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Bison Courier, August 29, 2013

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Bison Courier
Official Newspaper for the City of Bison, Perkins County, and the Bison School District
A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc.
P.O. Box 429 • Bison, South Dakota 57620-0429
Phone: (605) 244-7199 • FAX (605) 244-7198
The
$1.00
Volume 31
Number 11
August 29, 2013
Includes Tax
Highlights & Happenings
Substitute training at the Bison
School District on Thursday Sept
5th from 3:00-3:45PM for anyone
interested in substituting at the
school.
The Back to School Sock Hop
and Title I Annual Meeting will be
Tuesday, September 3 at Bison
School with a free supper begin-
ning at 5:00 P.M. followed by danc-
ing until 6:30. All preschoolers,
students K-6 and their parents are
invited to attend.
Arrow Transit will be traveling
through Bison to Rapid City the FIRST
Tuesday of every month. Call 374-
3189 to arrange a ride.
2013 Perkins Co. Princess Aspen Pulver, 2013 Perkins Co. Jr. Queen Maria Roghair, 2013 Perkins
Co. Queen Destiny Wesner.
Queens crowned at Perkins County Fair & Rodeo
Chapman receives $250
Alan Hewitt Scholarship
The South Dakota Association of Mutual Insurance Companies
held their 94th Annual Convention August 7-9 in Chamber-
lain, SD. A golf tournament is held in conjunction with this
convention, the proceeds of which are awarded as scholarships
to qualifying seniors. There is also a scholarship given in
memory of Alan Hewitt, who was a leader in the farm mutual
insurance industry for many years.
Daniel Chapman , Bison, SD, was the winner of the $250 Alan
Hewitt Scholarship. Qualifications for this scholarship are
based on Daniel’s scholastic achievement, his parents’ mem-
bership in Harding & Perkins Farm Mutual Insurance Company
and affiliation with SDAMIC. Daniel is the son of Kirby and
Sylvia Chapman, Bison.
The agency representing Harding & Perkins Farm Mutual In-
surance Company is Dacotah Insurance, Lemmon, South
Dakota, James Hodgson and Michele Haase, agents.
Thompson family heads to school
Taylor, Abigayle, Whitney and Angie Thompson looking forward to the first day of school.
**************************
**************************
Please drive careful,
children are vital to our community!
Join the Bison Girl Scouts, parent informa
tional meeting, 5:15 p.m., August 29th, Bison
School Lunch Room. K-1st Daisies; 2nd- 3rd Brownies;
4th - 5th Juniors; 6th- 8th Cadettes. $15 registration fee
FRIENDS•BADGES • TRIPS • PRIZES • SONGS •
CRAFTS • FUN ACTIVITIES • GAMES
For more info call: Stacy 244-7536 Or Angie 244-7676
Back to School Sock Hop, Tuesday, September 3 at
Bison School with a free supper beginning at 5:00 p.m.
followed by dancing until 6:30. All preschoolers, stu-
dents K-6 and their parents are invited to attend.
Indian Creek Lutheran Church is celebrating its his-
tory of sharing God’s word for 100 years. The 100th Year
Anniversary will be on September 7, 2013. The fellowship
hour will start at 5:00 pm. Supper will follow. Meat, buns,
cake and homemade ice cream will be furnished. Salads
will be potluck. The worship service will be at 7pm. You
are welcome to come and be able to visit with past minis-
ters and God’s family members. See you on Saturday the
7th of September.
The American Lutheran Church is seeking wedding
dresses, baptism gowns and Easter hats from 1913 - 2013
to display during their 100 Year Anniversary program. If
you have an item or know of someone who does, please con-
tact Salli at 605-244-5491.
Alcoholics Anonymous is meeting weekly in Bison. The
group meets every Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church. Everyone is welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 244-7199, or e-mailing to: courier@sd-
plains.com. We will run your event notice the two issues prior
to your event at no charge.
T
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i
s
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in Bison
THE BISON COURIER
Periodicals Postage Paid at Bison, SD 57620
POSTAL PERMIT #009-944
Published weekly every Thursday by Ravellette Publ., Inc.
at PO Box 429, Bison SD 57620-0429
Telephone: 605-244-7199 • Fax: 605-244-7198
E-mail Addresses: courier@sdplains.com
couriernews@sdplains.com
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Bison ............................................................................$36.04
Meadow, Shadehill, Prairie City, Reva & Lodgepole........$35.36
Lemmon........................................................................$36.04
in state ........................................................$39.00 + sales tax
out of state (Includes all Hettinger addresses.) ...$39.00 (no tax)
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Bison Courier, PO Box 429, Bison SD 57620-0429
Deadlines: Display and Classified Advertising: Mon-
days at 12:00 p.m. Legals: Fridays at 12:00 p.m.
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Editor/Office Manager: Arlis Seim
Asst. Editor/Reporter: Lita Wells
Ad Sales: Beth Hulm (244-5231),beth@sdplains.com
COPYRIGHT: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced from this publication, in whole
or in part, without the written consent of the publisher.
Page 2 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
The Stateline Right to Life
chapter met Tuesday, August 13th
at the Grand Electric Social Room
with nine members in attendance.
Our Right to Life sign along the
highway near Keldron, is in need
of repair. As a result the former
pictures on it will be replaced with
new pictures owned by the chap-
ter. Watch for it when you travel
east on Highway 12.
Another fund raising event is
coming up September 28th, at the
Coal Springs Annual threshing
Bee, the chapter members will sell
baked goods and garden produce.
A special event is planned for
Sunday, October 27 from 3 - 5 at
the Fair Building. It is a Fall Fes-
tival Carnival Party, a free event
for family fun. Watch for more in-
formation as the time approaches.
On Saturday, January 18, 2014
chapter members will sell conces-
sions and baked goods at the Het-
tinger/Scranton Girl’s and Boys
basketball games.
Many other Right to Life events
will also be held this fall. On Sep-
tember 14 there will be a walk for
Life Care Net in Rapid City. Sep-
tember 27 - 28 Concerned Women
for America will present a Culture
Warriors Conference in Fargo,
Stateline Right to Life plans busy fall
With long work days and fully-
booked nights, it’s no surprise that
sometimes a solid eight hours of
sleep is just not an option for
many. According to the National
Sleep Foundation’s 2012 “Sleep in
America” poll, about one in ten
Americans say they are likely to
fall asleep at an inappropriate
time — like during a work meet-
ing. With some positions, falling
asleep at inopportune times is
simply embarrassing, but in other
lines of work, falling asleep is very
dangerous. Try these tips from
TOPS Club, Inc.® (Take Off
Pounds Sensibly®), the nonprofit
weight-loss support organization,
to relieve fatigue and stay produc-
tive.
Get up and go
Studies from the American
Heart Association say that move-
ment increases the flow of blood to
the brain, which, in turn, helps
you feel more alert. Incorporating
more activity into your day can
give you a mood boost, too. A study
of 210 UK workers, most of them
with sedentary jobs, found that ex-
ercising during the workday made
them feel more forgiving of their
coworkers’ mistakes and more con-
fident in their own abilities, as
well as increased their work per-
formance. Take a short walk out-
side the office, or inside if the
weather isn’t cooperating, and
take the stairs instead of the ele-
vator. Stand while talking on the
telephone, and take regular
breaks for stretching.
Pack some protein
A 2011 study published in the
journal Neuron found that protein
stimulates orexin cells in the
brain, which send electrical im-
pulses that keep us alert and
awake. A carbohydrate-rich snack,
on the other hand, boosts blood
sugar and then lowers it just as
quickly, which can cause that
drowsy, dragging feeling. Quick,
work-friendly, high-protein bites
include a hard-boiled egg, a cup of
Greek yogurt, a handful of pump-
kin seeds, or almonds.
Give in to your caffeine crav-
ing
The reliable favorite, caffeine,
undoubtedly works to keep your
eyes open, but what’s the healthi-
est way to get it into your system,
and how much is enough? Experts
consider 200 to 300 milligrams of
caffeine per day a moderate
amount. So to avoid jitters or in-
somnia later in the day, limit your-
self to three eight-ounce cups of
coffee. By comparison, according
to the Mayo Clinic, black tea can
have up to 61 milligrams per eight
ounces. Coffee and tea are a better
choice than sugary and sodium-
filled energy drinks and sodas but
should still be sipped in modera-
tion.
Let the light in
Does your work environment
feel like a cave? With no indicators
of time of day or weather condi-
tions, fluorescent lighting, and
bleak surroundings, it’s easy to
feel sleepy. If you don’t work in
proximity to windows, studies
have shown that having a live
plant can be just as effective. A
study recently conducted at Wash-
ington State University showed
that having plants around a work
area can greatly improve employ-
ees’ energy level. The results
showed that workers with desk
plants were 12 percent more pro-
ductive and less stressed than
those who worked in an environ-
ment with no plants. Subject reac-
tion time in the presence of plants
was also 12 percent faster than
those in the absence of plants.
Keep tabs on your hydration
Water is important for your over-
all health and plays a part in en-
ergy levels as well. Dehydration
can cause fatigue, so be sure to
drink plenty of fluids. Also con-
sider eating foods high in water,
including strawberries, water-
melon, cantaloupe, peaches, cu-
cumbers, tomatoes, and zucchinis,
to replenish.
Energize your work day in a healthier way
North Dakota, at the Calvary
United Methodist Church. The six
speakers include; Kitty Werth-
mann, president of South Dakota
Eagle Forum; William Federer,
best selling author and President
of Amerisearch Inc.; Dr. Janice
Crouse, Director and Senior Fel-
low of the Beverly LaHaye insti-
tute; Kenda Bartlett, CWA
Executive Director; Caroline
Biggs, CWA Young Woman of
America Coordinator.
The next meeting is set for Tues-
day, September 24th at 5 p.m. at
the Grand Electric Social Room.
Teddi Carlson, Secretary
Preventing BER
As The Garden Gate closes for
another season we want to wish
you a bountiful harvest from your
garden and know you will be plan-
ning next year’s garden before the
frost finishes the season for 2013.
As you plan for next year, here are
a few suggestions that may help
you prevent, or at least diminish,
tomato blossom end rot (BER) for
2014.
There are several ways you can
take precautions for next year's
crop! Prevention starts this Fall
with soil preparation and moves
right into seedling preparation in
early Spring.
•Carefully harden off young
seedlings gradually to protect
them from extreme temperatures
and conditions.
•Select a planting area with
good drainage.
•Avoid setting out plants too
early in the season, which can ex-
pose them to cold temperatures
and cold soil. Allow soil to warm
before planting.
