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Bison Courier, August 15, 2013

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By Lita Wells
The monthly board meeting,
with all members present, met
Wednesday, August 7. The meet-
ing was changed from the regular
Monday meeting day to a Wednes-
day because this was the only
night that Interstate Engineering,
Nick Hoffman could meet with the
board. The meeting began with
aninterview for the one applicable
person that applied for the Town
of Bison position. The interview
was done in executive session
manner and lasted about 15 min-
utes After coming out from execu-
tive session the board got going on
their lengthy agenda for the Au-
gust meeting. First up was a sta-
tus report from Heath McKinstry.
McKinstry reported that the
sprinklers in the city park are not
spraying like they are suppose to
so he is going to look into this a lit-
tle deeper. He has also been busy
cleaning all the water valve boxes
around town on the streets, all
have been vacuumed and cleaned
out and all are functioning. The
other project that he would like to
get done before winter hits is find-
ing the service line on the corner
of Coleman Ave and Canvas
Street. When found they are talk-
ing of putting a curb stop here be-
cause both of the lines that run
over there are abandoned build-
ings. They believe it is in the ditch
somewhere but has been covered
up over the years. But more work
is needed to be done to resolve the
issue.
Next Nick Hoffman from Inter-
state Engineering came to visit
with the board about the
Lagoon/Sanitary project. The fund
engineering report and fund facil-
ity plan has been approved from
DENR and been sent back to Hoff-
man.The topics that were dis-
cussed to go on the plan was the
lagoon having rift raft put around
them, putting a lift station in the
lagoon, upgrading the lagoon to
make it bigger, upgrading the san-
itary sewer system throughout the
town of Bison. The initial plan was
to put lining down around lagoons
4 and 5. But Hoffman believes it
would be best to do all of the la-
goons to stop the erosion and pre-
vent the dirt from filling the
lagoons up. Also the town needs to
upgrade the sanitary sewer sys-
tem throughout the town of Bison.
In the sanitary project there is one
area that is in a critical state. This
is from 1st Ave and all the way
east to the gravel road, needs to be
relined. When the survey was
done with cameras it showed a lot
of lateral cracks along this stretch
of pipe. When fixing this area they
will not have to tear up the road
they will just reline it under the
road. The other concern is about
the line that runs right under the
courthouse but the workers will
have to deal with this when they
get to that stretch of pipe. But it
may or may not be done this year
due to the funding. On the plus
side the lagoon and the pipe under
the street are two separate items
and pull money from two separate
pots. The plan for this project has
a 10 year timeline. The timeline is
not structured where you can only
do certain things per year. The
only thing that will be slowing the
By Lita Wells
I am pleased to announce the
new 4-H Extension Secretary/As-
sistant Rebekah Veal. Veal’s posi-
tion is a full time position at the
courthouse. Her time at the court-
house is a split time however. Half
of the time she helps Kelli Schu-
macher, the 4-H Educator. The
other time, she is the secretary to
State’s Attorney, Shane Penfield.
Getting ready for the fair, the two
ladies have formed a great team-
work relationship. They are both
learning together as Veal and
Schumacher are new employees.
Veal however, is not a stranger
to 4-H as she also was a member
of 4-H when she was a child. She
was active in 4-H from 5th to 7th
grade. She enjoyed doing cookies,
flower arranging, and cake deco-
rating. Along with Schumacher,
Veal is also bringing a lot of expe-
rience with her to the job.
Veal was born and raised in
Northern Illinois, on a family
farm. The farm is located 30 miles
from Wisconsin border. She grad-
uated from Winnebago High
School in 2002, at Winnebago, Illi-
nois. She then furthered her edu-
cation at Black Hawk College in
Kewanee, Illinois. At Black Hawk
College she got her Associates De-
gree, in Agricultural Production.
Shortly after getting her degree at
Black Hawk College she then at-
tended Highland Community Col-
lege in Freeport, Illinois and
received a Certificate in Cosmetol-
ogy.
After attending college it was al-
ways her dream to move out west.
She then packed her bags and
moved out to Melville, Montana to
work at a Dude Ranch,” Sweet
Grass Ranch.” She loves animals
and really enjoyed working there,
but was then offered a position at
a little three room school house, to
be a Paraprofessional in Melville,
Montana. She worked there for 6
years.
In March of 2012, she met Shan-
non Veal, and they were married
May 18, 2013. Her position started
at the courthouse on May 8, so Re-
bekah had a very busy spring be-
tween starting a job and getting
married.
If not at work, she loves to be at
home as she says, “She's a home
body.” At home you will find Veal
spending time with their two dogs,
Teddy and new puppy Roxx. She
enjoys being out on the ranch/farm
helping her husband Shannon.
She also loves being out side tak-
ing care of the animals. When her
husband isn't busy at his job, the
two love to go boating, camping,
and hanging out with friends and
family.
process is the available money and
working time. Hoffman did sug-
gest that whatever the board de-
cides to do that they should group
things together due to living in
such a remote area and not just do
one block at a time. All these deci-
sions need to be sorted out because
the board needs to get the paper
work done because it has to be re-
viewed at a state meeting that is
scheduled for September 27. The
board decided that Hoffman
should talk with Heath McKinstry
because he knows more about the
pipes in Bison than the board
does. The board feels that they
will only be able to afford one step
at a time. The lagoon or the fixing
of the pipes throughout town are
their choices right now and the de-
cision will be made on which is
more urgent to get done. Juell
Chapman made a comment to
Hoffman that whatever they do it
all has to last for a long time. No
work on this project is starting yet
and the board doesn't know if it
will even get started this year. It
all depends on when it starts
snowing.
The next speaker at the meeting
was Shane Steiner. Steiner was
there to discuss the bids that came
in for the Airport Fuel System
project. The bids for this project
was advertised twice in all the
newspapers. The first bids that
came in on July 19th were ex-
tremely high from two contractors.
The engineer's opinion at this
time, was that the project was
going to cost $170,700.00. The two
companies that submitted bids
were Meyer Contracting from
continued on page 19
Bison Courier
Official Newspaper for the City of Bison, Perkins County, and the Bison School District
A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc.
P.O. Box 429 • Bison, South Dakota 57620-0429
Phone: (605) 244-7199 • FAX (605) 244-7198
The
$1.00
Volume 31
Number 9
August 15, 2013
Includes Tax
4-H Extention/States Attorney
secretary hired
Airport fuel system bid rejected
On behalf of the Perkins County Fairboard, I would like to
welcome everyone near and far to the 2013 Perkins County Fair
and Rodeo beginning Thursday, August 15th with the Perkins County
Queen contest through Sunday, August 18th. There will be 4-H static
exhibits, livestock shows, an antique tractor show, and a quilt show.
Friday night there will be a FREE appreciation supper followed by a
talent show. Saturday brings a horse show, poultry show, and a family
play day. Saturday night there will a Fair Supper, Rodeo, and a dance
featuring the Itty Bitty Opry band. To round it all off there will be a
Sunday breakfast followed by a Cowboy Church Service and an afternoon
rodeo performance. Come enjoy the weekend with us in Bison, South
Dakota where there is something for everyone. Bring something to exhibit
or just come and enjoy the acitivities!
Sincerely,
TW Schalesky
Fairboard President
School starts August 26th
Perkins County fair books are available at all the
local businesses.
Bison Public Library reading program, Wednesday Au-
gust 14th Preschool & Kindergarten 10:30. Friday, August
16th - 1st & 2nd grades 10:30.
The American Lutheran Church is seeking wedding
dresses, baptism gowns and Easter hats from 1913 - 2013
to display during their 100 Year Anniversary program. If
you have an item or know of someone who does, please con-
tact Salli at 605-244-5491.
Alcoholics Anonymous is meeting weekly in Bison. The
group meets every Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church. Everyone is welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 244-7199, or e-mailing to: courier@sd-
plains.com. We will run your event notice the two issues prior
to your event at no charge.
T
h
i
s
w
e
e
k
in Bison
THE BISON COURIER
Periodicals Postage Paid at Bison, SD 57620
POSTAL PERMIT #009-944
Published weekly every Thursday by Ravellette Publ., Inc.
at PO Box 429, Bison SD 57620-0429
Telephone: 605-244-7199 • Fax: 605-244-7198
E-mail Addresses: courier@sdplains.com
couriernews@sdplains.com
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Bison ............................................................................$36.04
Meadow, Shadehill, Prairie City, Reva & Lodgepole........$35.36
Lemmon........................................................................$36.04
in state ........................................................$39.00 + sales tax
out of state (Includes all Hettinger addresses.) ...$39.00 (no tax)
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Bison Courier, PO Box 429, Bison SD 57620-0429
Deadlines: Display and Classified Advertising: Mon-
days at 12:00 p.m. Legals: Fridays at 12:00 p.m.
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Editor/Office Manager: Arlis Seim
Asst. Editor/Reporter: Lita Wells
Ad Sales: Beth Hulm (244-5231),beth@sdplains.com
COPYRIGHT: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced from this publication, in whole
or in part, without the written consent of the publisher.
Nutrition Site
Menu
Thursday, August 15
Cacciatore chicken
baked potato
green bean almandine
applesauce
Friday, August 16
Hot beef sandwich
mashed potatoes w/gravy
corn
sunshine salad
Monday, August 19
Hamburger on w/w bun
hash browns
baked beans
tomato slice on lettuce
pears
Tuesday, August 20
chicken alfredo
harvest beets
apple juice
fresh fruit
Wednesday, August 21
Heartland shepard’s pie
baked sweet potato
tomato juice
pears
Women in the region have until
Sept. 13 to register for the 2013
South Dakota Rural Women in
Agriculture conference Oct. 3-4 in
Keystone, S.D.
This is a conference that women
who live and work in rural Amer-
ica will appreciate. Annually held,
the conference is a time for women
to do fun, relaxing events while
also learning about current topics
of importance in the agricultural
industry. Of course the networking
and social aspect of the conference
is the number one highlight with
women attending from Montana,
North Dakota, Wyoming and
South Dakota.
