD-
ING SERVICES, LABOR, 825.00; ALL
SAFETY PRODUCTS, SUPPLIES,
1,279.60; ASCD, SUPPLIES, 808.94;
AZEVEDO, MARILYN, SUPPLIES,
BILL, 342.55
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
53,920.68
CARDMEMBER SERVICES, IPADS,
949.76; CENGAGE LEARNING,
TEXTBOOKS, 743.60; GRAND ELEC-
TRIC, ELECTRICITY, 1,417.00;
PEARSON EDUCATION, TEXT-
BOOKS, 1,657.41; TOWN OF BISON,
WATER/SEWER/GARBAGE, 1,348.99;
TSP ENGINEERING, ENGINEER-
ING FEES, 15,932.77
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND
22,049.53
BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD, IN-
SURANCE, 2,100.00; DAKOTA FEED,
GAS, 63.35; HANDS ON HEALTH PT,
SPEC ED SERVICES, 1,498.55;
SCHOOL SPECIALTY, SUPPLIES,
89.64
TOTAL SPECIAL EDUCATION
FUND 3,751.44
AMERICINN OF ABERDEEN,
ROOMS, 599.20; BISON FOOD
STORE, FOOD/SUPPLIES, 38.66;
CASS CLAY CREAMERY, FOOD,
614.00; CENTRAL RESTAURANT,
SUPPLIES, 89.20; DAKOTA FEED,
GAS, 36.47; DROWN, CAMILLE,
SUPPLIES, 42.28; SHELL FLEET
PLUS, GAS, 41.49; SYSCO, FOOD,
2,256.98
TOTAL SCHOOL LUNCH FUND
3,718.28
Total Payroll for August-$24,893.65,
Elementary- 700.00; High School-
685.00; Title- 4174.50; Network-
31.14; BISON COURIER,PUBLISH-
ING/SUBSCRIPTION, 362.53; BISON
IMPLEMENT, SUPPLIES/REPAIRS,
372.51; BLUE CROSS BLUE
SHIELD, INSURANCE, 4,200.00;
BURKHALTER, BRAD, TESTING
FEE, 40.00; CARDMEMBER SERV-
ICES, SUPPLIES/TEXTBOOKS,
1,894.70; CENGAGE LEARNING,
WORKBOOKS, 352.00; DAKOTA
FEED, GAS/FUEL, 311.18; DEMCO,
SUPPLIES, 191.90; DRUIDE, SUB-
SCRIPTION, 280.00; FOLLETT,
TEXTBOOKS, 205.86; FREY SCIEN-
TIFIC, SUPPLIES, 1,203.16; G&O
PAPER, SUPPLIES, 4,970.89; GO-
PHER, SUPPLIES, 1,458.14; GRAND
ELECTRIC, SUPPLIES, 864.42;
HEARTLAND PAPER COMPANY,
SUPPLIES, 50.08; HOUGHTON MIF-
FLIN, WORKBOOKS; 538.46; HOUSE
OF GLASS, SUPPLIES, 376.15;
MOM’S CAFÉ, SUPPLIES, 511.50;
NORTHWEST SUPPLY, SUPPLIES,
167.86; REGION IV ADMINISTRA-
TORS, REGISTRATION, 135.00;
SAFETYSIGN.COM, SUPPLIES,
108.40; SANDERS, WAYNE, TEST-
ING FEE, 40.00; SCHOOL SPE-
CIALTY, SUPPLIES, 5,186.41; SHELL
FLEET PLUS, GAS, 78.85; SMITH,
GENE, BUS CONTRACT, 7,994.98;
SMITH, GENE, GAS STIPEND,
1,247.64; SOUTHWEST BUSINESS
MAINTENANCE, 30.00; TECHNOL-
OGY CENTER, THE, SUPPLIES/
SUPPORT, 3,384.73; THUNDER
BUTTE SPRAYING, WEED CON-
TROL, 260.00; TREETOP PUBLISH-
ING, SUPPLIES, 42.00; UNIVERSAL
ATHLETIC, SUPPLIES, 2,486.75;
VOWAC, WORKBOOKS, 52.17; WAD-
DELL, JOYCE, TRAVEL, 221.20;
WEST MUSIC, SUPPLIES, 108.15;
WEST RIVER COOP TEL, PHONE
994.75; Library-$100.00; Supt-
$5,416.67; Secretaries-$3,646.16; Fis-
cal-$2,761.63; Custodial-$5,648.14;
Co-curricular-$176.00; Spec Ed-
$100.00; School Lunch-$487.80
DELEGATIONS
NONE
KEVIN WEISHAAR-TECHNOL-
OGY
Kevin Weishaar shared his opinions
about what technology the district
should utilize.
TSP ARCHITECTURE UPDATE
Tim Roach, of TSP Architecture, pre-
sented his firm’s findings on the cost of
renovating the existing school building
to correct structural issues and become
compliant with current building codes
and Americans with Disabilities Act
requirements. The estimated cost of
renovations totals $11.7 million. Mr.