• Work in plenty of compost and
organic matter into the soil before
planting, so that the plant’s root
system has a better chance to
grow strong and deep. This can be
done in the fall after you have
cleaned up all the plant material,
or if it is disease free, worked it
into the soil.
•If you had to water extensively
this season it may be helpful to
your soil to add lime to all your
garden soil to reduce the salinity
caused by well water in this re-
gion.
•Add quick-release lime (NOT
“Quick-lime” ) but Horticulture
Lime, a mixture of calcium carbon-
ate and magnesium carbonate; or
Gypsum, calcium sulphate) when
planting tomatoes so that there’s
plenty of calcium in the soil and
it’s absorbed quickly. Tomatoes
grow best when the soil pH is
about 6.5.
•Keep your tomatoes’ water
supply even throughout the sea-
son so that calcium uptake is reg-
ular. Tomatoes need 1-3 inches of
water a week. They perform best
when watered deeply a couple of
times a week rather than superfi-
cially every day.
•Mulch plants once established
to maintain moisture levels.
•Once blossoms emerge, apply
tomato fertilizer that is high in
phosphorus (the second number in
a fertilizer’s three-number series),
like 4-12-4 or 5-20-5. Too much ni-
trogen (the first number) or large
amounts of fresh manure can pre-
vent calcium uptake. Too much ni-
trogen also increases foliage at the
expense of fruit.
•Cultivate carefully around
tomato plants to avoid damaging
root systems. Try not to dig more
than an inch or two deep around
plants.
Youth is like spring, an over
praised season more remarkable
for biting winds than genial
breezes. Autumn is the mellower
season, and what we lose in flow-
ers we more than gain in fruits.
~Samuel Butler
Submitted by Karen Englehart,
Master Gardener, SDSU Coopera-
tive Extension Service
Garden Gate
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 3
Rosebud News.......By Tiss Treib
Ron Sittner and his sister Diane
called on John and Shirley John-
son one afternoon this week.
LaVonne Foss spent time with
Shirley and Lexi Johnson Satur-
day.
Mike and Annie Johnson called
on Shirley and Lexi Johnson Sat-
urday evening.
Lexi Johnson was a Saturday
overnight guest of her grand-
mother, Shirley Johnson.
John, Gary and Jodi Johnson
spent Saturday at Seven Downs
Arena for the Bill Meyer’s horse
sale.
Tiss Treib called on Shirley
Johnson several times this past
week.
LaVonne Foss spent Sunday
with Shirley and Lexi Johnson.
Thelma Sandgren was an after-
noon visitor.
Jim and Patsy Miller spent
Thursday and Friday with Matt
and Christi Miller and visited with
Violet Miller Friday afternoon.
Jim and Patsy Miller attended
the Shriners picnic at Shadehill
Saturday.
Patsy Miller called on Linda
Seim Wednesday.
Mandy Anderson brought sup-
per to Nolan and Linda Seim
Thursday.
Sarah Dreiske, Spencer and
McKenna spent Friday afternoon
and evening with Linda Seim
while Larry Dreiske and Nolan
Seim traveled to Rapid City.
Sarah Dreiske spent Saturday
with her mother, Linda Seim
while Larry Dreiske accompanied
Nolan to Rapid City. Ruth Wiech-
mann and girls called on them in
the afternoon.
Bev Hoffman had lunch with Is-
abel Boespflug and her brother
Leo Boespflug of Ranchester, WY
in Lemmon Saturday.
Keith and Bev Hoffman had
supper in Lemmon Saturday
evening with Beenie Lockert.
Harris' and Keller's traveled to
Faith Monday to sell steers.
Duane Harris was a Tuesday
dinner guest of the Kellers.
Albert returned to work
Wednesday.
Friday, Duane Harris was a din-
ner guest of the Kellers.
Saturday, Dawn Harris and
Bridget and the boys traveled to
Hettinger for errands. Connie
Hermann and Tina Hermann
were brief evening guests, they
came to pick chokecherries.
Sunday, Dawn Harris stopped
by in the evening before heading
to work in Dickinson.
Justin, Jo and Jacob Seim left
Monday to fly to England to visit
Jo’s family.
Tiss Treib had lunch with
Michele Marthaller Tuesday in
Hettinger.
Tiss Treib met up with Dorena
Wiechmann and Esther Johnson
in Hettinger Tuesday afternoon
and visited for a bit.
Tiss Treib called on John and
Shirley Johnson Tuesday evening.
Rita Whittet met Tiss Treib in
White Butte Wednesday afternoon
and they traveled to Glen Ullin to
take the dogs back to Diana
Owens. They met up with Loren
Kilen and Amy Traxel while in
Glen Ullin and had a nice visit.
On the way home, Tiss took Rita
out to supper in Lemmon.
Ben, Ezra and Miles Wiech-
mann called on Tiss Treib Friday
afternoon and helped vaccinate
some cows.
Thelma Sandgren called on
Helen Meink Wednesday after-
noon.
Thursday, Steve Sandgren and
Mike Schmeltzer stopped in to
visit Thelma Sandgren and Steve
did some mowing.
Friday is Thelma Sandgren’s
day in Hettinger and Gladys Mer-
win and Thelma had lunch at the
Prairie Rose Floral. Later, Thelma
took her sister, Gladys Vliem out
of the Nursing home and Gladys
treated Thelma to ice cream and
coffee.
Thelma Sandgren attended wor-
ship at Rosebud Saturday evening
followed by coffee and a meeting.
Sunday, Thelma Sandgren at-
tended the Presbyterian Church in
Bison hoping to see Kylee, but her
family had packed her up and out
Saturday for her year at college.
James Sandgren treated Marci,
Paulette and Thelma to dinner in
Bison.
Weather
Wise
DATE HI LO PRECIP
Aug 20 98 70
Aug 21 96 57
Aug 22 85 58
Aug 23 89 65
Aug 24 94 64
Aug 25 94 66 .9
Aug 26 93 66
One year ago
Hi 98 Lo 48
Brought to you by
Grand Electric Co-op, Inc.
Dr. Jason M. Hafner
Dr. David J. Prosser
OPTOMETRIST
Faith Clinic
1st & 3rd Wed. of the month
Buffalo Clinic
2nd & 4th Wed. of the month
1-800-648-0760
Page 4 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
Sizing Up
Unlike women, when farmers
and ranchers meet each other for
the first time, they look each other
in the eye, say “Hi,” and shake
hands. That’s it. There’s no com-
paring each other’s outfits, hair,
shoes, fingernails, thighs, or body
proportions.
Men don’t care about another
guy’s physical appearance, but
when they’re looking at another
man’s set of corrals, hay fields,
crops, cattle, tractors and other
machinery, and anything pertain-
ing to another man’s hay bales,
that’s a whole different deal. Men
size each other up based on each
other’s work and success, and for
farmers and ranchers it’s all
things farm or ranch-related.
Farmer/rancher-style sizing up
can occur from afar, such as from
the highway driving by cattle
grazing in pastures or fields brim-
ming with a crop. When farmers
and ranchers drive interstate in
crop and cattle country, the last
thing they’re focused on is the
road. Their eyes bounce around
like a pinball from one side of the
highway to the other looking at
the work of farms and ranches in
passing. If you don’t believe me,
just ask their wives.
For men whose livelihood is in
agriculture, traveling into a differ-
ent agricultural region fascinates
them. They appear to be evaluat-
ing another man’s windrowing,
combining, stewardship practices,
crops, or cattle, but their wives are
never quite sure which one. Upon
entering into a region growing
completely different kinds of crops
or livestock breeds, ag men also
try to figure out another farmer or
rancher’s logic, system, or philos-
ophy on something according to
what he sees. Sometimes these
men will try to philosophize with
their wives, who are either oblivi-
ous to such observations, not con-
cerned, or both, about a puzzling
farming or ranching scene. A pop-
ular question in our vehicle is,
“Why do you suppose they (farm-
ers/ranchers) (fill in the blank)?”
Sizing up can also take place
while reading about agricultural
places featured in magazines and
newspapers or while visiting an-
other farm or ranch. With either of
these two observation methods, a
whole lot of mental absorption is
going on. Since it’s rare that farm-
ers and ranchers get to observe
other operations, visiting someone
else’s place is a full-on taking-it-
all-in kind of thing. Getting away
from the farm or ranch for more
than 12 hours is rare for families
in agriculture, so an opportunity
to see another man’s farm/ranch is
what you’d call eye candy to the
men who make their living in agri-
culture. Most farmers and ranch-
ers consider seeing anything that
reminds them of their work and
their own place their favorite part
of any family vacation.
The mental notes taken on an-
other man’s pastures, outbuild-
ings, machinery, livestock feeding
practices, storage systems, water-
ing systems, or whatever, are filed
away for mulling later. The infor-
mation gets analyzed during a
man’s daily pondering time or
most likely on a long drive home
while the whole family sleeps.
Men in agriculture love to see
how other farms/ranches operate
and size up other places for reas-
surance purposes regarding their
own operation because they all
work hard to run their place as ef-
ficiently as possible, provide a
high quality product, and to get
their own farm or ranch looking in
top shape. The conclusion of most
farmers and ranchers once they’ve
returned home is a renewed feel-
ing of pride in their work, crops,
livestock, but more importantly,
having somebody else drive next
time so they can look at all the
farms and ranches.
Guest Columnist
Amy Kirk is a ranch wife from Custer, SD
Grace Baptist Church • Pastor Phil Hahn
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship Service - 10:30a.m.
Wednesday Prayer Mtg. - 7:30 p.m.
Church of Christ
18 mi. south of Prairie City - Worship Service - 10:00 a.m.
Prairie Fellowship Parish ELCA • Pastor Dana Lockhart
Saturday evening service at Indian Creek - 5:00 p.m. • Rosebud - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday morning services at American - 8:30 a.m. • Grand River Lutheran
Christ Lutheran Church WELS
Pastor Gerhardt Juergens
Sunday Bible Class - 8:00 a.m., Worship Service - 8:30 a.m.
Coal Springs Community Church
Pastors Nels & Angie Easterby
South Jct. of Highways 73 & 20
Sunday School - 10:00 a.m., Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
Seventh Day Adventist Church • Pastor David Moench
Sabbath School - 2:00 p.m., Worship Service - 3:00 p.m.
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church • Fr. Tony Grossenburg
Saturday Mass: - Lemmon 4:45 p.m. Bison - 7:15 p.m.,
Sunday Mass: Lemmon - 8:15 a.m., Morristown - 10:30 a.m.