What to expect in 2013? Discus-
sion of key agricultural topics in-
cluding the Farm Bill,
Immigration, Easements, Con-
sumer Perceptions and Telling
Our Story.
Back by popular demand is jew-
elry making and shopping in Hill
City. New this year is a chance for
women to ‘Pay It Forward’ by cre-
ating Love Bundles at the confer-
ence that will be donated to area
women shelters.
Keynote speaker is John Be-
ranek with his presentation
“Kitchen Table Wisdom”. He will
motivate you and make you laugh
with stories of his comical farm
family.
Other featured speakers include
Katie Pinke talking about the
“Real World Agriculture” we live
in today; Olga Reuvekamp will
discuss her experience as an immi-
grant coming to work in America’s
ag industry with her presentation
“Aliens in Agriculture”; and
Quentin Riggings will discuss oil,
gas, and wind easements.
This is just a small sampling of
what to expect at the 2013 confer-
ence. More details can be found at
the South Dakota Rural Women’s
Facebook page. Or contact the
SDSU Regional Extension Center
in Lemmon, S.D. at (605)374-
4177. The conference will be held
at K Bar S Lodge and a block of
rooms is being held. Book yours by
calling (866) 522-7724.
DENTAL CARE IS COMING
TO BISON!!!
Screenings are available to individuals that have
not seen a private practice dentist in the last two
years and are patients of the Bison Community
Clinic. Digital x-rays will be taken, an intra-oral
camera will be available and preventive services
such as fluoride treatments, sealants and cleanings
will be performed by a staff dental hygienist.
Before the Dakota Smiles truck comes to Bison in
September, pre-screening appointments are being
taken. To sign-up for a screening contact: Susan at
244-5206
When the truck arrives in September, appoint-
ments for dental treatment can begin right away. If
you are interested in this service, please contact
Susan to fill out an application.
Page 2 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Register now for Rural Women’s
Conference Oct. 3-4
2013 Make it with wool district
contests have been scheduled in
Sioux Falls, Huron, Aberdeen, and
Newell, SD. Contests will be held:
District 3: Aberdeen, S.D. with
the Style Show at the Brown
County Fair at 3 p.m. on Saturday,
August 17. Judging will start at
10:30 AM. Contact District Direc-
tor, Stacy Hadrick, 347-1195.
District 4: Huron, S.D. with the
contest starting at 8:30 a.m. at the
SunQuest Village, Huron on Sat-
urday, September 7. Contact Dis-
trict Director, Dianne Perry,
546-2190.
District 5: Sioux Falls, S.D.
with the contest starting at 4 p.m.
in the New Extension Center,
2001 E 8th St on Monday, Septem-
ber 23. Contact Sandra Aamlid,
District Director at 371-1453.
District 1: Newell, S.D. with the
contest starting at 3:30 p.m.,
Thursday, September 19 at the
NVN Sr Center, Newell; with the
style show at the Newell Ram Sale
Barn. Contact Ida Marie Snorte-
land, District Director, 642-5123.
The 2013 State Contest will be
held in Brookings, S.D. September
27 & 28 during the SD Sheep
Make it with Wool
Growers Meeting. For more infor-
mation about the district and state
contests and to receive an entry
blank, contact Ida Marie Snorte-
land, 642-5123 or
Snorteland@blackhills.com.
Categories for the contest in-
clude pre-teen, 12 years old and
younger; Juniors, 13-16; Seniors,
17-24; adults, over 24; and profes-
sional. Other divisions include:
made for others, wearable acces-
sory, recycled article, and novelty,
quilt, and afghan's. There is some-
thing for everyone.
Dr. Jason M. Hafner
Dr. David J. Prosser
OPTOMETRIST
Faith Clinic
1st & 3rd Wed. of the month
Buffalo Clinic
2nd & 4th Wed. of the month
1-800-648-0760
Eew, What’s that White Fuzz?
This summer we have seen an
unusual amount of rain on our
mature gardens. You probably
have a lot of growth in your gar-
den and dense plants; this is a
recipe for powdery mildew. Pow-
dery mildew is unattractive and it
can affect the flavor and reduce
yields of some fruits and vegeta-
bles. Although plants are un-
sightly and can be weakened by an
infection, they do not usually die.
Powdery mildew on ornamentals
is an aesthetic issue, and not usu-
ally worth treating. Prevention
and control is more important for
vegetables because it affects the
product’s appearance and flavor.
Powdery Mildew is often found on
roses and peas are quite suscepti-
ble, however it can infect many
plants if the conditions are right.
The key to preventing it is plant-
ing mildew-resistant or mildew-
tolerant varieties. Resistant vari-
eties get less mildew than suscep-
tible varieties; tolerant varieties
may get some mildew, but it
shouldn't affect the performance of
the plant. If you order seeds from
a catalog it should state which dis-
eases the variety has a resistance
to or tolerance.
Prevention also includes siting
plants where they will have good
air circulation, and exposing as
much leaf surface as possible to di-
rect sunlight, which inhibits spore
germination. Heavy foliage as
might be the case this year is a
perfect habitat for this fungus.
You will first notice it as small yel-
low spots on the lower level of
leaves. It thrives in mid to late
summer. Exam the upper and
lower sides of five leaves, once you
have found one leaf spot apply a
fungicide, repeat in four days.
Vigilance is half the cure! Correc-
tion – there is no cure, only con-
trol.
There are many so called or-
ganic remedies out there. One
product sold in Garden Centers
called Serenade Garden Defense is
ineffective, save your money.
Some organic gardeners promote
using a “compost tea, research
tells us this is totally useless. The
best organic control is sulfur ap-
plied to the upper and lower leaf
surfaces, for this you need a
sprayer with a wand that has a
curved head so you can reach the
undersides of the leaves.
Other home remedies include
milk. Some research studies in
1999 and 2003 on infected zuc-
chini and winter wheat (respec-
tively) indicated that spraying
cow's milk slowed the spread of
the disease. To try this at home,
mix 1 part milk with 9 parts water
and spray the stems and tops of
leaves with the solution. Reapply
after rain.
Spraying leaves with baking
soda (1 teaspoon in 1 quart water)
raises the pH, creating an inhos-
pitable environment for powdery
mildew. You may want to add a
couple drops of dish soap to help
the spray adhere to the leaves bet-
ter, again spray the upper and
lower sides of the leaves.
Gardening requires lots of water
- most of it in the form of perspira-
tion. ~ Lou Erickson
Submitted by Karen Englehart,
Master Gardener, SDSU Coopera-
tive Extension Service
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 3
Garden Gate
Wilson and Biegler announce engagement
Paul and Jackie Wilson of Mina, South Dakota, announce the engagement of their daughter Amber
to Matt Biegler, son of Steve and Cristy Biegler of Aberdeen, South Dakota. Amber is the grand-
daughter of Jim and Vera Wilson of Bison, South Dakota. Amber is employed at Sanford Clinic in
Aberdeen. Matt is employed at Bieglers C&S Motor Sports. A September 13th wedding is planned.
Every day at
Northwest
Supply Co.
Lemmon, S D
Pepsi - Coke
products:
12 pack $4.19
24 pack $6.99
Page 4 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Palace
Theater
Turbo
PG • 96 min.
August 16 - 19
7:30 p.m. nightly
surround sound
Lemmon 374-5107
By Teddi Carlson
Four Bison School Board mem-
bers met Monday night at the
school to face a busy agenda at
their regular monthly session.
Board member Angie thompson
was absent.
The new superintendent, Mrs
Marilyn Azevedo, informed the
board that the school will be re-
viewed for accreditation this com-
ing spring by the state. This
review is done every five to seven
years and can be a desk review or
an on sight review. She remarked
that the last written review was
done in 2007. She showed concern
that documentation on evalua-
tions for teachers and para profes-
sionals (teachers aides) needed to
be done since 2010 but has not
been done. According to state
guidelines every teacher and par
professional needs to be evaluated
once a year. Azevedo will be work-
ing hard to get the necessary eval-
uations done before the
accreditation review this coming
spring.
The State Report Card was dis-
cussed. This card will also be
placed at various business places
for the public to read. For the past
few years the scores have gone
down significantly in some areas.
Scores are good in reading but
poor in math. Just a few poor scor-
ing students can bring down the
average. Azevedo suggested that
remedial programs in math are
needed to raise the scores. A new
test called Smarter Balance As-
sessment (Common Core) will be
implemented in May, 2014 for stu-
dent evaluation in South Dakota.
In the past the Dakota Step Test-
ing program has been done. The
new test is more academically
challenging. high School ACT test
scores brought down the Bison
High School scores. Azevedo
showed examples of evaluations
for teachers and para profession-
als used in New Hampshire that
could be used in the Bison School.
the state of South Dakota is now
working on a form that will be
used in the future to evaluate su-
perintendents. After teachers and
para professionals have been eval-
uated by the superintendent they
will see their evaluations and re-
ceive a score. “Receiving a score is
hard for many teachers to accept,”
said Azevedo . Yet evaluations are
necessary for the good of the
school. The Bison School teachers
will be trained in five sessions by
a team from Rapid City on Fridays
to help get their students ready for
the Common Core evaluation test.
Azevedo will work hard to prepare
the teachers for this new test.
Coaches for the coming school
term have now been hired as fol-
lows: Wayne Sanders will be head
coach for Football and Boys Bas-
ketball. BreAnn Nelson will be
Head Girls Basketball and Assis-
tant Volleyball. Lauren Holder
will be the Athletic Director. The
first football game will be on au-
gust 30th at Newell.
Sydney Arneson, a Bison High
School senior and President of her
class, was present to make a re-
quest. “I am here,” she said, “ on
behalf of the Senior Class to ask
permission to use the senior
lounge.” Quickly the Board acted
to grant her request with a few
stipulations. As per federal guide-
lines the sofa will be removed and
the door will remain open at all
times. Smoking or tobacco use is
also prohibited in the lounge.