Roach will conduct an informational
meeting for the public.
NWAS REPORT
No report was available.
CONTRACT WITH TIE
35. Motion by Thompson, second by
Kari to approve the contract with TIE
to provide Common Core training in
the amount of $4,000. Motion carried.
EMERGENCY BUS PACT
36. Motion by Arneson, second by
Thompson to approve the Emergency
Bus Pact for the 2013-2014 school year.
Motion carried.
APPROVE CONTRACTS
37. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to approve James Sandgren as the As-
sistant Football Coach in the amount
of $1,858 for the 2013-14 school year.
Motion carried.
38. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to approve Steve Senn as the Assistant
Girls Basketball Coach in the amount
of $1,690 for the 2013-14 school year.
Motion carried.
HOME SCHOOL APPLICATIONS
39. Motion by Beckman, second by
Kari to approve the home school appli-
cations received. Motion carried.
REQUEST FOR EARLY GRADUA-
TION
40. Motion by Thompson, second by
Arneson to enter executive session to
discuss a student issue. Motion car-
ried. Chairman Kvale declared the
meeting in executive session at 8:55
p.m. At 9:00 p.m. Chairman Kvale de-
clared the meeting back in regular ses-
sion.
41. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to approve the presented appli-
cation for early graduation. Kari
abstained from the vote. Motion car-
ried.
WOODCHIPS
Mrs. Azevedo updated the board on her
search for woodchips for the play-
ground and presented two options to
choose from.
HIGH SCHOOL SECRETARY PO-
SITION
42. Motion by Kari, second by Thomp-
son to approve the resignation of
Janelle Goddard as High School Secre-
tary effective September 30, 2013. Mo-
tion carried.
43. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to enter executive session to dis-
cuss personnel. Motion carried.
Chairman Kvale declared the meeting
in executive session at 9:15 p.m. At
9:30 p.m. Chairman Kvale declared
the meeting back in regular session.
44. Motion by Thompson, second by
Beckman to pay Joy Worm $16.00 per
hour to conduct secretary training,
retroactive to July 1, 2013. Motion car-
ried.
ADMINISTRATOR EVALUATION
SAMPLES
Superintendent Azevedo presented
sample Administrator Evaluation
forms.
FIELD TRIP MODELS
Superintendent Azevedo is in the
process of researching and compiling
various models of field trip policies in
an effort to present a model to the
board for approval.
KATHLEEN ENGLE CONTRACT
45. Motion by Arneson, second by
Thompson to approve a contract with
Kathleen Engle to provide consulting
services and establish an induction
program for the District. Motion car-
ried.
LOSS AUDIT SURVEY
The Associated School Boards of South
Dakota is in the process of completing
a Loss Audit Survey of the District.
REQUEST GYM TO SHOW MOVIE
“UNSTOPPABLE”
James and Marci Sandgren have re-
quested permission to show the movie
“Unstoppable” in the school gym. The
board honors this request.
SUPERINTENDENT NOTES
Common Core Training
Pledge & Announcements now done
over intercom
Freshman Impact
Infinite Campus application available
Substitute Teacher In-Service
Health and Fire Inspections, New
Signs Purchased
Music Theory Class
Key Issues
EXECUTIVE SESSION
46. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to enter executive session to discuss
personnel. Motion carried. Chairman
Kvale declared the meeting in execu-
tive session at 10:45 p.m. At 11:00 p.m.
Chairman Kvale declared the meeting
back in regular session.
ADJOURNMENT
47. Motion by Kari, second by Thomp-
son to adjourn the meeting at 11:00
p.m. Motion carried.
Dan Kvale, Chairman
Colette Johnson, Asst Business Mgr
[Published October 10, 2013 at a total;
approximate cost of $98.12.]
For all your advertising needs
Bison Courier
244-7199 or courier@sdplains.com
Press releases, engagements and
obituaries are free of charge.
14 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
Palace
Theater
The
Butler
PG-13
Oct. 4 - 6
7:30 p.m. nightly
• surround sound •
Lemmon 374-5107
Advertising Rates:
DISPLAY ADS: $4.70 per column inch.
CLASSIFIED ADS: $5.90 for 30 words; 10¢ for each word
thereafter. $2.00 billing charge applies.
THANK YOU'S: $5.90 for 30 words; 10¢ for each word
thereafter. $2.00 billing charge applies.
HIGHLIGHTS & HAPPENINGS: $5.90 minimum or $3.10
per column inch. $2.00 billing charge applies.
HAPPY ADS: With or Without Picture: $15.00 minimum or
$4.50 per column inch.
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT: $41.00 for a 2x7 ad.
Legal Deadline is Friday at NOON! Ad Deadline is Monday
at NOON! 244-7199 or courier@sdplains.com
AUCTION
LAND AUCTION: 428+/- acres,
Walworth County, Cropland,
Recreational, Investment, 6 miles
west of Bowdle, SD at the junction
of Hwy 12 and Hwy 47, October
30th, 2013. Call Dakota Proper-
ties, Todd Schuetzle, Auctioneer,
605-280-3115, www.DakotaProp-
erties.com.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
CALL AVON TO EARN extra
money for Christmas. **40% dis-
count/commission - $10 to start**
Call 605-334-0525.