Holland Center Christian Reformed Church
Pastor Brad Burkhalter • Lodgepole
Worship Service - 8:00 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church • Pastor Florence Hoff, CRE
Worship Service - 10:30 a.m.
Slim Buttes Lutheran • Pastor Henry Mohagen
Reva • Worship Service - 9:00 a.m., WMF 2nd Wednesday at 1:00 p.m.
Beckman Wesleyan Church • Pastor Brad Burkhalter
Prairie City
Sunday School - 10:00 a.m., Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m.
Vesper Service - 6:00 p.m., Wed. Evenings - 7:30 p.m.
Have you had someone ask you a question that you know
they know the answer? We maybe all have had that happen
at some time. It might be just for something to talk about
or it might be to find out how you are going to respond to a
certain subject or maybe how you feel on some political
issue. Jesus was asked questions along the way even if the
person knew the answer. In Luke chapter 10:25-37 we have
what is referred to as the story of the Good Samaritan. In
no way is Jesus telling this lawyer that if you helped out
this man, robbed and beaten and trouble, you would
“inherit eternal life”. But this was the question that this
lawyer asked Jesus and he answered his own question with
“Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all
your soul and with all you strength and with all you mind
and Love your neighbor as yourself”. Jesus said that is
right. When Christ is first in our lives and saturated in
our lives we have eternal life with Him. This lawyer was
very well educated in the law and understood that but
really didn’t understand Christ’s love and compassion.
If the lawyer would have walked away then and there,
we would not have the story of the Good Samaritan but he
asked the question “Who is my neighbor”. Jesus goes on
and tells the story establishing who our neighbor is. As a
believer in Christ as our savior we are to demonstrate our
love for fellow man because of Christ in our lives not to
gain eternal life.
Pastors Perspective
Pastor Henry Mohagen
Slim Buttes Lutheran Church
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 5
Tori Timm of Vale received third place, Tally Lundberg received second and Tylee Lundberg re-
ceived first place in the class of mares.
Christi and Cort Ryen placed first in the gelding class.
Laura Fisher placed second in the 14 & over Western pleasure
class.
Family Play Day results
First place winners in all of the
stickhorse events won a buckle.
Buckles were donated by Herman
& Ruby VanDenBerg, Prairie City;
Dr. Mark Nelson, DDS, Hettinger;
Dakota Plains Federal Credit
Union, Hettinger & Lemmon; Bob
& Camille Drown, Bison; Pre-
ferred Home Health, Buffalo; Jens
& Marilyn Hansen, Meadow.
Stick Horse race 0-4 yr olds: 1st
Owen Woods; 2nd Ellie Woods; 3rd
Laykn Hulm.
5-6 yr olds: 1st Whitney Thomp-
son; 2nd Katlyn Gebhart; 3rd
Drew Spence.
7-8 yr olds: Ellie Heig; 2nd
Shannon Gebhart; 3rd Mary
Carmichael.
Performance Class 1st Ellie Heig;
2nd Drew Spence; 3rd Katlyn Geb-
hart.
Stick Horse barrels 1st Ellie Heig;
2nd Katlyn Gebhart; 3rd Drew
Spence.
Bucking Broncs 1st Ellie Heig;
2nd Hayden Heig; 3rd Shannon
Gebhart.
Boot Scramble 0-4 yr olds 1st
Drew Spence; 2nd Aspen Pulver;
3rd Shannon Gebhart.
Horse events: Barrels 0-8 Talon
Lundberg; 2nd Cort Ryen.
9-16 yr olds 1st Peyton Mullinex;
2nd Nicole Hafner; 3rd Wade Pul-
ver.
16 & over 1st Rainie Mullinex; 2nd
Carla Timm; 3rd Destiny Wesner.
Tandem Bareback 1st Taylor &
Laura Fisher; 2nd Nicole Hafner
& Jenna Kari; 3rd Rainie & Pey-
ton Mullinex.
Sack Race 1st Rainie & Peyton
Mullinex; 2nd Rainie Mullinex &
Lonnie Richards; 3rd Carrie
Schalesky & Destiny Wesner.
Poles 9-16 yr olds 1st Peyton
Mullinex; 2nd Nicole Hafner; 3rd
Wade Pulver.
16 & over 1st Destiny Wesner; 2nd
Rainie Mullinex; 3rd Carla Timm.
Phone a Friend Jr. 1st peyton
Mullinex; 2nd Tayton Schofield;
3rd Coy Timm.
Sr 1st Christi Ryen; 2nd Rainie
Mullinex; 3rd Carla Timm.
Wheelbarrow Race 1st
Richards/Mullinex team; 2nd
Ryen team; 3rd Justin Kolb, Syd-
ney Senn, Jenna Kari team.
Mutton Busting at the playday 1st
Owen Woods; 2nd Mary
Carmichael; 3rd Talon Lundberg.
Saturday night rodeo 1st Will
Mickelson; 2nd Toby Mickelson;
3rd Sierra Mickelson; 4th Riley
Lawhead; 5th Jarett Schuchard;
6th Axelyn Sacrison; 7th S Mickel-
son; 8th Drew Spence; 9th Wynn
Laurence; 10th Riley Veal.
Sunday’s rodeo 1st Jarett
Schuchard; 2nd Wayce Nelson; 3rd
Hayes Burress; 4th Cruz Mack-
aben.
Steer Riding Playday 1st Wade
Pulver.
Saturday night rodeo 1st Wade
Pulver; 2nd Jayden Olson.
Sunday’s rodeo 1st Jacob
Schalesky.
Calf Scramble 0-8 yr olds 1st Jozi
Schuchard; 2nd Rope Roghair; 3rd
Hayes Burress.
9-12 yr olds 1st Kiley Schuchard;
2nd Wayce Nelson; 3rd Gavin Nel-
son.
Hayden Heig won the Miniature Pony class.
Perkins County Fair horse show
College
Subscriptions
to the
Bison Courier
are $25.48 for a
9 month Sub
Page 6 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
Mr. Brian Holder and his wife
Lauren moved to Bison from
Northampton, Massachusetts.
Brian is the new music
teacher at the Bison School,
and will be teaching general
music, band, choir, and jazz
band. He holds a Bachelor of
Music in Music Education de-
gree from the University of
Dayton, and both the Master
of Music in Music Perform-
ance and Doctor of Philosophy
in Musicology degrees from
the University of Florida. He
also has a wide performance
background, and has pub-
lished several articles on
music history. Brian looks
forward to working with all the
music students at the Bison
School, and can be contacted
at brian.holder@k12.sd.us
Mrs. Marilyn Azevedo, Super-
intendent
Mrs. Donna Keller, 1st grade
Josh McKinstry, Ruth Burkhalter, Daniel Burkhalter. Not pictured Joseph Kvale and Joey Auk-
land.
Katie Helms, NWAS, Early
Childhood Development and
Elementary Speech
Mrs. Lauren Holder, Athletic
Director
Mrs. Abby Landphere 4th
grade
Mr. Eric Terrel, I am thrilled
to be the new math teacher
in Bison. I have enjoyed vis-
iting with students and par-
ents around town and feel
very welcomed by the com-
munity. I am working to add
stability to the math program
and am excited to help ease
students math anxiety this
year. I look forward to work-
ing hard with my students to
prepare them for state test-
ing and college readiness. We
will also work to identify
other post secondary math
needs and build the skills our
students need to meet the
challenges and opportunities
presented to twenty first cen-
tury life long learners.
Camille Drown, head cook; Danelle Gerbracht, assistant cook
Returning cross country lettermen
New employees in the Bison School system
“Our sales are every day”
CC Flooring
Highway 12 • Hettinger • 701-567-2677
carpet • vinyl • hardwood
• ceramics
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 7
Coach Wayne Sanders and Assistant Coach James Sandgren
Back row: Tucker Watson Veal, Joshua Beckman, Logan Hendrickson, Ty Collins, Paden Sexton.
Front row Clayton Prelle, Reed Arneson, Michael Kopren, John Hatle.
Monday, September 3
NO SCHOOL
Tuesday, September 4
Sausage links
mac & cheese
green beans
salad bar, w/g roll
fruit & milk
Wednesday, September 5
Sloppy joes
string cheese
salad bar
fruit & milk
Thursday, September 6
Ham & scalloped potatoes
salad, w/g roll
fruit, milk
Back row: Kimberly Peck, Charlotte Johnson, Lenae McKinstry. Front row: Madison Hulm, Mar-
randa Hulm, Sydney Arneson.
Palace
Theater
The Smurfs 2
PG • 105 min.
August 30 - Sept. 2
7:30 p.m. nightly
NO Sunday matinee
surround sound
Lemmon 374-5107
Returning football lettermen and coaches
Returning volleyball lettermen
Page 8 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
Child and Adult Nutrition Serv-
ices in the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Education announces the
policy for free milk or free and re-
duced price meals. The policy ap-
plies to children unable to pay the
full price of meals or milk served
under the National School Lunch,
School Breakfast, and/or Special
Milk Programs. The administra-
tive office of each school that par-
ticipates in the Lunch, Breakfast,
and/or Milk Program has a copy of
the policy available for review.
Children from families whose
income is at or below the levels
shown are eligible for free or re-
duced price meals. Children from
a household whose income is at or
below the level shown for free
meals may be eligible for free milk
if the school participates in a fed-
erally funded Special Milk Pro-
gram.
Families may apply for free or
reduced price meals or free milk
for their children for school year
2013-14 according to guidelines ef-
fective July 1, 2013. Applications
will be provided to households by
the school. Families that are di-
rectly certified as eligible for free
meals will receive a notice of eligi-
bility
The school will use the prior
year’s eligibility status (free, re-
duced price, or paid) from last year
for up to the first 30 days of school
or until a new application is ap-
proved or direct certification is ob-
tained, whichever comes first.
Households that are currently
on Supplemental Nutrition Assis-
tance Program (SNAP) or Tempo-
rary Assistance for Needy
Families (TANF) will receive let-
ters from the school indicating
that their children are eligible for
free school meals. These families
should not complete an application
for free meals. If a family becomes
eligible for benefits mid-month,
the family should fill out an appli-
cation and list their case number
so they get the free benefits right
away. All children in a household
with any household member re-
Education department announces guidelines for
2013-14 free or reduced school meal programs
ceiving benefits under TANF or
SNAP are eligible for free meals.
Families receiving commodities
through the Food Distribution
Program on Indian Reservations
(FDPIR) can request an Intera-
gency Action Notice that can be
brought to the school in place of an
application to document free meal
eligibility, or they can complete an
application and list the FDPIR
case number. All children in a
household with any household
member receiving benefits under
FDPIR are eligible for free meals.