The 2007 registration handbook
was shown to Azevedo. It is now
outdated because different re-
quirements are now required for
High School graduation. After
“hashing” it over board members
agreed that it could be shortened
and placed in the High School stu-
dent handbook. Wording will be
changed to be in line with how reg-
istration is now done.
The second reading of the eligi-
bility policy was heard and ap-
proved by a vote of 3 - 1. Dan
Beckman made the only descent-
ing vote. As a result of this policy
student grades will be checked
every two weeks to determine
their eligibility for extra-curricu-
lar activities. Students will learn
to take more responsibility for
their grades. Teacher record books
will also be checked by Azevedo.
Teachers will then be forced to be
more responsible for their grade
book. this policy will also be placed
in the High School student hand-
book.
Teacher handbooks were passed
out for board members to examine.
Azevedo read all the changes she
made to this book and explained
the changes. Teachers will read
and study the book and be encour-
aged to make any necessary
changes for next year’s handbook.
One change was made in the El-
ementary student handbook. Par-
ents need to call the school if their
children will arrive at school be-
fore 7:50 a.m. The school needs to
know their names so they can be
responsible for them until school
begins.
A letter of resolution concerning
the tax levy was approved. It is the
same as last year with no changes.
Bids for coal and propane were
opened. The only bid for coal was
from Bison Grain at $59.10 per
ton. That bid was accepted. For
propane there were two bids,
Fisher Gas bid $1.28 per gallon
and Southwest Grain bid $1.29
per gallon or the posted cash price
of $1.17 less 10¢. By unanimous
vote the bid from Southwest Grain
was approved with the bid of the
posted cash price of $1.17 less
10¢.
The smart boards in the class-
rooms are not being used as often
as they could be used. Azevedo will
initiate some training to assist
teachers in smart board use dur-
ing this coming school term.
Coaches are now required to
take on line training offered by the
state. Azevedo will help the
coaches to complete the require-
ment.
Azevedo was also happy to re-
port that she has now received cer-
tification to be a superintendent in
South Dakota. indeed that is good
news.
The board also approved eight-
een home school applications and
three open enrollments.
The next meeting is September
9th.
School Board makes final preparation for the 2013-14 school year
For all your
advertising
needs
Bison Courier
244-7199
or courier@sdplains.com
Rosebud News...
....By Tiss Treib
Tiss Treib traveled to Lemmon
Monday afternoon.
Dale Johnson and his grandson
stopped in for a coffee break with
Thelma Sandgren Tuesday.
Wednesday morning, Jim and
Patsy Miller stopped at Thelma
Sandgren’s on their way home
from checking cows.
At noon Wednesday, Thelma
Sandgren took off for Bison and
had lunch with Marci Sandgren,
Paulette Ellison and Marcie Kari
at Mom’s café.
Thursday Brady Ham was a vis-
itor of Thelma Sandgren.
Friday, Thelma Sandgren made
her usual trip to Hettinger.
Thelma Sandgren attended wor-
ship at New Hope in Lemmon
Sunday and then went out to din-
ner with Steve and Susie Sand-
gren.
Troy Meink and family of Vir-
ginia arrived Friday and are
spending time visiting family.
Helen Meink, Duane and Sue
Meink, Troy Meink and family,
Carole Preszler and Leonard
Jonas went out to dinner in Lem-
mon Saturday.
Helen Meink was a Sunday din-
ner guest of Duane and Sue Meink
and house guests.
LaVonne Foss took Shirley and
Lexi Johnson to Hettinger Friday
shopping.
John and Shirley Johnson went
to Summerville for supper Sunday
evening.
Jim and Patsy Miller attended
the Livestock sale in Faith Mon-
day.
Patsy Miller made a trip to
Lemmon Thursday.
Jim and Patsy Miller made a
trip to Hettinger Friday afternoon
and visited with Violet Miller at
the Nursing Home. They were
then supper guests of Matt and
Christi Miller.
Jim and Patsy Miller attended
the parade in Faith Saturday. Jim
participated in it.
Matt and Christi Miller were
Saturday supper guests of Jim
and Patsy Miller.
Jim and Patsy Miller and Barb
Lyon attended the Rodeo in Faith
Sunday.
Wednesday, JoAnne Seim, Owen
and Ketch LaDue traveled to Lem-
mon and visited Wilford and De-
lores Seim. Horace Seim; Dorothy
Bowers and Dar Price were also
visited at Wilford and Delores’.
Thursday, JoAnne Seim, Owen
and Ketch LaDue; Jo and Jacob
Seim; Sammie and Elliott and
Asher Piehl; Jada and Paisley
Seim, Mya Moyer were dinner
guests of Bonnie Haynes.
Friday dinner and afternoon
guests of Tim and JoAnne Seim
were Hope, Isaac, Ella and Greta
Anderson.
Saturday, Tim and JoAnne Seim
took Owen and Ketch LaDue to
Spearfish to meet Danny LaDue
and a friend for their return to
their home in Drapper, Utah.
Bonnie Haynes and JoAnne
Seim were among the guests at
the home of Corrine Lockert’s to
celebrate the birthday of Dorothy
Bowers Sunday in Lemmon.
Jocie Egle and boys of Min-
nesota; Nonie Hoff of Lemmon;
Dean, Monte and Lynn Frey were
Thursday evening guests of
Dorothy Frey.
Monday, Bridget Keller and the
boys rode with Tabbi and Emily
Mauri and Bekah Askew to meet
Jennifer and Kaden Kvale at the
lake to spend the afternoon swim-
ming.
Tuesday, Bridget Keller and the
boys traveled to Lemmon for
makeup swimming lessons.
Wednesday, Albert Keller re-
turned home from work. Bridget
traveled to Bismarck that after-
noon to meet up with others to
travel on to Devils Lake for some
guard training on Thursday. She
returned home late Thursday
night.
Saturday, Lil Albert and Korbin
Keller spent the night with
Grandpa and Grandma Harris. Al-
bert and Bridget rode motorcycle
to Marmarth, ND to have supper
at the Past Time and then spent
the night and got to visit friends
Jay and Denise Tiedemann while
there.
Sunday, they traveled back
home and Bert and Patricia Keller
were afternoon and supper guests
of the Keller’s. Rob was a brief
evening guest as well.
Kristina, Zachery and Rebecca
Haugen spent some time with
Shirley Harris before returning to
their home.
Meadow News
By Tiss Treib
Tuesday morning Carolyn Petik
was a coffee guest of Bev Schopp.
Wednesday, Laurie and Danci
Hoff, Connie Hourigan, Jessie
Ginther, Ray and Julie Schopp
and family were guests of Fred
and Bev Schopp and helped Bev
celebrate her birthday.
Friday evening, Andrew Sack-
man, Katie and Kelly Schopp
came down to play cards with
their grandparents, Fred and Bev
Schopp.
Fred and Bev Schopp had lunch
in Lemmon Sunday with Dan,
Laurie and Danci Hoff and Jessie
Ginther.
On Wednesday, Carolyn Petik
and Grant Petik had lunch in
Grace Baptist Church • Pastor Phil Hahn
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship Service - 10:30a.m.
Wednesday Prayer Mtg. - 7:30 p.m.
Church of Christ
18 mi. south of Prairie City - Worship Service - 10:00 a.m.
Prairie Fellowship Parish ELCA • Pastor Dana Lockhart
Saturday evening service at Indian Creek - 5:00 p.m. • Rosebud - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday morning services at American - 8:30 a.m. • Grand River Lutheran
Christ Lutheran Church WELS
Pastor Gerhardt Juergens
Sunday Bible Class - 8:00 a.m., Worship Service - 8:30 a.m.
Coal Springs Community Church
Pastors Nels & Angie Easterby
South Jct. of Highways 73 & 20
Sunday School - 10:00 a.m., Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
Seventh Day Adventist Church • Pastor David Moench
Sabbath School - 2:00 p.m., Worship Service - 3:00 p.m.
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church • Fr. Tony Grossenburg
Saturday Mass: - Lemmon 4:45 p.m. Bison - 7:15 p.m.,
Sunday Mass: Lemmon - 8:15 a.m., Morristown - 10:30 a.m.
Holland Center Christian Reformed Church
Pastor Brad Burkhalter • Lodgepole
Worship Service - 8:00 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church • Pastor Florence Hoff, CRE
Worship Service -9:30 a.m.
Slim Buttes Lutheran • Pastor Henry Mohagen
Reva • Worship Service - 9:00 a.m., WMF 2nd Wednesday at 1:00 p.m.
Beckman Wesleyan Church • Pastor Brad Burkhalter
Prairie City
Sunday School - 10:00 a.m., Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m.
Vesper Service - 6:00 p.m., Wed. Evenings - 7:30 p.m.
There are a lot of people who faithfully buy their lottery tickets once even twice a week.
They are hoping to not only win a fortune but also peace of mind and happiness. Almost
always their investment results in disappointment, but they still continue to place hope in
something that is virtually hopeless. Wouldn't it be great to find a ticket that would
guarantee a lifelong win? I want to share with you the fortune I have received in my life
that became mine only by asking for it. Jesus is the only winning ticket to abundant life, joy
unspeakable, peace that passes all understanding, eternal life in heaven, and many other
blessings too numerous to count. I want you to know:
YOU DON'T HAVE TO BUY THE JESUS TICKET!
THERE IS AN ENDLESS SUPPLY OF TICKETS!
ALL JESUS TICKETS ARE WINNERS!
JESUS GIVES THE TICKET FREELY TO WHOMEVER ASKS FOR ONE!
I've seen the reaction of those who have won the lottery. They jump up and down, roll
around on the ground, or cry tears of joy. They even thank God. Years later their lives are
filled with despair and hopelessness because they realize that their fortune did not bring the
things they were expecting. I thank God for my Jesus ticket because I know that whatever
comes in life, I have a mansion prepared in heaven for me and His power to live while here
on earth.
DO YOU HAVE THE WINNING TICKET? JESUS SAYS, "ASK AND YOU WILL RECEIVE,
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND, KNOCK AND THE DOOR WILL BE OPENED UNTO YOU."