EMPLOYMENT
HUNKPATI INVESTMENTS, a
Native CDFI in Ft. Thompson, SD
seeks a qualified Executive Direc-
tor. For more information, call
605-245-2148 or email: searchcom-
mittee@hunkpati.org.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPI-
TAL, Custer Clinic, Hot Springs
Regional Medical Clinic and
Custer Regional Senior Care have
full-time, part-time and PRN (as-
needed) RN, LPN, Licensed Med-
ical Assistant and Nurse Aide
positions available. We offer com-
petitive pay and excellent benefits.
New Graduates welcome! Please
contact Human Resources at (605)
673-9418 for more information or
log onto www.regionalhealth.com
to apply.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD.
We have lowered the price & will
consider contract for deed. Call
Russell Spaid 605-280-1067.
FOR SALE
For Sale: a Besler Bale Bed,
electric over hydraulic; Hydraulic
cake feeder with orbit motor call
701-567-3641.
B17-2tc
For sale: Family type restaurant
located on main street in Bison,
South Dakota. Large dining area
as well as two additional rooms
that can be used for overflows,
special meetings or family gath-
erings. New ice machine and deep
fryers were recently installed.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • 15
Priced to sell. If interested please
contact Penny Nelson 605-490-
1068 (cell) or 605-244-7249
(home).
B16-2tc
For Sale: 3 bedroom 2 bath home
with landscaped yard on 4 lots.
Serious inquiries only 244-7214
or 490-7712.
B15-3tc
WANTED
Bison Housing & Redevelop-
ment Commission is seeking
applicants for a part-time main-
tenance position for the Home-
stead Heights housing facility
located in Bison, SD. A job de-
scription can be picked up on
Mondays or Thursdays from 9 to
11 a.m. at the management office
at Homestead Heights. Resumes
must be sent to BH&RC, PO Box
186, Bison, SD 57620. For more
information, call 244-5473.
Homestead Heights is an equal
opportunity employer.
B10-tfn
SPORTING GOODS
REDFIELD GUN SHOW - Satur-
day, November 2, from 9am-5pm,
Sunday, November 3, from 9am-
3pm. For more information call
605-472-0965.
HEALTH AND BEAUTY
PELVI C/ TRANSVAGI NAL
MESH? Did you undergo trans-
vaginal placement of mesh for
pelvic organ prolapse or stress uri-
nary incontinence between 2005
and the present? If the mesh
caused complications, you may be
entitled to compensation. Call
Charles H. Johnson Law and
speak with female staff members
1-800-535-5727.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5650, www.goldeneagleloghomes
.com .
OTR/DRIVERS
AMERICAN TRUCK DRIVING
ACADEMY offering 80-hour CDL
class for drivers with experience.
$2,135, funding may be available,
job guarantee if accepted for class.
1-866-308-7755 Yankton,SD.
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549.
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH TV RETAILER- Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-
1892.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classi-
fieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper or 800-658-3697 for de-
tails.
WANT TO BUY
ANTLERS WANTED up to 7.00 lb.
Deer , Elk/moose 7.50 lb. Bleached
3.00 lb. cracked 1.00 lb. Also need
Porcupines, Rattlesnakes, Elk
Ivories ,Mt. Lion skins. More info;
605-673-4345 /
clawantlerhide@hotmail.com
16 • The Bison Courier • Thursday, October 10, 2013
•FORAGE AND PRF IN ALL COUNTIES
•WHEAT In Winter Wheat Counties
October 16th, 2012: Forage Production and Acreage Reporting
Deadline, and forage plant count (including new seeding in
Spring or newly broken up ground).
November 14th, 2012: all wheat production, winter wheat
acreage reporting, to get in or out of PRF, and PRF Acreage due.
We now do electronic signatures so you must come in and sign when
making any changes and reporting acreage and/or production.
Incorrect information regarding a spouse or Tax ID # will void your policy but not
your premium.
DEADLINE DATES!
Farmers Union Insurance Agency
404 Main Avenue • Lemmon, SD 57638 • 605-374-3462 or
1-888-868-3282
CÞLw AGLNCY, L1O.
Crop Insurance Specialists Since 1984.
0lve us a calll
We'd be happy to
dlscuss .
All Your crop lnsurance Needs
5a|es U|ose 0ate for 2014 Urops Are:
Paìnfa|| Index on Pasture & Pay|and:
11/15/13
Annua| Iorage (Pay Mì||et, 5udan, etc.):
12/15/13
1hese are the dates to purchase, change or
cancel multi-peril crop insurance.
0fflce (606) 433-6411
or 1oll-Free (888) 433-8760
Pusty 0|ney ¹ Maurìce Pandcock ¹ Peìdì Porch ¹ 1ay|or Mohnen
1anner Pandcock ¹ Urady & ßernìce Urew
Crew Agency is an equal opportunity provider.

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