If the school knows of children
who are homeless, runaway, foster,
from a migrant household, or who
are enrolled in Head Start, they
will send a letter to the household
telling them the children are eligi-
ble for free meals. If the household
does not receive a letter or has
questions, they should contact the
school. The household must notify
the school if it chooses to decline
benefits.
Foster children that are under
the legal responsibility of a foster
care agency or court are eligible
for free meals. Any foster child in
the household is eligible for free
meals regardless of income.
Households may include foster
children on the application, but
are not required to include pay-
ments received for care of the fos-
ter child as income.
To apply for free or reduced
price meals, other households
should fill out the application and
return it to the school. An applica-
tion must include the names of
children for whom benefits are re-
quested, all household members
and their monthly income or des-
ignation that they do not have any
income, and be signed by an adult
household member with the last
four digits of that person’s social
security number. Incomplete ap-
plications cannot be approved for
free or reduced price meals. Addi-
tional copies are available in the
school office. The information pro-
vided on the application is confi-
dential and will be used for the
purpose of determining eligibility
status for school meals and Title I
programs. The school will provide
additional information if it wants
to use eligibility status for other
purposes.
An eligibility determination is
good for the whole year; however,
applications may be submitted at
any time during the year. Contact
the school if a household member
becomes unemployed or if the
household size changes. The chil-
dren from that household may be
eligible for free or reduced price
meals or free milk during the time
of unemployment if the house-
hold’s income falls within the in-
come eligibility guidelines.
Information on any application
may be verified at any time during
the school year by school or other
program officials.
If a parent or guardian is dissat-
isfied with the ruling on the appli-
cation for eligibility, she/he may
contact the determining official on
an informal basis. If the parent or
guardian wishes to make a formal
appeal, an oral or written request
may be made to the school’s hear-
ing official for a hearing to appeal
the decision.
Some schools may choose to
send a special notice about the
Children's Health Insurance Pro-
gram to households with the appli-
cation. It provides a way for school
personnel to know if families will
allow them to use students' eligi-
bility status for other program
benefits. The decision whether or
not a household is eligible for meal
benefits or not is not affected by
this form.
Non-discrimination Statement:
This explains what to do if you be-
lieve you have been treated un-
fairly. The U.S. Department of
Agriculture prohibits discrimina-
tion against its customers, em-
ployees, and applicants for
employment on the bases of race,
color, national origin, age, disabil-
ity, sex, gender identity, religion,
reprisal, and where applicable, po-
litical beliefs, marital status, fa-
milial or parental status, sexual
orientation, or all or part of an in-
dividual’s income is derived from
any public assistance program, or
protected genetic information in
employment or in any program or
activity conducted or funded by
the Department. (Not all bases
will apply to all programs and/or
employment activities.)
If you wish to file a Civil Rights
program complaint of discrimina-
tion, complete the USDA Program
Discrimination Complaint Form
found online at
http://www.ascr.usda.gov/com-
plaint_filing_cust.html, or at any
USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992
to request the form. You may also
write a letter containing all of the
information requested in the form.
Send your completed complaint
form or letter to us by mail at U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Direc-
tor, Office of Adjudication, 1400 In-
dependence Avenue, S.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by
fax (202) 690-7442 or email at pro-
gram.intake@usda.gov. Individu-
als who are deaf, hard of hearing,
or have speech disabilities may
contact USDA through the Federal
Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or
(800) 845-6136 (Spanish).
USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.
If a child needs a special diet as
prescribed by a doctor, the house-
hold should contact the school’s
food service manager.
The income scales below are
used to determine an applicant’s
eligibility for free or reduced price
meals if the household is at or
below the guidelines.
Income Eligibility Guidelines: 2013-2014
Annually Annually Monthly Monthly Weekly Weekly
Household size Free Reduced Free Reduced Free Reduced
1 $14937 $421257 $1245 $1772 $288 $409
2 $20163 $28694 $1681 $2392 $388 $552
3 $25389 $36131 $2116 $3011 $489 $695
4 $30615 $43568 $2552 $3631 $589 $838
5 $35841 $51005 $2987 $4251 $690 $981
6 $41067 $58442 $3423 $4871 $790 $1124
7 $46293 $65879 $3858 $5490 $890 $1267
8 $51519 $73316 $4294 $6110 $991 $1410
For each
additional $5226 $7437 $436 $620 $101 $144
family member,
add
Meadow News
By Tiss Treib
Pat Ellis and Jim Sanders were
Sunday evening scrabble players
with Bernie Rose.
Jerry and Carolyn Petik were in
Lemmon on Tuesday and took
Irene Young out to lunch.
Wednesday, Jerry and Carolyn
Petik accompanied the DeJon
Bakken family to Medora to at-
tend the musical.
Thursday afternoon, Jerry and
Carolyn Petik were among guests
of Kim and Jim Petik at the
Shadehill Lake Lodge. Thursday
evening they were visitors at
Thelma Lemke's and were among
several family members who went
out to supper with Jodi and Rick
Blackburn from Ranier, OR.
Kim Petik, Dottie Barnes and
daughters were Friday afternoon
visitors at the Jerry Petiks. They
came to see Web and Marilyn
Brower from Maine who are visit-
ing friends in the area. Friday
evening Jennifer and Rusty Craw-
ford of Washington State arrived
to visit with relatives in the area.
They and Brower’s were supper
guests.
Saturday morning the Craw-
ford’s and Petiks joined other fam-
ily members in Lemmon for lunch.
They also visited the Grand River
Museum.
Jerry and Carolyn were visitors
at Jim and Kim Petik's on Sunday
afternoon.
Gary and Cymbre Christman of
Houston, TX are visiting Art and
Marilyn Christman this week.
Omitted from last weeks Open
Class static exhibits Dorothy
Dedmon received a Blue ribbon
on her Mint fudge.
Tickets available at the door
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 9
Bareback
1st place- Lonny Lesmeister of
Rapid City, S.D. with a score of 79,
$388.00; 2nd place- Chance En-
glebert of Burdock, S.D. with a
score of 73, $291.00; 3rd place-
Mark Kenyon of Hayti, S.D. with
a score of 72, $194.00; 4th place-
Ryan Burkinshaw of Hermosa,
S.D. with a score of 70, $97.00.
Barrel Racing
1st place- Wanda Brown of Edge-
mont, S.D. with a time of 16.39,
$351.63; 2nd place- Kailee Webb
of Isabel, S.D. with a time of 16.56,
$291.00; 3rd place- Shanna An-
derson of Eagle Butte, S.D. with a
time of 16.71, $230.38; 4th place-
Hallie Fulton of Miller, S.D. with
a time of 16.77, $169.75; 5th
place- Brooke Howell of Belle
Fourche, S.D. with a time of 16.78,
$109.13; 6th place- ReAnn Crane
of Whitewood, S.D. with a time of
16.79, $60.63.
Bull Riding
1st place- Jake Foster of Meadow,
S.D. with a score of 80, $323.50;
2nd place- Zach Scofield of Belle
Fourche, S.D. with a score of 75,
$262.72.
Calf Roping - 1st place- Troy
Wilcox of Red Owl, S.D. with a
time of 10.40, $393.82; 2nd place-
Chad Pelster of Belle Fourche,
S.D. and Jace Melvin of Ft. Pierre,
S.D. with a team time of 10.70,
$291.97 each; 3rd place- Jesse
Medearis of Ismay, M.T. and Matt
Peters of Hot Springs, S.D. with a
team time of 10.80, $156.17 each;
4th place- Kourt Starr of Dupree,
S.D. with a time of 11.70, $67.90.
Goat Tying - 1st place- Katie
Doll of Prairie City, S.D with a
time of 7.50, $368.60; 2nd place-
Kristi Birkeland of Dupree, S.D.
with a time of 7.60, $276.45; tied
for 3rd place- Krystal Marone of
Isabel, S.D. with a time of 7.80,
$138.22 and Chelsey Kelly of
Dupree, S.D. with a time of 7.80
also, $138.22.
Ladies Breakaway - 1st place-
Samantha Jorgenson of Watford
City, N.D. with a time of 3.10,
$632.93; 2nd place- Amy Tierney
of Oral, S.D. with a time of 3.50,
$523.80; 3rd place- Elizabeth
Baker of Box Elder, S.D. with a
time of 3.70, $414.68; 4th place-
Brooke Howell of Belle Fourche,
S.D. with a time of 3.90, $305.55;
5th place- Misty McPherson of
Piedmont, S.D. with a time of 4.00,
$196.43; Tied for 6th place-
Brooke Nelson of Phillip, S.D. with
a time of 4.10, $54.56 and Kaycee
Nelson of Buffalo, S.D. with a time
of 4.10 also, $54.56.
Mixed Team Roping - 1st place-
Ashley Price of Faith, S.D. with a
time of 4.80, $337.56; 2nd place-
Elizabeth Baker of Box Elder, S.D.
with a time of 5.30, $279.36; 3rd
place- Brenda White of Oelrichs,
S.D. with a time of 6.80, $221.16;
4th place- Denise Nelson with a
time of 7.00, $162.96; 5th place-
Brooke Nelson with a time of 7.60,
$104.76; 6th place- Hanna Brown
of Faith, S.D. with a time of 7.70,
$58.20.
Saddle Bronc - 1st place- Travis
Schroth of Buffalo Gap, S.D. with
a score 79, $323.50; Tied for 2nd
place- Ty Kennedy of Philip, S.D.
with a score 78, $239.83 and
Wyatt Kammerer of Philip, S.D.
with a score of 78 also, $239.83;
3rd place- Shorty Garrett of
Dupree, S.D. with a score of 76,
$156.17; 4th place- Jay Long-
brake of Dupree, S.D. with a score
of 73, $100.40; 5th place- Kash
Deal of Dupree, S.D. with a score
of 72, $55.78.
Senior Mens Breakaway - 1st
place- Lynn McNenny of Sturgis,
S.D. with a time of 2.50, $337.56;
2nd place- Arlyn Lawerence of
Mobridge, S.D. with a time of 2.70,
$279.36; 3rd place- Terry
McPherson of Piedmont, S.D. with
a time of 3.20, $221.16; 4th place-
Les Haugen of Alexander, N.D.
with a time of 3.30, $162.96; 5th
place- Rick Downey of Piedmont,
S.D. with a time of 4.50, $104.76.