Pastors Perspective
Jesus is the Only Winning Ticket
By Tracy Buer, Special Guest Writer
Grace Baptist Church
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 5
Lemmon with Kavan Donohue
and John Lopez. Carolyn also vis-
ited with Irene Young on Wednes-
day morning.
Grant Petik was a Wednesday
overnight guest at Jerry and Car-
olyn's. He returned to his home in
Fond du Lac, WI on Thursday.
Jerry and Carolyn were Thurs-
day dinner guests at Jim and Kim
Petik's.
Carolyn helped with judging at
the Corson County Fair on Friday.
She and Jerry attended the Fair
on Saturday and Sunday. They
were brief callers at Kavan and
Lisa Donohue's on Sunday after-
noon.
“Our sales are every day”
CC Flooring
Highway 12 • Hettinger • 701-567-2677
carpet • vinyl • hardwood
• ceramics
Perkins County Fair & Rodeo
Friday, August 16th
Livestock Judging (cattle, sheep, goats & hogs)
Lobby Exhibits
Livestock 4-H & Open class
8 a.m. - 9 a.m. registration
Lobby Exhibits 4-H and open class
8 a.m. - 12 p.m. registration
FREE supper 5:30 p.m.
sponsored by Grand Electric & WRCTC
Talent show to follow supper
Thursday, August 15th
Queen Contest, 9 a.m.
Registration and Interview Judging of 4-H Static
Exhibits 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
$$$Best Pie and Best jr. pie contest
on Saturday $$$
for more information call 605-866-4410 www.perkinscountyfair.com
Supper Admission $5.00
Dance Admission
singles $3.00 couples $5.00
Wrist bands $15.00 adult and $8.00 for 7 -12
(for all weekend)
Rodeo Admission
Adults $7
7 -12 $4
6 and under FREE
Sunday, August 18th
Breakfast/Rodeo Slack 9 a.m.
Church 10:30 a.m.
RODEO 1 p.m.
featuring Mutton Busting & Steer Riding
Saturday, August 17th
Horse, cat, dog, rabbits and poultry judging
8 - 9 a.m. registration
Antique Tractor Show
$50 gas certificate to winner
Quilt Show
at the Bentley Building
Quilts must be registered Friday at 9 a.m.
$50 gift certificate to Buffalo Creek Quilt Shop to
winner
August 15 - 18, 2013
Family Fun Play Day
12 - 12:45 p.m. registration
Stick Horse Races
Bring your horse and have some fun!
Supper 5 p.m. at the Fair Building
Queen Crowning 5:30 p.m.
Carcass & Pie Auction
(to follow Queen Crowning)
RODEO 7 p.m.
featuring Mutton Busting & Steer Riding
Dance to Itty Bitty Opry Band 9:30 p.m.
Concessions Available Friday, Saturday & Sunday
Beer Garden Saturday Night & Sunday
Page 6 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Medora to Deadwood
Wagon and Trail Ride
The Medora to Deadwood
Wagon and Trail Ride will con-
clude the last leg of the journey
this summer. The northern route
will begin at the Niemi Ranch
near Buffalo, SD on August 31,
2013, and end in Medora, ND on
September 7, 2013. The southern
route from Buffalo to Deadwood
was completed last year. Proceeds
from the ride will benefit Dead-
wood History’s Days of ’76 Mu-
seum, Deadwood, South Dakota
and the Billings County Museum,
Medora, North Dakota.
During the late nineteenth cen-
tury in the west, all roads led to
Deadwood. The site of one of
America’s last great gold rushes,
Deadwood attracted thousands of
men and women from all walks of
life. Hearing the reports of gold in
the Black Hills, aristocratic
French nobleman Marquis de
Mores established his own stage
line from Medora to Deadwood in
1884. He charged 10 cents a mile.
The route took the stage to Dead-
wood, through the Black Hills, and
to the Badlands. Relay stations
were set up every 10 to 15 miles
for team changes and passenger
breaks. While some passengers
may have been keen on getting
rich in the gold rush, many histo-
rians believe the stage was used
by job seekers and tourists to shut-
tle between the two cities from
1884 to 1886. In 2013, modern
day trail riders will once again re-
live the journey.
Leona Odermann, Billings
County Museum manager and
Medora Area Conventions and Vis-
itors Bureau CEO, is helping to or-
ganize the trail ride. “This once in
a lifetime experience allows wag-
ons and horseback riders to cross
over the area National Grasslands
and endure the terrain stage
coaches dealt with in an earlier
era,” said Odermann.
The 2013 Medora to Deadwood
Wagon and Trail Ride Committee
includes Linda and Ray Gilbert,
Gordon and Lil O’Dell, Kim Shade,
Leona and James Odermann,
Kathy Miller, Gregg and Nadine
Radtke, Bob and Doreen Folske,
Jon Mattson, Doug Ellison and
Karin Savoie. Ray and Linda
Gilbert will be the lead wagon
with Dick Herman, Leroy Dean
and Kim Shade as the trail bosses.
Sponsors of the ride include:
North Dakota Tourism, Chateau
deMores State Historical Society,
Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foun-
dation, Whiting Oil, Dan’s Super-
market, Stockmen’s Livestock
Exchange Inc., National Grass-
lands and Badlands and MBI.
Registrations have been steady
and are nearing the total of 300
applicants. There are a few open-
ings left. Registration forms can be
found at
www.daysof76museum.com or by
calling Karin Savoie at 605-578-
1657.
For all your advertising needs contact the Bison Courier 244-7199
or courier@sdplains.com
Press releases, engagement announcements and obituaries are free of charge
Having One’s Very
Own Junkyard
There is a reason why our
ranch has its very own junk-
yard. The term “junkyard” is
just to mislead others about its
real purpose—it’s a redneck
rancher’s spare parts and ma-
terials warehouse.
The big and bulky items that
are stored down at our junk-
yard out of sight are often
times parted-out or resur-
rected for reuse in a different
form later on. When ranch
ideas turn into projects, the
first thing my welder-husband
does is rummage around the
junkyard for usable materials
he can scab off of something
else. Running to town or the
nearest big city is not very con-
venient or handy when the
Hubs wants to bring his inno-
vative idea into fruition ur-
gently. The junkyard is his
preferred go-to source for many
ranch project plans because it
avoids having to send me on a
half-day round trip to the city,
risking that I’ll get the wrong
materials, and spending
money.
The junkyard is a rancher’s
playground. Okay, more like a
rancher’s wife’s playground. I
oftentimes discover “treasures”
there and find the majority of
materials in the burn pile and
scrap metal piles located there
for my rustic and distressed-
look so-called projects, but our
junkyard is a vital component
to our ranching operation.
As I’ve mentioned before,
ranching families like ours live
out the motto of the Marine
Corps. daily: “Improvise,
Adapt, Overcome.” We are al-
ways partaking in one or a
combination of, improvising,
adapting, and overcoming
something. Our ability to carry
out any of these is often times
achieved by repurposing re-
sources in our junkyard.
It’s the first place my hubby
went to create our amped-up
ranch improvements like the
black Toyota and Dodge pick-
ups’ big game intimidator grill
guards, the hay-hauling rack
extensions that he built for the
30” flatbed trailer, and the con-
verted dump truck bed-turned-
large-capacity-water-hauling-t
railer. He has welded all sorts
of clever cow and ranch task-
related conveniences I love
that were derived from junk-
yard scrap including the re-
tractable ATV calf-packer rack,
ATV calf packer sled, and nu-
merous ATV accessories. One
or the other of our four-wheel-
ers have a custom travel mug
holder, ½ horseshoe replace-
ment gear shifting pedal, spot-
light stand, sorting stick
holder that doubles as a mock
roping saddle horn (for use in
doctoring cows or calves on the
range), metal box for storing
fencing materials, and a barb-
wire spool holder. Of all the
junkyard innovations he’s
welded, my all-time favorite is
the creep feed chute system.
With feed stored upstairs,
we’re now able to fill feed buck-
ets at ground level where we
feed our heifers instead of
packing five gallon buckets of
feed down the rickety barn
steps with extreme caution. It’s
a chore I don’t dread anymore
because the junkyard repur-
Guest Columnist
Amy Kirk is a ranch wife from Custer, SD
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 7
posed material created a time-
saver for packing buckets up
and down the steps and elimi-
nated the safety hazard steps
all together.
The items in the junkyard
are the perfect resource for my
husband’s system upgrades
and improvements because
they satisfy his pocketbook
hoarding tendencies. In an in-
tense project-building mode
the junkyard has also provided
him with a plethora of iron
scrap to carry out his welding
project plans instantly, satisfy-
ing his need for instant gratifi-
cation-type projects.
Even though we’ve been
married 19 years now, I always
know sparks are gonna fly
with my husband whenever he
says, “I’m goin’ to the junkyard
to look for somethin’.”
Weather Wise
DATE HI LO PRECIP
Aug 6 84 59 .18
Aug 7 78 53
Aug 8 75 50
Aug 9 75 55
Aug10 75 53 .35
Aug 11 76 56
Aug 12 na
One year ago
Hi 97 Lo 55
Brought to you by
Grand Electric Co-op, Inc.
Page 8 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Pastor Florence Hoff leading a special children service during mass at Shadehill Camping area
on August 4.
There was 89 people, not including the children,attending the service held at Shadehill Camping
area on Sunday, August 4. Everyone that was staying at the Shadehill Camping area was invited.
The youth rode their bikes around the campground delivering invitations
Local churches gather for campout at Shadehill
Pastor Florence Hoff leads
church service at Shadehill
Camping area on Sunday, Au-
gust 4. It was a joint
service/campout with First
Presbyterian Church, Grace
Baptist Church, Bison and
Spencer Memorial Presbyte-
rian of Lemmon.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 9
Adults and the children also played outdoor games at the Bison First Presbyterian Church annual
Shadehill Campout.