Steer Wrestling - 1st place-
Rick Baier of Buffalo, S.D. with a
time of 4.70, $379.76; 2nd place-
Hoyt Kraeger of Miller, S.D. with
a time of 5.50, $314.28; 3rd place-
Jayce Doan of McKenzie, N.D.
with a time of 5.60, $248.81; 4th
place- Casey Olson of Prairie City,
S.D. with a time of 6.00, $183.33;
3 way tie for 5th place- Vance
Steedley of Sundance, W.Y. with a
time of 7.40, $61.11 and Clint Doll
of Prairie City, S.D. with a time of
7.40, $61.11 and Brett Wilcox of
Red Owl, S.D. with a time of 7.40,
$61.11.
Team Roping Header - 1st
place- Radley Day of Volborg,
N.D. with a time of 6.00, $407.89;
2nd place- Chad Nelson of Bow-
man, N.D. with a time of 6.20,
$337.56; 3rd place- JB Lord of
Sturgis, S.D. with a time of 6.40,
$267.24; 4th place- Brett Wilcox
of Red Owl, S.D. with a time of
6.70, $196.91; 5th place- Wyatt
Bice of Killdeer, N.D. with a time
of 7.00, $126.59; 6th place- Terry
McPherson of Piedmont with a
time of 7.10, $70.33.
Team Roping Heeler - 1st
place- Taylor Williams of Volborg,
N.D. with a time of 6.00, $407.89;
2nd place- Parker Murnion of
Bowman, N.D. with a time of 6.20,
$337.56; 3rd place- Jesse
Fredrickson of Menoken, N.D.
with a time of 6.40, $267.24; 4th
place- Clint Cobb of Red Owl,
N.D. with a time of 6.70, $196.91;
5th place- Zane Hollenbeck of Re-
gent, N.D. with a time of 7.00,
$126.59; 6th place- Michael
McPherson of Box Elder, S.D. with
a time of 7.10, $70.33.
Results from Perkins County Fair rodeo
Page 10 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
BISON SCHOOL
DISTRICT #52-1
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
MEETING
DATE: August 12, 2013 TIME HELD:
7:00 p.m. KIND OF MEETING: Regu-
lar WHERE HELD: Boardroom MEM-
BERS PRESENT: Arneson, Beckman,
Kari, Kvale MEMBERS ABSENT:
Thompson OFFICERS AND OTHERS
PRESENT: Supt. Azevedo, Asst. Bus.
Mgr. Johnson, Sydney Arneson, Joey
Aukland, Joseph Kvale and Theora
Carlson
CHAIRMAN KVALE CALLED THE
MEETING TO ORDER WITH A CALL
FOR THE SALUTE TO THE FLAG.
CONSENT AGENDA
16. Motion by Arneson, second by Kari
to approve the consent agenda with
the following addition: 5a.Senior
Lounge Request and to approve the
minutes of the July 8th regular meet-
ing and the minutes of the July 11th
CLEANING, 69.73; CLASSROOM DI-
RECT, SUPPLIES, 80.78; CAN
SURETY, BOND, 50.00; CRITICAL
THINKING CO, BOOKS, 280.31;
CROW, BONNIE, SUPPLIES, 440.84;
CYNMAR CORP, SUPPLIES, 243.07;
DAKOTA FEED, GAS, 970.53;
DEMCO, SUPPLIES, 493.40; EPS,
SUPPLIES, 28.50; FLINN SCIEN-
TIFIC, SUPPLIES, 966.53; FLOWER
BOX, SUPPLIES, 56.18; G&O PAPER,
SUPPLIES, 69.50; GENESIS INC,
SUPPLIES, 27.00; GRAND ELEC-
TRIC, ELECT/LABOR/SUPPLIES,
2,548.10; HAND2MIND, SUPPLIES,
151.70; HARMON LAW OFFICE,
LEGAL FEES, 40.00; HEARTLAND
PAPER COMPANY, SUPPLIES,
273.87; HILLYARD/SIOUX FALLS,
SUPPLIES, 40.34; HOUGHTON MIF-
FLIN, WORKBOOKS, 1,567.86; IM-
PACT SCHOOLS OF SD, DUES,
500.00; INSECT LORE, SUPPLIES,
51.75; INT. ACADEMY OF SCIENCE,
SUPPORT FEE, 500.00; JACKSON,
BOB, LABOR/SUPPLIES, 1,986.00;
JOBS HQ, ADVERTISING, 605.95;
JONES SCHOOL SUPPLY, SUP-
PLIES, 49.25; K LOG INC, SUP-
PLIES, 335.26; KADOKA
SUNDOWNER INN, ROOM, 68.53;
KOPREN, BEV, SUPPLIES, 70.66;
and July 29th special meetings and to
approve the financial reports. Motion
carried.
APPROVAL OF CLAIMs
17. Motion by Beckman second by Ar-
neson to approve the claims listed
below. Motion carried.
A&B BUSINESS S U P P L I E S ,
361.42; ADVANCE PAYMENTS,
MONTHLY REIMBURSEMENT,
1484.89; AMERICAN TIME AND SIG-
NAL, SUPPLIES, 303.69; ANGRY
BEAVER, TREE REMOVAL, 400.00;
ASBSD, DUES AND FEES, 787.48;
BEST WESTERN VERMILLION,
ROOMS, 200.00; BIO CORPORA-
TION, SUPPLIES, 136.79; BIS-
MARCK TRIBUNE, ADVERTISING,
293.08; BISON COURIER, MONTHLY
PUBLISHING COSTS, 762.25; BISON
FOOD STORE, MONTHLY SUP-
PLIES, 9.69; BISON GRAIN CO. ,
GAS, 90.47; BISON IMPLEMENT,
SUPPLIES, 68.05; BLICK ART MA-
TERIALS, SUPPLIES, 106.92; BOB’S
PHOTO, SUPPLIES, 660.00; BSN
SPORTS, SUPPLIES, 684.36; CARD-
MEMBER SERVICES, SUPPLIES,
505.39; CHAPMAN’S ELECTRON-
ICS, SUPPLIES/LABOR, 1,205.28;
CLASSIC CLEANING, CARPET
KOPREN, HEIDI, SUPPLIES, 39.59;
LEARNING ZONE EXPRESS, SUP-
PLIES, 127.85; LIBRARY VIDEO
COMPANY, SUPPLIES, 41.85; MC-
GRAW-HILL COMPANIES, TEXT-
BOOKS/WORKBOOKS, 530.16;
MEDCO SUPPLY, SUPPLIES, 696.79;
MILES, SHELBY, SUPPLIES, 5.70;
MUTH PLUMBING, LABOR, 253.00;
NASCO SUPPLIES, 505.59; NCS
PEARSON, SUPPLIES, 414.00;
NEWSBOWL, SUPPLIES, 309.00;
NORTHWEST SUPPLY, SUPPLIES,
128.86; PALMER, BRISTOL, SUP-
PLIES, 124.05; PEARSON EDUCA-
TION, TEXTBOOKS, 186.93;
PENOR'S TEXACO, SUPPLIES/RE-
PAIRS, 67.70; POWERHOUSE, SUP-
PLIES, 16.50; PRESTWICK,
WORKBOOKS/SUPPLIES, 477.15;
QUILL, SUPPLIES, 288.80;
RAMKOTA INN, ROOMS, 296.97;
RAPID CITY JOUR NAL, ADVERTIS-
ING, 250.00; REALITYWORKS, SUP-
PLIES, 159.00; REALLY GOOD
STUFF, SUPPLIES, 265.15; REGION
IV ADMINISTRATORS, DUES,
135.00; RENAISSANCE LEARNING,
SOFTWARE RENEWAL, 1,049.00;
ROGER FRYE'S, PAINT SUPPLIES,
35.99; RYEN, CHRISTI,
TRAVEL/SUPPLIES, 586.95;
SCHOOL SPECIALTY, SUPPLIES,
814.29; SDSSA, REGISTRATION
FEE, 185.00; SOUTHWEST BUSI-
NESS, SUPPLIES, 662.00; SUPE-
RIOR SHOWBOARD, SUPPLIES,
124.50; SUPREME SCHOOL SUPPLY,
SUPPLIES, 267.08; TECHNOLOGY
CENTER, THE, MAINT/SUPPLIES
/SUPPORT, 3,250.97; TLC FABRICA-
TION, SUPPLIES/LABOR, 1,873.16;
TREND ENTERPRISES, SUPPLIES,
36.26; VERNEIR, SUPPLIES, 236.00;
VOWAC, WORKBOOKS, 932.96;
WEST RIVER COOP TEL, PHONE
BILL, 321.43
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
36,239.08
FOLLET EDUCATIONAL, TEXT-
BOOKS, 246.34; MCGRAW-HILL
COMPANIES, TEXTBOOKS, 198.72;
SOUTHWEST BUSINESS, PRINTER,
1,310.00; THE TECHNOLOGY CEN-
TER, COMPUTERS, 21,827.99;
TOWN OF BISON, WATER/SEWER
/GARBAGE, 991.93
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND
24,574.98
HANDS ON HEALTH PT, SPEC ED
SERVICES, 552.97; NORTHWEST
AREA SCHOOLS, SPEC ED SERV-
ICES, 18,798.50
TOTAL SPECIAL EDUCATION
FUND 19,351.47
DROWN, CAMILLE, SUPPLIES/
MEALS, 131.79; GERBRACHT,
DANELLE, MEALS, 63.00
TOTAL SCHOOL LUNCH FUND
194.79
Total Payroll for July-$17,119.81, Li-
brary-$1,300.00; Office of the Supt-
$5,416.67; Secretaries-$3,194.13;
Fiscal-$2,615.50; Custodial-$4,114.51;
Co-curricular-$484.00
DELEGATIONS
NONE
SENIOR LOUNGE REQUEST
18. Motion by Beckman, second by
Kari to approve the request made for
Senior Lounge privileges for the 2013-
14 school year. Motion carried.
NWAS REPORT
Dan Beckman gave a brief report on
the Northwest Area Schools monthly
meeting he attended.
ACCREDIDATION
Mrs. Azevedo informed the board of
the upcoming school accreditation re-
view that will be coming this school
year.
STATE REPORT CARD
Bison School has received the State
Report Card. Mrs. Azevedo reviewed
the results with the board.
EVALUATION OF STAFF
Mrs. Azevedo presented sample evalu-
ation forms for non-certified personnel.
The board instructed her to utilize her
preferred form. All staff will be evalu-
ated annually.
SMARTER BALANCE ASSESS-
MENT/COMMON CORE
Mrs. Azevedo discussed the require-
ments of the impending Common Core
requirements and Smarter Balance as-
sessments. She is implementing a
plan to provide required training to
staff.
REVISION OF REGISTRATION
HANDBOOK
Upon reviewing the Registration
Handbook, it was decided to integrate
portions of it into the Student Hand-
book, and eliminate the Registration
Handbook.
ELIGIBILITY POLICY (SECOND
READING)
19. Motion by Arneson, second by Kari
to approve the second reading of the
Eligibility Policy as presented. Roll
call vote: Beckman-no, Kari-yes, Arne-
son-yes, Kvale-yes. Motion carried.
GRADE POSTING REQUIRE-
MENTS
Mrs. Azevedo presented the new re-
quirements for timely recording of stu-
dent grades on Infinite Campus.
APPROVE HANDBOOKS
20. Motion by Arneson, second by
Beckman to approve the Elementary,
High School, and Teacher Handbooks
as presented. Motion carried.
TAX LEVY APPROVAL
21. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to approve the tax levies for the 2013-
2014 fiscal year at the following levies:
General Fund- Maximum, Capital
Outlay Fund- 2.00 mils, Pension- Max-
imum, Opt-Out- $200,000. Motion car-
ried.
BID OPENING
The following bids were received:
Propane-
Southwest Grain $1.29 per gallon
OR daily cash price minus $.10 per gal-
lon
Fisher Gas Company $1.28 per gal-
lon
Coal- Bison Grain $59.10 per ton
22. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to accept Bison Grain’s coal bid.
Motion carried.
23. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to accept Southwest Grain’s
propane bid for daily cash price minus
$.10 Motion carried.
HOME SCHOOL APPLICATIONS
24. Motion by Arneson, second by
Beckman to approve the home school
applications presented. Motion car-
ried.
OPEN ENROLLMENT APPLICA-
TIONS
25. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to enter executive session to dis-
cuss a student issue. Motion carried.
Chairman Kvale declared the meeting
in executive session at 9:15 p.m. At
9:25 p.m. Chairman Kvale declared
the meeting back in regular session.
continued on page 11
APPROVED FINANCIAL REPORT
GENERAL FUND CAP OUTLAY SPED ED PENSION T & A
Cash on Hand 7-1-13 7179.55 1285.79 12733.82 43257.91
Invested in Securities 736944.99 717419.45 49715.29 88726.76
Local Sources:
Receipts:
Interest 199.15 139.13 71.35
Taxes 29155.89 12636.27 8847.15
Rev in Lieu of Taxes 42054.23
Miscellaneous 2533.45
Intermediate Sources:
County Apportionment 1093.03
State Sources:
State Aid 33716.00
Perkins 3215.97
Total Receipts: 111967.72 12775.40 8918.50 1870.80 1451.55
Transfers In 63868.67
Transfers Out 25590.52 38278.15
Total Disbursements: 76181.75 15348.09 1932.03 3818.34
Cash on Hand 7-31-13 11800.11 937.70 10801.79 40891.12
Invested In Securities 831979.07 689604.33 58633.79 52319.41
IMPACT AID FUND: $81,551.36
OSCAR SMITH
SCHOLARSHIP FUND $296,051.81
SCHOOL LUNCH FUND 3087.76
Receipts 0.00
Disbursements 1029.46
Ending Balance $2058.30
TRUST AND AGENCY
Disbursements:
SD DCI
Background Check 43.25
General Fund
History Day Competition 2033.45
SD DCI
Background Check 43.25
SD FFA Assn
Registration 300.00
USD Cafeteria Meals 43.16
Clerk of Courts Filing Fee 31.14
Northwest Supply
Supplies 662.38
Postmaster Postage 15.32
Beau Gregory
Weight Equipment 600.00
P FleetGas 40.39
Clerk of Courts Filing Fee 6.00
Revenues:
General Fund
May Reimbursement 1404.75
Yearbook Advertisement 45.00
Dacotah Bank Interest 1.80
[Published August 29, 2013 at a total approximate cost of $115.80.]
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 11
Bison Town Board
Wednesday, August 7, 2013
6:00 p.m. City Hall
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL:
Chairman Juell Chapman called the
regular monthly meeting of the Town
Board to order at 6:00 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Aug. 7, 2013. All other trustees -
Luke Clements, Matt Butsavage, Mike
Lockert and David Kopren - were pres-
ent. Others present: Nick Hoffman,
Shane Steiner, John Blosmo, Stacy
Kvale, Angie Thompson, Lonnie and
Becky Krause; employees Heath McK-
instry, Rob Wedekind and Beth Hulm;
and Lita Wells, press.
THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
WAS RECITED BY ALL.
ALL ACTION IN THE FOLLOWING
MINUTES CARRIED BY UNANI-
MOUS VOTE UNLESS OTHERWISE
STATED.
EXECUTIVE SESSION FOR PER-
SONNEL PURSUANT TO SDCL 1-
25-25(2): 072-2013 – Lockert moved,
seconded by Butsavage to enter into
executive session at 6:05 p.m. to con-
duct an employee interview. Chairman
Chapman declared the meeting out of
executive session at 6:15 p.m.
STATUS REPORT: Trustees re-
viewed McKinstry’s written status re-
port with him. The complete report is
on file at City Hall. Also discussed was
the ownership of the following prop-
erty and procurement of an easement
to locate its curb stops: Parcel 1 –
North one-third (1/3) of Lot 1, Block B,
Jackson’s Addition to the Town of
Bison, Perkins County South Dakota;
and Parcel 2 – South two-third (2/3) of
Lot 1, Block B, Jackson’s Addition to
the Town of Bison, Perkins County,
South Dakota.
LAGOON/SEWER SYSTEM PROJ-
ECT: Engineer Nick Hoffman, Inter-
state Engineering, Spearfish, was
present to help trustees prioritize proj-
ects following completion of his study
regarding Bison’s Wastewater Treat-
ment and Sanitary Sewer Collection
System. 073-2013 – Clements moved,
seconded by Butsavage to prioritize
the lining of the cells/rip rap at the la-
goon and to line critical needs sewer
lines as identified by McKinstry. Car-
ried. (Hoffman will confer with Denise
Livingston, Rural Development Spe-
cialist at RCAC, to complete a 90/10%
grant application for the State Water
Board’s Sept. 27 meeting.)
MINUTES: 074-2013 - Lockert
moved, seconded by Clements to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular July
8 and special July 12 meetings as pre-
sented. Carried.
AIRPORT FUEL SYSTEM BIDS:
KLJ Engineer Shane Steiner reported
on the second round of bids for the card
reader fuel system at the airport,
which were opened on Aug. 6 in Bis-
marck. Earlier two bids were rejected
because they were too high and Steiner
had re-advertised. The second time re-
sulted in only one bid and trustees still
found it to be exorbitant. 075-2012 –
Lockert moved, seconded by Clement
to reject the bid of $311,350 from
Meyer Contracting LLC, Fargo, ND,
and to rebid the project in the spring.
Carried. 076-2013 – Clements moved,
seconded by Lockert to apply for a de-
sign grant to pay the engineering fees
already incurred for the fuel system
project and to authorize Chairman
Chapman to sign the grant applica-
tion. Carried.
AIRPORT LAYOUT PLAN: Before
Steiner left the meeting, Lockert re-
quested that all future mandatory tree
trimmings near the airport runway be
included in KLJ’s Airport Layout Plan
so that it would be included with grant
money for that purpose. Current tree
trimming will be at the Town of Bison’s
expense.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT: 077-
2013 – Lockert moved, seconded by
Kopren to approve an operating trans-
fer of $100,000 from General Fund to
the Special Project fund, per Appropri-
ation Ordinance 2012- 2. Carried. 078-
2013 – Chapman moved, seconded by
Clements to approve the Financial Re-
port as presented. Carried. (The com-
plete report is on file at City Hall.)
DELEGATION: Dog Ordinance –
Postponed. Bison Public Library –
Stacy Kvale, Angie Thompson and
John Blosmo turned in a budget re-
quest for 2014, up $600 from 2013’s
$13,400. They also spoke about stains
on the carpet as a result of tar on the
street outside. Hurry ‘n Hustle Club –
Becky Krause delivered a 2014 budget
request for half (approximately $7,500
- $8,000) of the club’s cost towards
their playground project at City Park.
Drainage/Curb - Lonnie Krause asked
if Bison Implement and PCRWS could
coordinate with the storm sewer proj-
ect to drain standing water from the
front of their buildings into the storm
sewer and to install curbs. It would re-
quire a change order to the storm
sewer contract. Currently, the system
is designed for drainage in the alley be-
hind those buildings. Water
leakage/damage: Blosmo presented the
board with an insurance claim stem-
ming from the June 6 flooding in his
basement. He stated that the cause
was a cracked meter coupling that
broke. Trustees instructed Hulm to
contact the Town’s insurance agent.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
SDRS Roth plan: 079-2013 –
Clements moved, seconded by Butsav-
age to sign up for a new voluntary
Roth plan with South Dakota Retire-
ment system, which would allow eligi-
ble employees to participate, at no cost
to the Town. Carried.
Pending Sump Pump and Dog
Management ordinances: Post-
poned.
ROW Easement: McKinstry will talk
to the property owner about a right-of-
way easement at the Prairie Lounge
property and Hulm will contact Attor-
ney Bogue to put a hold on a written
easement until further notice.
KBM Contract Amendment: Mike
Lockert moved, seconded by David Ko-
pren to approve an increase of $80,000
in KBM’s storm sewer contract budget,
up from $70,000 previously approved,
for a total of $150,000 in engineering
fees for the project. Carried.
NEW BUSINESS
Auto Supplement: 080-2013 – Ko-
pren moved, seconded by Clements to
auto supplement a $2,006.29 grant for
project #3-46-0003-06-2010 to the air-
port fund. Carried. 081-2013 -
Clements moved, seconded by Chap-
man to auto supplement a Small Com-
munity Planning grant of $4,800 for
engineering services into the sewer
fund. Carried.
Contingency Transfer: 082-2013 –
Motion by Clements, seconded by Ko-
pren to move $10,800 from contingency
(101-410-4291) to street machinery
(101-431-4340) for the recent purchase
of a 1998 IH dump truck from SD
Property Management Surplus. Roll
call vote: Kopren, aye; Lockert, nay;
Butsavage, aye; Clements, aye; Chap-
man, aye. Motion carried 4-1.
Airport Entitlement Transfer: 083-
2013 – Butsavage moved, seconded by
Clements to transfer $78,000 of un-
used aviation entitlement funds to a
Winner, SD airport project. Carried.
Set Bartender Salary: 084-2013 -
Clements moved, seconded by Chap-
man to set $8.50 per hour as the salary
for new bartender Salli Blazey. Car-
ried.