The children attending also spent some time down by the
water swimming while the adults visited on the shore at the
Bison First Presbyterian Church annual Shadehill Campout
that was held August 2 through August 4.
Joyce Aukland played the
organ for the chuch service
held at Shadehill Camping Re-
sort on Sunday, August 4.
At the Bison First Presbyterian Church campout held at
Shadehill Camping area on August 2 to August 4. People that
camped at the 10 campsites or 2 cabins that were reserved
were served pancakes in the morning made by the men of the
church.
At noon on Sunday after mass, the church welcomed everyone
that was staying at Shadehill to a potluck dinner. There was
so much food it covered two large picknick tables.
College
Subscriptions
to the
Bison Courier
are $25.48 for a
9 month Sub
Page 10 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Back row – Jim Brockel, Kiana Brockel, Eli Harpster, Katie Lychowitzer, Tayton Schofield. Front row – Halle Simmons, Roni
Voller, Rachel Holzkamm, Dustin Wells, Elliott Peil
Farmers Union Campers learn financial literacy, cooperation
Many Americans have too much
debt, aren’t saving enough money
every month and need to work on
their financial literacy. That edu-
cation should start early, and
Perkins County Farmers Union’s
annual day camp taught young
people about the importance of
taking care of their money and
about the impact cooperative busi-
nesses have had on our state’s
economy.
Several young people attended
this year’s camp themed, ‘Farmers
Union is our name, Cooperation is
our game.’ The kids participated in
activities and games that taught
them about cooperative business,
rural communities, and agricul-
ture in a fun and safe setting.
They participated in hands-on
team building activities, and
played a cooperative human board
game to test their knowledge of fi-
nances. The campers also worked
on 4-H projects at the day camp.
They made and launched bottle
rockets as well creating paper.
“We hope the children who learn
about saving money and cooperat-
ing with each other at an early age
will be more successful adults,”
said State Education Director
Bonnie Geyer. “Our youth need to
learn about what cooperation in
their own personal lives can do,
along with the importance of coop-
erative business and being a good
steward of the money they earn.”
Along with activities, games and
singing, each child also decorated
their own wooden bank as a craft
to promote saving money. Each
child also received a free T-shirt.
Participants at this year’s
Perkins County Farmers Union
camp were Dustin Wells, Roni
Voller, and Elliott Piel from Bison.
Eli Harpster from Prairie City;
Hallee Simmons from Sturgis;
Tayton Schofield from Faith; Katie
Lychowitzer and Rachel
Holzkamm from Hettinger, ND.
Helping at this year’s Perkins
County Farmers Union Camp
were Kiana Brockel and Jim
Brockel from Bison; Kelli Schu-
macher from Buffalo; and Summer
Interns Nicole Seible, and Kortny
Sterrett.
For more information on South
Dakota Farmers Union and how
you and your children can get in-
volved in the organization’s youth
activities, visit the education page
at www.sdfu.org or call Bonnie
Geyer, State Education Director at
605-352-6761 ext. 125.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 11
Page 12 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Burkhalter runs in two national track meets in eight days
Places in both
Daniel Burkhalter traveled with
his parents to Greensboro, NC for
the USA Track & Field Champi-
onships on July 27th. This na-
tional meet had about 8,000
athletes participating over 5 days
of competition. I've never seen
anything like it.
Daniel finished 5th (13-14
Boys)in the 3,000 meter run (9:35)
which also earned him Jr. Olympic
"All-American" status. The level of
competition in this country is just
amazing. Thanks to everyone who
got up Saturday morning and
watched it live, you are true fans.
After returning home on Mon-
day night, July 29, Daniel rested
and repacked to head out to Her-
shey, Pennsylvania for the Her-
shey National Track Meet on
August 3rd.
Daniel spent 3 full days in Her-
shey doing all kinds of fun activi-
ties. He went to the Hershey's
World of Chocolate, spent a day at
the Hershey Theme Park, at-
tended a banquet, and of course
ran in the track meet. Daniel ran
a 4:45 mile placing him 4th in that
meet.
The great thing about the trip to
PA was that Hershey paid for
everything, including transporta-
USA Track & Field Greensboro, NC. Eight National finalists having a great time. Daniel Burkhalter
is second from the right.
tion and entertainment. Dad likes
that sort of thing. Daniel also met
Carl Lewis (9 time Olympic Gold
Medalist) and had him autograph
his hat. One of Daniel's medals
was awarded to him by Rafer
Johnson (Olympic Gold Medalist
in the Decathlon).
Daniel also came home with a
host of chocolate products in sizes
(huge) I've never seen before. To
sum it all up, Daniel has had a
very memorable summer and now
he gets to come home and live with
Mom and Dad.
Congratulations Daniel!
Daniel Burkhalter with some memories.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 13
Bison School District #52-1
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federal
law, requires the Bison School District, with certain exceptions, obtain
your written consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable
information from your child’s education records. However, Bison
School District may disclose appropriately designated “directory in-
formation” without written consent, unless you have advised the Dis-
trict to the contrary in accordance with District procedures. The
primary purpose of directory information is to allow the Bison School
District to include this type of information from your child’s education
records in certain school publications. Examples include:
A playbill, showing your student’s role in a drama production;
•The annual yearbook;
•Honor roll or other recognition lists;
•Graduation programs; and
•Sports activity sheets, such as for wrestling, showing weight and
height of team members.
Directory information, which is information that is generally not
considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released, can also be
disclosed to outside organizations without a parent’s prior written
consent. Outside organizations include, but are not limited to, com-
panies that manufacture class rings or publish yearbooks. In addi-
tion, two federal laws require local educational agencies (LEAs)
receiving assistance under the Elementary and Secondary Education
Act of 1965 (ESEA) to provide military recruiters, upon request, with
three directory information categories – names, addresses and tele-
phone listings – unless parents have advised the LEA that they do
not want their student’s information disclosed without their prior
written consent.
If you do not want Bison School District to disclose directory infor-
mation from your child’s education records without your prior written
consent, you must notify the District in writing prior to the first day
of school in the fall. Bison School District has designated the follow-
ing information as directory information:
•Student’s name, address, telephone listing
•Student's date and place of birth.
•Student's dates of attendance
•Student’s grade level
•Student's participation in officially recognized school activities and
sports.
•Weight and height of students who are members of athletic teams.
•Degrees, honors, and awards received
•The most recent educational agency or institution attended
•Pictures of students on the school’s Infinite Campus Program and
Web Site; and to the local papers for honors, sport highlights, schol-
arships, or other news articles about students
Parents or Students who need assistance or who wish to file a com-
plaint may do so by writing to the Family Policy Office, U.S. Depart-
ment of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C.
20202-5920
Public notification of
nondiscrimination policy
The Bison Public School supports the provisions of Title IX of the
Educational amendments of 1972, Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of
1964 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 which commit
all schools to the elimination of discrimination on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex and handicap to those programs and activ-
ities offered to its students. It is the expressed intent of the Bison
Public School to provide equal opportunity for all students, free from
limitations of race, color, national origin, sex and handicap.
This concept of Equal Educational opportunity will serve as a guide
to the Governing Board, the Administration and staff in making de-
cisions relating to the employment of personnel, school facilities, cur-
riculum, activities and regulations affecting students and employees.
Inquiries regarding compliance with Title IX, Title VI, and Section
504, Affirmative Action, and The American With Disabilities Act,
which prohibit discrimination on basis of race, color, national origin,
sex and handicap conditions, may be directed to the Bison Public
School, Superintendent Marilyn Azevedo, PO Box 9, Bison, South
Dakota 57620, Telephone number 605-244-5271. Inquiries can also
be made to the Regional Director, Department of Education, Office for
Civil Rights, 10200 North Executive Hills Boulevard, 8th Floor,
Kansas City, MO 64153-1367.
Page 14 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
2013-2014 Bison School Faculty & Staff
Administration:
Superintendent: ...............................................................Marilyn Azevedo
Business Manager: ..........................................................Bonnie Crow
Asst. Business Manager: .................................................Colette Johnson
Faculty:
Kindergarten:.................................................................... Donna Keller
1st Grade: .........................................................................Darla Kahler
2nd Grade: ........................................................................Bev Kopren
3rd Grade: .........................................................................Heidi Kopren
4th Grade: .........................................................................Abby Landphere
5th Grade: .........................................................................Shelby Miles
6th Grade: .........................................................................Michelle Stockert
Title I: ................................................................................Roxie Seaman
Special Ed Director: ..........................................................Donna Keller
K-12 Special Ed: ...............................................................Julia Brixey
K-12 Music: .......................................................................Brian Holder
Physical Education: ...........................................................Kalin Chapman
Library: ..............................................................................Joyce Waddell
7-12 Art, Geography, Social Studies: ................................Tarina Kopren
7-12 Math, Quiz Bowl: .......................................................Eric Terrell
Science, Prom: ..................................................................Shawnda Carmichael
Ag, FFA: ............................................................................Christi Ryen
FACS, FCCLA: ..................................................................Joyce Matthews
Government, History, Business, 7th Social Studies:......... Kristen Seidel
HS English, Oral Interp, Play: ...........................................Elizabeth Bonacci
Paraprofessionals:
Kelli Birkeland
Heidi Collins
Londa Hendrickson
Nina Loper
Office Staff:
Jr & Sr High School Secretary: ...............................................Janelle Goddard
Elementary Secretary: ............................................................Bristol Palmer
Coaching:
Head Volleyball:...................................................................... Kalin Chapman
Asst. Volleyball: ......................................................................BreAnn Nelson
Head Football: ........................................................................Wayne Sanders
Asst. Football: .........................................................................James Sandgren
Cross Country & Track:........................................................... Brad Burkhalter
Head Boys Basketball: ............................................................Wayne Sanders
Asst. Boys Basketball:
Head Girls Basketball: .............................................................BreAnn Nelson
Asst. Girls Basketball: ..............................................................Steve Senn
Wrestling:
Golf: .........................................................................................Jeffrey Johnson
Yearbook: .................................................................................Kristen Seidel
Cooks:
Head Cook: ...........................................................................Camille Drown
Asst. Cook: ............................................................................Danelle Gerbracht
Custodial:
Head Custodian: ......................................................................Connie Aaker
Asst. Custodian:....................................................................... Becky Peacock
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 15
BISON SCHOOL DISTRICT #52-1
PO Box 9 • 200E Carr St • Bison, SD 57620
Bison Elementary • Bison Jr. & Sr, High School
School Year: August 26, 2013 - May 21, 2014
Classes start at 8:00 a.m.