PCRWS Resignation/Appointment:
085-2013 - Clements moved, seconded
by Chapman to accept Terry Haggart’s
resignation as the Town of Bison’s rep-
resentative on the Perkins County
Rural Water System board of directors
and to appoint Matthew Butsavage to
that position. Carried. Several trustees
may attend the Thursday, Aug. 8 meet-
ing of PCRWS board of directors where
the PCRW five-year plan will be dis-
cussed as it pertains to municipalities.
A+ Repair billing/account: Hulm
confirmed with trustees the costs
billed to A+ Repair for connecting to
the Town’s water and sewer system
($150 each) and for a meter deposit
($135) and also the amounts and serv-
ices to be charged on a monthly basis.
Tree Trimming at Airport: The
State Dept. of Transportation recently
surveyed trees encroaching on the end
of the Runway Protection Zone at
Bison Municipal Airport and marked
trees that must be trimmed. The Town
of Bison must comply or lose annual
airport entitlements. 086-2013 – Mo-
tion by Lockert, seconded by Chapman
to hire Angry Beaver Wood and Turf
(Finn Sacrison), Bison, to remove the
trees as specified by DOT and to clean
up the area afterwards for a cost of
$5,300, contingent on the contractor
providing proof of insurance and with
payment to made upon completion of
the job following approval of the
landowners and airport committee.
Carried.
Fuel Tax Reimbursement: 087-2013
- Lockert moved, seconded by Butsav-
age to request a fuel tax reimburse-
ment from the State of South Dakota
DOT to help pay for the tree removal
at the airport. Carried.
Workman Comp Board of Direc-
tors: There was no interest shown by
trustees to nominate a candidate to the
SDML Workers’ Compensation Fund
board of trustees.
2014 BUDGET
Trustees reviewed an early prelimi-
nary expenditure budget for 2014. The
first reading of the 2014 expenditure
and revenue budgets will occur during
the September 9 meeting of the Town
Board with final approval following a
second reading on October 7.
CORRESPONDENCE
None.
OPEN FORUM
Lita Wells requested that the Town
Board consider fixing the parking lot
by the public library. It will be an
agenda item on Sept. 9. Lights on the
Bison Welcome Sign at the junction of
Hwy. 20 and Coleman Ave. need atten-
tion.
CLAIMS: The following claims were
presented and approved for payment.
July payroll by dept – Fin. Admin.,
$801.56; Streets, $934.75; Airport,
$189; West Nile, $21; Parks & Rec.,
$1,164; Library, $822.78; Liquor,
$5,185.94; Water, $1,351.25; Sewer,
$561.75; Solid Waste, $1,767.369. Total
FICA, $2,762.65; Health Ins, $500;
SDRS, $659.70; Supp. Retirement,
$35; Banyon Data, prof. fees, $295;
Bison Country Club, subsidy, $100;
Bison Courier, publishing, $248.14;
Bison Food, supp, $13.53; Bison Grain
Co., supp, $1,808.76; Bison Imp, re-
pairs/maint/supp, $87.64; BL Con-
tracting, prof. fees, $152,144.30; Coca
Cola, supp., $317; DPFCU, util/supp,
$179.53; Dept. of Rev., sales tax,
$1,540.29; G&O, supp., $39.80; Grand
Electric, util., $2,409.74; Hettinger
Candy, supp., $1,070.10; Interstate En-
gineering, prof. fees, $6000; Jerome
Bev., beer, $1,915.20; Johnson Bros.,
on/off/misc, $2,126.27; KBM Engineer-
ing, prof. fees, $19,748.57; NW Bev.,
beer, $5,219.65; Northwest Pipe, re-
pairs/maint, $822.57; NWSDRLA,
prof. fees, $2,464.50; Pepsi, supp.,
$320.65; PCRWS, water, $8,934.70;
Perkins County Sheriff, prof. fees,
$3,000; Perkins County Title, prof fees,
$35; Republic, on/off sale and misc,
$1,669.43; Rockmount, supp., $202.97;
S&S, supp., $4,120.25; SD Lottery,
$995.77; Servall, prof. fees, $93.92;
Stateline Designs, misc., $23.50;
WRCTC, util., $272.65.
Chapman adjourned the meeting at
11:45 p.m.
ATTEST:
APPROVED:
Elizabeth Hulm, Finance Officer
Juell Chapman, Chairman
[Published August 29, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $106.57.]
School Board
continued from page 10
26. Motion by Arneson, second by Kari
to approve the open enrollment appli-
cations. Motion carried.
APPROVAL OF CONTRACTS
26. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to approve the contract to pro-
vide meals for Badlands Head Start.
Motion carried.
27. Motion by Arneson, second by Kari
to approve the contract with Teddi
Carlson as piano accompanist at a
wage of $12.14 per hour for the 2013-
14 school year. Motion carried.
28. Motion by Arneson, second by Kari
to approve the contracts with Wayne
Sanders as Head Football Coach at a
salary of $2,644 and Head Boys Bas-
ketball Coach at a salary of $2,644 for
the 2013-14 school year. Motion car-
ried.
29. Motion by Beckman, second by Ar-
neson to approve the contracts with
BreAnn Nelson as Assistant Volleyball
Coach at a salary of $1,858 and Head
Girls Basketball Coach at a salary of
$2,644 for the 2013-14 school year.
Motion carried.
30. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to approve the contract with Lauren
Holder as the Athletic Director at a
salary of $3,000 for the 2013-14 school
year. Motion carried.
EXECUTIVE SESSION
31. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to enter executive session to discuss
personnel. Motion carried. At 9:40
p.m. Chairman Kvale declared the
meeting in executive session. At 10:10
p.m. Chairman Kvale declared the
meeting back in regular session.
SUPERINTENDENT NOTES
Acellus & Smartboard Training
Coaching Training Requirements
Grand Electric Tailgate Party
Increased Bandwidth at School
School Lunch Audit Feedback
Superintendent Leave
32. Motion by Kari, second by Arneson
to adjourn the meeting at 10:30 p.m.
Motion carried.
Dan Kvale, Chairman
Colette Johnson, Asst Business Mgr
[Published August 29, 2013 at a total
approximate cost of $111.44.]
Provisional Budget
for
Perkins County,
South Dakota
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: that
the Board of County Commissioners of
Perkins County, will meet in the
Courthouse at Bison, South Dakota on
Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at 11:30
a.m. for the purpose of considering the
foregoing Provisional Budget for the
year 2014 and the various items,
schedules, amounts and appropria-
tions set forth therein and as many
days thereafter as is deemed necessary
until the final adoption of the budget.
At such time any interested person
may appear either in person or by a
representative and will be given an op-
portunity for a full and complete dis-
cussion of all purposes, objections,
items, schedules, appropriations, esti-
mates, amounts and matters set forth
and contained in the Provisional
Budget.
/s/Sylvia Chapman
Sylvia Chapman,
Perkins County Finance Officer
Perkins County, Bison, South Dakota
[Published September 29, 2013 at a
total approximate cost of $11.11.]
Remember: School is now in session!
Watch for children at
ALL times of the day.
Page 12 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
Nutrition Site
Menu
Thursday, August 29
Mexican chicken soup
fruity slaw
unsalted crackers
fruit crisp
Friday, August 30
Swiss steak w/onions& tomato
mashed potatoes
peas
fruit cocktail
Monday, September 2
Labor Day
Closed
Tuesday, September 3
Gr Beef/gr bean casserole
potato rounds
banana
Wednesday, September 4
Chicken & dressing
baked squash
harvest beets
jello w/fruit cocktail
For all your advertising needs Bison Courier 244-7199 or courier@sdplains.com
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 13
Fresh tasting bread to make
for classroom school snack!
Strawberry Bread
1 cup flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/4 cups strawberries,
mashed (can use frozen)
3/4 cup sugar
2/3 cup of oil
2 eggs
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1 (heaping) tsp of baking
soda
1. Mix together in a large
bowl, stirring until just com-
bined. Pour into a greased 8
inch loaf pan and bake in a
preheated oven at 350 de-
grees F until toothpick inserted
in center comes out clean,
about 1 hour.
Spelling List Study Tips
1. Sing a song: Spell the word to a common tune such as “Twinkle,
Twinkle Little Star.” Songs are easier remembered then poems. By
singing and spelling each letter. Like Cow. C-O-W.
2. Repetition Works: Repeating the word and spelling works wonders.
Spelling a word once is not going to remain in anyone’s short-term
memory. Spell it or write it a few times during practice, if it is a word that
a child struggles with.
3. Define the word: if a child knows the definition of a word it will also
keep it in their collective consciousness and not seem so foreign.
4. Daily Use: use the words in daily speech. Encourage the child to do it
also. They will hear it.
Baby Ads … 2x7 for $41.00,
call Bison Courier
244-7199 or courier@sdplains.com
School may have started but
summer is still here! It’s been a
scorcher this week. The air condi-
tioner works overtime and keeping
everything hydrated is a full time
job. Local schools started this
week and school buildings without
air conditioning have got to be re-
ally uncomfortable. The radio re-
ported that Pierre kids were sent
home early on Monday because of
the heat and will probably be re-
leased early the rest of this week.
I wouldn’t be surprised if several
other schools do the same.
It was pretty hot in Pierre last
week. After the Executive Board
meeting Monday afternoon, I got
in my car parked in front of the
Capitol building and the car ther-
mometer registered 106 degrees! I
kept the AC on high all the way
back to the ranch.
It was blistering hot Tuesday
morning when Eudell Larson and
his son went antelope hunting
here. They have archery tags and
we have antelope. A big buck ante-
lope hangs out near our mailbox
and there are a dozen or more
other antelope here. Eudell and
his son came Monday night and all
the antelope disappeared Tuesday
morning so the hunters left empty
handed that evening. The antelope
have returned so hopefully the
hunters will too!
The creek finally dried up
enough to cut so Reub started hay-
ing the slough grass. He got both
the rake and the baler stuck Tues-
day. Eudell was here to pull him
out the first time and Casey pulled
him out the second time. Reub and
Casey moved the haying machin-
ery to Gordon Helms’ alfalfa field
west of Prairie City on Wednesday
and put up enough square bales to
get us through lambing next
spring. Nothing smells sweeter
than freshly cut alfalfa.
The fire trucks got called to a
hayfield fire southeast of Prairie
City Wednesday. So far, we’ve had
enough moisture that we haven’t
had many fires around here, but
right now there are over fifty
major fires raging across western
United States.