Dismissal time is 3:43 p.m.
Lunch Program
Kindergarten through 12 • $3.50 ($70.00)
Adults• $4.25 ($85.00)
Milk ticket • $8.00
Admission to Home Athletic Events
Adults- $4.00 • Season Pass- $35.00
Students- $2.00• Season Pass- $12.50
Phone Numbers
Supt. and Business Manager • 605-244-5961
Jr./Sr. High School • 605-244-5961
Elementary • 605-244-5273
Gymnasium Lobby • 605-244-5274
School Closing
In case of severe weather, all families will be no-
tified via the schools telephone notification sys-
tem. This notification will come to the phone
number each family provided to the school. The
official announcement can also be heard over
these radio/TV stations: KBJM, Sturgis; KOTA
and KEVN, Rapid City and KNDC, Hettinger,
KZZI Spearfish and KELO TV-Closeline.
Parents should make arrangements, in advance,
where students are to go in case of early closing.
Written records
of these arrangements are to be on file in the of-
fice. Bristol & Janelle will also be providing infor-
mation via phone calls to staff.
Page 16 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Bison School’s sexual
harassment policy
Policy:
It is the Bison School District’s policy that sexual harassment is illegal, un-
acceptable and shall not be tolerated; and that no employee or student of the
school district may sexually harass another. Any employee or student will be
subject to disciplinary action, including possible termination, for violation of
this policy.
Definition:
Any unwelcome sexual advances, solicitation of sexual activity by promise
of rewards, coercion of sexual activity by threat of punishment, verbal sexist
remarks or physical sexual assaults constitute sexual harassment. This con-
duct has the effect of unreasonable interfacing with an individual’s academic
or work performance or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive em-
ployment or education environment, regardless of intent.
Responsibility:
School district officers, employees and students are responsible for main-
taining a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment.
Workshops and activities will be provided by the school district to explain the
policy and laws. Careful scrutiny will be undertaken of all allegations of sexual
harassment. False allegations that are malicious or ill-founded may constitute
libel or slander. Copies of the policy will be available at all administrative of-
fices.
Complaints:
Any employee who believes that they have been a subject of sexual harass-
ment by a district employee or officer should report this incident immediately
to their immediate supervisor. If the immediate supervisor is involved in the
activity, the violation should be reported to the supervisor’s immediate super-
visor. Students should report such incidents to the responsible administrator.
All reported incidents will be thoroughly investigated and subject to disci-
plinary action. Confidentiality consistent with sue process will be maintained.
If any employees or student files a written complaint because of dissatisfac-
tion with the handling of the complaint, they may utilize any applicable griev-
ance procedure.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 17
College Subscriptions to the
Bison Courier are $25.48
(9 month Sub)
Page 18 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
This is the machine that is housed in a cement pit at the end
of the shooting range area. This machine was $7,000, that
was received through a grant from NRA. Local people can
come shoot clay pengions at the shooting range on Wednes-
day nights at 6:30. Cost for member ship is $25.00 for adults
and children are $5.00. Everyone is invited to attend. You
may even attend a couple of times for free to see if you enjoy
the sport. The trap club runs until fall when the weather
starts to cool off for the winter. They meet weekly.
Local Bison Mechanic, Allen Palmer, takes a shot at a clay pi-
geon at the Trap shooting range.
Area man, Pat Clark getting ready to locate and shoot the
clay pigeons when Allen Palmer pushes the button to fire the
clay pigeon into the sky.
College Subscriptions to the
Bison Courier are $25.48
(9 month Sub)
Bison area Trap Club
mend this because when you get
fuel to fill it a tanker would come in
and fill Bison tank and then go and
fill Lemmon's tank. A tanker truck
holds any where from 8,000 to
10,000 gallons. The new tank that
is planned to go into the Bison air-
port is a horizontal tank that has a
double wall tank. The double wall
tank insures no leakage. The life
expectancy and warranty of a tank
this size is 30 years. The tank will
also be a 24 hour access pump.
Right now if planes want to fuel up
they have to call a number and
someone has to go up to the airport
and unlock it for the pilot. Survey
letters have been sent out to all the
pilots in the area and have been re-
turned stating that if Bison had a
24 hour access pump that 1,000 or
so gallons would be used per year.
It would open Bison Airport to be
used by more planes. Beth Hulm
says she gets call all the time about
the airport if we have fuel but
many don't stop because the pump
is not accessible without someone
unlocking it. However, with other
project in the works, the board feels
that they can not take the bid from
Meyer Contracting and decided
that they will re list the bid in the
fall again, hoping that they get a
lesser bid that fits. The plan states
that they have 3 years to do this
project.
On other topic that they dis-
cussed about the airport was the
trees at the end of Runway 29.
There are 15 feet of trees that need
to be trimmed. Currently this is not
in the state plan so the Town of
Bison has to foot the whole bill this
year. This is a liability issue and if
the town of Bison doesn't do it , the
airport will be shut down.The
board is in the process of putting
this in a plan and then they would
only have to pay 5% of the tree trim
bill. But for this year the Town of
Bison is going to hire Angry Beaver,
if they can show proof of insurance.
The bill for trimming the trees is as
follows: There are 10 mature elm
trees that need trimming at the
cost of $150, 5 mature ash trees
that need trimming at the cost of
$200 and 18 young trees that need
trimming at the cost of $100. Then
clean up, all the branches that will
be trimmed will be grounded up
and the wood chips will be laid out
among the trees. So the bill for this
project will be $5300.
Other topics discussed was dif-
ferent requests. The library board
would like $14,000. The Hurry and
Hustle Club would also like some
money to put rubber padding
around the playground at the city
park. John Blosmo also was in due
to his basement flooding. In June
when the Blosmo's got home their
basement was sitting with lots of
water. It happen when the new
water meter was put in and a cou-
pling leaked. The board is having
an insurance adjuster meeting with
Mr. Blosmo soon to settle the prob-
lem.
The meeting was adjourned at
10:30 p.m after the first reading of
the budget was discussed.
Next meeting is planned for Sep-
tember 9 at 7 p.m..
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 19
Local Farmer, Ben Kruger, shooting at the Trap Club that
meets on Wednesday nights at 6:30 p.m.
Local Carpenter, Dennis Lewton, taking his turn to shoot at
the flying clay pigeon.
Airport fuel bid
continued from page 1
Fargo, ND and U.S. Site Work
from Monticello, MN. Meyer Con-
tracting bid on July 19th was that
he could complete the job for
$323,350. U.D. Site Work submit-
ted a bid then to at the cost of
$394,003.00. So they opened it up
for more bids but the second time,
on August 6, when bids were
turned in they lost U.S. Site Work
and only got a bid from Meyer Con-
tracting. For some reason on the
second bid sheet the Engineer's
Opinion was more than what he
originally forecasted On August 6,
the Engineer's Opinion was that
the project was going to cost
$225,850.00. Meyer Contracting
did lessen his bid by about $10,000
with a bid of $311,350. The board
feels that all of the bids are way to
high at this time. If the town took
Meyer Contracting bid of $311,350
they also would have added cost of
Administration Preliminary & De-
sign, Construction Observation,
and Close out report which would
run an additional $46,650. So the
whole project would cost
$358,000.00. It however would not
cost the town $358,000.00 because
the FAA would be paying 90%, the
State would pay 5% and the town
would only have to pay 5% of the
bid. So it would cost the Town of
Bison $17,900. The reason the proj-
ect is so spendy is the tank it self
costs $84,000, according to Meyer
Contracting. The tank is a 4,000
gallon tank and this is what the
FAA recommends. They recom-
Page 20 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Thinking About Building?
NEW HOME • POST FRAME AG BUILDING
NEW SHOP • GARAGE • MATERIAL PACKAGE
HOME ADDITION • CUSTOM BUILDING
At Northwest Supply Company, we can do your job from
start to finish or recommend contractors that do
quality workmanship.
Give us a call to discuss your ideas.
U|enn & Margaret Ioge|man
RETIREMENT AUCTION
Wed. Aug 2S, 2013 * 10am MT
On Hwy 212, go 19 W of FaItb, SD, io Fo× Fidgc Fd,
iIcn 6 S & 1 W (16979 Fo× Fidgc Fd}
TRACTORS, SKIDSTEER: JD 4440 dsl,¡owsIifi, 3 ¡i, 3 oui,
CAH, 1000/540 ¡io, NEW Tircs 18.4×38, w/JD 725 Ldr &
Twin Cyl Cra¡¡l - Dolcai Clarl 632 Slidsiccr w/scoo¡ &
gra¡¡lc - IH 1066 Turlo dsl, cal, 3 ¡i, 1000/540 ¡io, Quil
TacI, good 18.4F38 iircs w/duals - JD 2955 dsl, 3 ¡i, 2 oui,
CAH, 1000/540 ¡io, w/JD 265 Ldr & Twin Cyl Cra¡¡l - JD
10' Hydr Dozcr - '54 Ford Julilcc Tracior w/3 ¡i., ncw rcar
iircs - Uscd dsl noior for 1066 - Fcar Eniry Larson Tracior
Cal - 7' 3 ¡i Disc for Ford Traciors - 3 ¡i Trailcr HiicI
w/lall - Tracior cIains - 3 ¡i. Quil HiicI - Scra¡cr Tircs -
HAY & HARVEST: JD 4895 dsl Windrowcr w/ JD 895 Powr
Fcvcrs, 16' Augcr Hd, CAH, Clcnn is vcry ¡roud of iIis na-
cIinc! - JD 567 Mcga-Widc Dalcr, rcally good, siorcd insidc
- Vcrnccr F23A Iydraul Twin V Falc - Masscy Su¡cr 92
Conlinc w/¡iclu¡, 14', runs OK - Vcrs 15' ¡ull-iy¡c
Windrowcr - IHC 9' Mowcr - Farn King 8×50 ¡io Augcr -
LaInan cIain Siacl Movcr, Iydra & ¡io, 13 1/2 × 28 MA-
CHINERY: KnigIi Dig Auggic 12 Mi×cr Wagon w/clcc scalcs
& 3 augcrs - AsIland 5 yd Diri Scra¡cr - Hay Dusicr Dalc
Proccssr - 3 ¡i. Sngl & Dll Dalc Forls - JD 16' Disc Drill w/
Alf Sccdcr & Fcri - JD DWA 18' Tndn Disc w/foldu¡ Wings
- Dalon 27' Ficld Culiivair, good for alfalfa or Iay land -
Fcicrl 9' Snow Dlowcr w/Iydra s¡oui, noi uscd nucI, siorcd
insidc - Tcrra Dond 3 ¡i. S¡rcadr Cradcr - 5-scc Harrow on
Trans¡ - Dual 600 indn a×l Manurc S¡rcadcr - 3 ¡i.
S¡raycr, 300 gal, 32' - 3 ¡i. Dladc - JD 100 CIiscl, 16' -
Cli¡¡cr Fanning Mill - LOTS OF SCRAP IRON & OLDER
MACH ~ RANCH EQUIP, TACK: Squcczc CI w/ Dig Val
Hdgaic - (15} Sirolcrg & (10} Vcrn's Pancls - 200 lu. Dull
Din w/augcr - 2 Saddlcs, Dridlcs, Tacl - 30 (4'} Lanling
Pancls - 25 Tirc Fccdcrs - Siou× Min Fccdrs - 2 Crcc¡ Fcc-
drs on WIccls & 1 on Slids - Pow Fiv Calf Tall - Load CIuic
on wIccls - Hdgai - Calf Warncr, Pullcr & Crool - Wirc Hog
Pancl - Hog Fccdcr - Wool Tics RRIb CattIe Brand: F Lazy
6 over Bar - TRUCKS & TRAILERS: '68 CIcv C-60 Farn
Trucl, 5 s¡, w/iwin cyl Ioisi & 16' Siccl Do×, runs good -
Surc Pull 8×32 C-nccl iandcn dual a×lc Flailcd Trailcr
w/lcavcr iail ran¡s - Tiian siccl g-nccl Siocl Trailcr, 6'8"
× 20', good sIa¡c - Hndc C-nccl sngl a×l 8×20 irailcr -
Hndc 6×10 Trailcr PICKUP, ATVs, CAR: '94 CIcv Silvcrado
4×4, auio, gas, c×i cal, runs good - (2} Honda FancIcr ES
4×4's - 4-WIcclcr S¡raycr - 4-wIcclcr Trailr - '73 Poniiac
Car Dody TANKS, CULVERT: 3500 gal. Poly Liquid Fccd
Tanl w/¡un¡ & good clcc. Moior - (2} 500 gal. dcsl Tanls
w/clcc Pun¡s - (2} 300 gal. ovId Tanls - Siccl Culvcri,
4'×20' 1 Ton ALFALFA SEED In ¡lasiic sacls, clcancd &
rcady io ¡lani - 1½ T COW CAKE - TOOLS, FENCING: Hy-
draul PosiIolc Augcr - Colcn Pownaic 6250 & WinCo 2500
waii PTO Ccncraiors - Dig Paris Din - Acciyl Wcldcr on
wIccls - Cardcn Tillcr & Su¡¡lics. Hoscs, Falcs - NEW Dar-
rcll Foiclla 15/40 Oil - Many wrcncIcs, good scis - Dii
SIar¡cncr - Log S¡liiicr - Conlin Sci. 1-3/8" ÷ 2", siand &
nciric - Plicrs - Soclcis - Visc Cri¡s - CIiscls - PuncIcs -
Hanncrs - Maliia CIo¡ Saw on siand - 2 Drill Prcsscs -
Crafis Fadial Arn Saw - good SiiIl CIainsaw - LP SIo¡
Hcaicr, lilc Kni¡co - Tallc Saw - DcncI Crindcr - Oil Darrcl
& Ccar Lulc Pun¡s - (2} l00= LP Doiilcs, 20= loiilcs - SIov-
cls - Corn Forl - PiicIforls - S¡adcs - Mall - Hoscs - 30T
Hydraul Prcss - Housc Jacls - Handyn Jacl - 200 Drand
NEW Siccl Posis & Siays - 2 NEW Folls Darl Wirc &
SircicIcr - ¡io Darl Wirc Unrollcr - 3 FEA Polcs - CIain
Hoisis - FaicIci Sira¡s - Livc Aninal Tra¡ - Ncw & Uscd
Lunlcr - Ccncni Mi×cr - Wovcn Wirc - Sonc Euclid & Trac-
ior Tircs ANTIQUES: IH Crcan Sc¡araior - Poi Dcllicd Siovc
- Crcan Cans - Dowls - Classwarc - Crocls - Dluc Jars
MEAT GRINDER, SAW, SLICER & HOUSEHOLD: Dcc¡
Frcczc - NEW DDQ Crill - Paiio Sci - Scw MacI - Scw Cal-
inci - 3 Foll Away Dcds - Mag Facls - Lan¡s - Con¡uicr -
Dool Cascs - Calincis - Wall Dccor - Enicriain Ccnicr - Sn
Elcc A¡¡lianccs
U|enn Ioge|man: 605-748-2436
llkê|IlK 1||IlêK älk\l|lä
0an: 605-544-3316 or 605-685-4556
0etaì|s & photos at: www.PìroutekAuctìon.com
College Subscriptions to the
Bison Courier are $25.48
(9 month Sub)
Storm sewer work has begun
These are the lids that will be placed on top of the man holes.
BL Construction moving dirt to put pipe in the storm sewer
project.
These are the manholes tht are being placed under the street.
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 21
STATE OF SOUTH
DAKOTA IN
CIRCUIT
COURT
)
)
COUNTY OF
PERKINS
FOURTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
PRO No. 13-10
In the Matter of the Estate of )
ILMA G. GABRIEL, Deceased.)
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE OF FORMAL PROBATE
AND APPOINTMENT OF PER-
SONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Notice is given that on the 9th day of
July , 2013, Faye F. Schalesky,
whose address is 16502 156th Street,
Faith, SD 57626, was appointed as
Personal Representative of the Estate
of Ilma G. Gabriel.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the
date of the first publication of this No-
tice or their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with
the Clerk, and a copy of the claim
mailed to the Personal Representative.
Dated this 15th day of July, 2013.
/s/ Faye F. Schalesky
FAYE F. SCHALESKY
16502 156th Street
Faith, SD 57626
Patricia Peck
Perkins County Clerk of Courts
P.O. Box 426
Bison, SD 57620
(605) 244-5626
Dale R. Hansen
Hansen Law, PC
P.O. Box 580
Sturgis, SD 57785
(605) 347-2551
[Published July 25, August 1, August
8, August 15, 2013 at a total approxi-
mate cost of $77.35.]
Be thinking about starting a
subscription for your
college student this fall!!
First year or graduate
student … Your
college-bound
student will love
getting news from
home!!
It’s Almost Back-to-College Time …
Are you ready for another semester of hard work and
fun?
Use these helpful tips to make the most of the coming
school year,
whether it’s your first or last!
• Don’t schedule classes back-to-back. You won’t be rushed, and you’ll
have time after class to study.
• Get involved! If you didn’t last year, play a sport, join a club, or start
one of your own.
• Have fun! A balance between work and play is the key to a good year.
• Take breaks while studying – 10 minutes for every hour is sufficient.
Also, study in the daytime as much as possible.
• Make and stick with a livable budget. Don’t forget to factor in little
things like CDs and haircuts.
• Create open communication with your roommate(s) early on. Get to
know each other’s personal values, habits and expectations.
Pioneer Review
Box 788 • Philip • (605) 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant
Box 435 • Wall • (605) 279-2565
Kadoka Press
Box 309 • Kadoka • 837-2259
Faith Independent
Box 38 • Faith • (605) 967-2161
Bison Courier
Box 429 • Bison • (605) 244-7199
Murdo Coyote
Box 465 • Murdo • (605) 669-2271
New Underwood Post
Box 426 • New Underwood • (605) 754-6466
All College Subs to any of
these newspapers:
$25.48 tax included
BL Construction digging up the street in preparation for the storm sewer.
Not much moisture this week, less
than a quarter inch here, but we had
some beautiful weather. These nice
warm days and cool nights could be
addictive.
Casey and crew headed out early
Monday morning for the Rodeo Bible
Camp at Kadoka. Casey has been
the steer wrestling instructor at the
rodeo camp for several years and
this year Bryce and Trig, a pile of
horses, and Ryne Baier went along
to help. Dalton and Sadee Hurst and
Tayle Brink also attended from
Harding County. Pastor Michael
Brandt, Pam Howe’s favorite
brother, was the speaker at camp
this year and Pastor Wes and Sue
Labrier from Union Center taught
Bible classes. Jim Hunt thought
Michael needed a hat so he’d fit in at
camp, so Jim bought a nice straw
hat, had his kids shape it, and gave
it to Michael. The kids said he
looked really good in it too!
Michael and his family lived in
Hettinger while his father, Erwin
Brandt, was pastor of the Ellingson
Lutheran Parish in the Ralph area
in the 1950s and 1960s. Michael was
pastor at Abiding Savior in Sioux
Falls and he started the radio pro-
gram from there that is broadcast
over KBHB Radio at 8:00 Sunday
morning.
Taz stayed home to help Grandpa
haul bales from the hayfields to the
hay corrals. This was Taz’s last week
of summer ‘vacation’ and he left
early Sunday morning to start foot-
ball practice in Chadron Sunday af-
ternoon. He won’t be home again
until Labor Day weekend.