I’ve been getting questions
about my bill that passed to allow
the killing of wolves in South
Dakota. The law took effect on
July 1st, but until USFW takes
the wolf off the Endangered
Species list in the lower 48 states,
it’s still illegal to kill a wolf in
western South Dakota. USFW
plans to remove the wolf from the
Endangered Species list and the
comment period remains open
until September 11, so if you
haven’t filed your comment yet
you still can. Go to the federal
rulemaking site at www.regula-
tions.gov and submit your com-
ment on the Gray Wolf: Docket
No.[FWS-HQ-ES_2013-0073]
I joined a dozen other South
Dakota legislators at the Common
Core conference in Rapid City Sat-
urday to learn more about the
Common Core curricula that is
coming to us from the federal gov-
ernment. What we heard is really
concerning. 45 states have
adopted the Common Core na-
tional standards, and they are
being implemented this year. Why
did they agree to this? Because the
Obama administration had $4.35
billion of Race to the Top federal
funds, and states had to adopt
"college-and-career ready stan-
dards" if they wanted to be eligible
to compete for those funds. Only
four states turned down the fed-
eral money to implement federal
standards that will result in a
huge expense to taxpayers in the
future and cause the dumbing
down of our educational system.
Educators from both the right and
the left oppose Common Core. To
understand why, google “Common
Core” for a wealth of information.
A couple years ago Vic Weyrich
sent me this timely article called
“No parent left behind”:
These are real notes written by
parents in a Tennessee school dis-
trict:(spellings have been left in-
tact)
•My son is under a doctor’s care
and should not take PE today.
Please execute him.
•Please exkuce Lisa for being
absent she was sick and I had her
shot.
•Dear school: Please ecsc’s John
being absent on Jan. 28, 29, 30, 31,
32, and also 33.
•Please excuse Gloria from jim
today. She is administrating.
•Please excuse Roland from P.E.
for a few days. Yesterday he fell
out of a tree and misplaced his hip.
•John has been absent because
he had two teeth taken out of his
face.
•Carlos was absent yesterday
because he was playing football.
He was hurt in the growing part.
•Megan could not come to
school today because she has been
bothered by very close veins.
•Chris will not be in school cus
he has an acre in his side.
•Please excuse Ray Friday from
school. He has very loose vowels.
•Please excuse Pedro from
being absent yesterday. He had
(diahre, dyrea, direathe), the shits.
[words in ()s were crossed out]
•Please excuse Tommy for being
absent yesterday. He had diar-
rhea, and his boots leak.
•Irving was absent yesterday
because he missed his bust.
•Please excuse Jimmy for being.
It was his father’s fault.
•I kept Billie home because she
had to go Christmas shopping be-
cause I don’t know what size she
wear.
•Please excuse Jennifer for
missing school yesterday. We for-
got to get the Sunday paper off the
porch, and when we found it Mon-
day, we thought it was Sunday.
•Sally won’t be in school a week
from Friday. We have to attend
her funeral.
•My daughter was absent yes-
terday because she was tired. She
spent a weekend with the
Marines.
•Please excuse Jason for being
absent yesterday. He had a cold
and could not breed well.
•Please excuse Mary for being
absent yesterday. She was in bed
with gramps.
•Gloria was absent yesterday as
she was having a gangover.
•Please excuse Brenda. She has
been sick and under the doctor.
*Maryann was absent December
11-16, because she had a fever,
sore throat, headache and upset
stomach. Her sister was also sick,
fever, sore throat, her brother had
a low grade fever and ached all
over. I wasn’t the best either, sore
throat and fever. There must be
something going around, her fa-
ther got hot last night.
Now we know why parents are
screaming for better education for
our kids!
Grand River Roundup ............................................................... By Betty Olson
Page 14 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013
Enjoy low cost of living with great
hunting and fishing! Our very com-
petitive wage depends on qualifica-
tions and experience. Please send
resume to Jerry Hericks, service
manager, Potter County Implement,
30965 U.S Highway 212, Gettys-
burg, SD 57442, or e-mail to her-
icksj@deerequipment.com or call
Jerry at 605-769-1710.
Looking for an EXPERIENCED
SALES AGRONOMIST who is will-
ing to be a part of a team and play a
role in management. Knowledge in
plant nutrition, crop protection and
precision Ag is needed. Call Colby at
605-772-5543. Howard Farmers
Coop, Howard SD.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD.
We have lowered the price & will
consider contract for deed. Call Rus-
sell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota.
Scott Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig
Connell, 605-264-5650, www.golde-
neagleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional
word $5.) Call this newspaper or
800-658-3697 for details.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up
to 48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call
Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-3549.
AUCTIONS
BLACK HILLS – DEERFIELD
LAKE area Absolute Auction Sep-
tember 18. Beautiful home & barn
on 7.2 acres, perfect retreat or horse
property. See on www.bradeenauc-
tion.com Ph: 605-673-2629.
EMPLOYMENT
Director and/or Office Manager
wanted: Good with people and or-
ganization. Knowledge in budgeting,
grant applications, bookkeeping.
Send resume or write for application
to: chris_arrow@sdplains.com or
Arrow Transit, 111 4th St. W., Lem-
mon, S. Dak.
Applications for Police Officer. Clos-
ing date:9/6/13. Call 605-234-4401 or
send resume: Chamberlain Police,
715 N Main Street, Chamberlain,
SD 57325. Full benefit package.
EOE.
Shop foreman sought by multi-store
John Deere dealership operation.
Position currently open at Potter
County Implement, Gettysburg, SD;
a part of C&B Operations, LLC. Ap-
plicants should possess good organi-
zational skills and the ability to
manage farm equipment service per-
sonnel in a growth oriented dealer-
ship. We offer progressive marketing
plans, competitive pay, and a full
benefit package. Please send resume
to Ben Wieseler, store manager, or
Jerry Hericks, service manager, Pot-
ter County Implement, 30965 U.S
Highway 212, Gettysburg, SD
57442, or e-mail to
hericksj@deerequipment.com, or call
Jerry at 605-769-1710.
RDO EQUIPMENT CO. – Competi-
tive wages, benefits, training, profit
sharing, opportunities for growth,
great culture and innovation. $1,500
Sign on Bonus available for Service
Technicians. To browse opportuni-
ties go to www.rdoequipment.com.
Must apply online. EEO.
Parts salesperson sought by multi-
store John Deere dealership opera-
tion. Position currently open at
Potter County Implement, Gettys-
burg, SD; a part of C&B Operations,
LLC. Applicants should possess good
knowledge of farm equipment, com-
puter skills, retail selling skills, and
be customer service oriented. We
will train the right person. We offer
John Deere training, competitive
pay, full benefit package, including
401k, health, and dental plan.
Please send resume to Naomi Her-
mann, parts manager, Potter County
Implement, 30965 U.S Highway
212, Gettysburg, SD 57442, or e-
mail to
hermannn@deerequipment.com or
call Naomi at 605-765-2434.
Qualified service technicians sought
by progressive, multi-store South
Dakota John Deere dealership. We
offer factory training, health insur-
ance, dental insurance, life insur-
ance, 401k plan, paid holidays and
vacation days in our benefit pack-
age. Applicants must be able to work
independently and want to progress
in compensation and skill level.
FOR SALE
For Sale: 50x60 shop building cor
heat & propane heat. Former UPS
building, if interested contact 244-
7192, Bison SD.
B11-3tp
For Sale: Country Inn Motel -
turnkey busines, serious inquiries
only call 605-244-5234.
B11-3tp
For Sale: Alfalfa seed, grass seed
and high test alfalfa hay. Delivery
available and volume discount
available. Call 798-5413.
B1-11tp
WANTED
Bison Housing & Redevelop-
ment Commission is seeking ap-
plicants for a part-time
maintenance position for the
Homestead Heights housing facil-
ity located in Bison, SD. A job de-
scription can be picked up on
Mondays or Thursdays from 9 to
11 a.m. at the management office
at Homestead Heights. Resumes
must be sent to BH&RC, PO Box
186, Bison, SD 57620. For more
information, call 244-5473. Home-
stead Heights is an equal opportu-
nity employer.
B10-tfn
The Bison School District has
an opening for a High School Sec-
retary. Applicants need to be serv-
ice oriented, flexible, and
personable. They should possess
strong communication skills and
computer skills. Candidates must
possess skills in email, Microsoft
office, and data entry. During the
school year, hours of employment
are from 7:30AM-4:30PM 4 days a
week with the potential of working
up to 40 hours and 168 hours dur-
ing the summer months. Hourly
wage is $11.50 per hour and bene-
fits include $350 toward health in-
surance, dental insurance, term
life insurance, and participation in
the South Dakota retirement sys-
tem. Applications are available at
the Bison School District High
School office. Closing date for ap-
plications is September 13, 2013.
B11-3tc
PERKINS COUNTY SHER-
IFF’S OFFICE accepting applica-
tions for a deputy sheriff position
in Lemmon. An EOE Perkins
County Sheriff ’s Office PO Box
234 Bison, SD 57620 605-244-5243
B11-2tc
INVITATION
Carmichael’s & Roth’s are hosting
a dance with music by the Broken
spokes on august 31st at 8 p.m. at
Brent and Carrie Roths north of
the Buzz Stop. All friends and
family are welcome.
B11-1tc
Seeking persons for
•RN and LPN FT/PT
•Dean of Nursing
• C.N.A.’s
Must have good work ethic.
Competitive wages
Complete benefits package for FT.
For more information call
Human Resources
at 605-374-3871 or
get application at
Five Counties,
Box 479,
Lemmon, SD 57638.
connie.benson@fivecounties.org
EOE/M/FV/D
Drug Free Workplace Employer
Five Counties
Nursing Home
Advertising Rates:
DISPLAY ADS: $4.70 per column inch.
CLASSIFIED ADS: $5.90 for 30 words; 10¢ for each word
thereafter. $2.00 billing charge applies.
THANK YOU'S: $5.90 for 30 words; 10¢ for each word
thereafter. $2.00 billing charge applies.
HIGHLIGHTS & HAPPENINGS: $5.90 minimum or $3.10
per column inch. $2.00 billing charge applies.
HAPPY ADS: With or Without Picture: $15.00 minimum or
$4.50 per column inch.
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT: $41.00 for a 2x7 ad.
Legal Deadline is Friday at NOON! Ad Deadline is Monday
at NOON! 244-7199 or courier@sdplains.com
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 29, 2013 • Page 1 5
Every day at
Northwest
Supply Co.
Lemmon, S D
Pepsi - Coke
products:
12 pack $4.19
24 pack $6.99
Page 16 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 29, 2013

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