I cut up the cabbage my sister
gave me last week to make five
pounds of sauerkraut Tuesday while
the guys were hauling hay and fix-
ing gates. Wednesday, while the
guys were still hauling hay, I walked
down to the lone chokecherry tree
growing out of the wood pile and
stood on some precarious perches to
pick three gallons of plump, ripe
chokecherries. Thursday I cooked
and juiced the chokecherries and
made a couple apple pies, and Fri-
day I made 19 jars of chokecherry
jelly. With all these provisions I’m
‘putting by’, I’m almost ready for
winter! Not that I’m looking forward
to cold weather!
Missy rode down to Kadoka with
LaDelle Brink and Julie Hurst for
the Bible camp rodeo Thursday af-
ternoon and the crew got back to the
ranch late Thursday night. Bryce
and Trig unloaded the trailer Friday
morning and Ryne Baier left early
that morning for his fencing job.
Our area lost a couple of our own
this week. Norman Vansickel, 86,
Spearfish, died Thursday at
Spearfish Regional Hospital. Nor-
man was born and raised at Opal
where he and his wife McGee
(Schuelke)ranched for years before
retiring and moving to Spearfish.
Norman’s funeral will be held Tues-
day in Spearfish with burial at the
Black Hills National Cemetery.
Carl Ogaard, 81, longtime Belle
Fourche business man, passed away
last Saturday in Belle Fourche. He
was the son of Olaf and Marie
Ogaard from the Lodgepole area.
Carl’s funeral services will also be
Tuesday in Belle Fourche.
As a side note, our house was built
for Olaf and Marie Ogaard at their
place west of Lodgepole in 1928.
When our tiny trailer house became
too crowded for our rapidly expand-
ing family, we bought the house from
Glen Strid, moved it to our ranch
and set it on a walk-in basement.
Dean and Lola Oja were working at
the Simpson ranch at the time and
Lola came over to help me knock the
plaster off the walls and ceilings so
we could insulate it and sheetrock
the inside. In 1992 we were right in
the middle building on an addition
when Reub’s Dad passed away.
Time sure flies.
There are still a few Harding
County History books available. If
you want one, send a check for $80
for the two volume set written to
“Harding County history book” to
Alice Holcomb, 13699 Harding Rd,
Buffalo, SD 57720 if you plan to pick
the set up and $90 if you want them
mailed.
I missed Faith’s big celebration
this year, but it sounded like they
had a fun time. Casey, Taz, Ryne
Baier, and Jeremy Stadheim were in
the rodeo Saturday evening and
Stacy and Katie Doll competed on
Sunday. We stopped to visit with the
Dolls Sunday evening when we saw
the girls and Doug and Jan switch-
ing horses and trailers at their mail-
box. Stacy told us that Casey had
won the steer wrestling.
Pastor Henry and Linda Mohagen
were at Bible Camp at Cloquet, Min-
nesota this weekend so Michael
Brandt preached at Slim Buttes
Lutheran Sunday. His wife Colleen
brought her mother, Pauline Doe,
down from Hettinger to church.
Pauline will spend this week visiting
Michael and Colleen at their new
house in Rapid City.
For those of you who don’t remem-
ber the old Burma shave signs, here
is a quick lesson in our history of the
1930s and '40's. Before the Inter-
states, when everyone drove the old
two lane roads, Burma Shave signs
would be posted all over the country-
side in farmers' fields. They were
small red signs with white letters.
Five signs, about 100 feet apart,
each containing one line of a four
line couplet and the obligatory 5th
sign advertising Burma Shave, a
popular shaving cream. Here are
some of the actual signs:
DON'T LOSE YOUR HEAD
TO GAIN A MINUTE
YOU NEED YOUR HEAD
YOUR BRAINS ARE IN IT.
Burma Shave
SPEED WAS HIGH
WEATHER WAS NOT
TIRES WERE THIN
X MARKS THE SPOT.
Burma Shave
PASSING SCHOOL ZONE
TAKE IT SLOW
LET OUR LITTLE
SHAVERS GROW.
Burma Shave
Grand River Roundup ............................................................... By Betty Olson
Page 22 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Advertising Rates:
DISPLAY ADS: $4.70 per column inch.
CLASSIFIED ADS: $5.90 for 30 words; 10¢ for each word
thereafter. $2.00 billing charge applies.
THANK YOU'S: $5.90 for 30 words; 10¢ for each word
thereafter. $2.00 billing charge applies.
HIGHLIGHTS & HAPPENINGS: $5.90 minimum or $3.10
per column inch. $2.00 billing charge applies.
HAPPY ADS: With or Without Picture: $15.00 minimum or
$4.50 per column inch.
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT: $36.00 for a 2x7 ad.
Legal Deadline is Friday at NOON! Ad Deadline is Monday
at NOON! 244-7199 or courier@sdplains.com
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Alfalfa seed, grass
seed and high test alfalfa hay. De-
livery available and volume dis-
count available. Call 798-5413.
B1-11tp
be picked up at Freeman City
Hall, 185 E. 3rd Street, Freeman,
SD, or call 605-925-7127. Com-
pleted application can be sent to
Lisa Edelman, Finance Officer, PO
Box 178, Freeman, SD 57029.
Deadline for applications is Au-
gust 23, 2013.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
WANTED. Full-time, competitive
wages, and benefits provided. Ex-
perience in auto body or transmis-
sion repair preferred. B & M Body
and Repair. Hoven, SD. Contact
Mike @ 605-948-2224.
NOW HIRING A full-time writer
at the award winning weekly
newspaper, Chamberlain/Oacoma
SUN located on the Missouri
River, along I-90 in central South
Dakota. Contact
lucy@lcherald.com.
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR
WYLIE? $1000 Flatbed Sign-On
*Home Weekly *Regional Dedi-
cated Routes *2500 Miles Weekly
*$50 Tarp Pay (888) 691-5705
www.drive4ewwylie.com.
FOR SALE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD.
We have lowered the price & will
consider contract for deed. Call
Russell Spaid 605-280-1067.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South & North
Dakota. Scott Connell, 605-530-
2672, Craig Connell, 605-264-
5 6 5 0 ,
www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classi-
fieds Network to work for you
today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this
newspaper or 800-658-3697 for de-
tails.
OTR/DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest
up to 48 states, home regularly,
newer equipment, Health, 401K,
call Randy, A&A Express, 800-658-
3549.
HEALTH/BEAUTY
ARE YOU A 45-79 Year Old
Woman Who Developed Diabetes
While On Lipitor? If you used Lip-
itor between December 1996 and
the present and were diagnosed
with diabetes while taking Lipitor,
you may be entitled to compensa-
tion. Call Charles H. Johnson Law
toll –free 1-800-535-5727.
AUCTION
OLD SD GOVERNOR’S Mansion
Real Estate AUCTION in Rapid
Valley. August 22, 2013 at 10AM
held on site. Visit www.Stur-
gisSD.com for terms, details, &
photos. 14.7 acres, 7000+/-sqft
home. 605-347-7579.
MEADE COUNTY, SD Absolute
Real Estate LAND AUCTION. Au-
gust 20, 2013 2:30pm held in Stur-
gis. 72+ Mountain Top Acres near
Boulder Canyon. 2 Tracts & 1
Unit. 605-347-7579.
EMPLOYMENT
POLICE CHIEF – FREEMAN, SD
The City of Freeman is taking ap-
plications for a full time Police
Chief. Responsibilities include su-
pervision and direction of police
department personnel and poli-
cies, community relations, police
patrol and other law enforcement
duties. High School Diploma or
G.E.D. required. Certified Officer
preferred. Salary is dependent on
qualifications and experience. Ap-
plication and job description can
The Bison Courier • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Page 23
“Water for Life and for Energy”
Specializing in Sand Free Water
Residential • Stock • Geothermal
• Municipal • Irrigation
For all your well drilling needs
Tim Adair
PO Box 713
Martin, SD 57751
Office 605-685-2083 • Cell - 605-685-5638
or 605-685-5372
Licensed in SD, ND, MT
email tadairdrilling@yahoo.com
f0ll·1lM0 F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed Press Operation
seeking full-time help. Willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
* * * *
CaII Don or Beau: 859-2516
or pick up an appIication at the
Pioneer Review in PhiIip
FOR SALE: Suffolk & Suffolk-
Hamp.-x Ram Lambs & Yearling.
Lemmon, SD Call 605-374-5105
or 605-645-9584.
B9-2tc
NAPA AUTO PARTS
Hettinger • Call Dan soon at
800-432-2004 or 701-567-2431
Page 24 • The Bison Courier • Thursday,August 15, 2013
Highlights & Happenings
Multi family Rummage/Mov-
ing/Estate Sale at the former
Bison Lumber/PDQ Building on
Coleman Ave. Friday, August 16,
7am - 4pm and Saturday August
17, 8am-1pm. Many items, some-
thing for everyone. Check it out!
Garage Sale for Christ Lutheran
Church, Friday, August 16, 4:30
p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Saturda,y August
17, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. at the Lemburg
garage at 503 East Main. Misc.
items & bake sale.
Rummage Sale 3-Party Land-
phere/Jackson Rummage Sale Fri-
day, Aug. 16 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. directly west of Bob Hanson’s
at the old abandoned Kopren
home.
Rummage Sale at the home of
Helen Aaker from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. on Friday, Aug. 16 and Satur-
day, Aug. 17 from 8:00 a.m. to
noon, with prices being slashed on
Saturday!
Garage Sale Misc. household
stuff. Also, 1994 Jayco Pop-up
camper - fully contained. August
17th from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Located
at New A + Repair shop - West of
Bently building off Carr Street.
Any group interested in sell-
ing food at a Bison High School
home game should contact Bison
School @244-5961 by August 19th.
Stateline Right to Life is having
a booth at the Perkins County
Fair, Friday, August 16, your help
with baked goods, garden produce
and home canned goods is appre-
ciated.
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